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Full text of "Proceedings: Grand Lodge of A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 1961"

Grand Lodge 



A.F. & A.M. of Canada 



In the Province of Ontario 




PROCEEDINGS 



^•^ 



1961 




BROCK 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 

From the 

Masonic Library 

of 

J. Lawrence Runnalls 

St. Catharines 

August 1988 



LIBRAHY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Heritage Lodge No. 730 G.R.C. & Grand Lodge A.F.& A.IVI. of Canada in the Province of Ontario 



http://www.archive.org/details/grandlodge1961onta 




MOST WORSHIPFUL BROTHER 

RUSSELL WILLIAMS TRELEAVEN 

GRAND MASTER 



GRAND LODGE 
A. F. & A. M. OF CANADA 

In the Province of Ontario 

PROCEEDINGS 



ONE HUNDRED AND vSIXTH 
ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

HELD IN THE CITY 

of 

TORONTO 

July 19th, A.D. 1961, A.L. :>961 




The Property of and ordered to be read in all 
the Lodges and presei'\'ed. 



A BRIEF BIOGRAPHY OF OUR 
GRAND MASTER 

Our Grand IMaster, Russell Williams Treleaven, 
was born in London, Ontario, the son of the Reverend 
R. J. Treleaven, D.D., and Catherine A. Treleaven. 
He was educated in the Public Schools at Aylmer and 
Brantford and in the Collegiate Institutes at Hamil- 
ton and Toronto (Parkdale C.L). Following his high 
school education he studied law at Osgoode Hall, 
Toronto, from which he graduated in 1913 and was 
called to the Bar as a Barrister-at-Law and was 
sworn in as a Solicitor, all in the same year, 1913. 

On October 24, 1914, he married A. Grace Free- 
man, B.A., of Burlington, Ontario, They have two 
children, a son and a daughter, both married, also 
four gi'andchildren. 

As a young man our Grand Master was the 
winner of three Public Speaking Contests two in 
the Methodist Young Men's Association in Toronto 
and one in the Canadian Club, Hamilton. 

In May, 1956, he received an Honorary Degree 
of Doctor of Sacred letters (S. Litt. D.) from 
Victoria University. 

In 1986 his ability in the field of law was recog- 
nized by his appointment as King's Counsel, now 
Queen's Counsel. And in January, 1946, he was 
appointed to the Bench as a Justice of the Supreme 
Court of Ontario, from which he recently retired. 

His contributions to public service were many 
and varied. He was the first President of the Opti- 
mist Club of Hamilton, and was later honored by 
election to the office of District Governor. For ten 
consecutive years he was elected to the Board of 
Education in Hamilton, holding the office of Chair- 
man of that Board in 1942. He was twice President 
of The Hamilton Automobile Club, in 1926 and again 
in 1944, after serving for many years as a Director 



of the Club. He was also a Director of The Ontario 
Motor League. From 1946 to the present time he 
has been Chairman of the Commission for the in- 
vestigation of Cancer Remedies. 

His close associations with church work came 
quite naturally, having been raised in the Manse. 
He was leader and teacher of the Young Men's Bible 
Class in Ryerson United Church, Hamilton, from 
1916 to 1940, during which time many young men, 
w^ho became outstanding in their professions and in 
industry, benefitted from his spiritual guidance. 
His services were not confined to one church for in 
1918 he was elected a delegate to the General Con- 
ference of the Methodist Church, which assignment 
he held until Church Union in 1925. He was one 
of the Committee of Forty w^ho negotiated the Basis 
of Union. He then became a member of each Gen- 
eral Council of The United Church of Canada until 
he was appointed to the Bench, in 1946, and was 
continuously a member of the Executive and Chair- 
man of the Missionary and Maintenance Committee. 

\Ve, as Masons, know him from his close associ- 
ations with Masonry since his initiation in Acacia 
Lodge, No. 61, Hamilton, in 1919. He became Master 
of the Lodge in 1937 and District Deputy Grand 
Master of Hamilton District "B" in 1942. He was 
elected to the Board of General Purposes of Grand 
Lodge in 1945 and thereafter until in 1951 he was 
made an Honorary Member of the Board having 
served for some years as Chairman of the Committee 
on Grievances and Appeals. He was elected Deputy 
Grand Master in July, 1959, and was installed as 
Grand Master on July 20, 1961. 

He is a member of the Murton Lodge of Perfec- 
tion, the Hamilton Sovereign Chapter of Rose Croix, 
and the ]\Ioore Sovereign Consistory, Ancient and 
Accepted Scottish Rite of Canada. He was received 
into the Provincial Grand Lodge of the Roval Order 
of Scotland in April, 1960. In September," 1960, he 
was coroneted an Honorary Inspector-General of the 
Supreme Council, A. and A. S. Rite, 33°. 



To the hi^h and important office of Chief Head 
and Ruler in the Craft he comes well prepared from 
his vast experience gained in the practice of law, on 
the Bench and in many phases of church and com- 
munity service, to which must be added his great 
love and zeal for all Craft activities and associations. 



GRAND LODGE AF. & AM. OF CANADA 
IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



PROCEEDINGS 
OF AN ESPECIAL COMMUNICATION 

At an Especial Communication of the Grand 
Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, in the Province of 
Ontario, held at the City of Hamilton, on Monday, 
October 31st, A.D. 1960, A.L. 5960, at the hour of 
8 p-m. 

There were present: 

M.W. Bro. C. M. Pitts Grand Master 

R.W. Bro. H. E. Wilson Grand Senior Warden 

R.W. Bro. J. R. Grant Grand Junior Warden 

R.W. Bro. R. G. Hazlev.-ood Grand Chaplain 

R.W. Bro. D. G. Townsend Grand Registrar 

M.W. Bro. J. A. Hcarn Grand Treasurer 

R.W. Bro. E. G. Dixon Grand Secretary 

M.W. Bro. W. J. Dunlop Past Grand Master 

M.W. Bro. T. H. Simpson Past Grand Master 

M.W. Bro. J. P. Maher Past Grand Master 

M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn Past Grand Master 

V.W. Bro. H. B. Jackson Grand Senior Deacon 

V.W. Bro. C. W. Emmett Grand Junior Deacon 

V.W. Bro. W. E. Meldruni .... Grand Director of Ceremonies 
R.W. Bro. George J. McQueen ... Ass't. to the Grand Secretary 

V.W. Bro. A. J. Cobban Grand Pursuivant 

V.W. Bro. George T. Evans Architect 

V.W. Bro. Norman Gourlie Ass't. Grand Organist 

The following- District Deputy Grand Masters 
and Members of the Board of General Purpyoses were 
present also : 

R.W. Bro. F. R. Allison D.D.G.M. Niagara "A" 

R.W. Bro. L. S. Beak D.D.G.M. Toronto "4" 

R.W. Bro. E. D. Berry D.D.G.M. Ottawa 

R.W. Bro. A. J. Buchanan D.D.G.M. Wellington 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



R.W. Bro. J. A. Crone D.D.G.M. Toronto "5" 

R.W. Bro. J. C. Cunningham D.D.G.M. Hamilton "A" 

R.W. Bro. W. H. Gould D.D.G.M. Toronto "3" 

R.W. Bro. H. D. Haggarty D.D.G.M. Prince Edward 

R.W. Bro. G. W. Hall D.D.G.M. Georgian 

R.W. Bro. George Jackson D.D.G3I. St. Lawrence 

R.W. Bro. P. C. McTavish D.D.G.M. Grey 

R.W. Bro. E. W. Nancekivell D.D.G.M. Hamilton "B" 

R.W. Bro. W. E. Sills D.D.G.M. Toronto "2" 

R.W. Bro. A. G. Skinner D.D.G.M. Brant 

R.W. Bro. W. H. Smith D.D.G.M. Wilson 

R.W. Bro. W. A. Stewart D.D.G.M. Toronto "1" 

R.W. Bro. W. K. Bailey Member of the Board 

R.W. Bro. R. C. Berkinshaw Member of the Board 

R.W. Bro. M. C. Hooper Member of the Board 

R.W. Bro. J. A. Ir\-ine Member of the Board 

R.W. Bro. P. S. MacKenzie Member of the Board 

R.W. Bro. G. J. Patterson Member of the Board 

R.W. Bro. Wellington Smith Member of the Board 

and many other Past Grand Lodge Officers, Masters, 
Wardens, Officers and Members of Lodges. 

Grand Lodge was opened in Ample Form by 
M.W. Bro. Clarence MacLeod Pitts, Grand iMaster, 
at 8 o'clock in the evening in the Scottish Rite Build- 
ing, who announced that this Especial Communic- 
ation of Grand Lodge had been called for the purpose 
of Unveiling the Corner Stone and Dedicating the 
new Grand Lodge Memorial Building just recently 
completed. Grand Lodge was then called off and 
the procession was formed by the Grand Director 
of Ceremonies, and, led by the Salvation Army Band, 
marched to the site where the officers took up the 
proper positions at the northeast corner of the build- 
ing. The Ceremonies were as follows: 



UNVEILING OF THE CORNER STONE 

R.IV. Bro. R. C. Bcrklnsharji', Chairman of the Build- 
ing Cammittee: "M.W. Grand Master: It is with great 



6 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

pleasure that, on behalf of the Special Building Com- 
mittee, I welcome you and the members of the fraternity 
of Masons, to unveil, with the tim-e-honored ceremonies 
of the Craft, the corner-stone of this building. We 
apprleqiate your presence and feel honored in your 
acceding to our request, and trust that while you are 
with us your visit may be both profitable and enjoyable." 

The Grand Master addressed the assemblage. 

Grand Chaplain : *'0 Thiou, the Great Architect and 
Ruler of the Universe, we implore Thee to be with us, 
Thy serv^ants, in this solemn rite in which we are about 
to engage. Let the symbolism of the Corner Stone be 
abundantly impressed on our hearts, and help us in the 
upbuilding of our minds and characters. May the build- 
ing which is erected on this site be the dwelling-place of 
harmony, of love, and of dharitable thought; may the 
uses to which h shall be put ever redound to Thy glory 
and tlie good of mankind, and be sanctified by Thy 
Divine blessing. Glory be to God on high !" 

Response : "As lit was in the beginning, is now and 
ever shall be, world without end. So' mote it be." 

The Grand Master informed the assemblage that 
the phi-al containing the coins and other articles hare been 
deposited in the cavity of the Stone by the Grand Secre- 
tary during the construction of the building. 

Grand Master: "This Stone has been well made, 
Truly Laid, Well Proved, True and Trusty." 

Grand Master unveiled the Stone. 

Grand Master: "The brethren will give Grand 
Honors, taking time from the Grand Director of Cere- 
monies." 

The Architect : "Most Worshipful Sir, I present 
you w(ith the plans of the building." 

Grand Master: "Master architect, the corner-stone 
of this building having been laid according to the rules 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 7 

of architecture, and in confoTmity with the regulations 
of our fraternity, I now present you with the implements 
applied to it {presenting the Gavel, Square, Level and 
Pluinb-nile), and also the plans : in full confidence that as 
a skilful and faithful workman you have used them in such 
a manner that the building- has risen in order, harmony 
and beauty, and that it has established your reputation 
as a skilful builder, and reflects credit also on those who 
have selected you for this imjx>rtant undertaking." 



H\mn 



All people that on earth do dwell, 
Sing to the Lord with cheerful voice, 

Him serv^e with mirth, His praise forth tell. 
Come ye before Him and rejoice. 

O enter then His gates with praise, 
Approach with joy His courts unto: 

Praise, laud and bless His name always, 
For it is seemly so to do. 

For why ? the Lord our God is good. 

His mercy is forever sure ; 
His truth at all times firmly stood, 

.And shall frotm as:e to asfe endure. 



Grand Master addressed the Chairman of the Com- 
mittee. 

Grand Chaplain : **!Ma\- the blessling of the Great 
Architect of the Universe rest upon us and upon all 
regular Freemasons ; and may the sublime principles of 
]\Iasonry so enrich their hearts, that Craftsmen through- 
out the world may have wiisdom in all their work, strength 
in times of difficulty, faith as the foundation of hope, 
and charity as the fruit of obedience to His revealed 
will." 

Response: "So mote it be.'' 



8 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

DEDICATION CEREMONY 

The Chairman presented the gold key to the Grand 
Master. 

Chairman : "M.W''. Sir, the members of the Com- 
mittee have furniished this memorial building to the best 
of their abiHty, with all the appointments necessary for 
the work, and in a manner suitable and convenient for 
Grand Lodge administrative purposes. They desire that 
this memorial building may be examined by you, M.W. 
Sir, and, if it meet with your approval, that it may be 
solemnly dedicated for such purposes in conformity with 
the usages and customs of the Craft." 

Grand Master: Bro. Chairman, in accordance with 
your request, I w'ill examine this memorial building and 
try it by the Square, Level and Plumb Rule." 

Architect: **^LW. Sir: Having been entrusted with 
the superintendence and mianagement of the construction 
of this edifice and having, according to the best of my 
ability, accomplished the task assigned me, I now beg 
leave to surrender the implements which were committed 
to my care, when the foundation of this fabric was laid, 
humbly hoping that my exertions meet w^ith your aip- 
probation." 

Grand Master: "Bro. Architect, the skill you have 
displayed in the execution and management of the trust 
reposed in you, in connection with this work, has secured 
the approval of Grand Lodge, and our hope is that this 
memorial building n:ay continue a lasting mionument to 
the brethren who gave their lives in the cause of freedom 
and to our departed brethren who have contributed to 
the growth and vitalit}' of Freemasonry." 

Acting Deputy Grand Master: ''M.W. Sir, the home 
of the Craft, and the plan upon which it has been con- 
structed, having met with your approbation, it is the 
desire of the Craftsmen that it should now be dedicated 
in conformity witli the prescribed form, custom and 
usage." 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 9 

Grand Master: "We will now proceed to dedicate 
the memorial building in confomiity with the usages and 
customs of the Craft. R.W. Bro. G. C, you will read 
from the \'olume of the Sacred Law, how Hiram came 
out of Tyre to assist in the Building of the Temple." 

Grand Chaplain: "And King Solomon sent and 
fetched Hiram out of Tyre. 

■'He was a widow's son, of the tribe of Naphtali, and 
his fatiier was a man of Tyre, a worker in brass : and he 
was filled with wisdom and understanding, and cunning 
to work all works in brass. And he came to King Solomon 
and wrought all his work." 

Grand Master: ''The Grand Chaplain will now offer 
the invocation." 

Gra)id CJwplain : "O Thou, Great and Grand 
Architect of the Universe, the Omnipotent, Omniscient, 
and Omnipresent Ruler of Heaven and Earth, Designer 
and Creator of all worlds, without Whom we can neither 
live, move nor have our being, look doAvn upon us, Thy 
servants, in this solemn rite in which we are engaged. 
Grant us. we humbly implore Thee, wisdom to guide us 
in all our works, and strength to overcome all the 
difficulties and temptations tliiat beset mankind. Inspire 
us with the beauty of hannony in all our communications, 
and, whether in or out of this meeting place, may the 
spirit of fraternity animate us ; and may this solemn 
service in which we, as Craftsdnen, nov^' take part, be 
sanctified by Thy Divine approval. Glory be to God on 
hiigli !" 

Response: "As it was in the beginning, is now^ and 
e-v-er shall be, world without end. So mote it be." 

The Grand Director of Ceremonies took from the 
pedestal the z'essel with corn (zcheat) and delivered it to 
the Grand Junior JVarden, zvho presented it to the Grand 
Master. 

Grand Junior JVarden: M.W. Sir: It has been the 
custom in the dedication of Masonic temples to sprinkle 



10 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

com on the floor of the lodge as an emblem of plenty. 
I, therefore, present you with this vessel filled with corn, 
in conformity with the ancient usages and customs of 
the Craft." 

Grand Master : "In the name of the Great Architect 
of the Universe, to whom be glory, honour and power, I 
dedicate this memorial building to Freemasonry." 



Hymn : 

Genius of Masonr>^ descend, 

And with thee bring thy spotless train ; 

Constant our sacred rites attend, 
While we adore thy peaceful reign. 

Grand Director of Ceremonies: "The brethren will 
now give the Grand Honours thrice." 

Grand Chaplain: "For he cast two pillars of brass, 
of eighteen cubits high apiece: and a line of twelve 
cubits did compass either of them about. 

"And he made two chapiters of molten brass to set 
upon the top of the pillars : the height of the one chapiter 
was five cubits, and the height of the other chapiter 
was five cubits. 

"And the nets of checker work, and wreaths of chain 
work for the chapiters which were upon the tops of the 
pillars ; seven for the one chapiter, and seven for the 
other chapiter." 

The Grand Director of Ceremonies took from the 
pedestal the vessel zvith wine and delivered it to the Grand 
Senior Warden, zvho presented it to the Grand Master. 

\ 

Grand Senior Warden: "M.W. Sir: It has been 
the custom in the dedication of Masonic Temples to pour 
wine upon the floor of the lodge as an emblem of joy and 
cheerfulness. I, therefore, present you with this vessel 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 11 

filled with wine, in conformity wath the ancient usages 
and customs of the Craft." 

Grand Master: "In the name of the Great Architect 
of the Universe, to W'hom be Glory, honour and power, 
I dedicate this memorial building to Virtue." 

Hymn: 

Bring with thee Virtue, brightest maid. 

Bring Love, bring Truth and Friendship here, 

While kind Relief will lend her aid 
To smooth the wrinkled brow* of care. 

Grand Director of Ceremonies: "The brethren will 
now give the Grand Honours thrice." 

Grand Chaplain : "And he made the pillars, and two 
rows round about upon the one net work, to cover the 
chapiters that were upon the top, with pomegranates : and 
so did he for the other chapiter. 

"And the chapiters that were upon the top of the 
pillars were of lily work in the porch, four cubits. 

"And the chapiters upon the two pillars had pome- 
granates also above, over against the belly which was by 
the net work : and the pomegranates were two hundred 
in rows round about upon the other chapiter. 

"And he set up the pillars in the porch of the temple ; 
and he set up the right pillar, and called the name tliereof 
Jachin : and he set up the left pillar, and called the 
name thereof Boaz. 

''And upon the top of the pillars was lily work : so 
was the work of the pillars finished." 

The Grand Director of Ceremonies took from the 
pedestal the vessel zuith oil, and delivered it to the Deputy 
Grand Master who presented it to the Grand Master. 

Deputy Grand Master: "M.W. Sir: It has been the 
custom in the dedication of Masonic Temples to pour 



12 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

oil upon the floor of the lodge as an emblem of comfort 
and eonsolation, I, therefore, present you with this 
vessel filled with oil, in conformity with the usages and 
customs of the Craft" 

Grand Master: "In the name of the Fraternity of 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, I dedicate this 
memorial building to Universal Benevolence." 

Hymn: 

Come Charity, with goodness crowned, 

Encircled in thy heavenly robe ; 
Diffuse thy blessings all around. 

To every corner of the globe. 

Grand Director of Ceremonies : "The brethren will 
now give the Grand Honours thrice." 

Grand Master: "The Grand Chaplain will now 
offer the dedicatory prayer." 

Grand Chaplain : "O Lx)rd, our God, eternal and 
Ineffable Being, for there is no God like unto Thee, 
give Thy blessing to the ceremonies with which we this 
day dedicate this memorial building to the work of the 
Craft. Grant that all engaged in, and invested with, the 
management of the work, may be endowed with wisdom 
from on high. May this memorial building be the home 
of Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth, and may w^ be 
enabled to conduct our work in full assurance of the 
fulfilment of Thy great promise. We commend the 
Craft to Thee. Thou knowest all things, even the secrets 
of our hearts. Protect us in the daily walk of life. Be 
with us in all our undertakings, and never leave us nor 
forsake us ; and when we have, in accordance with Thy 
Divine approbation, finished our work here below, grant 
us a place in the eternal lodge, the inheritance of those 
who obey Thy will. 

"IVIay this memorial building now dedicated to 
Masonry, be ever the sanctuary- of \'irtue. Charity and 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 13 

Universal Benevolence, and may the Great Architect of 
the Universe, the Giver of every good and perfect gift, 
bless the Craftsmen here assembled, and all the brethren 
throughout the world. May He grant to each of them 
in needful supply, corn, wine and oil, so that with bread 
they may feed those that hunger, with w^ine they may 
cheer the sorrowful, and with oil pour the healing balm 
of consolation on those sick and afflicted. Glorv be to 
God on High !" 

Response : "As it was in the beginning, is now and 
ever shall be, world without end. So mote it be." 

Hymn : 

To Heaven's high Architect all praise : 
All praise, all gratitude be given ; 

Who deigned tiie human soul to raise 
By mystic secrets sprung from heaven. 

Grand Master: "Y.W. Bro. Grand Director of 
Ceremonies, you will make proclamation that this mem- 
orial building has been solemnly dedicated for the purpo- 
ses of Masonry, in conformity with the ancient usages 
and customs of the Craft." 

Grand Director of Ceremonies: "Brethren, by com- 
mand of the I\I.\\\ the Grand Master, I proclaim from 
this Grand East, that this memorial building has been 
solemnly dedicated for the purposes of INIasonr}', in con- 
formity with the ancient usages and customs of the Craft. 
The Craft will take due notice thereof and govern them- 
selves accordingly." 

Grand Master: "My brethren, the ceremony in 
which we have been engaged should recall to our minds 
the principles upon which our Institution is founded, ^^'e 
implore the Great Architect of the Universe to endue us 
with wisdom to guide us in our works, and with strength 
to overcome our difficulties and temptations. We also 
aisk Him to inspire us with the beauty of love and 
harmony. The memorial building is dedicated to Free- 
masonry ; to impress upon us the duty of cultivating the 



14 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

great tenets upon which the Craft is founded; to cause 
us to think seriously of the lessons which are taught in 
our ceremonies, on our duty to God and to our Neigh- 
bour ; to impel us to walk uprightly in our lives ; and to 
strive for our own improvement and for the betterment 
of our fellowmen ; that humanity at large may benefit by 
the cultivation of our fraternal feelings and actions. It 
is dedicated to virtue, to remind us that we have been 
taught to practise the four cardinal virtues ; that we may 
be guided by the virtue of Temperance, in a constant en- 
deavour to avoid excsss and vice in every form ; that we 
may be strengthened by Fortitude to do our duty as it 
may be disclosed to us, halting not, but doing right for 
the love of the right : that Prudence may direct us in 
our occupations and desires, that our daily tasks may be 
undertaken and performed with perseverance and faith- 
fulness; that Justice may be our guide in judging others 
and in our dealings with them socially and materially, 
and that in all things we may 'do unto others as we 
would that they should do unto us.' It is dedicated to 
Universal Benevolence, in the hope that charitable feelings 
may be the happy masters of our hearts, leading us — ^nay, 
compelling us — to remember the unfortunate and afflict- 
ed, and to afford them relief and s}TTipathy. My brethren, 
the practice of these virtues, in their fullest meaning and 
extent, will conduce to the promotion of fraternal feelings 
and prosperity in your lodge, will bring upon you bless- 
ings untold, and will strengthen the golden chain that 
links, in fraternal embrace, the members of our great 
brotherhood." 



Grand Director of Ceremonies : "The brethren will 
now sing the closing hymn." 



Hymn : 



All hail to the morning that bids us rejoice, 
The Temple's completed, exalt high each voice ; 
Give thanks to the Builder with joyful acclaim, 
Resolved to be worthy of Masonry's fame. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 15 

Almig-hty Jehovah, descend now and fill 

This lodgfe with Thy glory, our hearts with good-will ; 

Preside at our meetings, assist us to find 

True pleasure in teaching good-wuU to mankind. 

Our great institution Thy wisdom contrived ; 
From Thee to support it shall Strength be derived ; 
And when the creation shall fall to decay, 
Its beauty shall rise with the radiance of day. 

Grand Master : "The R.W. the Grand Chaplain will 
pronounce the benediction." 

Grand Chaplain'. "O God, Sovereign and Creator 
of all worlds, sanctify this work, in which we have this 
day taken part. Pour down Thy blessing upon us. 
Guide us as citizens in the paths of rectitude, and as 
Craftsmen may we have Thee ever with us to lead and 
direct us in accordance with Thy revealed will." 

Response: "So mote it be." 

The National Anthem 

The procession v^as re-formed and the brethren 
returned to the Scottish Rite Building where Grand 
Lodge was closed in Ample Form. 

The brethren, with their ladies, gathered in the 
banquet room of the Scottish Rite Cathedral where 
light refreshments were served. 




Grand Secretary 



GRAND LODGE AF. & A.M. OF CANADA 
in the Province of Ontario 



PROCEEDINGS 

At the One Hundred and Sixth Annual Com- 
munication of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of 
Canada, in the Pi'ovince of Ontario, held in the City 
of Toronto, commencing Wednesday, July 19th, A.D. 
1961 A.L. 5961. 

Present were : 

THE GRAND MASTER 
M.W- Bro. C. M. Pitts 

THE DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 
R.W. Bro. R. W. Treleaven 

R.W. Bro. H. E. Wilson Grand Senior Warden 

R.W. Bro. J. R. Grant Grand Junior Warden 

R.W. Bro. R. G. Hazlewood Grand Chaplain 

M.W. Bro. J. A, Heam Grand Treasurer 

R.W. Bro. G. J. McQueen Ass't. to the Gr. Secretary 

R.Vv^. Bro. D, H. Townsend Grand Registrar 

V.W. Bro. W. E. Meldrum Grand Dir. of Ceremonies 

PAST GRAND MASTERS 

M.W. Bros., J. A. Kearn, W. L. Wright, and H. L. Martyn. 

THE DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS 

Algoma S. I. Knox 

Brant A. G. Skinner 

Bi-uce W. J. Spencer 

Chatham H. W. Bauer 

Eastern W. W. Smail 

Frontenac J. F. Whiting 

Georgian G. W. Hall 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 17 

Grey P. C. McTavish 

Hamilton "A" J. C. Cunningham 

Hamilton "B" E. W. Nancekivell 

London A. C. Whitmore 

Muskoka-Parry Sound S. G. Avery 

Niagara "A" F. R. Allison 

Niagara "B" G. E. Cornell 

Nipissing East T. G. Tulloch 

North Huron J. E. Little 

Ontario W. C. Wakelin 

Ottawa E. Deans Berry 

Peterborough W, H. Mortlock 

Prince Edward H. D. Haggarty 

Sarnia S. C. Rowe 

South Huron J. E. Bryan 

St. Lawrence George Jackson 

St. Thomas J. 0. Tolman 

Temiskaming W. H. Quinn 

Toronto 1 W. A. Stewart 

Toronto 2 W. E. Sills 

Toronto 3 W. H. Gould 

Toronto 4 L. S. Beak 

Toronto 5 J. A. Crone 

Toronto 7 J. H. Gahagan 

Victoria W. J. Mulligan 

Wellington A. J. Buchanan 

Western J^. E. Johnson 

Wilson W. H. Smith 

Windsor W. E. Lumley 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVE GRAND LODGE OF 

J. A. Hearn Scotland 

W. K. Bailey Alberta 

R. W. Treleaven British Columbia 

J. A. Irvine Manitoba 

W. H. Gibson New Bninswick 

John Heisler Quebec 

Walter T. Robb New South Wales 

D, J. Gunn New Zealand 

Charles Fotheringham Oueensland 

E. W. E. Saunders Tasmania 

B. C. McClelland Western Australia 



18 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMITNICATION 

G. J. McQueen Alabama 

0. M. Newton Arizona 

W. L. Wright California 

H. Minchinton Colorado 

J. A. Heam Illinois 

A. E. MacGregor Iowa 

Alan Broughton Kansas 

Geo. T. Evans Kentucky 

W. T. Overend Maine 

Stilson Swales Maryland 

H. L. Hartyn Massachiisetts 

Harvey Linklater Michigan 

C. E. Hough Missouri 

C. M. Pitts Nebraska 

H. B. Coxon Nevada 

B. B. Foster New Hampshire 

C. P. Tilley New Mexico 

G. F. Kingsmill New York 

A. C, Ashforth North Carolina 

C. M. Rawson Oklahoma 

F. D. Shannon Oregon 

Geo. F. Clark Rhode Island 

Ed. Balfour Tennessee 

A. W. Baker Texas 

Birkett Lishman Virginia 

W. D. Connor West Virginia 

T. N. Clarke Argentina 

Wellington Smith Bahia (Brazil) 

J. H. Burke Colombia Bogota 

W. L. Wright Denmark 

J. N. Allan Ecuador 

Wm. J. Attig Guatemala 

W. B. Cannon York, Mexico 

G. E. French Netherlands 

R. C. Berkinshaw Norv/ay 

A. D. McRae Para (Brazil) 

Allan C. Mason Paraiba (Brazil) 

Robert Strachan Venezuela 

The M.W., the Grand Master, C. M. Pitts, 
disting-uished guests and officers of Grand Lodge 
took their places in the Auditorium of the Central 
Technical School at ten o'clock in the forenoon. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 19 

MASTER MASONS ADMITTED 

The Grand Master invited all Master Masons to 
enter and take seats in the balcony. 

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

The brethren joined in singing the National 
Anthem followed by "My Country, 'Tis of Thee", and 
"Two Countries by the Sea". 

The brethren joined in singing three verses of 
"Unto the Hills". 



DELEGATES REGISTERED 

No. 2, Niagara, Niagara-on-the-Lake — J. H. Hutchison, 
W. E. Brown, F. L. Collard. 

No. 3, Ancient St. John's, Kingston — ^W. D. Stevens, E. 
W. Luker, H. E. Mills, T. J. Donnelly, L. N. Armstrong, W. 
H Gummer, C. R. G. Hall, H. P. Wilson, W. D. Johnston, B. 
W. Taylor, W. E. Kidd. 

No. 5, Sussex, Brockville — L. H. Bracken, H. L. Connell, 
H. F. Blanchard. 

No. 6. The Barton, Hamilton — J. W. Hamilton, J. E. 
Piercy, J. T. Broadbent, C. H. Cunningham, C. M. Piercy. 

No. 7, Union, Grimsby — A. Jarvis. 

No. 9. Union, Napamee— G. A. Reid, C. D. Sills, K. S. 
Ham, C. E. Henricks, J. C. A. Tustin, M. H. Martin. 

No. 10, Norfolk, Simco«— J. O, King, C. Letherby, F. L. 
Grigg, F. M. Reid, J. C. King. B. M. Pearce. G. F. Anger, 
B. B. Smith, F. G. Kelsall. F. K. Kent, F. S. Kent. 

No. 11. Moira, Belleville— A. W, Mamer. D. P. Foster, J. 
R. Grant, H. L. Martvn, H. Bailey. 

No. 14, True Britons'. Perth— W. H. Keays, J. D. Gard- 
iner, S. H. Bell, G. W. Wilson. 

No. 15, St. George's. St. Catharines— H. W. Thompson, 

E. L. James, J. B. Sainsbury, J. Pallister, W. E. Thompson, 
L. A. Burch, W. P. Holmes. 

No. 16, St. Andrew's. Toronto^— €. E. Waldron. H. L. 
MartjTi, E. C. Fowler, S. M. Ketcheson, T. H. W. Salmon, J. 

F. Scott. S. M. Sinclair, J. J. Henderson. 

No. 17, Stj John's, Cobourg — J. Kemaghan, B. Baluk, 
W. C. Wakelin, K. Ash, J. Moses, A. Bowman, H. Lord. 

No. 18, Prince Edward, Picton— N. Love, H. Clark, E. 
L. James. 

No. 20. St. John's, London— P. G. Edwards, A. H. McCor- 
mick, W. H. Kipp, A. M. George. 



20 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 21 A, St. John's, Vankleek Hill — ^K. McLennan, A. D. 
McRae. 

No. 22, King Solomon's, Toronto — G. Pitcher, J. N. 

Williams, J. A. Mackay, J. Broadfoot, T. Singleton, D. M. 
Tozer, H. I. Moody, W. J. Dawson Jr., R. Coultart. 

No. 23, Richmond, Richmond Hill — ^G. A. Gardner, S. 

F. Tinker, H. Ince, H. L. Martyn, F. J. Graham, F. CoUard, 
N. Chatterley. 

No. 24, St. Francis, Smiths Falls— E. C. Dowdall, W. G. 
Kirkwood, C. A. Bailey, H. W. Stanzel, J. J. Carpenter, S. T. 
Woodlev, R. C. Furdy. 

No. 25, Ionic, Torooito— A. B. Ward, F. C. Forster, J. 

E. Cameron, G. M. Hargraft. 

No. 26, Ontario, Port Hope — W. H. Rowden, M. Bucking-- 
ham, F. Charles, G. Finnie, R. Hughes. 

No. 27, Strict Observance, Hamilton — R. Barty, G. W. 
Skinner, J C. Guy, J. H. Rogers, R. F. Billin^on, S. A. 
Tinson. R. G. Truscott, G. F. Kingsmill, A. E. Cook, H. W. 
Price, J. E. Inch, G. A. Bryant, W. B. Duncan, T. McCann. 

No. 28, Mount Zion, Kemptville — S. A. Price, G. J. 
Pure ell. 

No. 29, United, Brighton— J. F. Brown, K. A. McQuoid, 

G. F. Little, H. B. McConnell. 

No. 30, Composite, Whitby — H. F. Town, L. H. Inkpen, 
W. F. Gutherie, C. B. Rycroft. R. W. Agg, M. M. Slickter, 
G. E. Gouldbura, J R. Frost, D. E. Gibson, E. R. Stafford, 
W. Davidson, W. G. Augustus, F. J. Gale, G. B. Whitfield, 
H. W. Jermyn, E. C. Hughes, A. A. Archibald, W. F. Kelsey, 

F. W. Marsh, B. J. Gutherie. 

No. 31, Jerusalem, Bowmanville — iR. H. Graham, R. E. 
Hendry, H. G. Freeman, C. E. Allen. 

No. 32, Amity, Dunnville— 0. M. Krick, J. N. Allan, F. 
R. Martin, E. C. McCullough, R. S. Ash. 

No. 33, Maitland, Goderich— M. W. Cox, W. H. Roope. 

No. 34, Thistle, Amherstburg — K. Gordon, J. Whyte, L. 
J. Mosey, G. Somerton, N. Rattew, C. Ayerst, H. Jubenville, 
K. Amer. 

No. 35. St. John's, Cayuga— R. M. Murphy, A. G. Skin- 
ner, B. B. Foster, M. Coverdale. 

No. 37, King Hiram. Ingersoll — C. W. Wilson, H. J. 
Upfold, W. Robertson, E. C. Johnson. 

No. 38, Trent, Trenton— G. B. Hemstreet, C. Baker, C. 
Dyer, 0. M Newton, D. McMaster, F. Boulton, T. Bedford, 
D. S. Sager. 

No. 39, Mount Zion, Brooklin — K. Greer, R. Richardson, 
L. McCoy. R. E. Mowbray. 

No. 40. St John's. Hamilton-^. W. Spillett, W. G. Sanger, 
R. M. Stevens, W. L. Sommerville, J. R. D. Moon, J. H. 
Jackson, W. J. Dyson. 

No. 41, St. George's, Kingsville — M. L. Wigle, W. 
Humphreys, T. V. Maxwell. 

No. 42, St. George's. London — A. M. Maxwell Jr., E. 
Sherrin, F. H. James, C. M. Hunter. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 21 

No. 43, King Solomon's, Woodstock — W. D. Richards, H. 

F. Barry, G. Jakeman, A. W. Massie, N. Weakley. 

No. 44, St; Thomas, St. Thomas^. A, Walton, C. Cor- 
mack, A. V. Levack, R. H. Bruce, J. I. Cuyler, N. E. Rolling, 

G. Neal. R. B. Barr. 

No. 45, Brant, Brantford^J. C. Creamer, R. W. E. 
McFadden, H. H. Clark. 

No. 46, Wellington, Chatham— H. D. Paulucci, H. Willis- 
ton, B. E. Easton, V. Sloan, R. J. New. 

No. 47, Great Western, Windsor— N. F. Harris, W. T. 
Carmichael, A. R. Bourne, G. Murray, E. C. Brown, C. E. 
Hillman. 

No. 48, Madoc, Madoc — W. Derry. 

No. 50, Consecon, C^nsecon — E. V. Young, D. Alyea, R. 
Spencr.r. 

No. 52, Dalhousie, Ottawa — A. Eraser, E, H. Kingston, 

A. R. D. McNeely, B. Lishman, C. M. Pitts, J. R. McFarland. 

No. 54, Vaughan, Maple — C. Malloy, S. Diceman, N. A. 

Lund, A. Cameron, W. R. Rumble, F. Elliott, M. Kinnee, C. 

MoCloskey, J. J. Witherspoon. 

No. 55, Merrickville, Merrickville — L. H. Yeomans, G. 
Jackson, J. H. Kidd, R. Patterson. 

No. 56, Victoria, Samia — A. J. Facer, L. C. Ewener. J. 
Watson, W. T. Mollitor, H. J. McClintock, H. Barnes, R. A. 
Campbell, L. J. Crooks. 

No. 57, Harmony, Binbrook— D. C. Young, G. R. Bell, G. 
R, Hunt, F. Leeming. 

No. 58, Doric, Ottawa — J. Shoosmith, J. W. Dewhirst, 
J. J. Allan, J. E. Green, 

No. 61, Acacia, Hamilton— W. F. Benedict, C. R, Middle- 
ton, C. D, Robinson, R. W. Treleaven, G. F. Clark, G, J. 
Patterson, H, L Martvn, J. L. Stewart, D. R. Shaw, J. M. 
Connor, C. D. Reading, W. D. Connor, G. T. Evans, R. J. 
Connor. A. N. Hill, G. H, Walker, M. E, Baseman, L. W. 
Jones, W. R. Binney. 

No. 62, St. Andrew's, Caledonia — R. F. Thompson, H. 
Martindale, S, Craig, C. Young, W. Williamson, G. G. 
Thompson. 

No. 63, St. John's, Carleton Place— G. C. Crampton, W. 
J. Armstrong. 

No. 64, Kilwinning. London — G. R, Dean, C. M. Kennedy, 
W, G. Robinson, W. J. L. Taylor, W. L. Smith, J. A, Johnston, 
E. Chamberlain, B. Cameron. 

No. 65, Rehoboam, Toronto— V. B. Gale. D. J. French, 
H L. Martyn, E. J. Call. W. S. Faulkner, A. E. Smith, F. 
C. Hamilton, F. R. Workman, H. D. Holden, J. Stephen, J. 
R. Locock, B. L. Davidge. 

No. 66, Durham, Newcastle — A. G. Perrin, C. Farrow, F. 
Le Gresley. J. Scott, E. F. R, Osbome, F, McMullen, W. H. 
Gibson. D. E. Gibson. 

No. 68, St. John's. Ingersoll— C. N. Meatherall, T. W. 
McBeath, G. E. Sandick, W. L, Jellous. 



22 GRAND LODCljS OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 69, Stirling, Stirling— M. Clancy, G. Finkle, J. L. 
Good, M. Johnston, I. Caldwell. 

No. 72, Alma, Gait— L. T. Oldfield, W. C. Couch, 
S. M. Shantz, F. N. Couch. 

No. 73, St. James, St. Marys — D. C. White, H. Sparling, 
R. C. Bradford, H. R. Alberts. 

No. 74, St. James, South Augusta — B. E. Edwards. 

No. 75, St. John's, Toronto— C. A. Boddy, M. H. Wilson, 
J. S. Lawson, F. C. Webb, J. D. Spears, T. F. Dodson, E. 
J. Hicks, G. W. Bayliss, A. S. Drummond, S. J. Burt, P. H. 
Burt, E A. White, A. L. Hayes, C. S. Jackman, W. J. Homer, 
G. G. Argo, J. P. Todd, B. E. Garrett, R. Winter, E. 0. King, 
G. N. Colquhoun. 

No. 76, Oxford, Woodstock— J. J. Weber, F. F. Dicker- 
son, R. H. Parker, C. E. Nettleton. 

No. 77, Faithful Brethren, Lindsay — J. M. Roy, C. H. 
Heels, F. P. Lowry, G. H. Cobb. 

No. 78, King Hiram, Tillsonburg — J. E. Stephenson, L. 
J. Bennett, W. H. Gibson, A. A. Coyle, J. Sauter, 

No. 79, Simcoe, Bradford — N. H. Barron, G. L. Blackwell, 

B. T. Home, W. K. Orr, D. Gray, C. Ritchie, R. Browm. 

No. 81, St. John's, Mount Brydges — J. A. McLean, T. 
Green, L, Mahler, D. McGugan. 

No. 83, Beaver, Strathroy— R. W. Tufford, R. Patterson, 
D. C. Lamond, C. Gibson, M. Carruthers, S. Swales. 

No. 84, Clinton, Clinton — W. S. Craig, R. R. Fitzsimmons, 
R. G. Shortreed. 

No. 85, Rising Sun, Athens — D. R. Layng, J. B. Kelly. 

No. 86, Wilson, Toronto— D. C. Thompson, W. A. Robin- 
son, H. Minchinton, H. L. Martyn, J. L. Rook, C. J. E. Lawer, 

C. Cook, A. H. Anderson, A. L. Tinker, W.V, McClure, M. 
C. Drysdale. 

No. 87, Markham Union, Markham — ^H. Graham, H. C. 
Coathup, A. J. Woods, R. J. A. Young, F. Wame, G. L. 
Williamson. 

No. 88, St. George's, Owen Sound— N. E. Amott, J. E. 
Knox, E. J. Cole, K. D. MacDonald, R. R. B. McKennitt, C. 
V. Kellough, R. S. Browne. 

No. 90, Manito, Collingwood — A. G. Dempster, W. M. 
Prentice, G. H. Robinson. G. E. Munro. 

No. 91, Colborne, Colborne — D. M. Peebles, J, Lynn, A. 
Learmonth, A. Wolfraim, L Buchanan, R. A. Smith. 

No. 92, Cataraqui, Kingston— W. A. Sheppard, T. N. 
Clarke, H. L. Martyn, W. J. Sheppard. 

No. 93, Northern Light, Kincardine — ^D. 0. Edmiston, 
J. W. Campbell, H. L. Martyn, E. F. Martyn, G. H. Linklater, 
H. J. Norman. W. N. Ross. 

No. 94. St. -Alark's. Port Stanley— J. H. Burke, J. A. 
Quinn. H. G. Goodhue, J. L. Brumpton, W. A. Burke. 

No. 96, Corinthian, Barrie — W. T Kirkpatrick, L. Foster, 
L. Ellis, B. A. Wilson, A. C. Eraser. 

No. 97, Sharon, Queensville— C. R. Houston, R. G. 
Strasler, W. J. Cole, W. Hayes. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 23 

No. 98, True Blue, Boltooi— M. Irwin, R, Walton, G. L. 
Hill, K. Mactaggart, F. Mactaggart, H. Taylor. 

No. 99, Tuscan. Newmarket— S. Jefferson, H. W. Garrett, 
H. A. Jackson, R. 0. Wonch, G. W. Cuppage. 

No. 100, Valley, Dundas--R. F. Carmichael, R. J. Martin, 
G. M. Quiackenbush, C. Mallett, A. Brown, A. N. Hill. 

No. 101, Corinthian, Peterborough— W. 0. Thimbeck, H. 
A. Baptie, W. Martin. 

No. 103, Maple Leaf, St. Catharines — ^F. E. Sampson, J. 
Snure, W, J. Davison, J. Thomson, M. M. Southward. 

No. 104, St. John's, Norwich — V. L. Moore, F. Hopkins, 
W. Burrill, A. B. Am, F. O. Fewster, G. W. Muckle, G. H. 
Poldon. 

No. 105. St. Mark's, Niagara Falls— A. C. Pratt, C. 
Terryberry, R. Woods, T. N. Dewar, H. Higgins, W. Johnston, 
J, Holton. 

No. 106, Burford, Burford— H. L. Davidson, J. Polley, 
F. Taylor, J. P. Fraser, W. G. Gumey, C. Cook. 

No. 107, St. Paul's, Lambeth— W. Anguish, R. McDougall. 

No. 108, Blenheim, Princeton — ^C. Bonney, G. Kitchen, 
J. B. Wallace. M. Riach. 

No. 109, Albion, Harrowsmith — L. H. Babcock. 

No, 110, Central, Prescott— W. H. Whitney. 

No. 113, Wilson, Waterford-^G. E. Saul, J. R. Cook, N. 
R. Berry, H. R. Misener, C. L. Tench. 

No. 114, Hope, Port Hope— G. H. Corbett, W. M. McEwen, 
P. R. Gustar, R. A. Gustar, G. Finnic, R. C. Wakely, L. E, 
Clayton, J. E. Hope. H. J. C. Beatty, R. D. Raby. 

No. 115, Ivy, Beamsville — L. G. Rouse, 0. R. Ransom, L. 
E. Hippie, G. H. Dickson. 

No. 116, Cassia. Thedford — L. Cameron, E. Harrison, N, 
Moloy, H. Briers, P. Bass. 

No. 118, Union, Schomberg— G. Cook, N. Blatchford, J. 
Ellison. C. Graham, W. Hammett, W. Carr, H. G. Russell, 
W. F. Aitchison, C. Jessop, R. Jennings, C. Black, W. E. 
Dale, C. W. Marchant, H. Fuller. E. J. Pearson, C. Wanchope, 
M. Stewaz-t, M. Kaake, N. Weir, H. G. Rose, W. Hodgson, N. 
Green sides. 

No. 119, Maple Leaf, Bath— E. Gait. A. Simpkins, S. 
Colville, E. Buck, G. B. Miller, B. Caughey. 

No. 120, Warren, Fin gal— M. Adams, N. McGugan, W. 
Glover, D. Orchard, H. Silcox. 

No. 121, Doric, Brantford- F, A. Hunt, R. E. Simon, E. 
J. Usher. 

No. 122, Renfrew, Renfrew-^, Slingerland, H. H. 
Dymond. L. B. Smith. 

No. 123, The Belleville, Belleville — K. A. Thompson, W. 
J. Rapino, E. W. Harrison, H. G. Bates, R. C. Woodley, E, 
S. Fairman, W. D, Embury, W. D. Dixon, R. M. Gunsolus, 
W. G. Slack, V. H. Graves. 

No. 125, Cornwall, Cornwall— N. G. M. Tuck, G. E. 
McCutcheon. 



24 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICAnON 

No. 126, Golden Rule, Campbellford— M. Locke, E. R. 
Steele, B. H. Beatty. _ 

No. 127, Franck, Frankford — E. G. Gilmour, E. Ander- 
son, D. Montgomery, H. D. Haggarty, H. Terry, P. Ghase. 

No. 128, Pembroke, Pembroke — H. T. Hale, A. Levoy. 

No. 129, Rising Sun, Aurora — G. H. Bunt, S. Aylett, R. 
B. Brown, W. H. Stoddart, E. J. Eveleigh, T. K. Fice, F. D. 
Lacey. 

No. 131, St. Lawrence, Southampton — G. R. Chapman, C. 
Manning. 

No. 133, Lebanon Forest, Exeter — G. W. Lawson, W. M. 
Cann. 

No. 135, St. Clair, Milton— C. H. Fay, J. C. Cunningham, 
F. W. Chisholm, K. Y. Dick. 

No. 136. Richardson, Stouffville — R. Snowball, C. J. 
Garrett, W. Wallace, M. Symes, A. E. Weldon. 

No. 137, Pythagoras, Meaford— D. Dobie, K. Mackey, F. 
Dougherty. 

No. 139, Lebanon, O^hawa — M. D. Jacobi, G. Werry, T. L. 
Wilson. H. O. Flintoff, N. A. Rae, M. Libby, F. Mills, F. G. 
Harris, S. F. Everson. 

No. 140, Malahide, Aylmer— R. Sinden, S. W. Durkee, 
H, K. Freeman. 

Now 141, Tudor, Mitchell — J. Sorensen. 

No. 142. Excelsior, Morrisburg — ^M. W. Rielly. 

No. 144, Tecumseh, Stratford— W. M. Gilmore, S. W. 
Rust, J. D. Hesson, H. S. Beckner. 

No. 145, J. BL Hall, Millbrook— H. R. Campbell, J. S. 
McGill. 

No. 146, Prince of Wales, Newburgh — ^R. W. Shortts, D. 
Sexsmith. 

No. 147, Mississippi, Almonte — W. Y. Wood, A. M. 
Hudson, S. H. Morton. 

No. 148, Civil Service, Ottawa— N. F. H. Bright, E. D. 
Berry, R. J. Parlee, J. Sim, T. W. Clark. 

No. 149, Erie, Port Dover — F. G. A. Morris, P. M. Leney, 
W. H. Smith, H. R. Scruton, H. B. Barrett, T. B. Barrett. 

No. 151, Grand River, Kitchener— G. R. Jaggs, R. J. 
Carse, F. L. Barrett, R. Marshall, H. W. Rothaermel, A. C. 
Mason. L. R. Blumbergh, W. G. Vassie, W. G. Sheard, W. H. 
Peacock. M. Keffer. 

No. 153, Bums', Wyoming— G. L. White, W. S. Steadman, 
A. W. Yost, J. G. Rice. 

No. 154. Irving. Lucan — A. F. McLean. 

No. 155, Peterborough, Peterborough — E. Mcllraith, W. 
Anderson. 

No. 156, York, Toronto— A. H. Gray, J. A. Pearce, E. 
Dodd, M. T. A. Moorby, S. E. Everest, B. Logie. H. H. Ran- 
som, W. S. Collins, K. S. Ash, E. A. Horswill, R. Ferguson, 
W. R. Kinsman, T. E. Foxall, H. R. Whyte. W. J. Edwards, 
A. McKennedv, L. R. Chester, B. E. Gohn, J. D. MacGregor, 
A. Brymer, J. R. Ball, C. Scott, H. W. Gray. 

No. 157, Simpson, Newboro — W. B. Guthrie. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 25 

No. 158, Alexandra, Oil Springs— J. Randall, W. R. 
Morley, W. Gadsby, J. Ferguson, C. Knight, R. Cadwallader, 
G. C. Aldred. 

No. 159, Goodwood, Richmond— B. C. Wilson, A. McWade, 
J. Gilpin. . 

No. 161, Percy, Warkworth— R. McNally, H. S. Ewing. 

No. 162, Forest, Wroxeter — H. McMichael. 

No. 164, Star-in-the-East, Wellington— L. E. Wight, B. 

A. Evans. ^ ^ _,, j t 

No 165, Burlington, Burlington — L. W. G. Crawford, L. 
G. Brid'er, J. G. Tancock, C. D. Reading, H. K. Durber. 

No 166, Wentworth, Stoney Creek— H. H. Johnson, C. 
Hunter,' J. N. W. Hughes, W. A. McNeil, F. R. Lee. 

No 168, Merritt, Welland— C. E. Griffin, A. C. Dick, 
H. J. Patis, B. Grant. ^ ^ 

No. 169, Macnab, Port Colborne — L. J. Kennedy, W. 
Ashenden, L. D. Winn, J. 0. Killer, J. C. Kaiser. 

No. 170, Britannia, Seaforth— E. Larone, W. Dalrymple, 
C. A. Reith, R. MacGregor, E. C. Boswell. 

No. 171, Prince of Wales, lona Station — B. Wells, J. O. 
Tolman, W. G. Agar, J. Pyatt. 

No. 174, Walsingham, Port Rowam— W. Gee, W. Knowles. 

No. 177, The Builders, Ottawa— W. J. Paterson, W. J. 
May, D. G. Hewer, H. B, Hayes, W. J. Roe, J. A. Heisler. 

No 180, Speed, Guelph— K. A. Young, E. Wilson, H. C. 
Morrison, J. F. Heap. 

No. 181, Oriental, Port Burwell- K. C. Emerson, M. 
Melchior. , ^ _ .^ , 

No. 184 Old Light, Lucknow— W. E. Collyer, J. E. Little, 
H. Strapp, B. Irwin. 

No. 190, Belmont, Belmont— D. Black, D. Groat. 

No.l92, Orillia, Orillia— G. E. Smith, M. A. Macdonald, 
G. A. McLean Jr., J. E. Shenton, C. O. Parnaby, A. J. Truman, 
W. E Bacon, W. R. Bagley, M. J. Leatherdale. 

No. 193, Scotland, Scotland— K. Poss, W. J. Clark, N. 
E Lawrence, J. S. Macaulay, N. Macpherson. 

No. 194 Petrolia, Petrolia— R. Cox, M. J. Huddlestone, 
N. Scott, R. Aiken, D. Dalziel, J. A. McCabe, N. White, J. W. 

Williams. x t^ t 

No. 195, Tuscan, London— A. W. HaiTis, W. L. Dunn, J. 
L. Crinklaw, E. A. Miller, C. C. Smith, C. M. Piercy. 

No. 196, Madawaska. Arnprior — J. Geddes, D. J. Macklem. 

No. 197, Saugeen, Walkerton— R. E. Ross, D. C. Park, 
P S. MacKenzie, G. M. Ross, G. Henderson, J. A. Gowanlock, 
d'. Brindlev, T. E. Brant, C. A. Hobley, N. R. Robertson. 

No 200, St. Alban's, Mount Forest — C. Fairbairn, W. E. 
Barker, G. Coutts. C. Johnson, F. D. Scott, W. Perry, J. 
Mowat, R- E. Davies, H. J. Corley. 

No. 201, Leeds, Gananoque — G. Emmerson, T. Daniels. 

No. 203, Irvine, Elora— F. G. Harrison, W. G. Taylor, E. 
A. Thomson. A. B. Barton, A. B. Eraser, J. C. Scott, R. Dun- 
can, S. W. Fairsveather, J. E. Snyder. 

No. 207, Lancaster, Lancaster — D. S. Cameron. 



26 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 209, Evergreen, Lanark — L. Closs, R. Craig. 

No. 209A, St. John's, London— W. A. Smith, G. S. Phipps, 
W H. Cook, H. B. Coxon, J. A. Irvine, A. C. Whitmore, J. 
R. Atkins, G. F. Kingsmill, C. B. Sutton, C. P. Haskett. 

No. 215, Lake, Ameliasburg — A. C. McFaul, D, Dempsey. 
No. 216, Harris, Oirangeville — J. R. Hoare, W. T. Robb. 
No. 217, Frederick. Delhi— D. Wilson. 
No. 218, Stevenson, Toronto — E. A. Graham, J. H. John- 
ston, S. P. Davy, E. A. Armstrong, J. T. Wallace, F. C. 
Hedges, W. R. Kent, R. W. Hamilton. 

No. 219, Credit, Georgetown — J. Addy, L Noble. 
No. 220, Zeredatha, Uxbridge — G. E. Hockley, C. G. 
Armstrong, R. N. Cordingley, W. H. Gould, H. V, Watson, C. 
Feasby, J. A. Noble, M. D. Feasby. 

No. 221, Mountain, Thorold— M. J. Gillespie, C. C. Martin, 
W. W. MacDonald, 0. R. Steadman, J. M. Lee. 
No. 222. Marmora, Marmora — K. Trumble. 
No. 223, Norwood, Norwood — C, Cuthbertson, C. Mac- 
Millan, A. M. Weir, D. A. McNeil. 

No. 224, Huron, Hensall— E. Campbell, W. J. F. Bell, 
W. O. Goodwin, R. K. Peck, F. Wright. 

No. 225, Bernard, Listowel — M. H. Walker. 
No. 228, Prince Arthur, Odessa — J. M. Baines, 
No. 229, Ionic, Brampton — H. Tomlinson, G. Read, W. A. 
Campbell, W. Clark, F. F. Wilcox, 0. T. Walker, V. A. Mount- 
ford, R. Grafton, J. G. Thompson, H. F. Loughin, F. W. 
Richardson, R. J. Wilson, J. Willis, H. A. Wilson, F. E. C. 
Cheyne. C. H. Wiggins, N. L. Powell, D. H. Loughlin, J. 
J. Campbell, K. Davidson, G. W. McCullough, J. C. Wiggins, 
R. D. Boyle, M. J. Treleaven, H. McClure, C. A. Firman. 

No. 230, Kerr, Barrie— J. H. Shepherd, R. W. Stewart, J. 
S. Veals, E. R. Lewis, C. J. Allison. 

No. 231, The Lodge of Fidelity, Ottawa— L. G. Moar, C. 
R. Sharp, C. F. Howard, J, E. Eraser. 

No, 232, Cameron, Dutton— S. McWilliam, J. U. Brovni. 
No. 233, Doric. Parkhill— C. Sadler, W. Steeper, C. Hod- 
gins, B. Taylor. 

No. 234, Beaver, Thornbury — M. G. McKechnie. 
No. 235, Aid worth. Paisley— L. B. Evans, E. B. Grant. 
No. 236, Manitoba, Cookstown — J. R. Pearson, L. Rowe, 
T. Robinson, E. Gilroy, L. Jackson, A. Gilroy, F. Houghton, 
E. Morrison. 

No. 237, Vienna, Vienna — H. P. Grant. 
No. 238, Havelock, Watford— F. Watson, R. Wallis, W. 
J. Miller, G. C. Searson, W. J. Plain, C. Watson, H. A. Mc- 
Kenzie, C. Harper, M. Powell, O. E. Wallis, G. Woods, E. 
Fisher, G. S. Cowan, L. Cundick, E. S. Janes, K. Inman, J. 
C. Hillis. 

No. 239, Tweed, Tweed— W. R. Marsh. 
No. 242, Macoy, Mallotrytown — W. E. Andress, H. L. 
Scott. 

No. 243, St. George, St. George — H. L. Martyn, R. Loube. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 27 

No. 245, Tecumseh, Thamesville — C, D. Krieger, J. M. 
Coutts, H. A. Cameron, G. Robertson, W. E. Hopper, A. W. 
Cryderman. 

No. 247, Ashlar, Toronto — R. Muir, R. A. Fairhead, K. 

C. Legge, C. C. Rous, R. O. Graham, W. H. Campbell, C. W. 
Rous, P. F. Wayman, T. K. Wade, J. F. Stewart, J. P. Kent, 
G. C. Moore, F. M. Mann, R. S. Wayman, E. W. E. Saunders, 
W. M. Gordon, D. A. Mcintosh, A. H. Butler. 

No. 249, Caledonian, Midland— C. A. Flowers, J. J. 
Robins, R. R. Wilson. 

No. 250, Thistle, Embro— S. Thomas, S. Muir, B. McCall, 
N. McLeod, C. G. Munro, A. G. McCorquodale, A. H. Cody. 

No. 253, Minden, Kingston— W. S. Stabler. 

No. 254, Clifton, Niagara Falls— R. E. Miller, S. De- 
Lorenzo, R. Davies, H. Langfield, S. E. Sauer, G. S. Warren. 

No. 255, Sydenham, Dresden — W. Invin, G. L. Dunlop, 
H. Martin, W. Tiffin, J. T. Ferguson, J. T. McVean, G. Ron- 
son, G. Wickens, S. Duddy. G. A. Martin, R. Dusten, J. E. 
Houston, A. Forshee, I. H. Robinson, H. Daly, G. C. AUdred, 

D. Thompson, G. Holmes, W. A. Craig, F. L. Wismer, 

No. 256, Farran-Ault, Ingleside — E. Crites. 

No, 257, Gait, Gait— K. W. Manning, D. Crombie, F. C. 
Ackert, R. Clark, D. J. Marriott, W. L. Haney, R. W. Dundas, 
J. E. Bavley, A. H. Kruse, C. H. Smith. 

No. 258, Guelph, Guelph— W. M. Wilkie, F. H. Theakston, 
B. R. Mullinex, F. H. Cooke. 

No. 259, Springfield, Springfield— M. H. Ker, J. W. 
Green. 

No. 260, Washingtom, Petrolia— A. R. Pegg, M. J. Karr, 
P. C. McPhedran, W. C. Hackett. 

No. 261, Oak Branch, Innerkip— G. A. Smith, W. A. 
Chesney, G. A. Shields, J. C. Long, W. A. Redman, R. Chesney, 
R. S. Gillespie, H. Smith, J. R. Thornton, P. G. Strong, A. F. 
Thomson. 

No. 262, Harriston, Harriston — D. M. Aitchison, J. Con- 
nell, C. Scarffe. 

No. 263, Forest, Forest— A. M. Metcalfe, R. Emery, S. 
Ellerker, W. F. Braun, J. E. Harris. 

No. 264, Chaudiere, Ottawa— W. J. Avres Jr., T. A. Clark, 
M. H. Chapman, G. C. Bennett, W. Gray, F. F. Horton, J. C. 
Nelson, W. S. Beveridge, T. E. Killeen, R. G. Phillips, C. E. 
Steele, J. A. Reid, C. A. McRory, A. E. Jinkinson. 

No. 265, Patterson, Thornhill— H. C. Hinchley, N. G. 
McDonald, R. W. Aston, R. T. Moore. 

No. 266, Northern Light, Stayner— P. M. Slotesbury, G. 
A. Clemence, W. A. Blackburn. 

No. 267, Parthenon, Chatham — R. Nerden, R. McKenzie, 
R. Montgomery. 

No. 268, Verulam, Bobcaygeon — R. B. Kennedy, W. J. 
Mulligan, A. E. Woollard. 

No. 269, Brousham Union, Claremont— E. Ward. W. Hill. 
G. Symes, L. Pugh. 



28 niRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 270, Cedar, Oshawa— W. J. Burch, G. K. Branton, H. 
S. Sliter, H. L. Wallace, H. S. Palmer, C. M. Wallace, E. F. 
Farrow, E. L. Elliott. 

No. 271, Wellington, Erin — D. Everson, S. Scott. 
No. 272, Seymour, Ancaster — J. A. Lowry, J. Hunter, P. 
Massey, E. Swackhamer, W. M. Lampman, J, McDougall, 

No. 274, Kent, Blenheim — ^V. Russell, I. McConnell, A. 
V. D'Clute. 

No. 276, Teeswater, Teeswater — G. R. Roane, J. Black- 
well. W. P. Arkell, P. Moffat, C. Thompson, G. Melvin, W. 
Armstrong. 

No. 277, Seymour, St. Catharines — J. S. Brooks, J. 0. 
Breen, W. S. Bunston. 

No. 279, New Hope, Hespeler— F. R. Paddock, A. T. 
Prestwich, B. Elliott, W. S. McVittie. 

No. 282, Lome, Glencoe — A. H. Moore, W. E. Carruthers, 
K. Kendrick, H. Bauer, W. A. Munro, A. D. McKellar. 

No. 283, Eureka, Belleville— A. B. Gerow, H. T. Adams, 
E. C. Wood, B. G. Wilkinson. 

No. 284, St. John's, Brussels — R. G. Hazlewood, D. Dun- 
bar, R. Bronson, C. Krauter. 

No. 285, Seven Star, Alliston— J. P. Sheridan, R. N. 
Walker, R. Elphick, N. L. Oliver, J. B. Anderson, D. G. 
Alderson. 

No. 286, Wingham, Wingham — A. Corrigan, K. H. Saxton, 
W. Van Wyck, R. Campbell. 

No. 287, Shuniah, Port Arthur — A. M. Mayes. 
No. 289, Doric, Lobo— M. Marsh, W. G. Frank, A. Hock- 
ing, A. Liscumb, E. Mitchell, C. Vail. 

No. 290, Leamington, Leamington — E. P. Stephens, F. 
Pres.ton, J. Brown, R. McLean, H. F. Plumb, F. Curtis, G. R. 
Jackson, D. Atkin, C. R. Brown. 

No. 291, Dufferin, W, Flamboro— C. A. Scott, C. W. 
Nicholson, G. R. Hunt. 

No. 292, Robertson, King — C. Henshaw, F. Hare, N. 
Taylor, W. Jennings, F. E. Boys, W. Holies, R. Watson, N. 
McMurchy. 

No. 294, Moore, Courtright — G. D. Jennings, J. D. 
Murray. 

No. 295, Conestogo, Drayton — E. Flath. 
No. 296. Temple, St. Catharines— W. H. Ridge, W. L. 
Misener, W. F. Vaughn, J. Backus, J. S. Anderson, J. Thome. 
No. 297, Preston, Preston — R. H. Hoffman, A. L. Haber- 
mehl, K. W. MacDonald, R. R. Shantz, L. R. Hertel. 
No. 299, Victoria, Centreville — J. Wagar. 
No. 300, Mount Olivet, Thomdale — J. C. Sutherland, C. 
V. Fox, M. Archer. I. McGuffin. 

No. 302, St. David's, St. Thomas-^. West, C. Mellor, 
H. Chater. P. C. Southern. W. V. McNea, P. R. Locke. 

No. 303, Blyth, BIyth— H. T. Vodden, B. Cook, D. B. 
Smith. D. Howes. 

No. 304, Minerva, Stroud — C. H. Robertson, F, Campbell, 
N. Watson, F. Shannon, G. W. Campbell, H. F. Sanders. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 29 

No. 305, Humber, Weston — S. H. Johnson, A. Thorn, W. 
Lithg-ow, K. Harrison, H. E. Cornell, M. Smeall, J. Duke, 
W. Ames, D. Williams, R. Cruise, R. Simpson, F. Thain, A. 
Scythes, W. Hall, E. Carruthers, H. Seal, T. Spour, E. 
Worg-an, J. Hamer, H. H. Burlington. 

No. 306, Durham, Durham — K. Leith, P. Nelson, J. 
Hooper, N. Greenwood, G. McGirr. 

No. 307, Arkona, Arkona — C. J. Rowland, F, Muma, E. 
Buller, H. D. Thompson, G. Edwards, G. Morningstarj^ 

No. 309, Morning Star, Carlow — J. Wilson, C. Adams, A. 
Stoll, R. D. Munro, H. Hill, W. G. Treble, J. H. Feagan, W. 
J. Craig. 

No. 311, Blackwood, Woodbridge— S. D. Kaiser, G. H. 
Troyer, H. A. Hopkins, M. C. Hooper, A. B. Cousins, G. L. 
McGiilivray, R. N. Mitchell, A. E. Kearney, S. McClure. 

No. 312, Pnyx, Wallaceburg— J. S. Craven, W. Laing, E. 
Ritchie, H. B. Sands, J. Gordon, G. Webb. 

No. 313, Clementi, Lakefield— R. H. Campbell, T. J. S. 
Payton, D. McConkev. 

No. 314, Blair, Palmerston— R. Clark, R. P. D'Alton, J. 
Nicoll, C. Hunt, K. M. Henderson, L. Morphy, J. F. 
Edwards. 

No. 315, Clifford, Clifford— V. Stewart, R. Mcintosh, J. 
Ferguson, M. Milligan, G. White, C. Dally, J. Fergiison, J. 
Gerrie. T. Aitken, T. A. Murray, A. Darroch, J. Milligan, A. 
Filsinger, H. Douglas, A. Landman. 

No. 316. Doric, Toronto— D. R. Clark, A. W. Emery, M. 
C. Starr, J. Leedham, A. G. Cranham, F C. Canover, G. 
Christopher, K. B. Rowe, R. G. Mahaffev. P. C. Fowler, A. 
J. Collins, S. Hamilton, J. H. Forde, E. L. Belfry, E. Johnson, 
E. G. Breen, E. Langley. 

No. 318, Wilmot, Baden— A. E. J. Weiler, D. F. Robert- 
son, E. Wright, B. J. Omand. 

No. 319, Hiram, Hagersville — O. C. Dell. 

No. 320. Chesterville, Chester\ille — M. Beckstead, H. 
Durant, L. Jordan. 

No, 321, Walker, Acton— S. K. Joe, L. E. Youngblut, M. 
H. Bauer, J. A. Leslie. A. J. Buchanan, N. L. Bowles, R. H. 
Elliott, L. W. Lovell, H. L. Ritchie. 

No. 322, North Star, Owen Sound— R. H. Cowan, S. C. 
Dunbar, H. F. Graham, A. F. Gordon. N. E. Macdonald, M. 
W. Macintosh, P. F. Rowe, W. B. Phillips, R. V. Garbutt, J. 
M. Smith, W. D. Morrison, N. H. Wilson. C. Morrison, E. L. 
Vanstone, J. J. Teschke, L. C. Baker. 

No. 323, Alvinston, Alvinston — K. B. Winnett, R. White, 
R. Ferguson, W. H. Clark, R. Doan, A. Kerr, C. Myers, C. 
Campbell, R. Myers, H. Colhoun, J. McCallum, S. Mitchell, 
L. McCaw. 

No. 324, Temple. Hamilton— J. W. Sharpe, G. W. Archer, 
A. H. Mellanby. H. B. Jackson, H. M. Hicks, G. R. Walls, A. 
G. McLeish. C. H. Cunningham, D. W. Gathers. 

No. 325, Orono, Orono — J. A. Rickaby, J. Ogden, A. 
McGill. G. Cotter. H. E. Duvall, D. Deeley. 



30 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 326, Zetland, Toronto— G. E. Hill, H. C. Jackson, R. 
E. Baylis, N. M. Bassin, L. S. Walker, H. L. Hastie. 

No, 327, Hammond, Wardsville — G. Purdy, J. Heath Jr., 
E. Payne, R. McNaughton. 

No. 328, Ionic, Napier--S. C. Rowe, R. J. Kelly, W. 
Smith, L. Field, W. H. A. Thomas, A. McLean, G. Taylor, R. 
McLean, G. McPhail, M. Toohill, F. Richardson, A. Richard- 
son, E. Denning, L. Richardson. 

No. 329, King Solomon, Jarvis — L Smelser, G. P. Blight, 
O. C. Dell, A. L. Miller, W. L. Keen. 

No. 330, Corinthian, London — J. Wood, J. M. Mennel, J. 
Hessey, W. F. Botham, J. W. Bradt, W. E. Bradt, J. T. Brown, 
J. R. Kilpatrick. 

No. 331, FoiTdwich, Fordwlch — S. K. Graham, J. H. 
Pollock, W. McElwain, N. Wade. 

No. 332, Stratford, Stratford— W. G. Gray, W. J. 
Edwards, H. J. Kastner, W. Neely. 

No. 333, Prince Arthur, Flesherton — B. A. Mcintosh, J. 
McWilliam. 

No. 334, Prince Arthur, Arthur— S. Goulding, P. Mc- 
Tavish, C. Hynd. 

No 336, Highgate. Highgate— A. Dickson, C. Spence, P. 
Lalonde. 

No. 337, Myrtle, Port Robinson — ^D. Camp, G. Pearson, 
iF. H. M. Hardy, L. M. Holditch, A. Egerter, T. E. Reavley, 
L. C. Stallwood, A. C. Avery, L. V. Neill, S. J. Gill, R. 
Biggar, W. E. Moulton, J. E. C. Simpson. 

No. 338, Dufferin, Wellandport— D. Cass, 0. Shoalts, C. 
Wittenberg, W. A. Farr, F. Hiles, G. M. Bayes. 

No. 339, Orient, Toronto — ^C. McManus, S. Harrison, G. 
Renfrew, H. L. Martyn. A. M. Thome, G. W. Furlong, H. W. 
Pierce, P. C. Werthner, A. Spalding, A. M. Watt, J. L. Smith, 
A. G. Neale, J. S. Little, A. E. Day, T. Gubb, G. B. Craigie, 
W. Pendleton. J. Harrison, C. Collard. T. R. Coates. 

No. 341, Bruce, Tiverton — W. G. Downey, A. MacArthur, 
M. MacKenzie, L. Keyes, J. Steinhoff, J. L. MacKinnon, S. 
McPherson, J. McFadyen, B. MacKinnon, R. P. Webster, C. B. 
Cottrill, W. Campbell. 

No. 343, Georgina, Toronto — 'E. R. Davies, W. L. Mason, 
R. C. Berkinshaw, P. W. Davies, A. W. Fox, W. F. Roberts, 
J. V. Trebell. 

No. 344, Merrill, Dorchester — N. J. Sauter, L. J. Gent, 
J. R. Morris, R. A. Logan, H. W. Parkes, A. McGeachy. 

Now 345, Nilestown, Nilestown — R. J. Carswell Jr., H, 
M. Hunter. 

No- 346, Occident, Toronto — W. H. B. Avery, F. C. Aimer, 
H. E. Wilson. H. L. Martyn, D. A. Gerow, J. T. Berry, G. 
Sanford, M. F. Smeall, H. E. McBride, K. C. E. Gates, R. J. 
Mills, H. B. Hutchins, J. A. Leslie, W. M. Glover, C. W. 
Emmett, R. G. Loftus, V. S. McGlynn. 

No. 347, Meircer, Fergus — J. L. Carter, D. Low, C. G. 
Millson, W. Young. 

No. 348, Georgian, Penetanguishene — N. Keefe. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 31 

No. 352, Granite, Parry Sound— W. H. Gerhart, J. J. 
Hogarth. 

No. 354, Brock, Cannington— W. D. Wetheral. 

No. 356, River Park, Streetsville — L. M. McGillivary, A. 
L. Couse, E. F. Bevis. 

No. 357, Waterdown, Millgrove — C. 0. Lester, J. 
Sutherland, M. R. Cummins, J. F. Griffin, J. R. Nicol, A. 
McPherson, J. N. Green, B. F. Sheppard, B. Ballard. 

No. 358, Delaware Valley, Delaware— G. Dafoe, G. F. 
McKay. 

No. 360, Muskoka, Bracebridge — E. P. Lee, J. D. Mac- 
Naughton, J. W. Pierce, R. F. Heath. 

No. 361, Waverley, Guelph^O. T. Flint, W. J. Boulding, 
R. G. Stephens, A. W. Baker. 

No. 362, Maple Leaf, Tara— H. Wolfe, D, Graham, G. S. 
Matthias, G. A. N. Funston, F. E. B. Scace, G. H. Morrison, 
C. M. Merriam, G. A. Robertson. 

No. 364, Dufferin, Melbourne— E. Brock, T. McCallum, 
J. C. McLean, D. Campbell, J. L, Stephenson. 

No. 367, St. George, Toronto — ^J. E. Pearce, A. McEwan, 
G. F. Guy, W. F. Damp, A. Hargreaves, A. G. Saunders, M. 
J. Damp, R. Hill, H. Dixon, P. Ritchie, F. E. Stafford, G. F. 
Emmett, A. R. Carrothers. 

No. 368, Salem, Brockville— E. A. Dickenson, 0. H. 
Francis. 

No. 369, Mimico, Lambton Mills — J. H. M. Smart, G. L. 
Hallitt, J. Irvine, K. C. Siddall, J. Hopkins, J. Kendall, W. G. 
Marshall, W. Wedgewood. F. W. Birch. J. H. Dicken. W. 
Creech, J. Glendenning, J. Elford, C. D. Cuthbert, E. J. 
Culham, V. S. Wilson, W. F. Leuty, D. W. Forrester, F. A. 
C. Butler, E. Bavley, G. Silverthorn, D. J. Beagan. 

No. 370, Harmony, Delta— R. Guthrie. 

No. 371, Prince of Wales, Ottawa— R. H. Sloan, K. G. 
Willing, J. H. McKinney, E. B. Nelson. 

No. 372, Palmer. Fort Erie — J. Jones, R. F. Girdlestone, 
R. E, Gardiner, G. E. Cornell, J. A. Foster, G. K. Chapman, 
C. K. Souder. 

No. 373, Cope-Stone. Welland— G. E. Farr, L. Thornton, 
H. W. Gisel, W. B. Martin, F. E. Watt, N. H. Korell, H. 
L. Headington, G. Caswell. 

No. 374. Keene. Keene — L W. Drimmie, F. Nelson, S. M. 
Comrie, D. H. Macfarlane, L. Wismer. 

No. 375, Lome, Omemee— C. R. Vaughan, W. B. Shaw, 
T. C. Best, J. S. Veals. 

No. 376, Unity, Huntsville — S. G. Avery, S. J. Goodwin, 
J. G. Nickalls. 

No. 377. Lome. Shelburne — H. Invin, K. Bumside, E. 
Patterson, W. Newell, C. Gillis, C. Faint, B. Robinson, T. H. 
McGhee, J. A. Doney, G. Firth. 

No. 378, Kine: Solomon's, London — A. W. H. Raine, A. 
Bailev, A. Raine Sr., J. F. Higgins. A. B. Clinton. 

No. 379, Middlesex. Bryanston — G. McRoberts, W. Mc- 
Guffin, W. McRoberts, E. Grose, D. Lamond. 



32 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 3S0, Union, London — J. W. Carson Jr., C, Amos, H. 
Hillis, W. R. Knight, K. L. Peers, J. W. Carson Sr. 

No. 382, Doric, Hamilton — M. E. Sheridan, G. J. McQueen, 
T. G. Regan. W. J. Macintosh, R. G. Wands, W. J. McQueen. 

No. 383, Henderson, Winchester — T. A. Sheldrick. 

No. 384, Alpha, Toronto— L. Taylor, G. Thompson, V. 
Brereton, R. Evans, P. W. Rogers, 0. E. Kennedy, W. H. 
Brown, D. J. Torrens, R. N. McEIhinnev, H. R. Kennedy, G. 

A. Rider, D. P. Collins, H. F. Begbie, N. Wardle, D. Robert- 
son, M. A. Searle, W. G. Janes, H. E. French. 

No. 385, Spry, Beeton— T. F. Dale, G. T. R. Devall, T. 
Bell, W. L. Watson, S. R. McKelvey, H. Robinson, W. S. 
Robinson, R. J. Mitchell, R. J. Watson. 

No. 386, McColl, West Lome— D. Todd, J. L. Atkinson. 

No. 387, LanS'downe, Lansdowne — E. Hamilton, W. A. 
Trickey, H. Trueman, W. J. Webster, W. H. Rath. 

No. 338, Henderson, Ilderton— H. L. O'Neii, J. W. Zavitz, 
R. G. Evans, R. A. W. Carter, G. R. Bov/man, G. B. Car- 
michael. 

No. 390, Florence, Florence— G. Parking, L. Elliott, V. 
W. Nurse, W. R. Buchanan, S. Jones, S. T. Hanks, W. G. 
Chapman, O. Q'Neil. 

No. 391, Howard, Ridgetown— J. A. R. Macdonald, G. 
Schweitzer, N. Evans, B. B. Foster, W. Armstrong, W. Rivers, 
R. Spence, D. McDiarmid, R. Schweitzer, E. Walker, H. 
O'Neill, A. Smith, T. E. Armstrong, M. McKay, D. Mclntyre, 

B. McDougall. 

No. 392, Huron, Camlachie — J. F. Armstrong, R. C. 
McFarlane, A. Hillier, M. Burnley, J. G. McLean. 

No. 394, King Solomon, Thamesford— R. A. Hogg, T. R. 
Nancekivell. 

No. 395, Parvaim, Comber — N. Wright, D. Washburn, H. 
W. HiHrnan, G. H. Breen, L. Dietrich, J. A. Shanks, A. R. 
McFadden. 

No. 396, Cedar, Wiarton— D. Holohan, C. Hyatt, D. R. 
Davidson, J. F. Currie, W. C. Sanders, A. Tomlin. 

No. 397, Leopold, Brigden — W. A. Bradshaw, E. Shaw, 
E. N. Pierce, W. Bradshaw. 

No. 398, Victoria. Kirkfield— G. N. Stewart, H. Mc- 
Caskill, J. D. McMillan, A. W. Jewell, G. V. Grant, M. 
McKenzie. 

No. 399, Moffat, Harrietsville — L. Jamieson, J. Johnson, 

C. Hnvle. 

No, 400, Oakville. Oakvill^G. E. Morden, C. D. Donald, 
J. W. Stewart, C. T. Sherry, H. G. McKillop. 

No. 401, Craig. Deseronto — E. Gustafson, B. Portt. 

No. 402, Central, Essex— M. F. Sadler, B. Smith, R. W. 
Sweptman. A. Ransom. 

No. 403, Windsor, Windsor— H. B. Coristine, A. Kerr Sr., 
W. J. Haines, A. W. Huggett, J. Tough, A. Shaw, C. W. 
Knowler. 

No. 404, Lome, Tamworth — D. Norris, G. Bradshaw, H. 
J. Hinchey. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 33- 

No, 405, Mattawa, Mattawa — J. Banish. 
No. 406, The Spry, Fenelon Falls— A. Gillis. C. E. Dun- 
ham. 

No, 408, Murray, Beaverton — R. P. Rilance, C. Doherty, 

A. W. Baker, E. 0. Harris, G. R. Yule, A. Grant, W, J. Veale, 
W. J. Gillespie. 

No. 409, Golden Rule, Gravenhurst — O. Finnson, W. E. 
McDonald, J. B. Lindsell. 

No. 410, Zeta, Toronto — A. M. Smith, B. Posgate, C. G. 
Collett, J. A. Rayner, S. Alexander, D. G. Lyons, W. H. C. 
McEachern. 

No. 411, Rodney, Rodney— I. Little. 

No. 412, Keystone, Sault Ste. Marie — J. E. Jannison, J. 

B. Sainsbury, L. G. Shier, R. A. Buck, A. Y. Broughton, W. 

C. Sanders. 

No. 413, Naphtali, Tilbury— W. Roszell, A. McQuire, J. 
Hassard, W. E. Lumley, A. F. Shaw, L. Taylor, R. McAlorum, 
E. Sparling, G. Ludwig, J. Drouillard. 

No. 415, Fort William, Fort William— J. E. Davies, K. 
Mackay. 

No, 416, Lyn, Lyn — ^G. Gilmer, L. Brown. 

No, 417, Keewatin, Keewatin— J. A. Cox. 

No. 418, Maxville, Maxville— ^C. B. McDermid, R. A. 
Stewart. 

No. 419, Liberty, Sarnia — ^G. Gough, E. L. Treitz, 
A. Thompson, C. A. Johnson. R. Brooks. 

No. 420, Nipissing, North Bay — G. R. Kelly, R. A. 
Robertson, M. G. Gould, H. H. Perkins. 

No, 421. Scott, Grand Valley— C. W. Curtis, B. Fife. 

No. 422, Star of the East, Bothwell— C. Forrest, G. Mc- 
Donald, T. Boon, A. C. Doman. 

No. 423, Strong. Sundridge — J. Sim. 

No. 424, D&ric. Pickering— A. W. Wright, L. White, W. 
T. Overend. R. D. Rahmer, V. C. Balsdon, H. S. Anderson, A. 
Ru.^sel, C. A. Balsdon. 

No. 425, St. Clair, Sombra— J. A. Templeton, W. J. 
Anderson, R. A. Nelson, G. Branton, B. G. Waddell. 

No. 426, Stanley, Toronto — A. A. Gordon, R. L. McTavish, 
J. P. Liscumb, J. E. Irvine, J. L. Johnson, J. 0. Arnott, W. 
C. Wetherup, R. M. Fraser, G. R. Burgess, J. R. Cox, C. A. 
Eraser. G. W. Tindall, A. T. Hume. 

No. 427, Nickel, Sudbury— J. J. Gilpin, A. R. Gilpin, A, 
Dinwoodie, J. R. Home, H. A. Death, W. J. C. Noble, W. E. 
W. Cressey, A. C. Fraser, M. Ironstone, C A. Ebv. 

No. 428, Fidelity, Port Perry— W. H. McMillan, R. R. C. 
Davison, S. T. Lane, N. W. Heavn, W. J. Carnegie, C. L. 
Midgley, L. D. Colbear. R. H. Cornish, G. Jeffrey, G. M. 
Gerrow, G. Christie, G. R. Davey, H. D. Sauter, H. H. Mul- 
lisran. 

No. 429, Port Elgin, Port Elgin— R. Chappell, G. C. 
Fleming, H. Morrow. 



34 GRAND LODG(B OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 430, Acacia, Toronto — V. H. Perry, W. Joyce, H. 
May, E, Balfour, A. Jones, H. P. Phillips, L. C. Sutherland, 
J. A. Smith, E. C. Hall, H. A. Sinclair, F. Pickering, G. 
Reynolds, S. W. Alexander. , 

No. 431, Moravian, Cargill— B, Elphick, J. M. Reid, J. 
A. Garland. 

No. 432, Hanover, Hanover — J. W. Love, E. J. Scar- 
borough, W. A. Wright. 

N<y. 433, Bonnech€re, Eganville — V. M. Poland, H. G. 
Green, E. C. Drefke, R. G. Boland. 

No. 434, Algonquin, Emsdale — J. E. Hodgson, E. V. 
Elliott, C. W. Tyers. 

No. 435, Havelock, Havelock — L, H. Cooke, W. J. Nobes. 

No. 436, Bums, Hepworth — R. Johnston, J. Rusk, W. 
Spencer, W. Morley, G. Walker, W. Lennox, R. Cruickshank. 

No. 437, Tuscan, Sarnia — S. S. Hango, W. L. Brown, F. 
M. Bennett, D. H. Townsend, S. A. Smith, O. W. Robb, G. 
Walker. 

No. 438, Harmony, Toronto — J. R. Scott, G. Murray, D. 
Shaw, D. MacGillivray, E. Hanley, H. Tough, M. Byam, W. 
R. Shaw, D. Craig. 

No. 439, Alexandria, Alexandria — A. McNeil. 

No. 440, Arcadia, Minden — W. A. Rogers, H. Mcintosh. 

No. 441, Westport, Westport — R. Sweetman. 

No. 442, Dyment, Thegsalon — A. M. Henderson. 

No. 443, Powassan, Powassan — E. C, Langford, F. Stillar, 
R. Lyle, H. J. Paul, W. N. Simms, F. W. Toswell. 

No. 444, Nitetis, Creemore — H. Newell, S. O. Nixon, 
J. M. Heslip. 

No. 446, Granite, Fort Frances— C. F. Schubring, N. E. 
Johnson, L W. Smith, S. R. L. Newman, 

No. 447. Sturgeon Falls, Sturgeon Falls — U. T. Brodkorb, 
H. A. Batsford, A. J. Stewart, M. Carswell, G. R. Bartlett. 

No. 448, Xenophon, Wheatley— H. Walker, J. K. Mills, M, 
Whaley, C. Foster, K. Quick, W. E. Dales. 

No. 449, Dundalk, Dundalk-^. W. Seeley, F. Dales, L. 
Eraser, S. C. Snedden. 

No. 450, Hawkesbury, Hawkesbury— P. E. Wall, L. G. 
Harcourt. 

No. 451, Somerville, Kinmount — A. Brown, B. Austin. 

No. 452, Avommore, Avonmore — B. MacRae. 

No. 453, Royal, Fort William— G. F. Hole. 

No. 454, Corona, Burks Falls— J. B. Fell, H. B. Brandt, 
T. K. Daley, N. Sedore. 

No. 455, Doric, Little Current — L. H. Peck. 

No. 456. Elma, Monkton — E, A. Thomson, J. C. Rennick, 
L. Pickard, H. Partridge, C. Harrison, R. Elliott, W. Smith, 
G. Richmond, C. Little, C. Merryfield. E. Tapp, H. Stacy. 

No. 457. Century, Merlin— H. Atkinson, G. C. Wellwood. 

No. 458, Wales, Looigue Sault— W. D. McNaughton, C. 
Wereley. 

No. 459, Cobden, Cobden— R. Childerhose. P. W. Collins. 

No. 460, Rideau, Seeleys Bay — D. Moorhead. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 35 

No. 461, Ionic, Rainy River — A. D. Carson. 

No. 462, Temiskaming, New Liskeard — F. C. Nelson. 

No. 463, North Entrance, Haliburton — D. Kenning, J. 
Taylor, E. Robertson, G. Brennan. 

No. 464, King Edward, Sunderland— C. St. John, 0. 
Bagshaw, R. Bartley, C. E. Shier, L. I. Oldfield, R. W. Old- 
field, G. G. Pinkham. 

No. 465, Carleton. Carp— R. W. Moore, L. Story, A. 
Mooney, H. Armstrong, C. Downey. 

No. 466, Coronation, Elmvale — E. Thurlow, M. Corbett, 
J. K. MacAuley, D. Dawes. 

No. 467, Tottenham, Tottenham — C. J. Flear, A. McLean, 
G. J. Cocking, G. B. Mallion. 

No. 468, Peel. Caledon East — W. Kee, J. F. Lennox, A. 
Ebdon, H. L. Martyn, G. E. Pallister. H. A. Spratt, W. B. 
Cannon, H. L. Noble, J. S. Veals, J. N, Proctor, J. B. Ward, 
H. Shilson. L. G. Berney, J. A. McFarlane. H. Spratt. 

No. 469, Algoma, Sault Ste. Marie— K. J. McCracken, H. 
Routledge, G. L. Whalen. 

No. 470, Victoria, Victoria Harbour — C. Pearsall, W. B. 
Crooke, G. Belcher, 0. Marshall. 

No. 471, King Edward VII, Chippawa— E. G. McKenzie, 
L. Poole. 

No. 473, The Beaches, Toronto — W. Morton, F. McCarthy. 

No. 474, Victoria. Toronto— L. S. Weir, W. D. Kirkland, 
A. W. Lord, W. A. Matthews, A. K. Kean, N. Henry, G. W. 
Eckert, G. W. Carrow, G. A. Williams, P. F. Egerton, P. A. 
Jerman, A. Wilson. 

No. 475, Dundum, Hamilton — J. W. Lampkin, C, W. 
Manning, R. Buchanan, J. W. Craven, G. Cousins, J. Schofield 
Sr. 

No. 476, Corinthian, North Gower — H. L. Greer. 

No. 478, Milverton. Milverton — J. Petrie, H. Debus, J. 
Ritter, W. Pugh, W. J. Cockwell, M. Mogh, J. Atkin. 

No. 479, Russell, Russell — K. J. Campbell, L. W. Latimer, 
W. M. Stanley. 

No. 480. Williamsburg, Williamsburg — A. McQuigge, W. 
W. Small, G. Garlotigh. 

No. 481, Corinthian, Toronto — G. E. Hough, H. L. Mart>Ti, 
H. T. Blumsom, F. Hutchinson, E. Flath, J. B. Stevenson, S. 
H. Cockbum, A. W. Cecil, D. A. Probert, J. Manuel, A. J. 
Cobban. 

No. 482, Bancroft, Bancroft— W. H. Davy, H. Petch. 

No. 483. Granton, Granton — L. Marshall, N. Amos, J. 
Bryan, R. Mills, G. Wilson, J. Elston, B. Grant, G. Squire, J. 
Miller. 

No. 484, Golden Star, Dryden— J. A. Cox. 

No. 485. Haileybury, Haileybury — A. L. Throop, W. J. 
Attig. T. G. Tulloch. 

No. 486, Silver, Cobalt— W. J. Mathews, H. 0. Armstrong. 

No. 487. Penewobikong, Blind River— M. R. Bell, M. 
F. Lees. T. W. Christilaw. 



36 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 488, King Edward, Harrow — G. L. Graham, R. S. 
Skinner, B. C. Martin, D. M. Martin, A. C. Quick, 

No. 489, Osiris, Smiths Falls — W. C. Gamouras, J, Fair- 
field, J. A. Heisler. 

No. 490, Hiram, Markdale — N. Bui-ritt, R. Brady, W. 
Ellison. 

No. 491, Cardinal, Cardinal— H. E. Keeler, T. E. Amell. 

No. 492, Karnak, Coldwater— R. F. Aitchison, G, W. 
Hall, F, C. Lovering, G. R. Lane, G. E, Cooper, D. F. Athron. 

No. 494, Riverdale, Toronto — I. C. Roll, W. Miller, J. 
John=ton, W. Thorn, H. L. Martyn, P. Bell, G. Jones, H. 
Claridge, E. G. Guest, F. J. Pike, W. B, Christie, C. M. 
Rawson. 

No. 495, Electric, Hamilton — J. G. Hamilton, A. Scott, 
H. L. Martyn, H. F. Fuller, W. T. Davies, W. Hoyle. 

No. 496, University, Toronto — H. A. Blanchard, B. F. 
Fonvard W. H. Kirk, A. E. MacGregor, M. C. Hooper, P. W. 
Rogers, J. J. Traill, W. C. Cuttell, R. J. Greer, J. T. Burt- 
Gerrans, N. W. Reynolds, E. J. Walkom, J. Campbell Jr. 

No. 497, St. Andrew's, Arden — J. Savigny. 

No. 498, King George V, Coboconk — M. J. McKague, R. 
Bryant. 

No. 499, Port Arthur, Port Arthur— S. I. Knox, E. A, 
Enstrom. 

No. 500, Rose, Windsor — J. M. Bow, W. A. Murray, N. 
Yared, E. N. Shrier, W. Doran. 

No 501, Connaught, Toronto— W. T. Taylor, C. W. L. 
Eggett, G. C. Mercer, J. T. Lee, T. M. Staunton, F. Shackle- 
ton, W. Manson, A. E. Hallam, C. H. McFaddin, G. W. G. 
Gauld, A. D. Norris. 

No. 502, Coronation, Smith ville — F. A. Moorecroft, A. 
Young, D. M. Muir, C. A. Merritt, S. Magder. 

No. 503, Inwood, Inwood — B. Chapman, B, Henderson, 
Allan Campbell, L. Elliott, B. Johnson, J. R. Graham, N. 
Campbell, W. J. Campbell, Alex. Campbell, G, Tinney, K. 
Cameron, G. Campbell, Basil Johnston. 

No. 504, Otter, Lombardv— D. C. Covell, N. Edwards, H. 
L. Polk, H. R. Tennant, P. Jones, G. P. Marshall, W. M. 
Stanzel. 

No. 505, Lynden, Lynden — C. Hinan, S. Hunt. 

No. 506, Porcupine, South Porcupine — W. D. Miller, R. 
G. Childs. 

No. 508, Ozias. Brantford — J. C. Coker, E. H. McKerrall, 
R. Scott, F. E. B Scace. 

No. 509. Twin City, Kitchener— W. W. Shilling, H. B. 
Coxon, W. J. Searson, O. A. Keffer. 

No. 510, Parkdale, Toronto — B. Craine, W. H. Cressv.ell, 
R. Y. Gilpin. E. H. Wilson, W. H. Wake, R. C. Mair, F. 
A. R. McNair, C. L Goddard. E. M. Grose. A. Fry. 
No. 511, Connaught, Fort William— P. S. Good. 
No. 512. Malone. Sutton West— H. O'Neil, R. E. Weir, 
J. Tate, R. Bartley, C. Martin. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 19&1 87 

No. 513, Corinthian, Hamilton — E. R. Seager, F, F. 
Dickerson, J. R. Badcock, J. H. Jackson, A, G. Elford, G. R. 
Riggs, A. E. Cheesman. 

No. 514, St. Alban's, Toronto— H. Patterson, J. Thistle, 
E. Elcombe, A. 0. Murray, E. W. Stoddard, J. L. House, 
A. M. Burgess, K. P. Stevens, G. W. McRae. 

No. 515, Reba. Brantford— H. J. Smith, S. Lengyell, W. 
E. McFadden, T. E. Greenaway, C. Dickinson. 

No. 517, Hazeldean, Hazeldean — G. M. Scott. 

No. 518, Sioux Lookout, Sioux Lookout — J. A. Cox. 

No. 519, Onondaga, Onondaga — M. M. Westbrook, F. J. 
Poirier, G. Douglas, R. W. Featherston, R. Jamieson, H. B. 
Glass, R. Mannen, H. Featherston, W. Martin. 

No. 520, Coronati, Toronto — R. B. Cheeseman, H, H. 
Duckworth, E. W. Rolston, R. J. Woods, H. C. Kingstone, H. 
Lane, F. G. Chandler, G. B. Bailey, W. T. Overend, W. G. 
Neale, D. C. Little, J. D. Lyon, L. Lloyd, J. A. Burrj Jr., 
W. H. Saunders, R. G. H. Chappell, J. B. Wilson. 

No. 521, Ontario, Windsor — J. E. Le^vis, M. N. Mainprize, 
R. V. Wakeley, T. L. Mclntyre. S. M. Irwin, P. F. Cipparone. 

No. 522, Mount Sinai, Toronto — D. List, P. Abrams, A. 
L. Tinker, H. Phillips, L. Levy. 

No. 523, Royal Arthur, Peterborough — D. A. Abraham, 
R. 0. Standish. 

No. 524, Mississauga, Port Credit— W. G, McNay, N. 
Matheson, J. Heywood, L. Brunskill. A. Gerhart, W. H. 
Pallett, R. E. Malpass, J. Grimmon, E. E. Slacer, D. B. 
Searles, H. Sanders, G. B. Jackson, G. D. Pattinson, J. A- 
Smith. 

No. 525, Temple, Toronto — F. Grundy, D. J. Gunn, J. 
Meldrum, E. Hughes, A. Wilson. 

No. 526. Ionic, Ottawa— G. T. Cole, W. J. Watling, R. C. 
Taylor, J. H. Carkner. 

No. 527, Espanola, Espanola — A. J. Higgins, J. F. 
Boucher. 

No. 528, Golden Beaver, Timmins — H. Poole. 

No. 529, Mvra, Komoka — F. Payne, M. Gray, G. Gerry, 
C. Fletcher, B. Frank, B. Gray, S. Swales. 

No. 530, Cochrane. Cochrane — W. H. Quinn, J. A. Foster. 

No. 531. High Park, Toronto — J. G. Jenkins, W. G. 
Mabey, W. R. Alexander, C. N. Bell, W. J. Hutchison, W. 
R. Shai-pe. 

No. 532, Canada. Toronto— S. R. Daggett, W. Fairclough, 
R. J. Scott. J. A. Hearn, W. A. Hagan, R. Carney, H. W. 
Lyons. L. C. Alchin. T. A. Johnston, W. H. Sawyer. H. K. 
Lee. T. J. Sleeth. F. P. Giffen. W. Skeates. K. M. Johnston, 
A. Murdoch, T. R. Hunter, W. Ramsay, C. Thomas, A. E. 
Skeats. 

No. 533, Shamrock. Toronto — ^R. E. A. Lindsey, W. Searl, 
R. R. Prosser. J. 0. Cameron, H. Milnes, R. R. Bums, C. 
Leitch. G. H. Lepper. 

No. 534, Englehart, Englehart — R. Roach, D. J. Paterson. 



38 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 535, Phoenix, Fonthill — E, L. Franks, J. M. B. Mc- 
Clellan," W. R. Moffat, T. A. Barron, J. A. Barron, B. C. 
Damude. 

No. 536, Algonquin, Copper Cliff — J. G. McLennan, G. 
Robb. 

No. 537, Ulster, Toronto— H. McKee, G. W. Kerr, F. 
Phillips, H. L. Mart\Ti, W. Hoey, T. H. Hamilton, C. A, Jones, 
C. M. Flatten, R. Aiken, S. H. Simpson, A. E. Neill, T. A. 
Murphy, H. D. Holden, H. Patterson, W. M. Clapperton, A. 
J. Pedlar, T. J. Murphy. 

No. 539, Waterloo, Waterloo— F. J. Pryor, D. H. Caughill, 
C. E. Ruppel, E. Flath, N. A. MacEachem, J. E. R. Walker, 
J. I. Dugan, N. A. Schnurr. 

No. 540, Abitibi, Iroquois Falls — E. C. Jack. 

No. 541, Tuscan, Toronto— T. B. Crane, J. M. McCombe, 
W. V. Ridgu-ay, S. G. Nicholls, S. O. Cuthbertson, J. E. 
Carter, L. H. Zurbrigg, G. R, Jackson. 

No. 542, Metropolitan, Toronto — A. J. A. Simmons, F. 
J. Garrod, H. L. Martyn, W. R. Daniels, A. L. Tinker, N. 
Verrill, H. Campbell, C. F. Marsh, J. A. Matheson, R. L. 
Peacock. 

No. 543, Imperial, Toronto — A. G. Hartwick, G. P. San- 
ford, C. B. English, H. L. Martyn, C. C. Teskey, A. E. Moss, 
E. E. Reid, C. L. Ford, A, Pollock, A. H. C. Boot, W. G. 
Mills, D. A. McLean, R. A. Gibson. 

No. 544, Lincoln, Abingdon — R. W. Davey, V. Wice, H. 
■G. Jackson, R, L. Jackson. 

No. 545, John Ross Robertson, Toronto — E. E. Hartley, 
S. H. Cowell. J. C. Cookson, H. F, Vigus, J, A. Robertson, 
L. E. Love, A. M. Clark, E. H. Manley, J. R. Legecy, J. H. 
Jackson, J. S. Lundy, C W. Homer, A. T. Williams, T. E. 
Clegg, J. H. Williamson, H. B. Swift, D. Dyer, W. E. 
Graham, F. W. Slade. 

No. 546, Talbot, St. Thomas— J. Pickston, G. W. Sutton, 
H. E. Fackrell, H. E. McNames, C. E. Hague, W. G. Saxon, 
S. Grantham, C. H. Roberts, W. A. D. Paterson, J. C. 
Ferguson. 

No. 547, The Victory, Toronto— F. H. Westbrook, J. 
Mclvor, W. Innes, F. Mason, J. S. Adam, W. B. Bailey, J. H. 
Fair, E. W. Medhurst. 

No. 548, General Mercer, Toronto— R. A. Sim, E. F. 
Seaboum, R. E. Gerrard, R. J. Lewis, H. E. LeMaitre, G. 
Rees, W. Aspinall, H. Hardy, J. W. Gerrard, H. W. Dunton. 

No. 549, Ionic, Hamilton — W. G. Warden, M. Packer, R. 
Kerr, T. Bacon, J. M. Connor, A. W. Marshall. 

No. 550, Buchanan, Hamilton— W. R. Magwood, G. E. S. 
OsAvald, K. F. V/arwick, J. Hobson, S. H. Dolman. 

No. 551, Tuscan, Hamilton— C. G. Battev, A. R. Shave, 
W. Whvte, R. G. Hazlewood, W. Bro\vn. R. Sheppard, J. 
Baird, R. A. Carter, H. M. Mclntyre. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 89 

No. 552, Queen City. Toront<>— B. K. Bell, A. Williams, 

C. Smith, C. Perrett, J. J. Smith, G. A. Dorkin, J. Mitchell, 
J. Hillman, J. McMechan, W, Carey, H. Lemmer, W. H. 
Reid, H. T. Sears, H. Rehill, G. G. Spracklin, J. Meek, R. 
Elsie, L. Elsie. 

No. 553, Oakwood, Toronto — C. G. Pearce, E. S. Wood- 
cock, G. W. Blackmore, H. E. Ward, N. R. Baird. F. A. 
Sceviour, J. D. Ballantyne, G. R. Smith, A. E. Percival, J. 
Urquhart, J. E. Wardle, H. F. Norman, I. S. Gray, S. J. C. 
King, T. M. Maltby. 

No. 554, Border Cities, Windsor — F. J. Barlow, R. G. 
Warren, N. Spence, A. H. MacQuarrie W. G. Purbrick, A. 
Haycock, G. M. Wilson, E. J. Morton, C. J. McCallum, R. 
Colledge, W. S. Joiner, M. Bobier, D. F. Parson, T. W. 
Totten, R. R. Shipley, J. Lock, J. D. Gardiner, R. E. Warren, 
E. G. Carmichael. 

No. 555, W^ardrope, Hamilton — I. Etherington, J. A. 
Turner, G. A. Gledhill, W. J. Smith, W. J. Attig, G. A. 
Ireland, W. S. Ir\-ine, T. Tregunno, M. E. Smith, G. W. 
Roberts. 

No. 556, Nation, Spencerville — E. T. Kelso, B. J. Steck, 
J. H. Bennett. 

No. 558, Sidney Albert Luke, Ottawa — W. A. Gregory, F. 
W. Hewitt, J. B. Desjardins, J. A. Reid, J. F. P. vanVeen, 

No. 559. Palestine, Toronto — A. Allison, L. Copeland, 
W. Collis, P. Gantman, H. H. Bocknek, H. Ginsberg, M. 
Sklar, S. Spivak, B. Mandel, H. M. Rotenberg, H Papemick, 
H. H. Donin. 

No. 560, St. Andrew's. Ottawa— W. T. Stewart, J. W. 
McMullen, J. Dewhirst, A. E. Mulligan, W. J. Tate, J. 
O'Donovan, C. C. Dale, J. S. Abernethy, W. C. Pescod, D. M. 
McQuitty. G. C. Sutcliffe, R. Bajme, G. Mitchell, A. M. 
Merritt, D. B. Higg-inson. J. A. Heisler, W. R. Rowsome. 

No. 561, Acacia, Ottawa— G. N. Fee, W. F. Davis, W. 
J. Tavlor. 

No. 562, Hamilton, Hamilton— D. 0. Willson, D. L. G. 
Weaver, T. H. Chardine, F Scott. 

No. 563, Victory, Chatham— W. L. Green Sr., D. H. 
Rawlings. 

No. 564. Ashlar, Ottawa-^. McKie, N. H. Thomas, W. E. 
Meldrum, G. J. Martin. 

No. 565. Kilwinning, Toronto — ^R. Collett, G. Mclntyre 
Jr., C. G. Copeland, E. L. James, H. L. Martvn, J. M. Hain, 
G. F. Brav. B. C. McClelland, G. Mitchell, E. J. Langley, 
G. E. Langley. E. W. Pattison. 

No. 566, King Hiram, Toronto — J. T. Rose, A. E. Dyer, 
W. M. Shaw, D. J, B. Wright, B. M. Clancy, A. Wright, S. D. 
Shaw. 

No. 567. St. Aidan's, Toronto — T. L. Hobbs, M. C. Blav- 
lock, H. S Pike, H. G. McKague, H. J. Bolton. 

No. 568. Hullett, Londesboro — W. TjTidall, D. Anderson, 
J. Neilans, C. Vincent. 



40 (jRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 569, Doric, Lakeside — H. Munro, J. Wilson, H. 
Fraser, G. Gregory, D. Seaton. 

No. 570, Dufferin, Toronto— J. Struthers, J. Chatel, W. 
Innes, G. N. Walker, W. H. Kinsman, W. H. Stevens, D. H. 
Graham, F. N. Andrews, E. E. Reilly. 

No. 571, Antiquity, Toronto — A. P. Evans, J. T. Cassie, 

D. A Wright, W. Sellers, W. Midwood, P. A. MacEachern, 
J. H. Curtis, G. A. Ramsev, J. M. Rae, T. J. Matchett, R. M. 
Brown, C. P. Smith. 

No. 572, Mizpah, Toronto — A. D. Chambers, J. Booton, 
J. H. Gahagan, A. Bougourd, J. E. Stuckum, T. J. A. Gamey, 
F. M. Shepherd, J. W. Thomson, C. J. Shiblev, R. D. Robinson, 
J. G. Baker, H. F. Allen, R. W. Frow, E. T. Lee. 

No. 573, Adoniram, Niagara Falls — W. H. Cartwright, 
F. E. Wilson, G. E. French, W. J. Stonehouse. 

No. 574, Craig, Ailsa Craig— F. Steward, L. Stokes, J. 
Rosser, F. Dickins, G. Sutherland. 

No. 575, Fidelity, Toronto — G. Mitchell, W. Boardman, 
H. Langstaff, W. Sills, J. Graham, H. Jackson, P. C. Bolton, 

E. Be vis. 

No. 576, Mimosa, Toronto — R. E. Hadfield, C. T. Snider, 
W. E. Webster, A. Wilson, F G. Hunt, A. I. Hoover, E. 
Hadfield, J. J. Pepino, A. Hart, W. G. McCulloch, H. Murphy. 

No. 577, St. Clair, Toronto— J. C. Honan, T. Brodhurst, 
H. L. Martyn, G. R. Stephens, J. W. Phillips, C. E. Hough, 
J. Inglis, J. M. Yates. W. G. Frisby, S. G. Manley, R. C. 
Lewis. J. E. Yaeger, R. J. Fischel, A. G. Saunders, J. W. 
Woodland. 

No. 578, Queen's. Kingston— H. C. Babcock, D. R. Hall, 
J. F. Whiting, E. G. Carmichael. 

No. 579, Harmony, Windsor — A. J. Elliott, E. D. Drum- 
mond. H. A. Anderson, G. E. Cammidge, J. B. Lundberg, 
M. Enkin, S T. Yaxley. H. R. Wellington, R. M. J. Jarratt, 
A. Poulsen, R. E. Klein, K. J. Vannan, D. Vannan, T. F. 
Sartain, G. Finnie. 

No. 580, Acacia, London— R. Sewell, W. A. W. Last, W. 
Carsh, E. Chamberlain. 

No. 581, Harcourt, Toronto— C. R. Bui-ton, N. R. First- 
brook, D. S. Copus. 

No. 582, Sunnyside, Toronto — V. R. Aveline, D. W. Mc- 
Kerracher, R. P. Gordon, J. J. Walford, J. H. Hiscox. 

No. 583, Transportation, Toronto — J. P. Shunk, J. W. 
Stacev, J. M. Aikman, F. W. Charles, M. L. Buckingham, 
C. T. Mitchell, J. J. Williams, C. H. Armstrong. 

No. 584, Kaministiquia, Fort William — J. Shanahan. 

No. 585, Royal Edward. Kingston — W. J. Algate, G. 
Watkin, L. D. Smith, K. Mclntyre, W. J. Meers. 

No. 586, Remembrance, Toronto — W. A. King, E. Swan- 
ton, A. Bennett, H. C. Judges, C. Yates, G. H. Howey, S. F. 
Hutchinson, C. Reader, T. J. Shea, C. W. J. Hutcheson, L. G. 
Towner. F. J. Johnson, R. A. Doyle. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 41 

No. 587, Patricia, Toronto — G. Rankin, L. A. Simpson, 
H. E. Hallett, G. W. Carg-ill, A. Braidwood. M. F. Smeall, J. 
Urquhart, C. Jennings, W. Vose, W. R. Vansickle, C. L. Hall, 

A. E. Foote, W. Woodman. 

No. 588, National, Capreol— D. G. Simmons, L, W. Ellis. 

No. 589, Grev Toronto— J. H. Brereton. T. Chard, E. S. 
Hubbard, K. J. West. H. J. Taylor, H. Jowett, W. M. Mc- 
Kenzie, C. Hoyle, T. A. Simpson, L. N. Brooks, A. J. McCully. 

No. 590, Defenders, Ottawa — J. J. Balchin. 

No. 591, North Gate, Toronto— J. T. Bush, H. L. Martyn, 
R. F. Lightfoot, K. B. Page, P. G. Turner, C. J. Hunt, W. 
J. Eraser, E. N. Gregoiy, C. K. F. West, F. P. Lowry, A. W. 
Dixon, R. H. Sanderson. 

No. 592, Faixbank, Toronto — ^E. E. Wilson, F. Reynolds, 

B. J. Smith, E. A. Mason, G. M. Watson, L, Vigus, F. G. 
Cluskey, F. Elliott. 

No. 593. St. Andrew's, Hamilton — N. J. Campbell, W. 
Baillie, N. J. C. Eastwood, R. Strachan. J. Baird, J. I. Carrick, 
J. B. McConnachie, D. J. Miller, T. B. MacNaughton, J. T. 
Broadbent. 

No. 59 1. Hillcrest, Hamilton — G. Cruden, E. W. Nancek- 
ivell. D. H. Felker, G. C. Morris, S. G. Kemp, C. Irons. 

No. 595, Rideau. Ottawa— W. G. Dalzell, H. Moore. 

No. 597, Temple. London— K. R. Stott, W. J. M. Fuller, 
G. A. Eraser, W. G. Stewart. H. R. Sykes. 

No. 598. Dominion, Windsor — R. B. (?lark, W. Hatton, 
M. Hall. S. H. Knight, A. Pardv, A. L. Boyd, T. J. Viveash, 

C. E. Milburn, R. E. Lonnee. B. E. Beger. 

No. 599, Mount Dennis, Toronto — G. A. Conti, A. F. 
Nisbet Sr., G. N. E. Dver, J. K Moir. G. H. Grant, A. 

F. Nisbet. A. Conti, F. S Fordham, W. Allaby, G. R. Allaby, 
H. M. LeGard. F. Thain. T. R. Wood. W. Wood, R. 0. Drink- 
waiter, A. J. Milne, J. E. Hoyle. 

No. 600, Maple Leaf. Toronto— S. Brown, E. P. Bruce, J. 
C Piatt. R. W. Hastie, G. Proctor, J. J. Smith, R. A. Duff, 
H. S. Hillier. 

No. 601. St. Paul, Samia— B. Newman. H. Falck, R. E. 
Strain, A. E. Bowd. 

No. 602, Hugh INIurray, Hamilton — R. E. Passmore, H. G. 
Fn'rcloiirh. R. J. Woods, J. Eaglesham, H. Grove, F. Turner, 
W. P. Connor, :M. E. Baseman. 

No. 603, Campbell. Campbellville— R. Garter, F. Mc- 
Niven, H. R. :MoDonald. T H. Snyder. 

No. 604. Palace, Windsor— V. C. Wright. J. E. Shiw, L. 
W Waterman. R J. Ridlev, H. Tavlor, T. J. Henry, B. A. 
Gladstone, B. D. Swanson, A. S. Pearson. J. B. :Mi!ner, E. W. 
Waterman, R. B Thompson. J. G. Moncreiff, H. M. Smith, 
C. A. Jackson. W. K. McKeown. G. H. Thayer, F. E. Dayaf. 

No. 605, Melita, Toronto — J Hutton, J. H. Hunter. W. 

G. Jar\-is, H. L. MartA-n. A. C. Gerrard. G. A. Vallary. D. S. 
Linden, A. L. Lee, W. G. Pilkington, E. A. Howsam, E. W. 
Skirrow. S. W. MacLeod. 



42 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 606, Unity, Toronto— G. T. Hackett, H. Jack, T, J. 
Minaker, M. A. Earle, H. Sinclair, D. Stuart, J. B. Siemms, 
J, B. Stevenson, H. Browning. 

No. 607, Golden Fleece, Toronto— J. K. Reid, J. C. Han- 
son. H. L. Martyn, C. S. Edwards, J. A. F. Green, A. Green, 
R. R. H. Green, W. D. Grierson, E. J. Barter, C. F. Bearden. 
No. 608, Gothic, Lindsay— R. P. Reeds. R. F. Quibell, B. 
A. Wilson, H. H. McFadden, J. V. Sloan, G. K. Johnson. 
No. 609, Tavistock, Woodstock— S. A. Goring. 
No. 610, Ashlar, London — R. R. Preston, J. T. MacMillan, 
H. Unwin, C. W. Reeves. C. O. Foster, K. E. Yates, J. B. 
Lawrence, R. C. Fuller, H. G. McKillop, D. R. Sanderson, R. 
N. Weekes, E. J. Woodcock, R. L. Irwin. 

No. 611, Huron-Bruce, Toronto — J. H. King, G. D. Bird, 
H. L. Martyn, D. D. McAlpine. E. F. Martyn, G. M. Fleming, 
J. W. Ross, B. Brown, A. J. McLaughlin, R. W. EOison, C. 
S. Farmer H. F. Guenther, M. E, Tolmie, R, I. Fergu^son, 
G. J. Ferguson, B. A. Campbell, J. B. Wylie, L E. Grant, T. 
Harwood, R. C. Cameron, T. F. Graydon. 

No. 612, Birch Qiff, Toronto— F. J. Edwards, A. T. 
Young, R. J. Williams, W. C. Cameron, A. J. Morganson, 
A. Palmer, W. E. Graham, W. M. Wright, K. M. Comrie. 

No. 613, Fort Erie, Fort Erie— H. W. Stou-ffer, G. R. 
Brown, L. C. Russ, J. O. Sinclair. 

No. 614, Adanac, Merritton — W. R. Benning, A. Thomson, 
J. W. Stewart, A. V. Hammond. G. P. Wills. 

No. 615, Dominion, Ridgeway — P. Cooper, G. A. Lewis, 
A. W. Collard. 

No. 616, Perfection. Niagara Falls — ^F. J. Brown, P. 
Hoffman. 

No. 617, North Bay, North Bay— C. W. MeCulley, L. A. 
MacNabb, R. B. Reid, H. E. Ward, L. G. Miller, A. S. R. 
Easey. 

No. 618, Thunder Bay, Port Arthur— J. H. McMullin, A. 
V. Chapman. 

No. 619, Runnymede. Toronto — R. E. Page, L. G. Evans, 
R. A. Stewart, S. R. Baker, W. J. McDougall, R. F. Brown, 
H. E. Mole, E. C. Roelofson, J. H. Odell, W. J. Armstrong, 
H. L. Sare, E. W. Tilley, J. K. Charles, F. W. Thorn, H, S. 
Parkinson. 

No. 620, Bay of Quinte, Toronto— H. S. Wardman, E. 
Barber, C. W. Rous, W. K. Bailey, G. E, Sprung, E. J. 
Harwood, H. Babbit, F. Landon, J. W. Russell, E. F. Jackson, 
C. G. Quirt, S. R. Johnston, F. C. McKay, S. Chamberlain, C. 
J. Cushnie. W. H. Reid. 

No. 621, Frontenac, Sharbot Lake — ^D. Morrow. 
No. 622, Lome, Chapleau— A. A. Small, W. Steed, H. 
W. Strapp. C C. McKnight, G. N. McKnight, N. W. Pellow, 
J. M. Park, D. J. Broomhead, W. J. Cowlan, H. M. Smith, 
T. G. Godfrey. 

No. 623, Doric, Kirkland Lake — R. Loach. W. Allan, J. 
W. Bradley, N. E. Loney, F. H. Longmoore, H. Atkins. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 43 

No. 624, Dereham, Tillsonburg— A. T. Hanson, J. F. Way, 
R. S. Ellis, L. D. Barrett, W. L. Anscombe, W. J. M. Hart. 

No. 625, Hatherly, Sault Ste. Marie — D. N. McCormack, 
W. L. Wrig-ht, F. W. Colloton. 

No. 626, Stamford, Niagara Falls — A. Duncan, C. S. 
Momingstar, R. Deeks, C. C. Martin, J. F. Duncan, V. R. 
Hall, R. F. Cooper, J. E. W. Skinner, C. H. Hartzner, W. J. 
Goodyear. 

No. 627, Pelee, Pelee Island— M. Krestel Sr., H. K. Quick. 
No. 628, Glenrose, Elmira — W, Shipley, J, Cruickshank, 
J. Kirkham, C. E. Blow. 

No. 629. Grenville. Toronto — R. R. Weston, F. J. Garrett, 
H. L. Martvn, A. McCarthy, J. G. Dodd, S H. S. Brennan, A. 
L. Scace, J. H. Kidd, R. W. McKay, J. A. Eyre, F. A. Boulden. 
No. 630, Prince of Wales, Toronto— D. J. H. Thompson, 
H. C. Thompson, H. L. Martvn, H. M. McCaskill, C. G. Proud- 
foot, E. H. Smith. L. L. Perkin, A. Bissett, H. W. Hill. 

No. 631, Manitou, Emo— W. A. Smith, J. W. Smith. 
No. 632, Long Branch, Mimico — A. Pelley, C. A. Loutitt, 
J. Nicholl, A. A. Kennedy, A, W. Bennett. C. G. Wonfor, A. 
G. Pratt. 

No. 633, Hastimgs. Hastings— T. F. Parker, W. H. Mort- 
lock, C. B. Plant. H. Fife. 

No. 634. Delta, Toronto— R. Harrison, T. K, Allen, A. 
Ollev, H. R. MoiTis. N. H. Brown, L. Tearne, E. G P. Secord, 
E. Flath. W. C. McGregor, M White, L. Hope, H. B. Lane, 
A. Schofield. H. A. Scott. C. E. Crease. G. H. Griffith, H. B. 
Swift, C. H. Taylor, J. MacLellan, A. Lawrence, A. E. Hay- 
ward. 

No. 635, Wellington, Toronto — R. N. Butcher, D. Nicol, 
C. F. Peck, J. H. Mitchell, E. Flath, C. J. S. Nixon, L. A. 
Callingham. F. Elliott, N. J. Nixon. 

N. 636, Hornepayne, Homepayne — H. J. Walker, T. 
Nicholson, J. R. Sweet, A. C. Eraser. 

No. 637, Caledonia, Toronto — C. W. Ness, L. Chamberlain, 
G. McBain. J. D. Edgar, N. R. Strutt, J M. Watt, T. J. 
Arthur, C. E. Leek. D. Grant, W. L. Goldson, J. Watt, W. R. 
Kent. G. Simpson. A. G. Marr, H. Willis. 

No. 638. Bedford. Toronto— L H. Tavlor. A. H. L, 
Barker. R. D. Long. F. E. Malcolm. A. S. Chapman. K. T. 
Northover, H, Deamley, T. Adams, F. J. Graham, H, Sander- 
son. 

No. 639, Beach, Hamilton Beach — P. Andrews, E. R. 
Binkley. F. E. Tremaine, C. R. Midgley, E. M. Waterbury, 
A. Brown, E. R. Johnson. 

No. 640, Anthonv Saver. Toronto — D. McClov. J. D. W. 
Cumberland. R. W. Richards. A. W. Bryan. H. N. Elliott. 

No. 641, Garden. Windsor — J. A. Jame?. J. A. Johnston, 
J. G. Kirk^vood. J L. Burt, H. R. Banwell. E. J. Banwell, 
H. S. A.nderson. F. H. Longmoore, J. Briggs, F. W. Badder, 
J. E. Murphy Jr. 

No. 642, St. Andrew's, Windsor— H. W. Dawe, H. Somers, 
C, W. Flett. 



44 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 643, Cathedral, Toronto — J. P. Hipkiss, C, W. Belliss, 
W. T. Cathcart. G. A. Bick, F. Harland, A. E. Calverley, S. 
M. Lundy, A. Irvine, D. Ck)rmack, W. L. Law, H. C. Tolmie, 
J. K. McGuire. 

No. 644, Simcoe, Toronto — E. I. Nelson, E. L. Highstead, 
W. H. Collett, M. Mclver, M. J. Leatherdale, P. J. Spring, 
R. J. Flynn, E. W. Grose. M. R, S. Hoey, G. J. Montgomery, 
L. E. West, W. S. Pringle, G. W. Lennox, W. M. Prentice, 

F. P. Beardsall. 

No. 645, Lake Shore, Mimico — T. J. Lucas, G. H. Clark, 
J. P. O'Sullivan, W. A. Stewart, G. H. Hogle, M. S. Cooke, 
H. E. Newton, J. H. Wilson. G. 0. Kyle, C. H. McFaddin, 

G. W. G. Gauld, E. C. Horwood, G. E. Boydell. 

No. 646, Rowland, Mount Albert— H. J. Morton, G. E. 
Snyder, E. E. Comer, 0. L. Shuttleworth, J. A. Crone, L. 
Robertson, W. S. Blizzard, C. R. Moorhead. R. C. Moorhead. 

No. 647, Todmorden, Todmorden — J. G. Hallam, L, 
Armitage, N. W. Gurr, T. Meakins, G. Bro\\Ti, L. Bramwell, 
G. Armitage, W. E. Irwin. 

No. 648, Spruce Falls, Kapuskasing — E. R. Kennedy, C. 
R. Ross, L. Kussner. F. N. Rupert, A. Downie, A. T. Ivy. 

No. 649, Temple, Oshawa— T. J. Grosart, J. W. Cornish, 
J. A. Barron, A. S. Clark, J. Jackson, J. F. Carey, B. J. 
Stredwick. 

No. 651, Dentonia, Toronto — J. J. Gilmour, R. A. John- 
ston, S. Williams, S. Cecil, J. F. Mitchell, E. Stevens, F. H. 
Taylor, A. P. Johnston, C. V. Miller, R. Levens, T. J. Trotter. 

No, 652, Memorial, Toronto — ^F. G. Cooke, A. Wallace, 
M. K. MacLean, H. L. Martvn, S. R. Herd, W. J. Finch, J. 
L. Mould, J. W. Good, J. K. Colvin, J. Sim, W. T. Boxall. 

No. 653, Scarborough, Agincourt — ^N. L. Churcher, H. 
Atkinson, W. E. Bowes, A. S. Jovce, D. J. MacDonald, W. L. 
Strieker, L. S. Beak. 

No. 654, Ancient Landmarks, Hamilton — S. B. Lancaster, 
J. P. MayberiT, W. L. Strieker, B. D. Burt, J. D. Taylor, L. 
J. Hewitt, L. A. Staples. 

No. 655, Kingsway, Toronto — G. E. Roelofson, D. J. 
Gunn. F. W. Hewitt, E. Flath, S. G. Nicholls, A. E. Foote. 

No. 656, Kenogamisis, Geraldton — H. G. Sutherland. 

No. 657, Corinthian, Kirkland Lake— T. J. Clark, N. E. 
Loney. 

No. 658, Sudbury, Sudbury— S. S. Speigel, G. W. Cham- 
bers, A. Armitage, R. J. Home. 

No. 659, Equity, Orillia — D. J. Messenger, P. E. Bagley, 
K. McDonough. G. A. Smith, H. E. Smxith, F. M. Lamb, J. 
C. Ferguson, T. R. Chester, T. J. Purvis, C. H. Johnston, 
J. P. Todd. 

No. 660, Chukuni, Red Lake — W. L. Sanderson, L, H. 
Cooke. 

No. 661, St. Andrew's, St. Catharines— D. K. Diggins, 
F. R. Allison, J. Thomson, J. Anderson, E. R. Lewis, J. Backus. 

No. 662, Terrace Bay, Terrace Bay — A. W. R. Sinkins. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 46 

No. 663. Brant, Burlington— R, W. McPhail, G. E. Far- 
quhar, H. Greenwood, W. A. Klainka, D. K. Wright- 
No. 664, Sunnylea, Toronto— ^D. W. Lambie, H. F. Hunter, 

D. C. Murrie, G. H. Weston, G. E. Tapp, R. A. Hicks, 
G. E. Rees, W. C. Duerdoth, J. Kendall, G. B. Chapman, W. 
H. S. Robertson, A. Braidwood, A. E. Foote, L, J. Tomlinson, 

E. L. Mitchell, G. D. Wynd. 

No. 665, Temple, Ottawa— G. W. Wilson, D. S. Cummings, 
B. A. Wilson, M. Hopper, T. H. Birtch, H. O. Polk. 

No. 666. Temple Belleville— A. J. Clare, B. A. Gill. 

No. 667, Composite, Hamilton— H. W. Priest, E. A. 
Aldredge, E. W. Nancekivell, R. Buchanan, K. Warwick, D. 
H. Felker, G. C. Morris. W. T. Bacon, R. W. Faulds, F. 
Shoebridge, T. G. Regan. 

No. 668, Atikokan, Atikokan— J. T. Stamler, W. L. 
Sanderson. 

No. 669, Corinthian, Cornwall — G. McCutcheon. 

No. 670. West Hill, Agincotirt- L. J. Ellis, B. Loveridge, 
W. T. Overend, J. J. Laing, D. Bruce, A. J. Grigsby. 

No. 671, Westmount. Hamilton— S. J. Griffin, J. A. 
Spencer, J. J. Bolton, K. F. Warwick, S. H. Dolman. 

No. 672, Superior, Red Rock— H. W. Hill. 

No. 673, Kempenfeldt, Barrie— D. E. Magee, A. C. 
Worrall, J. B. French, F. Shannon, C. E. Crease. H. F. 
Morren, D. F. Tupling. 

No. 674, South Gate, Toronto— J. S. Hazard, J. I. Parke, 
S. P. Davy, L. Bininskill, J. Heywood, C. M. Lobban, J. 
H. Wilton, J. W. Grimmon, I. E. Sisler. 

No. 675. William James Dunlop, Peterborough — J. M. 
Turner, F. C. Millard, W. H. Mortlock, R. E. Dima, R. L. 
Dobbin. 

No. 676, Kroy, Thomhill— R. F. Eatock. R. Osborne, G. 
Turriff, E. Brown, W. Sills, H. L. Martyn, P. A. Parker, N. 
Henry. E. F. Bevis, H. G. Jackson. 

No. 677, Coronation, Weston — ^C. H. Moulton, R. Wilson, 
L. R. Salisbury, G. H. Thomas, F. Thain, W. Wood, R. O. 
Drinkwalter, A. J. Milne. G. E. Latam, P. A. Parker. 

No. 678, Mercer Wilson. Woodstock — E. E. Nadalin, A. 
Dickinson, W. Vale, N. E. Weakley, A. E. Thurlow, M, A. 
Stoodley. 

No. 679, Centennial, Niagara Falls — R. D. J. Momingstar, 
L. Kleer, E. Holton, L. D. Wooding, C. C. Martin. J. L. 
Grierson. 

No. 680, Woodland, Wawa— D. H. Harten, J. G. Cawley, 
D. Robart. 

No. 681, Claude ^I. Kent, Oakville— C. G. Franklin, W. 
G. Paget. R. C. Anderson, H. G. McKillop. 

No. 682. Astra, Westoti— -R. C. Frise, W. P. Ford, J. H. 
Weech. E. Flath, E. F. Bevis. R. Cruise, E. J. Carruthers, E. 
J. Culham, J. M. Boak, J. C. Wardlaw. 

No. 683, Wexford, Agincourt^. R. Alexander, W. R. 
Kean. H. G. Attwood. H. L. Martyn, W. R. Bulloch, W. L. 
Strieker, L. S. Beak. 



46 GRAND LODfijE OF CAN/VDA AN:^;UAL COMMUNICATION 

No. 684, Centennial, London — C. F. M. Ross, S. Kohn, 
W. A. Weames, J. A. Ir\nne, W, L. Smith, W, J. L. Taylor, 
J. A. Johnston, G. F. Kingsmill, E, Chamberlain, C. J. Hill, 
L. E. Fenn. 

No. 685, Joseph A. Hearn, Port Credit — S. Piper, A, G. 
Macdonald, J. G. Betts, J. A. Hearn, J. R. Fbmn. J. W. 
Stewart. 

No. 686, Atomic, Deep River — J. M. Putnam, L. Law, W. 
Fletcher, E. C. Trapp. 

No. 687, xMeridiaci, Dundas — N. E. Byrne, J. D. Twible, 
A. Baillie, G. J. Patterson, G. J. McQueen, G. W. A. Roberts. 

No. 688, Wvndham, Guelph— R. W. Maltby, H. C. Noble, 
J. D. Shaw, H. G. Ziegler, J. F. Heap, J. J. Spark. 

No. 689, Flower City, Brampton— J. W. Elley, S. G. Has- 
1am, N. D. Davidson, W. A. Campbell, C. F. Kline, V. A. 
Mountford, J. W. Grimmon, G. Cotton, G. Kearns, J. A. 
McCleave, E. G. Langley. 

No. 690, Temple, Kitchener— T. C. Boon, T. Williams, E. 
Bodman, W. J. Searson, G. H. Shannon, W. E. James, R. 
Cooper. 

No. 691, Friendship, Copper Cliff— N. E. Silverson, K. R. 
Johnston, H. R. Butler, G. H. Eckert. 

No. 692, T. H. Simpson, Stoney Creek — H. J. Weir, K. 
Page, A. Barlow, E. M. Waterbury, F. R. Lee, W. A. McNeil. 

No. 693, East Gate, Agincourt — R. A. Dunlop, H. D. 
Shield, D. B. Filsinger, C. C. Teskey, C. B. Mabley. 

No. 694, Baldoon, Wallaceburg- E. W. Allen, D. Arm- 
strong, G. C. Phair, T. L. MacNally, K. R. Colwell. 

No. 695, Parkwood, Qshawa— C. M. Elliott, A. D. Hele, 
R. Dunlop, W. J. MacDonald, J. Jackson, A. S. Clark, H. O. 
Flintoff. 

No. 696, H. L. Martyn, Toronto— L. G. Towner, D. M. 
Martyn, H. L. Martvn, H. Lane, W. T. Overend, V. Balsdon, 
H. F. Norman, R. J. Woods. 

No. 697. Grantham, St. Catharines — A. J. Harley, S. A. 
Stevens, S. D. Costen, R. MacLellan, S. W. Bunston. 

No. 698, Elliot Lake, Elliot Lake— K. C. Maynard, L. K. 
Davis, F. R. Jones. 

No. 699, Bethel, Sudbury— L. S. J. Atkinson, J. Walsh, 
D. D. Westland. 

No. 701, Ashlar, Tillsonburg— J. P. Williams, G. E. 
Cartwright, R. J. Paget, H. W. Parkhill, W. H. Gibson, C. 
Fotheringham. 

No. 702, Lodge of Fellowship, Richmond Hill — P. G. 
Savage, F. Walker, R. Scarlett, A. Cameron. 

No. 703, Lodge of the Pillars, Weston — J. Melzer. 

No. 704, Aurum, Timmins — A. K. Graham, E. W. John- 
son R. E. Findlay, J. Urquhart. 

The Grand Master appointed R.W. Bro. Geo. J. 
McQueen to act as Grand Secretary, in the absence 
of the Grand Secretary through illness. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 47 

GUESTS 

M.W. Bro. W. L. Wright presented to the Grand 
Master and introduced to Grand Lodge the following 
distinguished guests: 

GRAND CHAPTER— ROYAL ARCH MASONS 

M. Ex. Comp. C. W. Enimett, Grand First Principal. 
M. Ex. Comp. M. A. Searle, Grand Scribe E. 

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED SCOTTISH RITE 

M. Puissant, J. A. Simpson, Sovereign Grand Com- 
mander, Canada. 

m. Bro. Charles H. Cunningham, Grand Secretary 
General, Canada. 

M. Puissant, R. L. Loyd, Sovereign Grand Com- 
mander, England. 

CONNECTICUT 
M.W. Bro. Paul D. Collier, Grand Master. 

DELAWARE 

M.W. Bro. Charles E. Daniels, Grand Master. 
R.W. Bro. Chester R. Jones, Grand Secretary. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

M.W. Bro. Ralph M. Wolfe, Grand Master. 

M.W. Bro. Samuel W. Mcintosh, Past Grand Master 
and Executive Secretary, Grand Masters' Con- 
ference of North America. 

ILLINOIS 

M.W. Bro. Paul R. Stephens, Grand Master. 
M.W- Bro. Everett L. Lawrence, Past Grand Master 
and Grand Secretary. 



48 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

INDIANA 

M.W. Bro. H. S. Jackson, Grand Master. 
M.W. Bro. Oswald A. Tislow, Past Grand Master 
and Grand Treasurer. 

MAINE 

M.W. Bro. Leon j\L Sanborn, Grand Master. 

R.W. Bro. Raymond Rideout, Deputy Grand Master. 

MANITOBA 

M.W. Bro. B. Stuart Parker, Grand Master. 

MARYLAND 

M.W. Bro. Martin H. Kinsinger, Grand Master. 
M.W. Bro. Harry L. Huether, Past Grand Master. 
R.W. Bro. Gerald M. Pine, Grand Secretary. 
R.W. Bro. Claud Shaffer, Grand Secretary Emeritus. 
R.W. Bro. Frank L. Smith, Jr., Superintendent, 
Masonic Home. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

R.W. Bro. Tliomas A. Booth, Deputy Grand Master. 
M.W. Bro. Thomas S. Roy, Past Grand Master. 

MICHIGAN 

M.W. Bro. Willard Saur, Grand Master. 

M.W. Bro. Charles T. Shciman, Past Grand Master 

and Grand Secretary. 
M.W. Bro. W. Wallace Kent, Past Grand Master. 

MINNESOTA 

R.W. Bro. David E. Palmer, Grand Secretary. 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

M.W. Bro. Charles D. Dickison, Grand Master. 
R.W. Bro. Albert C. Lemmon, Grand Secretary. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 49 

NEW JERSEY 

M.W. Bro. H. W. Earl, Grand Master. 

R.W. Bro. Roland J. Behrens, Junior Grand Warden. 

NEW YORK 

M.W. Bro. Carl W. Peterson, Grand Master. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

M.W. Bro. James W. Brewer, Grand Master. 
M.W. Bro. R. L. Pugh, Past Grand Master. 

NOVA SCOTIA 

M.W. Bro. W. Everett Moseley, Grand Master. 

OHIO 

M.W. Bro. Charles H. Strayer, Grand Master. 
R.W, Bro. Colin B. Montis, Junior Grand Warden. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

R.W. Bro. Max F. Balcom, Grand Master. 

R.W. Bro. Charles H. Nitsch, Past Grand Master. 

R.W. Bro. Ralph W. Temple, Grand Marshal. 

W. Bro. Claud E. Campbell, Grand Sword Bearer. 

QUEBEC 

M.W. Bro. James M. Marshall, Past Grand Master 

and Grand Secretary. 
M.W. Bro. Lionel J. Robb, Past Grand Master. 
R.W. Bro. Dr. C. Ritchie BeU, Past Grand Chaplain. 

RHODE ISLAND 

M.W. Bro. J. Stafford Allen, Grand Master. 

R.W. Bro. Leonai'd E. Smith, Senior Grand Warden. 

SASKATCHEWAN 

M.W. Bro. J. E. Burt, Grand Master. 



50 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

M.W. Bro. A. J. M. Wannamaker, Past Grand 
Master. 

M.W. Bro. John I. Smith, Past Grand Master. 

TENNESSEE 

M.W. Bro. L. Aubrey Hag-an, Grand Master. 

VERMONT 
M.W. Bro. N. Dean Rowe, Grand Master. 

VIRGINIA 

M.W. Bro. E. C. Glover, Grand Master. 
M.W. Bro. Archer B. Gay, Past Grand Master and 
Grand Secretary. 

WEST VIRGINIA 

M.W. Bro. Delbert E. Williams, Grand Master. 
R.W. Bro. Julian B. HoUing-sworth, Grand Secretary. 

WISCONSIN 
R.W. Bro. Paul W. Grossenbach, Grand Secretary. 

The Grand Master extended a very cordial wel- 
come to our distinguished guests, after which, led 
by the Grand Director of Ceremonies, Grand Hon- 
ours were given. 

PAST GRAND MASTERS 

The Deputy Grand Master presented to the 
g-uests and to Grand Lodg-e our Past Grand Masters 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 51 



present, namely: M.W. Bros. J. A. Hearn, W. L. 
Wright, and H. L. Martyn. 



WELCOME BY TORONTO LODGES 

R.W. Bro. L. S. Beak, D.D.G.M., presented the 
other District Deputy Grand Masters of the Toronto 
Districts and the Worshipful Masters of the lodges 
in the Districts. On their behalf Wor. Bro. R. B. 
Cheeseman, the Master of Coronati Lodge, No. 520, 
extended to the Grand Master and to the members 
of Grand Lodge a most cordial welcome. The Grand 
Master made suitable reply. 

MINUTES 

The Assistant to the Grand Secretary proceeded 
to read the Minutes of the last meeting held in 
Toronto on July 20, 1960, when it was moved by the 
Deputy Grand Master seconded by M.W. Bro. H. L. 
Martyn, and resolved : That inasmuch as the Minutes 
of the last Annual Communication held in Toronto 
have been printed and distributed to all constituent 
lodges the same be now taken as read and confirmed. 



RULES OF ORDER 

The Rules of Order as prescribed by he Con- 
stitution governing the conduct of the meeting were 
read by the Assistant to the Grand Secretary. 



ORDER OF BUSINESS 

It was moved by the Deputy Grand Master, 
seconded by M.W. Bro. H. L. ]Mart>Ti, and unani- 
mously carried, that the Order of Business of this 
Annual Communication be changed at the discretion 
of the Grand Master. 



52 CJRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL OOMMTJNICATION 

GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS 

To the Officers and Members of the Most Worshipful 
the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada, in 
the Province of Ontario. 

My Brethren: 

It is with profound gratitude to the Great 
Architect of the Universe that we meet today, _ in 
peace and security, and acknowledge His guiding 
hand in the conduct of our affairs in the year just 
past. 

It is with a renewed sense of pleasure that we 
meet in the City of Toronto for the 106th Aimual 
Communication of our Grand Lodge, and enjoy the 
warm fraternal fellowship of the brethren of this 
great City, and call to mind tiie many happy Annual 
Communications which have been held here through- 
out the past years. To the Chairmen and members 
of the various committees of the area, who have 
made the necessaiy arrangements for our comfort 
and the effective carrying on of our duties, we extend 
our most grateful thanks. We recognize that it is 
a tremendous task to arrange the details involved 
in caring for the registration of 3,500 to 4,000 
delegates and all that is connected with our meeting, 
both as to hotel accommodations and the facilities 
of this place of meeting at Central Technical School. 
It is only in Toronto that we find all the things 
necessary to the efficient conduct of our business 
and social activities. Therefore, we continue in the 
debt of tlie Toronto brethren for their great help- 
fulness. 

I welcome you all to this Annual Communi- 
cation. We are particularly happy to have so many 
distinguished leaders and Grand Lodge officers from 
our sister Grand Jurisdictions, both of Canada and 
the U.S.A. and beyond tlie Seas. I trust that they, 
and their ladies, will fully enjoy the happy associ- 
ations afforded by our meetings and the social 
events provided. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 6S 

NECROLOGY 

During the past year, death has again laid a 
heavy hand upon our membership by calHng to the 
Grand Lodge above 2783 of our brethren. We pause 
to pay tribute to their memory and to him who was 
Dean of our Past Grand Masters, Most Wor. Bro. 
William James Dunlop, a great ]Mason and a friend 
of the whole fraternity. An outstanding leader in 
the field of education, his career and character are 
both an inspiration and an example to all who were 
privileged to know him. He is greatly missed in 
our Council and in his home, and to his widow, as 
to the loved ones of all our departed brethren, we 
extend our heartfelt sympathy. We record the fol- 
lowing in grateful tribute to the memory of our 
beloved Grand Master. 

WILLL^M JAMES DUNLOP, B.A., B.Paed., 
F.C.L, LL.D. 

William James Dunlop was bom in Durham, 
Ontario, on June 24, 1881, the son of the Rev'd 
James Cochrane Dunlop and Agnes (Freel) Dunlop, 
both of whom are now deceased. At the age of 
seven he enrolled as a pupil in a little rural school 
near Durham. WTien he was ten years old, the 
family moved to Stayner, where his education was 
continued in the StajTier Public and Continuation 
School and then in the Collegate Institutes at Colling- 
wood and Clinton. He attended the Model School 
in Clinton and taught for a yeai* in a rural school 
in the township of Hullett. 

Dr. Dunlop entered the University of Toronto in 
September, 1900, as an undergraduate in the Honour 
Course in Modern Languages. At the end of his 
first year, he stood first in the University in English 
of the First Year and had a high standing in French, 
German, Latin and Italian. He then left the Uni- 
versity and, after teaching for some years, completed 
the work for the B.A. degree, partly by attendance 
at a Summer Session at the University of Toronto 



54 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

and then, after transfer and a good deal of study, 
was awarded the degree of Bachelor of Arts by 
Queen's University in 1912. 

For three years he was Principal of the Public 
and Continuation School in Tavistock ; then for one 
year Principal of the King Edward Public School in 
Peterborough ; after that, for two and a half years, 
Principal of the Queen Alexandra Model School in 
the same city. 

On December 1st, 1910, Dr. Dunlop joined the 
staff of the University of Toronto Schools where he 
remained until June, 1918. 

In 1912 he became Manager of "The School", a 
teachers' magazine and, from 1913 to 1921, he was 
both editor and manager of this educational maga- 
zine which, under his direction, built up a nation- 
wide circulation among teachers and inspectors. For 
some years he was manager of the Canadian Hist- 
orical Review. The work of editing and managing 
was carried on concurrently with his duties dn the 
University of Toronto Schools and the Faculty of 
Education of the University of Toronto. In 1915 
and 1916 he was a Lieutenant Instructor in the 
Canadian Officers' Training Corps. From 1918 to 
1920 he was a lecturer in School Management and in 
Methods in History, Geography, Spelling and 
Hygiene in the Faculty of Education, University of 
Toronto. 

On July 2nd, 1920, Dr. Dunlop was appointed 
Director of University Extension and Publicity for 
the University of Toronto. This was his work for 
thirty-one years, but, in addition, he was Acting 
Manager of the University of Toronto Press duriixg 
World War II. In 1926 he graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Toronto with the degree of Bachelor of 
Pedagogy. 

In 1934 Dr. Dunlop founded the Canadian As- 
sociation for Adult Education ; was President of that 
Association for the first three years and Chairman 
of the Executive Committee for several years sub- 



TORONTO, 0>rrARIO, 1961 55 

sequently. He has contributed frequentb' to edu- 
cational journals in Canada, in Great Britain, and in 
the United States. During World War II he was 
Chairman of the Committee on Education set up by 
the Citizens' Committee for Troops in Training in 
Toronto; was in charge of the edaication of the 
Troops in Military District No. 2. He was Chairman, 
at tile same time, for Canadian Legion Educational 
Services. He was Chairman of the Board of Exam- 
iners in Optometry for Ontario for ten years. He 
was a member of the General Committee of the 
Leonard Foundation and resigned as Chairman of 
the Board of Trustees of Wycliffe College in 1959. 
In June, 1942, he was made a fellow of the Canadian 
Credit Institute (F.C.I.) and in the same month was 
awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws 
(LL.D.) by the University of Western Ontario. He 
was Chairman of the Canadian Legion Committee 
(Ontario Command) on Education and Citizenship. 
In June 1953, he was awarded the honorary degree of 
I^xjtor of Laws by the University of Ottawa ; in May, 
1956, by Queen's University; and in June, 1957, by 
Assumption University of Windsor. 

For two years, 1937 to 1939, Dr. Dunlop was 
Grand Master of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario, and he subse- 
quently was elected as Grand Treasurer in July, 1941, 
from which position he retired in September, 1959, 
although continuing to discharge duties in Masonry. 
For many years he was Superintendent of the 
Sunday School of St. Paul's Anglican Church, Bloor 
Street East, Toronto. 

In 1905 he married Mary Gillespie, daughter of 
the late Duncan Gillespie of Stayner, who passed 
away in July, 1942. 

He is survived by his widow, the former Evaleen 
Kilby, whom he married in 1943. 

Dr. Dunlop was appointed Minister of Edu- 
cation on October 2, 1951, and retired from that 
office on December 16, 1959, but continued to serve 
in the Cabinet of Ontario as a Minister without 



56 GIAXD LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Portfolio until his retirement from that position in 
November, 1960. At that time, he became Vice- 
Chairman of the University Co-ordinating Com- 
mittee, thus making available to the Government of 
Ontario his great talents and capacity from his ex- 
perience in the educational field. 

At his death he represented the Riding of Eglin- 
ton in the Ontario Legislature. 

Most Wor. Bro. Dunlop was initiated in Peter- 
borough Lx>dge, No. 155, Peterborough, on October 
the 30th, 19t)8, at the age of 27 years. He was 
Worshipful Master of University Lodge, No. 496, 
Toronto, in 1922. He was a life member of Uni- 
versity Lodge, No. 496, Toronto, Antiquity Lodge, 
No. 571, Toronto, Grey Lodge, No. 589, Toronto, 
Peterborough Lodge, No. 155, Peterborough, Prince 
of Wales Lodge, No. 630, Toronto, Acacia Lodge, 
No. 61, Hamilton, Malahide Lodge, No. 140, Aylmer, 
Nickel Lodge, No. 427, Sudbur\% Ulster Lodge, No. 
537, Toronto, Kilwinning Lodge, No. 565, Toronto, 
Remembrance Lodge. No. 586, Toronto, St. Andrew's 
Lodge, No. 16, Toronto, High Park Lodge, No. 531, 
Toronto, St. Alban's Lodge, No. 514, Toronto, William 
James Dunlop Lodge, No. 675, Peterborough, and 
Medita Lodge, No. 605, Toronto. He was Past 
First Principal of University Chapter No. 421, Royal 
Arch Masons, of Toronto, and an Honorary 33° mem- 
ber of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. 

At the funeral service, held at St. Paul's 
And' can Church, Toronto, on Monday, February 
6th. 1961, the Church was filled with his close rela- 
tions, the representatives of the Queen, the Federal 
and Provincial Governments, the Judiciary, the City 
and ^letropolitan Toronto, the Departments of the 
University of Toronto, and all branches of ^lasonry. 
Our Grand Lodge was represented by the Grand 
Master, Deputy Grand Master, all Past Grand 
Masters, members of the Board and a host of the 
brethren and friends. Interment was in Mount 
Pleasant Cemetery. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 57 

So was laid to rest one of the great men and 
Masons of our time. 

"For all the blessings life has brought 
For all its sorrowing hours have taught, 
For all we mourn, for all we keep, 
The hands we clasp, the loved that sleep ; 

The noontide sunshine of the past, 
Thes-e brief, bright moments fading fast, 
The stars that gild our darkening years, 
The twilight raj' from holier spheres; 

We thank Tliee, Father ; let Thy grace 
Our loving circle still embrace, 
Thy mercy shed its heavenly store, 
Thy peace be with us eveiTnore." 

MEMORIAL SERVICE 

The Grand Master invited the Grand Chaplain, 
R.W. Bro. Rev. R. G. Hazlewood, to the dais. Under 
the Grand Chaplain's direction the following Mem- 
orial Service was held. 

Grand Chaplain : 

I heard a voice from heaven, saying unto me. 
Write, from henceforth blessed are the dead which 
die in the Lord: Even so, saith the Spirit, for they 
rest from their labours. 

(A brief period of silence will be observed) 

Psalm 90: 1-6, 10, 12 14-17 (Read responsively). 

Grand Chaplain : 

Almighty and Eternal God, who art the Source 
of life and health, we remember with thanksgiving 
this our Brother, who having finished his course on 
earth, has passed to the Grand Lodge Above. We 
pray that his life of service and example of faithful- 
ness may inspire us who follow him to gi'eater and 
more fraitful service to Thy lionour and glory. 
Through Jesus Christ our Lord. 



58 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Almig-hty God with whom do live the spirits of 
them that depart hence in the Lord and with whom 
the souls of the faithful, after they are delivered 
from the burden of the flesh are in joy and felicity: 
We beseech Tliee to hasten Thy Kingxiom; that we 
with all those that are departed in the true faith of 
Thy Holy Name, may have our perfect consummation 
and bliss, both in body and soul, in Thy eternal and 
everlasting glory ; through Jesus Christ our Lord. 

; 

Almighty God, Father of all mercies, and giver 
of all comfort; deal graciously, we pray thee, with 
those who mourn, that, casting every care on Thee, 
they may know the consolation of Thy love. 
Through Jesus Christ our Lord. 

The Lord bless us and keep us: the Lord make 
His face to shine upon us and be gracious unto us; 
the Lord lift up His countenance upon us and give 
us peace now and for evermore. Amen. 

The brethren resumed their seats and the 
Grand blaster continued his Address. 

RECOGNITION OF ONE HUNDRED YEARS 
OF ACTIVE EXISTENCE 

As the years slip by since the formation of our 
Grand Lodge, an increasing number of lodges have 
presented their claims for 100 years of continued 
active existence and, after careful enquiry and the 
production of the substantiating documents, the fol- 
loAving 7 lodges have been granted permission to 
wear gold braid in accordance with Section 262. 

(a) Franck Lodge, No. 127, Frankford, as of 21st 
of February, 1960. 

(b) Tecumseh Lodge, No. 144, Stratford, as of 24th 
of January, 1961. 

(c) Malahide Lodge, No. 140, Aylmer, as of 27th 
of March, 1961. 

(d) Lebanon Lodge, No. 139, Oshawa, as of 20th of 
July, 1961. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 59 

(e) Mississippi Lodge, No. 147, Almonte, as of 20th 
of July, 1961. 

(f) Grand River Lodge, No. 151, Kitchener, as of 
20th of July, 1961. 

(g) Burns' Lodge, No. 153, Wyoming, as of 27th of 
December, 1961. 

APPOINTMENTS 

(a) As there was no nomination for Grand Chap- 
lain, I appointed R.W. Bro. Rev, R. Gordon 
Hazlewood, a Past Master of St. John's Lodge, 
No. 284, Brussels, as Grand Chaplain, and di- 
rected that he be installed at Grand Lodge 
last July. 

(b) Owing to the death of M.W. Bro. W. J. Dunlop, 
Chairman of Fraternal Correspondence, I ap- 
pointed M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn, as Chairman 
of this Committee, and R.W. Bro. J. J. Talman, 
as Reviewer, to complete the Reviews of the 
Proceedings of other Grand Lodges, pai'tially 
covered by M.W. Bro. Dunlop. 

(c) Owing to the resignation of R.W. Bro. Molson 
C. Cain, Chairman of the Library Committee, 
due to ill health, I appointed M.W. Bro. J. P. 
Maher as Chairman of this Committee. 

PAST RANK 

(1) Dispensation having been granted to Kilwin- 
ning Lodge, No. 64, to hold their installation on 
December 30, 1959, instead of on Christmas Day, 
Wor. Bro. Bruce Cameron served five days less 
than the prescribed twelve months. I recommend 
that he be given the rank of Past Master. 

(2) Owing to a change in the Bylaws of Pytha- 
goras Lodge, No. 137, Wor. Bro. Ken Mackey served 
three weeks short of the prescribed twelve months. 
I recommend that he be given the rank of Past 
Master. 



60 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

(3) Farran-Ault Lodge, No. 256, was granted a 
dispensation to hold the installation in their new 
Temple on 13th January, 1960. Wor. Bro. Keith 
Dafoe sei-ved seventeen days short of the prescribed 
twelve months, his successor having been installed 
on 27th December, 1960. I recommend that he be 
given past rank. 

(4) Owing to difficulties encountered by Hammond 
Lodge, No. 327, in the Treasurer's accounts, the 
Auditors were not able to submit a statement on 
Deoem.ber 27, the regular night for installation, and 
W. Bro. Robert McNaughton was not installed until 
the regular meeting in January, one month later. 
Through no fault of his he did not serve the pre- 
scribed twelve months. I recommend that he be 
given the rank of Past Master. 

(5) Owing to a change in the Bylaws of Florence 
Lcxige, No. 390, W. Bro. Leith McCabe did not serve 
the prescribed twelve months as Master. I recom- 
mend that he be given the rank of Past Master. 

(6) The new Temple of Fidelity Lodge, No. 428, 
was dedicated on December 8, 1959, which ^yas 
their regular installation night. The installation 
took place on December 15, 1959, and consequently, 
W. Bro. C. L. Midgley served one week short of the 
prescribed twelve months. I recommend that he be 
given past rank. 

(7) Dispensation having been granted to Port Ar- 
thur Lodge, No. 499, to hold its installation on 
December 19th, W. Bro. Harold Pergamit served 
eight days less than the prescribed twelve months. 
I recommend that he be given past rank. 

(8) Owing to the postponement by dispensation, of 
the installation of Canada Lodge, No. 532, from 
January 1st to January 15th, 1960, Wor. Bro. Per- 
cival W. H. Sa\\n.'er served two weeks short of the 
prescribed year. I recommend that he be given past 
rank. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 61 

(9) OM'ing to some difficulties, which arose in Bu- 
chanan Lodge, No. 550, Wor. Bro. Joseph Hobson, 
throug-h no fault otf his, was not installed until two 
months after the date set by bylaw. He has served 
faithfully and has attended all meeting's. I recom- 
mend that he be given the rank of Past Master. 

(10) Owing to a change in the Bylaws of West 
Hill Lodge, No. 670, W. Bro. Douglas Bruce served 
eleven and one-half months as Master. I recom- 
mend that he be given the rank of Past Master. 

(11) Owing to circumstances beyond his control, 
Wor. Bro. Gerald E. Johnson of St. Andi-ew's Lodge, 
No. 661, had seived as Junior Warden, Senior War- 
den, and then as Worshipful Master until July, 
1960, without missing a meeting, then, having to 
move in his employment to the U.S.A., he was short 
approximately six months of the full year temi. I 
recommend that he be given past rank. 

DONATIONS 

I have authorized donations from our General 
Fund in an amount of $2^600.00 apportioned as 
follows : — 

Bov Scouts Association 

(Ontario Division) $500.00 

Girl Guides Association 

(Ontario Division) $500.00 

Ontario Cancer Fund • $500.00 

Ontario Crippled Children Hospital . . • $500.00 

Canadian Heart Fund (Ontario) $500.00 

Canadian Masonic Research Association $100.00 

I now ask your approval of these donations. 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES APPOINTED 

I have appointed the folllowing Grand Represen- 
tatives on the recommendation of the respective 
Grand Masters, to act near their Grand Lodges: 



62 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

New South Wales — R.W. Bro. F. N. Bodding- 
ton. 

Alabama — R.W. Bro. Harry P. Suggs. 
New York — W. Bro. Joseph H. Reynolds 
Sweden — R.W. Bro. 0. V. F. Holmgren 
Ecuador — Bro. Bolivar Plaza N 

I have been pleased to recommend to the 
Grand Masters of Sister Jurisdictions, the appoint- 
ment of Grand Representatives near our Grand 
Lodge as follows: 

England — M.W. Bro. T. H. Simpson 
Scotland — M.W. Bro. J. A. Hearn 
Alberta — R.W. Bro. W. K. Bailey 
Virginia — V.W. Bro. B. Lishman 

; NEW LODGES INSTITUTED 

During the year, the following Lodge has re- 
ceived a dispensation and has been instituted: 

Aurum I^dge, U. D. Timmins, on August 5th, 
1960, by R. W. Bro. W. H. Quinn, D.D.G.M. 

LODGES CONSTITUTED AND CONSECRATED 

Since our last Annual Communication, the fol- 
lowing Lodges have received their warrants and 
have been regularly constituted and consecrated 
by the Grand Master and Past Grand Masters on 
the dates shown: 

(a) Ashlar Lodge, No. 701, Tillsonburg, on the 25th 
October, 1960, by the Grand Master. 

(b) The Lodge of Fellowship, No. 702, Richmond 
Hill, on the 23rd of September, 1960, by M.W. 
Bro. H. L. Martyn, Past Grand Master. 

(c) Tlie Lodge of the Pillars, No. 703, Weston, on 
the 29th of November, 1960, by M.W. Bro. J. 
A. Hearn, Past Grand Master. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 63 

LODGE ROOMS DEDICATED 

Last year we dedicated thirteen lodge rooms but 
this year we have only had the pleasure of taking 
part in six such occasions; but all of these have 
been in recognition of the special efforts of the local 
brethren to replace their facilities, after a disastrous 
fire, or to improve their location, and we extend our 
congi'atulations on the successful culmination of 
their united efforts. 

It should be noted that the plans and locations of 
these lodge premises have been previously present- 
ed and approved by our Grand Lodge Advisory Com- 
mittee on Lodge Buildings, under the Chairman- 
ship of V. Wor. Bro. George T. Evans, who has de- 
voted a great deal of time in serving most ef ficientlj'" 
and effectively in this capacity. His technical knowl- 
edge and pix)fessional experience as an architect, 
have added much to the final results achieved in 
attractiveness and functional usefulness for the 
comfoii; of the brethren and the proper working of 
our ritual. Our lodge premises are becoming in- 
creasingly a pride in their respective communities. 

The especial Communications of Grand Lodge 
called for these celebrations have again been well 
attended, sometimes well in excess of tlie capacity 
of the halls, which is a splendid evidence of tiie in- 
terest of the brethren. 

The following is a list of the lodge rooms dedi- 
cated: 

(a) Merrickville Lodge, No. 55, Merrickville, on 
December 9th, 1960, by the Grand Master. 

(b) Franck Lodge, No. 127, Frankford, on Decem- 
ber 16th, 1960, by the Grand Master. 

(c) Evergreen Lodge, No. 209, Lanark, on May 
11th, 1961, by the Grand Master. 

(d) Elliot Lake Lodge, No. 698, Elliot Lake, on Mav 
20th, 1961, by M.W. Bro. W. L. Wright, Past 
Grand Master. 



64 (IRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

(e) St. Alban's Lodge, No. 200, Mount Forest, on 
May 26th, 1961, by M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn, 
Past Grand Master. 

(f) The new Masonic Temple, Thornhill, on June 
16th, 1961, by M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn, Past 
Grand Master. 

LODGE CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS 

It has been an outstanding year for the num- 
ber and character of the 100 year anniversaries of 
so many of our lodges. I have been most happy and 
delighted to have been present at all thirteen of 
these special occasions in the life history of these 
lodges. 

Specially noteworthy were the centennial cele- 
brations of Civil Service Lodge, No. 148, Ottawa, 
which covered three consecutive days and included 
a service of Divine Worship and Thanksgiving on 
Sunday, May the 14th, attended by the brethren and 
their families, a banquet on Monday, and, on Tues- 
day the centennial meeting of the Lodge with the 
Memorial Service for the departed members, the 
dedication of the new regalia, jewels and equipment, 
and the re-dedication of officers and members to the 
service of Freemasonry and to their lodge, followed 
by the presentation of a Veteran's Jubilee Medal 
and a William Mercer Wilson Medal, and a final 
banquet. Altogether it was a most memorable 
occasion. 

To all these venerable lodges, I extend the best 
wishes of Grand Lodge for their continued success 
and high achievement in the next century of service. 

The following is a list of the lodges and the 
dates of their centennial celebrations: 

(a) Union Lodge, No. 118, Schomberg, on 7th Sep- 
tOTnber, 1960. 

(b) Pdchardson Lodge, No. 136, Stouffville, on 29th 
Septeanber, 1960. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 65 

(c) St. Clair Lodge, No. 135, Milton, on SOtih Sep- 
tember, 1960. 

(d) Pembroke Lodge, No. 128, Pembroke, on 1st 
October, 1960. 

(e) Wilson Lod^e, No. 113, Waterford, on 22nd 
October, 1960. 

(f) Tudor Lodge, No. 141, Mitchell, on 5th Dec- 
ember, 1960. 

(g) Franck Lodge, No. 127, Frankford, on 16th Dec- 
ember, 1960. 

(h) Hope Lodge, No. 114, Port Hope, on 14th Jan- 
uary, 1961. 

(i) Malahide Lodge, No. 140, Aybner, on 26th April, 
1961. 

(j) Civil Service Lodge, No. 148, Ottawa, on 14th, 
15th, and 16th May, 1961. 

(k) Erie Lodge, No. 149, Port Dover, on 20th May, 
1961. 

(1) Lebanon Lodge, No. 139, Oshawa, on 29th May, 
1961. 

(m) J. B. Hall Lodge, No. 145, Millbrook, on 30th 
May, 1961. 

VISITATIONS TO OTHER GRAND 
JURISDICTIONS AND MASONIC BODIES 

We have aorain been greatly favoured by very 
v.'arm and cordial invitations to attend the Annual 
Communications of our sister Grand Jurisdictions 
in Canada and those of many of the Grand Jurisdic- 
tions in the U.S.A. While it has been impossible to 
accept all these invitations with attendance by the 
Grand Master, Grand Secret^.ry, or other appointed 
representatives, nevertheless we have endeavoured 
to be present and extend our good wishes as often 
as time and circumstances would pennit. On all 
such occasions, your Grand Master and his repre- 
sentatives were accorded the greatest courtesy and 
the waiTnest and most cordial receptions, with over- 
flowing hospitality, which leaves one with the feel- 
ing of the inadequacy of simple words to express 
our deep appreciation. There exists the fullest co- 
operation and mutual understanding between all 



66 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Grand Lodges, which makes our association together 
most happy and contributes to the general well- 
being of our beloved Fraternity. 

The following is, at least, a partial list of our 
visitations, with the indication of the time and place 
and representatives of our Grand Lodge officially 
present : 

(a) Supreme Council A. & A.S. Rite on the 12th 
September, 1960, attended by the Grand Master. 

(b) Grand Lodge of Delaware, on 4th October, 1960, 
by the Grand Master. 

(c) Grand Lodge of Illinois, on 6th October, 1960, 
by the Grand Master. 

(d) Grand Lodge of West Vij'ginia, on the 11th Oct- 
ober, 1960, by the Grand Master. 

(e) Grand Lodge of District of Columbia, on the 
20th December, 1960, by the Grand Master. 

(f) Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, on the 27th of 
December, 1960, by the Grand Master. 

(g) Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, on the 27th of 
December, 1960, by M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn. 

(h) Grand Lodge of District of Columbia, 150th 

Anniversary, on the 22nd of February, 1961, by 

the Grand Master, 
(i) Grand Lodge of Minnesota, on the 22nd of 

March, 1961, by M.W. Bro. J. A. Heam. 
(j) Grand Lodge of Connecticut, on the 5th of 

April, 1961, by M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn. 
(k) Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons of Canada, 

on the 18th day of April, 1961, by the Grand 

Master and the Grand Secretary. 
(1) Grand Lodge of New Jersey, on the 19th day of 

April, 1961, by the Grand Master, 
(m) Grand Lodge of New York, on the 2nd of May, 

1961, by the Grand Master, 
(n) Grand Lodge of Rhode Island, on the 16th of 

May, 1961, by M.W. Bro. J. A. Hearn. 
(o) Grand Lodge of Indiana, on the 16th of May, 

1961, by R.W. Bro. E. G. Dixon, Grand Secretary. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 67 

(p) Grand Lodge of New Brunswick, on the 25th 

of May, 1961, by the Grand Master. 
(q) Grand Lodge of Quebec, on the 1st of June, 

1961, by the Grand IMaster. 
(r) Grand Lodge of Manitoba, on the 8th of June, 

1961, by the Grand Master. 
(s) Grand L#odge of Alberta, on the 14th of June, 

1961, attended by the Grand Master, 
(t) Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan, on 21st of June, 

1961, attended by the Grand Master. 
(u) Grand Lodge of British Columbia, on the 22nd 

of June, 1961, attended by the Grand Master. 

It will be noted that yoiir Grand i\Iaster has 
been able during his term of office, to attend person- 
ally all our sister Canadian Grand Lodges with the 
exception of the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia, which 
causes him the greatest regret because of the close 
association that has long existed with so many of 
the meimbers of this Grand Lodge. I hope I may be 
spared to repair this omission at an early date. 

At the Annual Communication in Bathurst, N.B., 
on May 25th, 1961, your Grand Master was present- 
ed with a framed certificate as an Honorary Past 
Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of New Bruns- 
wick, which, as a native son of that Province, will 
always be greatly cherished by me, and for which I 
express my grateful thanks. 

The kind invitation of M. Wor. Bro. Wallace 
Kent to attend the Grand Lodge of Michigan on IMay 
the 22nd and 23rd, in Detroit, was accepted but had 
to be cancelled, at the last moment, owing to the 
sudden death of my cousin, Bro. Hollis J. MacLeod 
Fiske, of St. Catharines, and the necessity of attend- 
ing the funeral on May 23rd. ]\Iy regrets were tele- 
phoned to their Grand Secretary when it was impos- 
sible to arrange other representation in time over 
the Victoria Day holiday. 

In addition to these visits outside our ovm 
Jurisdiction, I had the honour to be the guest of 



68 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Rt. Wor. Bro. Scott Lieby, P.G.M. of the Grand 
Lodg-e of Pennsylvania, at his 80th birthday party 
at the Penn-H arris Hotel in Harrisburg, Pa., on the 
evening of January 19th, 1961, and to have the 
privilege, in conjunction with the Grand Master of 
Pennsylvania, Rt. Wor. Bro. Max Balcom, of con- 
gratulating Bro. Lieby, one of the gi'eat Masons of 
that gi^eat State. Next day, I was the guest of their 
Grand Lodge at the Masonic Homes in Elizabeth- 
town, Pa., a farm and Masonic home and community 
of over 1,500 acres and 700 guests, with hospital, 
rest homes, lodge room, schools and all necessar\' 
appurtenances for the convenience and comfort of 
old and young alike, as as well as about 400 employ- 
ees. It was a bitter winter day, but an unforgettable 
experience of Masonic fellowship and hospitality. On 
March 23rd, 1961, at Hershey, Pa., in the Hershey 
Hotel, another testimonial gathering was held to 
honour Bro. Lieby, to which your Grand Master was 
again invited. 

On Friday, November 4th, 1960, I was the 
gaiest of Valley field Lodge, No. 75 G.R.Q., in Valley- 
field, P.Q., on the occasion of a testimonial banquet 
to their Grand Master, M. Wor. Bro. Lionel Robb. 
It was a great privilege to be present and extend 
the congratulations and best wishes of our Grand 
Lodge on such a happy event. 

VISITATIONS WITHIN OUR JURISDICTION 

It has again proved impossible to accept all the 
invitations extended to me to be present at all the 
Masonic functions within Ontario which have been 
so graciously tendered the Grand Master. In each 
ca6.e I have tried to explain the inability to accept, 
which was generally, if not always, due to conflict- 
ion of dates and the impossibility of travelling the 
necessary distances in the required time. Air travel 
has made many of my engagements possible, which 
by car or train would have been out of the question. 
TTie Districts and the D.D.G.M's. have been splendid 
in their co-operation and the receptions tendered 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 69 

me have been wonderful, and the enthusiasm and 
attendance most inspiring. I hope the brethren have 
been equally impressed on these occasions as has 
been their Grand Master. To all who, by their 
labour and attention, have contributed to the success 
of these meeting's, for the gifts received and the 
hospitality enjoyed, I am most deeply grateful. 

During my two years in office I have attended 
receptions in honour of the Grand Master in all 37 
Districts and, in this last year, have visited and been 
received by the following Lodges and Districts, in 
addition to my regular attendiiiee at my own Dal- 
housie Lodge, No. 52, in Ottawa, and the centennial 
celebrations already recorded : 

Algoma District Reception, Port Arthur, September 

9th, 1960. 
Western District Reception, Fort Frances, September 

16th, 1960. 
Western District Reception, Keewatin, September 

17th, 1960. 
Brant District Reception, Waterford, October 22nd, 

1960. 
Wellington District Reception, Guelph, October 26th, 

1960. 
Nipissing East District Reception, Haileyburv, Oct- 
ober 28th, 1960. 
St. Lawrence District Reception, Perth, November 

2nd, 1960. 
Georgian District Reception, Orillia, November 28th, 

1960. 
South Huron District Reception, Mitchell, December 

5th, 1960. 
London District Reception, London, December 6th, 

1960. 
Toronto Districts 3, 4 and 7 Reception, Scarboro, 

March 15th, 1961. 
Hamilton Districts A and B Reception, Hamilton, 

April 7th, 1961. 
Niagara Districts A and B, Niagara Falls, April 24th, 

1961. 



70 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Chatham District Reception, Glencoe, April 25th, 

1961. 
St. Thomas District Reception, Aylmer, April 26th, 

1961. 
Ottawa District iMasonic Ball, Ottawa, April 29th, 

1961. 
Temiskaming- District Reception, Timmins, May 5th, 

1961. 
Temiskaming District Reception, Kirkland Lake, May 

6th, 1961. 
Nipissing West District Reception, Sudbury, May 

13th, 1961. 
Muskoka-Parry Sound District Reception, Huntsville, 

May 17th, 1961. 
North Huron District Reception, Lucknow% May 18th, 

1961. 
Wilson District Reception, Port Dover, May 20th, 

1961. 
Peterborough District Reception, Peterborough, 

May 30th, 1961. 
Dalhousie Lodge, No. 52, Ottawa, Installing Master, 

June 6th, 1961. 

I v/ould be very remiss if I failed to record here 
my deep appreciation of the many kind offices and 
courtesies extended to me on all occasions of my 
visits throughout the Jurisdiction. On many of my 
trips, I have had the excellent company of the Grand 
Secretary and, only the fact of his devotion to the 
office duties, kept us from being more often to- 
gether. The brethren in the local areas have been 
most attentive and V. Wor. Bro. William E. Meldrum, 
Grand Director of Ceremonies, and V. Wor. Bro. 
Birkett Lishman, Past Grand Director of Ceremonies, 
have devoted much time in driving with me when car 
transportation was necessai'v. My sincere thanks to 
all these friends and brethren. 

CORNER STONE LAYING. PALMERSTON 
PUBLIC SCHOOL 

Our Grand Lodge was invited to lay the Corner 
Stone of the Palmerston Public School at 3:00 p m. 
on May 18th, 1961. The Grand Master, accompanied 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 71 

by the Grand Director of Ceremonies, V. Wor. Bro. 
W. E. Meldrum, was present, being enroute to the 
reception of North Huron District at Lucknow, There 
was a large gathering of Grand Lodge officers, with 
the Grand Secretary, R. Wor. Bro. E. G. Dixon, As- 
sistant to the Grand Secretary, R. Wor. Bro. 
G. J. McQueen, and Bro, C. Newcombe, from the 
Grand Lodge Offices. Arrangements were under the 
direction of R. Wor. Bro. (Dr.) Jas. E. Little, 
D.D.G.M. of North Huron District. The day was 
cool and blustery and the ceremony was followed by 
a heavy rain. The Civic and Provincial authorities, 
with the local School Board and Trustees, 250 
children from the school, and many parents, were 
an appreciative gathering. 

Your Grand Master was presented with a silver 
trowel, suitably inscribed, used in the ceremony, 
which he returned to the authorities to be preserved 
in their archives, along with the trowel used by our 
Past Grand Master, M. Wor. Bro. Sir John Gibson, 
on the occasion of the la>ing of the comer stone of 
the first public school building at Palmerston in 
1893. 

7TH BIENNIAL CONFERENCE OF CANADIAN 
GRAND AND DISTRICT GRAND LODGES 

Our Grand Lodge had the privilege of being 
hosts, in Toronto at the Roval York Hotel, on Feb- 
ruary 16th, 17th and 18th, 1961, to the 7th Biennial 
Conference of Grand and District Grand Lodges of 
Canada. Every Grand Lodge was fully represented, 
together with delegates from the District Grand 
Lodge of England and the District Grand Lodge of 
Scotland, which both have jurisdiction in New-found- 
land. Very earnest and profitable discussions took 
place on the various items on the agenda for our 
meetings, w^hich included the following subjects": 

Our Responsibilities as Masons in Everyday Life. 

The Masonic Relief Association of United 
States and Canada. 



72 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Penalties of the Craft Degree. 

Is Masonic Instruction Efficient Enough Today? 

Life Membership. 

What are the Privileges and Prerogatives of a 
Grand Master? 

The 8th Biennial Conference is to take place in 
Winnipeg in February, 1963. 

GRAND MASTERS' AND GRAND SECRETARIES' 
CONFERENCES IN WASHINGTON 

Our Grand Lodge was again represented at the 
Conferences of Grand Masters and Grand Secre- 
taries of North America in Washington on February 
the 19th to 23rd. 1961, with the Grand Master, M.W. 
Bro. Harry L. Martyn, and R.W. Bro. E. G. Dixon, 
Grand Secretary, as our representatives. We were 
welcomed to Washington bv the Grand Master of 
the District of Columbia, M.W. Bro. Ralph M. Wolfe, 
and thanked by M.W. Bro. J. Edwin Larson, Grand 
Master of Florida. After the executive business had 
been disposed of, we enjoved an address on 
"Masonry at Work" by M.W. Bro. W. Wallace Kent, 
Grand Master of Michigan. The Commission's report 
on InfoiTnation for Recognition was presented and 
the details of conditions in countries where Masonry 
was seeking recognition were given. Our own M.W. 
Bro. Harry Martyn is on this Commission and is its 
Chairman for the coming year. The Commission 
is performing an excellent service as a vehicle of 
information, much of it difficult to obtain accurately. 
Papers for the affirmative and negative were pre- 
sented on the following subjects: 

(1) Has a Grand Lodge now in amity with a Grand 
Lodge within a National sovereignty the right 
to recognize another Grand Lodge within the 
same country with which the Grand Lodge al- 
ready recognized is not in amity ? 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 73 

(2) Should this Conference endeavour to organize 
an International Masonic Conference? 

(3) Should Lodges of Research be encouraged in 
our Grand Lodges? 

There were no votes taken by the Grand 
Masters present on these subjects, either for or 
against, but each had his own opinion after listen- 
ing to the debate. Visitors were present from the 
European Continental Countries, The Philippines, 
South and Central America and Cuba, the latter 
being in exile on account of political conditions in 
their country. 

The banquet was well attended in the Presi- 
dential Ball Room, the principal speaker being the 
Honorable Sigard Anderson, Commissioner, Federal 
Tirade Commission U.S.A. 

Tlie Grand Secretaries' meetings were held 
concurrently with the Grand Masters' Conference 
and dealt with matters connected with the office and 
business administration of Grand Lodge affairs. 
Their banquet was a great success, less formal in 
character, but most enjoyable. The speaker was 
M.W. Bro. Chester Hodges, Past Grand Master of 
Ohio. Our own Grand Secretary, R. W. Bro. E. 
G. Dixon, is a Past President and highly esteemed 
member of this group. I recommend that our Grand 
Lodge continue its association with this Confer- 
ence, from which much information and highly de- 
sirable personal contacts are obtained. 



HONORARY MEMBERSHIP ON THE BOARD 

There is one vacancy, under the provisions of 
the Constitution, in the list of Honorary Members 
of the Board. R.W. Bro. R. C. Berkinshaw has 
sei-ved on the Committee of Audit and Finance 
since 1945. and. from 1947, has been Chainnan of 
this very important Committee. He has also been 



74 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNTTAL COMMUNICATION 

Chairman of the Special Building Committee, which 
has completed our beauutiful Remembrance Mem- 
orial Building in Hamilton. I recommend that he be 
made an Honorary Member of the Board in recog- 
nition of these services, and in anticipation of con- 
tinued services in the future. 



HONORS RECEIVED FROM OTHER GRAND 
LODGES 

I acknowledge, with deep and most sincere ap- 
preciation, the honors conferred upon your Grand 
Master and Immediate Past Grand Master, M.W. 
Bro. Harry L. Martyn, since I presented my former 
report to Grand hodge. 

(a) The Jeremy Ladd Cross Medal for distinguished 
service by M.W. Bro. Percy H. Bennett, Grand 
Master of New Hampshire- 

(b) The Christopher Champlin Medal for outstand- 
ing achievement by M.W. Bro. Irving L. Tucker, 
Grand Master of Rhode Island. 

(c) The Honorary Rank of Past Grand Master of 
the Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan. 

(d) To M.W. Bro. Harry L. Martyn, the Henry 
Price Medal by M.W. Bro. Laurence E. Eaton, 
Grand Master of Massachus-etts. 

These evidences of esteem and good will with 
which our Grand Jurisdiction is held by our sister 
Grand Jurisdictions is a thrilling experience, which 
we will humbly endeavour to merit. 

DEDICATION OF NEW GRAND LODGE 
MEMORIAL BUILDING 

On the evening of October the 31st, 1960, in 
the presence of a large company of present and 
past Grand Lodge officers, brethren and their ladies, 
our new Grand Lodge Memorial Building was form- 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 "5 

ally dedicated according to ancient custom. Tlie 
very inclement weather necessitated the band and 
most of the more than 350 guests to be sheltered 
inside the building during the ceremonies, which 
commenced v.ith the unveiling of the corner stone. 

R.W. Bro. R. C. Berkinshaw, Chairman of the 
Special Building Committee, presented the Grand 
Master with the gold key of the building. Light 
refreshments were served afterwards in the Scot- 
tish Rite Banquet Room next door. 

This wonderful new Memorial Building for the 
accommodation of our Grand Lx>dge offices and the 
seat of our Grand Lodge administration, was first 
occupied on October 21st, 1960. We occupy the 
basement and gi'ound floor, and the second floor ■will 
be used for rental office space to a suitable tenant 
in the near future. It is a beautifully appointed 
building, complete in every detail to make it a worthy 
memorial to our departed brethren who gave their 
lives in the cause of freedom in two world wars and, 
also those who, through the last 105 yeai-e, have 
contributed to the growth, vitality and stability of 
Freemasonry in this Jurisdiction. I trust that every 
brother will avail himself of the first opportunity 
of visiting this memorial, inspecting its facilities, 
and appreciating the beauty of its architecture, its 
furnishings and the m.arble plaque and altar table 
with the flags as a perpetual evidence of our vener- 
ation of the past heroic and faithful services of 
those who are with us no more. 

Last yesr I authorized the establishment of the 
Grand Lodge Remembrance Memorial Fund, pro- 
ceeds of which v.-ere to be used to assist in defraying 
the cost of the land and construction of the building 
and its furnishings. This year the Fund was con- 
tinued and the Immediate Past D.D.G.M.'s, with the 
present D.D.G.M.'s, were to see that every brother 
in our 37 Districts had an opportunity of making a 
personal contribution to this Memorial Fund. This 
would give every member the personal satisfaction 



76 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

of participating in this project, which incixientally 
provides the first permanent headquarters for the 
Craft which our Grand Lodge has ever possessed. I 
am grateful to R.W. Bro. Walter H. Gibson for as- 
suming the Chairmanship of this Special Committee 
and tile hard work he has put into its guidance. 

This Fund has not met with the success which 
I had expected. At the date of writing this report, 
the total received is slightly over $55,000.00, or 
about one-third of what I had confidently hoped for. 
Many have been most generous in their contribu- 
tions, but many have made no response to date. It 
is intended to be a gift of affectionate devotion, not 
in the nature of an assessment. Perhaps I erred 
in suggesting that $1.00 per member would ac- 
complish our objective in this regard, for it was 
never intended to impose a ceiling on the tangible 
evidence of any brother's loyal affection. 

Acknowledgement is here made to the donors 
of the flags and standards which stand at the aJtar 
table and the two beautiful paintings in the offices 
of the Grand Master and the Grand Secretary. 

Whether the Grand Lodge Remembrance Mem- 
orial Fund shall remain open beyond the present 
year is a matter for the decision of my successor in 
office. 

GRAND MASTER'S BANQUET 

On Wednesday, July 19th, 1961, (this evening 
at 7.15 p.m.) the traditional Grand Master's Banquet 
will be held in the Canadian Room of the Royal 
York Hotel. We hope to accommodate at least 
1500 on this occasion and I trust every brother who 
so desires will find a ticket available. Tliese have 
been distributed on a pro-rated basis through the 
D.D.G.M.'s, as in foiTner years. We are again most 
grateful to the Special Commmittee on Arrange- 
ments, M.W. Bros. J. P. Maher, Joseph A. Hearn, 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 77 

Harry L. Martyn and R.W. Bros. E. G. Dixon and 
W. K. Bailey for their services in arranging the 
programme, the menu, the seating and the dis- 
tribution of tickets. Our guest speaker is the Very 
Rev. Dr. Ritchie Bell, of Presbyterian College, Mont- 
real, who combines the very best qualities of an 
after-dinner speaker with a deep understanding of 
the problems which beset this generation of men 
and Masons, and their physical, mental and spirit- 
ual needs. You will be both entertained and edified. 

SAFE KEEPING OF LODGE RECORDS 

We have all our Grand Lodge records now safe- 
ly deposited in large air conditioned fire-proof vaults 
in our Memorial Building, but we are seriously con- 
scious of a lack of such suitable facilities for the 
valuable and irreplacable records of our local con- 
stituent lodges. Experience has proved to us that 
constant attention must be given by the officers of 
local lodges to assure that their records are kept in 
a safe fir-e-proof place and not left where they can 
be destroyed by fire or loss through inadvertency. 
Lodge premises burn with disconcerting regularity 
and it is suddenly discovered that all the records 
that cannot be replaced, together with their warrant, 
have gone. Duplicate warrants can be furnished, 
but not originals, and the records are gone forever. 
When it is necessary to establish 100 years of con- 
tinuous existence and active service, the lodge can- 
not establish the facts without local records and it 
has caused considerable confusion and heartache 
when dates for wearing gold braid under section 
262 have to be deferred to a later date which can 
be fully established. Let Masters, Wardens and 
Secretaries take note and govern themselves ac- 
cordingly. Money can be contributed to replace 
building and equipment but not your valuable re- 
cords, so do not leave them in unsafe lodge buildings. 

LIFE MEMBERSHIPS 

Many lodges are taking note of the increasing 
costs of operating their local affairs and are revis- 
ing their dues upwards to make income meet ex- 



78 GRAND LODf.E OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

penditures. This means that, in the older lodges 
particularly, the newer members are having to sup- 
port the life members who obtained their relief 
from further dues when costs of operations were 
much lower. These life members have vested 
rights, which cannot be interfered with or revoked 
except by mutual consent. However, lodges should 
now be looking carefully into their local situation in 
this regard to assure the present requirements for 
life membership adequately provide for a continu- 
ing income to the lodge on an actuarial basis when 
the dues from a brother cease but the cost of his 
membership continues as an expense to the lodge. 
Grand Lodge last year had to increase the fee for 
comnnutation of dues for life membership, and con- 
stituted lodges should do likewise as regards their 
own dues. Grand Lodge has not. to date, written 
into our Constitution a requirement as regards mini- 
mum life membership dues for lodges, as has been 
done by some other Masonic bodies, but it may be 
necessary in the not too distant future to give con- 
sideration to this problem. This would protect the 
financial stability of lodges who fail to foresee the 
dangers in granting life memberships to their mem- 
bers on an uneconomical basis, which will tend to 
impose an insuperable burden on dues paying mem- 
bers if the time comes when there should be a lack 
of candidates who would provide fresh fees and 
dues. 

SUSPENSIONS AND RESIGNATIONS 

Last year I called attention to the serious situa- 
tion whieh was developing in our Jurisdiction with 
regard to increased suspensions and resignations, 
which were, to some extent, preventable, and also 
the heavy increase in deaths, which is a loss beyond 
our control. 

This year, despite the earnest exhortation to 
watch the "back door" of our lodges, as well as our 
entrance portals, the record from the Grand Secre- 
tary's office is even more disturbing We have 616 
constituent lodges and 1 under dispensation, or 617 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 79 

in all. La'st year we had 948 resignations and this 
year 1029, an increase of 81. Last year there were 
869 suspensions against 981 this year, an increase of 
112. This gives a total combined increase in these 
losses of 199. Death accounted for 2783, compared 
with 2525 last year, an increase of 258. Reference to 
the Stati,stical Report of the Grand Secretary for 
1946 to 1960 shows a continuous decline in initiations 
and a constant and disturbing increase in suspen- 
sions, with the result that, for 1960, we show a net 
gain (for which we are gi'ateful) of 147. In 1946 
our net gain was 4891. Our total membership as of 
December the 31st, 1960, was 136,413. 

These figures graphically indicate that there 
is something wrong. Freemasonry has not lost 
its appeal for "men who prize honour and duty 
above the exteraal advantages of rank and fortune". 
Somewhere along the road of Masonic experience, 
many of our brethren have lost the way. One can 
account for some resignations as being occasioned 
by the brother affiliating with another lodge when 
he moves to a new location. Affiliations last year 
were 904 against 964 for the previous year, but i029 
resignations leaves at least 75 who were lost to 
active membership or were surplus losses over the 
brethren who join us from other Jurisdictions. 

It becomes abundantly clear that we have to 
stop our losses by N.P.D. and this can only be ac- 
complished by the ardent and personal attention of, 
not only the Secretary of the Lodge, but the Master 
and his officers and the brethren who apply them- 
selves to ascertain the cause of the brother's ar- 
rears and endeavour to solve his problems, whether 
they be financial or emotional. Perhaps such inti- 
mate attention to these details \vi\\ discover helpful 
features to correct conditions in the lodge, which 
will work to the betterment of all its associations and 
programs. We must follow the "land marks" and 
procedures, but we must not fall into a rut of un- 
interesting, unplanned, and ineffective routines 
which fail to retain the support and commendation 



80 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

of the brethren who should look forward to each 
lodge meeting as the night of nights to be guarded 
against encroachment. 

We cannot solicit for our membership. The 
candidate must come into Freemasonry of his own 
free will and accord. But each one of us can so live 
and act in our daily contact with our fellow men as 
to interest them in discovering some of the sources 
of our well being and enthusiasms until it is pos- 
sible to introduce them into the marvellous fellow- 
ship of those who would be "Builders" in a com- 
munity of men and nations which needs Masons in 
their speculative capacities as much as they needed 
Masons in the days of the Cathedral Builders of old. 

From now on, let us be determined to have no 
more losses for N.P.D. than those which come about 
because the brother has lost all possibility of contact 
with or by his lodge. 

DISCIPLINE 

The Master of one of our constituent lodges, in 
reviewing the lodge records, found that a serious 
deviation from the Constitution had occurred in 
connection with the balloting, initiation, passing 
and raising of one of his candidates. It having 
been brought to my attention, I appointed a Com- 
mission consisting of M.W. Bro. Harry L. Martyn, 
R.W. Bro. D. J. Gunn, and R. W. Bro. W. K. Bailey 
to make full investigation of all the circuanstances. 
Their report indicated clearly that there was no 
evil intent or desire to avoid full compliance with our 
rules and regulations, but, due to a combination of 
local circumstances, our requirements with regard 
to 'balloting had been overlooked. Under Section 58 
rV, I healed the irregularity of the action regarding 
the brother's reception into Masonry, as he was a 
perfectly innocent party in all these matters, and I 
administered a reprimand to the officers of the lodge 
directly concerned, receiving their assurance that 
no repetition of such an irregular occurrence could 
or would occur in the future. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 81 

DIVINE SERVICES OF LODGES AND DISTRICTS 

It is most gratifying to oibserve that the prac- 
tice of holding a District Divine Service is prac- 
tically universal throughout our Jurisdicton, and, in 
many of the larger Districts, more than one Service 
is held to make the attendance of the brethren more 
convenient. In addition, I am happy to note that 
individual lodges, or local gi'oups of lodges, have 
combined to hold Church Services conducted by 
their Chaplain or local ordained ministers. The 
spiritual health of our Fraternity is strengthened 
by these opportunities of corporate worship, which 
is their primary purpose, but it also is an evidence 
to the Community of the high purposes and rever- 
ent faith of the members of our Fraternity in our 
reverence for, our submission to, and our adora- 
tion of, the Supreme Being, the Great Jehovah 
and the Incarnate Word. We are most grateful to 
our brethren, the ministers of religion within our 
Fraternity, as well as those others who have led 
our worship in these services of prayer and praise. 

VISIT TO CANADA LODGE, No. 3527 

One of the highlights of this last year in office 
was occasioned by the invitation of the Worshipful 
Master and Officers of Canada Lodge, No. 3527, 
London, England, to attend the 50th Anniversary of 
the founding of their Lodge. I was pleased to accept 
this kind invitation and was present on Tuesday, 
June 27th, 1961, flying over to London. Ariiving 
the afternoon of June 26th in company with Very 
Wor. Bro. T. Ashmore Kidd, I was met at the London 
Airport by Wor, Bro. Willis Cooper, Secretary of 
Canada Lodge, and we were driven to our separate 
hotels. Due to engine trouble our plane was seven 
hours late, but our reception was most gracious. Rt. 
Wor. Bro. R. C. Berkinshaw was able to attend the 
luncheon that I missed and he most ably represented 
Canada. Later, we were entertained at a reception 
in Freemasons' Hall by tlie Grand Secretary, Rt. 
Wor. Bro. James Stubbs, which gave an excellent 



82 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

opportunity of meeting distinguished Masons from 
all over the world, and their ladies. The following 
day, Bro. Stubbs entertained Sir Ernest Cooper and 
myself at lunch at the Connaught Room adjoining 
Freemasons' Hall, which afforded an opportunity 
to talk over Masonic relations and inspect that 
wonderful building. At 4:00 p.m. the brethren of 
Canada Lodge and their guests began to arrive, and, 
after the formal business of the Lodge, your Grand 
Master, together with the brethren from Canadian 
Jurisdictions, was formally received and welcomed 
with full honours, following which the Assistant 
Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of England, 
Rt. Wor. Bro. Major General Sir Allan Adair, was 
received representing the Grand Master, Most Wor. 
Bro. Earl of Scarbrough. It was my privilege to pre- 
sent to the Worshipful Master, Ian Percival, M.P., a 
square and compasses in gold, suitably inscribed, with 
the congratulations and best wishes from our Grand 
Lodge as a lasting memento of the occasion. These 
were immediately put to use as the Great Lights 
with the V.S.L. Then Rt. Wor. Bro. Ed. H. Rivers, 
Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Alberta, 
presented three specially wrought gavels for the 
Master and Wardens of the Lodge suitably desig- 
nated and these, too, were put to immediate use 
following a most interesting and effective ceremony. 
A very inspiring commemorative address was deliver- 
ed by Very Wor. Bro. Rt. Rev. Bishop of Dunwick, 
P.G. 'Chaplain, most suitable for this semi-centennial 
celebration, in the course of which he quoted from 
an address of our own Most Wor Bro. Archbishop 
Wm. L. Wright. The banquet which followed in the 
Connaught Rooms will long be remembered by all 
who were privileged to be present. The Grand Lodge 
Officers from Canadian Jurisdictions present, in 
addition to your Grand Master, were as follows : 

R.W. Bro. Col. G. W. Morrison, P.D.D.G.M. of Nova 
Scotia. 

R.W. Bro. Dr. R. C. Berkinshaw, C.B.E., BA,, 
LL.D., P.G.S.W. Canada (Ontario). 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 83 

R.W. Bro. Dr. James J. Talman, P.G.S.W, Canada 

(Ontario). 
R.W. Bro. Robert Darby, P.D.D.G.M. Ottawa Dis- 
trict, Canada (Ontario). 
R.W. Bro. Andrew F. Tannahill, P.D.D.G.M. 

Toronto District "A", Canada (Ontario). 
R.W. Bro. H. D. Fawcett, P.D.D.G.M. District 18, 

Alberta. 
R.W. Bro. Edward H. Rivers, Grand Secretary, 

Alberta. 
V.W. Bro. Tlios. E, Jackson, Past District Secretary 

Wilson District, Canada (Ontario). 
V.W. Bro. T. Ashmore Kidd, P.G.S.D. Canada 

(Ontario). 
V.W. Bro. C. S. B. Lait, P.G. Purs., Alberta. 
V.W. Bro. S. H. B. Tonkin, P.G.S. Canada (Ontario). 
V.W. Bro. Fred Smith, P.G.S. Canada (Ontario). 

To these brethren from our Jurisdiction I wish 
to extend my sincere thanks for their presence and 
support. 

Following- the London visit, arrangements had 
been made to meet the Grand Master and Grand 
Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Ireland in Dublin, 
where Most Worshipful Bro. Raymond F. Brooke 
entertained at a luncheon party Rt. Wor. Bro. George 
S. Gamble, Deputy Grand Master, R.W. Bro. Major 
Thomas F. Laurie, Grand Treasurer, Rt. Wor. Bro. 
James 0. Harte, Grand Secretary, Wor. Bro. S. W. 
Aitken and myself. The next day, Bro. Aitken 
motored me to Belfast, where we lunched witli V.W. 
Bro. R. H. Dickson, Grand Secretary', Provincial 
Grand Lodge of Down, before flying to Glasgow 
where I was again met by another Brother Robert 
Aitken, and where, at an infoiTnal reception, I met 
the present and past presiding officers of St. Vincent 
Lodge, No. 553. 

On Monday, July 3rd, I was met by the Grand 
Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, Rt. Wor. 
Bro. Dr. Alexander F. Buchan, with two other very 
distinguished Masons, Rt. Wor. Bro. R. S. Lindsay 



84 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

and Rt. Wor. Bro. Major R. H. F. Moncreiff, and 
was taken to the famous lodge room of Cannongat© 
Kilwinning, No. 2 in Edinburgh. We had lunch at 
an old inn and, later, I was entertained at Culross 
^bbey House, the home of the Earl and Countess of 
Elgin. The next evening, after a wonderful day 
with Dr. Buchan, it was my great pleasure to attend 
the annual assembly of the Royal Order of Scotland 
and the banquet afterward^, where your Grand 
Master was honoured by being asked to deliver the 
oration on that occasion. Boarding the Empress of 
England the next day, July 5th, at Greenock, motor- 
ed there by the courtesy of my host. Most Wor. Bro. 
The Earl of Elgin, and Bro. R. Aitken, I found special 
accommodation awaiting me through the kindness 
of the brethren on board ship. It was an exceedingly 
gi-eat privilege to be asked to take the Chair at an 
infoiTnal gathering, on July 6th, of the Masons from 
all over the World who were passengers on board, 
which was the 126th such a meeting on this ship 
since it went into service. This was a further in- 
timate indication of the universality of Freemasonry. 
The one disappointment in connection with this 
wonderful experience was the inability of our Grand 
Secretary, R.W. Bro. Ewart G. Dixon, to accompany 
me on the trip because of the pressure of duties in 
connection with this Annual Communication of 
Grand Lodge. 

CONCLUSION 

As I look back over these last two years of ser- 
vice as your Grand Master, I feel humbled by the 
limitations of what I have been able to accomplish, 
but thrilled in the knowledge that you judged me 
adequate to assume the tasks of the office. Provi- 
dence has been most kind in providing health and 
strength and the means of caiTying on and being 
available for all the obligations that arose in the 
course of the years. Without the ready and effect- 
ive co-operation of all connected with Grand Lodge, 
either elected or appointed, and the constant help- 
fulness and experience of the Grand Secretary and 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 83 

the office staff there, it would be impossible to 
discharge the duties expected of a Grand Master. 
Therefore, to R.W. Bro. Ewart G. Dixon, R.W. Bro. 
George J. McQueeoi, Bro. Clifford Newcombe, 
and the office staff, I pay my sincere tribute to 
their consideration and efficiency. 

It has been a great blow to our Grand Lodge 
to have lost, during my teiTn of office, five Past 
Grand Masters, all who have been a wonderful 
strength of wisdom and experience. In the five re- 
maining Past Grand Masters, I have found an 
ever available source of understanding helpfulness 
and assured co-operation, which have made these 
years a happy memory, and, I trust, years of con- 
structive advance. Our Deputy Grand Master, R.W. 
Bro. The Hon. Mr. Justice Russell W. Ti-eleaven, 
suffered a severe illness, but we rejoice in his re- 
covery and look confidently to the future of the 
Craft under his leadership. To him, and to the 
Past Grand Masters, I extend my thanks for the 
many occasions when they represented Grand Lodge 
officially or supported the Grand jMaster when he 
was present. It has been wonderful to be associated 
with such a fine team of administrators and Masons. 

Our Grand Treasurer, M.W. Bro. Joseph A. 
Heara, has been active in the discharge of his duties, 
and the problems of finance during his t»rm of 
office have not been easy. As President of Masonic 
Holdings, in whose name our new Memorial Build- 
ing is held, Bro. Hearn has contributed of his great 
executive ability and qualities of leadership in di- 
recting the activities of his board of directors. 

To M.W. Bro. Harry L. IVIartyn, my predecessor 
in office, has fallen the great responsibility for Rit- 
ual, as Custodian of the Work, and the instruction 
of the D.D.G.M.'s in the proper discharge of their 
official duties. He has covered the whole Grand 
Jurisdiction for this pui-pose and I have had the 
most enthusiastic reports from all sections of his 
invaluable service to Freemasonry and the whole- 



86 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA- ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

hearted appreciation of his brethren. It was a 
great personal pleasure to be present, in Ottawa, 
at the concluding session of M. Wor. Bro. Martyn's 
full day of Masonic instruction to the brethren of 
the Ottawa District on November 5th, 1960. His 
inspirational directions and advice on ritual, and 
constitutional matters connected with our Craft, 
will long be remembered and practised by the large 
gathering of brethren who were privileged to have 
shared in these meetings. I would add here my 
sincere appreciation to the cheerful and efficient 
assistance of the staff of my office in Ottawa. It 
is not too simple to exercise executive function in 
different spheres of activity in offices 300 miles 
apart, but the problems have been simplified by the 
constant efficiency and support of V.W. Bro. Birkett 
Lishman, P.G.D. of C, — an association which has 
extended over 33 years. To him go my especial 
thanks. 

Our Library continues to serve the members 
under the very efficient guidance of R.W. Bro. A. E. 
MacGregor, our Librarian, whose devotion to his 
work has helped so many to obtain information and 
reading on many subjects. As editor of our Grand 
Lodge Bulletin, he renders equally valuable services 
in the dissemination of news of happenings within 
the Craft in our Grand Jurisdiction. For such loyal- 
ty to his work we are deeply indebted to him. 

It is impossible to mention all who have con- 
tributed to the pleasure of these years of office. I 
have tried to express my appreciation, as the occa- 
sion offered, for the many gifts, both personal and 
for the Memorial Fund, and for the many acts of 
personal kindness and hospitality I have enjoyed, 
both within and outside our Jurisdiction. One of 
the great thrills of being Grand Master is the oppor- 
tunity to stand before great and small gatherings 
of Masons, to look into their faces and see reflected 
there the earnest purpose and genuine affection for 
this wonderful Fraternity of Freemasonry, and to 
speak a word of greeting from Grand Lodge, and 
to remind them of the eternal verities and the sound 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 87 

foundations upon which Freemasonry rests. It is 
a most arresting thoug-ht to consider the tremen- 
dous potential of intellectual, moral, and spiritual 
forces represented at such gatherings, as well as the 
material capacities. If we are to be true to our 
vocation, we must not only strive to be happy our- 
selves, but to communicate that happiness to others. 
Our Committees on Masonic Education are promot- 
ing the former and our Committees on Benevolence 
are labouring to assist in accomplishing the latter. 

We cannot tyle the doors and close our eyes to 
what is going on in the world today. Rival ideolo- 
gies are encroaching dangerously on our way of 
life as laid down for our guidance in the Volume of 
the Sacred Law. Pressing duties and responsibili- 
ties of business, religion, and family life, as well as 
the insistent calls for relaxation, pleasure and enter- 
tainment, would seem to m.ake any summonsing to 
greater fidelity to one's fraternal obligations to the 
lodge an exhortation to the inconvenient, if not the 
impossible, in these busy strenuous lives we live. 
But we should not lose our sense of values. Masonry 
has tremendous advantages to offer to men today, 
as it has had in the past, to which we can all attest, 
but if its true mission is to be accomplished, it re- 
quires fidelity, devotion, application and courage, for 
it is not easy to withstand the forces of evil which 
oppose or misrepresent our Craft. When the liberty 
of the inaividual in society disappears. Freemasonry, 
as an organization in the community and nation, 
will likewise disappear. 

Masoniy is not a religion, nor has it any political 
affiliations. Well inforaied Masons know what they 
stand for in their individual responsibilities to God, 
to their neighbours and to themselves, and should 
go out into life and live up to those principles. 

In the face of all the statistics, and the trends 
of our times, we cannot assume an attitude of either 



88 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNTJAL COMMUNICATION 

careless optimism or selfish indifference. It is a 
day of opportunity for those who will work, ever 
conscious that: 

God is our refuge and our strength, 

In straits a present aid ; 

Therefore, although the earth remove. 

We will not be afraid. 

The Lord of Hosts is on our side 

Our safety to maintain; 

The God of Jacob doth for us 

A refuge high remain. 

Fraternally and respectfully submitted, 

C. M. PITTS, 

Grand Master. 

APPENDIX A 

I 
The following lodge rooms have been dedicated : 

(a) Merrickville Lodge, No. 55, Men-ickville, on 
December 9th, 1960, by the Grand Master. 

(b) Franck Lodge, No. 127, Frankfoixi, on Decem- 
ber 16th, 1960, by the Grand Master. 

(c) Evergi-een Lodge, No. 209, Lanark, on May 
11th, 1961, by the Grand Master. 

(d) Elliot Lake Lodge, No. 698, Elliot Lake, on May 
20th, 1961, by M.W. Bro. W. L. Wright, Past 
Grand Master. 

(e) St. AI ban's Lodge, No. 200, Mount Forest on 
:\Iay 26th, 1961, by M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn, 
Past Grand Master, 

(f) The new Masonic Temple, Thornhill, on June 
16th, 1961. by :\I.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn, Past 
Grand Master. 

BUILDING DEDICATED 

The nev>- Grand Lodge Memorial Building, Ham- 
ilton, on Monday, October 31, 1961, by the Grand 
Master. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 89 

LODGES CONSTITUTED AND CONSECRATED 

(a) Ashlar Lodge, No. 701, Tillsonburg, on the 25th 
October, 1960, by the Grand Master. 

(b) The Lodge of Fellowship, No. 702, Richmond 
Hill, on the 23rd of September, 1960, by M.W. 
Bro. H. L. jNIartvn, Past Grand Master. 

(c) The Lodge of the Pillars, No. 703. Weston, on 
the 29th of November, 1960, by M.W. Bro. J. 
A. Hearn, Past Grand Master. 

LODGES INSTITUTED 

Aurum Lodge, U.D. Timmins, on August 5th, 
1960, by R.W. Bro. W. H. Quinn, D.D.G.M. 

CORNER STONE LAID 

Palmerston Public School, Palmerston, on May 
18, 1961, by the Grand Master. 

CORNER STONE UNVEILED 

Grand Lodge Memorial Building, Hamilton, on 
October 31, 1961, by the Grand Master. 

APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEE ON THE 
GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS 

At the conclusion of the Address it was moved 
by M.W. Bro. W. L. Wright, seconded by M.W. Bro. 
H. L. Martyn. and carried: That a committee com- 
posed of all the Past Grand Masters present, con- 
sider and report to Grand Lodge on the Grand 
Master's Address. The motion was put by the 
Deputy Grand IMaster. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE 
GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS 

This report was presented by M.W. Bro. J. A. 
Hearn, in the absence, because of illness, of M.W. 
Bro. T. H. Simpson, and on motion of M.W. Bro. 



90 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Hearn, seconded by M.W. Bro. W. L. Wright, it was 
received and adopted. 

To the Officers and Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. 
of Canada, in the Province of Ontario, 

Brethren: 

The Address of the Grand Master at each Grand Lodge 
Communication is the highlight of the meeting, since it is a 
recording of the various events which have occurred in our 
Grand Lodge during the past year. With a large Grand 
Lodge such as ours, having a membership of more than 
136,000, it must necessarily involve a lengthy report. In his 
Address the Grand Master outlines certain of his decisions 
and rulings and other recommendations and none of these 
can have effect until formally approved by Grand Lodge. 
This Committee composed of Past Grand Masters is appointed 
for the purpose of considering his Address and the matters 
dealt with therein. 

Your Committee feels sure that every heart and voice of 
the members of Grand Lodge will respond to the fine tribute 
paid by the Grand Master to the late Most Worshipful 
Brother William J. Dunlop. He made a great contribution to 
our Grand Lodge and his death was a severe loss. 

The Grand Master has recorded the numerous visitations 
made by him during the past year: 

(1) To Lodges and Districts in our jurisdiction. 

(2) To other jurisdictions and Masonic Bodies partic- 
ularly those to our sister Canadian Grand Lodges. 

(3) Those outside of the jurisdiction. 

The Grand Master has covered a wide area in such 
visitations and your Committee commends him upon his 
splendid efforts which must involve a great influence in 
cementing goodwill among the various parts of the jurisdic- 
tion of our Grand Lodge as well as the Canadian Grand 
Lodges and other Grand Lodges outside our jurisdiction. 

The Grand Master records a number of appointments 
made by him, including that of Grand Chaplain, Chairman 
of the Committee on Fraternal Correspondence, and Chairman 
of the Library Committee, and recommends the awarding of 
Past Rank to eleven Past Masters who for some good reason 
have not served their full term. In addition, he recommends 
a number of appointments of Grand Representatives of our 
Grand Lodge. Your Committee approves of all of these. 
The Grand Master refers to seven more Lodges that have 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 91 

been in existence for over one hundred years and are now 
entitled to wear gold braid. Your Committee congratulates 
these seven Lodges and approves of the Grand Master's 
recommendation. 

The Grand Master recommends certain charitable grants 
all of which your Committee approves. He refers to a dis- 
pensation having been granted to one new Lodge and that 
four other new Lodges have been constituted and consecrated. 
Your Committee heartily approves of this evidence of pro- 
gress in the Order and we wish these Lodges success in the 
years to come. 

It is gratifying to hear that six new lodge rooms have 
been dedicated and we wish to congratulate these various 
Lodges on the fact that they have now new quarters. We 
wish them every success and hope their new quarters may 
be an added incentive to their work. At the same time, the 
Grand Master refers to the excellent work of Very Worshipful 
Brother George T. Evans in assisting with the plans and 
specifications of the various lodge rooms being altered or 
built and your Committee joins with the Grand Master in 
commending Very Worshipful Brother Evans for the excellent 
work he has done and is doing. 

The Committee heartily commends the holding of the 
Biennial Conferences of Canadian Grand Lodges and District 
Grand Lodges as referred to in the Address of the Grand 
Master. This is an effort which creates well informed 
members of the Craft and promotes national unity. We also 
heartily endorse the attendance of our representatives, in- 
cluding the Grand Master and Grand Secretary, at the Grand 
Masters' and Grand Secretaries' Conferences in Washington. 
This is something which tends to promote international good- 
will and W3 heartily endorse it and agree that our Grand 
Lodge should continue its association with these Conferences. 

Your Committee heartily approves of the recommend- 
ation that Right Worshipful Brother R. C. Berkinshaw be 
made an Honorary Member of the Board of General Purposes. 
Right Worshipful Brother Berkinshaw has done excellent 
work in connection with the finance? of our Grand Lodge 
and we are sure that he will appreciate this slight evidence 
of our appreciation of his efforts. 

The Grand Master has again this year spoken of the 
large number of resignations and suspensions that have 
taken place. This is a disturbing matter and, while we must 
bear in mind that our Grand Lodge is a large one and there 
is constant change taking place from time to time, we feel 
this is a matter which concerns every member and forms a 
challenge to the officers of each Lodge to investigate any 
proposed suspensions or resignations and interview the mem- 
bers involved, with a view of trying to ascertain what is the 
cause and endeavour to rectify it or find some solution. 



92 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Your Committee concurs in the reference of the Grand 
Master to the beautiful new Grand Lodge Memorial Building. 
It is a structure of great beauty which reflects credit on 
our Oi'der and every member may feel proud of it. Any who 
have not visited it should do so. 

We agree with the remarks of the Grand Master with 
respect to the establishment of the Grand Lodge Remem- 
brance Memorial Fund. We are aware that this is a project 
which is close to his heart and we regret his disappointment 
at the results to date. We recommend to the Grand Master- 
elect that steps be taken to continue the Committee so that 
everyone who has not yet contributed may have an oppor- 
tunity to do so. 

The Committee concurs in the reference to the safe 
keeping of lodge records and agrees ^\'ith the Grand Master's 
warning that Masters, Wardens and Secretaries of the Lodges 
should take note. 

We also heartily concur in and endorse his reference 
to life memberships. 

We rejoice in the fact that our Grand Master accepted 
the kind invitation of Canada Lodge, No. 3527, London, 
England, to attend the fiftieth anniversaiy of that lodge 
and we greatly appreciate the many kind courtesies extended 
to our Grand Master. It is good to renew friendships in the 
Old Land whom we all admire. 

Your Committee recommends, without reservation, that 
Grand Lodge confirm all that the Grand Master has reported 
in his Address. At the same time, we wish to congratulate 
him most sincerely and most heartily on the manner in which 
he has conducted the affairs of our Grand Lodge during the 
past two years and on the unsparing and devoted manner in 
which he has carried out his duties as Grand Master. With 
his words of gratitude and commendation to the Grand 
Secretary' and his staff, we heartily concur. Our Grand 
Lodge is fortunate in its choice in this regard. 

With sincere affection and high regard for our Grand 
Master this report is respectfully and fraternally submitted 
to Grand Lodge. 

T. H. SIMPSON, 

Chairman. 

LETTERS OF REGRET 

The Assistant to the Grand Secretary advised 
that several letters and communications had been 
received from Grand Masters, distinguished brethren 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 93 

and Grand Lodges extending most cordial fraternal 
greetings and best wishes and expressing regret 
that they were unable to be present or represented. 

RECEPTION OF GRAND REPRESENTATIVES 

As the Assistant to the Grand Secretary called 
the roll of Grand Representatives of other Grand 
Lodges those who were present stood up and were 
welcomed by the Grand Master. Grand Honours 
were then given under the direction of the Grand 
Director of Ceremonies. 

AUDITOR'S REPORT 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers 
and Members of Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I beg to report having completed the continuous 
monthly audit of accounts of the Grand Treasurer 
and of the Grand Secretary for the year ended 31st 
May, 1961, and I have verified the statements sub- 
mitted by the Grand Treasurer showing the receipts 
and disbursements of the General and the combined 
Memorial and Semi-Centennial Funds for the rear 
ended 31st May, 1961. 

The investment securities of the General. Mem- 
orial and Semi-Centennial Funds, as set out in the 
respective schedules accompanying the Grand Treas- 
urer's report, were produced by the Canada Pei*m- 
anent Trust Company for my inspection. I found 
them in order. 

I wish to extend my appreciation to the Grand 
Treasurer's Clerk and to the staff at the office of 
the Grand Secretary for their co-operation during 
the audit procedure. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

H. FRANK VIGEON, C.A., 

Auditor. 



94 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

GRAND TREASURER'S REPORT 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers 
and Members of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. 
of Canada, in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I submit for your consideration the Grand Treas- 
urer's report for the fiscal year, ended May 31st, 
1961, which shows in detail receipts and disburse- 
ments together with schedules of investments for 
General and Memorial Accounts. 

RECEIPTS: 

An analysis of receipts in the General Account 
indicate an increase over the previous year; income 
from dues and fees show an increase in excess of 
$13,000. The change in dues structure, established 
last year, is now being reflected, even though, only 
in effect a half year. Income from investments is 
up $7,000, indicating a higher yield. 

In the memorial account, the following donations 
are acknowledged with grateful appreciation: 

Estate John Coulson $ 2,084.76 

Estate Chas. E. Sealev 5,000.00 

Clifford Lodge No. 315 25.00 



Total $ 7,109.76 

DISBURSEMENTS : 

By comparison with the budget approved a 
year ago, it v/ill be noted that we have remained well 
within the estimates. One non-recurring item is 
that of furniture and equipment for the new offices 
at Hamilton, amounting to $19,174.10 after allowing 
for trade in of the old furniture. Reserve for this 
expenditure had been set aside annually for this 
item for the past three years. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 95 

Benevolent grants from the General Fund 
amounted to $59,182.34 and from the Memorial 
Account $6,175.00, a total of $65,357.34. 

Having occupied our new offices at 363 King 
Street West, Hamilton, since October, a new basis 
of rent for Grand Lodge had to be established. 

The basis of rent payable by Grand Lodge to 
Masonic Holdings for the space they occupy has been 
arrived at by simple mathematics. Grand Lodge 
must simply taike up the differential between the 
costs of maintaining the new building, taxes, main- 
tenance, insurance, debenture interest, depreciation, 
and some provision for debenture retirement, less 
rentals received from tenant occupying the upper 
floor. On this basis it would appear, that the rent 
would be $3,000.00 per month. Included in this 
vear's expenditures is rent based on this formula 
from November 1st, 1960 to May 31st, 1961. 

You will be asked to approve the following 
charitable donations: 



Canadian Masonic Research ....$ 100 00 

Boy Scouts, Ontario Division .... 500.00 

Girl Guides, Ontaiio Division . . 500.00 

Cancer Fund, Ontario 500.00 

Heart Fund of Canada 500.00 

Ontario Crippled Children 500.00 

$2,600.00 

Last year, you will recall, upon recommendation 
of the Committee of Audit and Finance that Benev- 
olent grants be paid out of the General Fund up to 
the amount of the appropriation for such purpose. 
It would appear that the proportion of dues allocated 
for benevolence actuallv increased to $96,420.63 at 



96 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

May 31st, 1961, an increase for the year of 
$24,206.03. I recommend that a study be made 
during the coming year to anticipate future require- 
ments and a more realistic division of dues between 
actual benevolent rsquirem.ents and general expenses. 
This would have the effect of making additional 
funds available for reduction of bank loans with sub- 
sequent reduction in bank interest. 



In order to facilitate financing of our new 
offices Grand Lodge has purchased from Masonic 
Holdings additional debentures of $172,000 bearing 
5% interest or a total to date of $392,000.00 in the 
General Account. 



It will be apparent that the Memorial Account 
will accrue a cash surplus each year, now that benev- 
olent disbursements are made chiefly from the Gen- 
eral Account. I recommend that such surpluses 
from interest or maturities be invested in Masonic 
Holdings debentures or by a transfer of securities 
already held by the General Fund. This will again 
make funds available to reduce bank advances. The 
authority for such action is probably already vested 
in your Grand Master, the Chairman of Audit and 
Finance and the Grand Treasurer, but I thought it 
well to have it on record and your approval. 



I want to record here my grateful thanks to the 
Grand Secretary and the members of his staff, the 
Auditor and the Grand Treasurer's Clerk for their 
co-operation during the past year. The many complex 
problems of financing during our building program 
have been made much easier by their fullest co-oper- 
ation. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted, 

J. A. HEARN, 

Grand Treasurer. 



TORO^P^O, ONTARIO, 1961 97 

GRAND LODGE A.F. & A.M. OF CANADA 
IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

GENERAL FUND 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
For the Year Ended 31st May, 1961 

RECEIPTS: 

Cash on hand and in Bank, 1st June, 1960 $ 1,645.95 

Refunds $ 635.50 

Dues, fees, etc 175,922.21 

Interest on Investments 36,669.90 

Investments matured 1,000.00 

Loans from Canadian Bank of Commerce 205,000.00 419,227.61 



420,873.56 
DISBURSEMENTS: 

Grand" Secretary $ 11,025.20 

Clerical, G.S. Office 14,589.20 

Supervisor of Benevolence 7,025.20 
Grand Treasurer's Clerk 
$800.00, postage $15.00 815.00 

$ 33,454.60 

Office: 

Rent $ 21,751.87 

Lig-ht and caretaking .... 302.42 

Printing, stationery and 

supplies 6,196.83 

Postage 1,851.63 

Express, telephone and 

telegraph 1,012.74 

Furniture and 

equipment ....$ 19,619.60 
Less allowance 
on old furniture 445.50 19,174.10 

50,289.59 

Interest on Candian Bank of Com- 
merce loan 6,479.06 

Canada Permanent Trust Co., Fees 

and disbursements 685.20 

Premiums Fidelity Bond and insurance 75.00 

Auditor 1,200.00 

Special printing for re-sale to Lodges 5,300.68 

Engrossing warrants 30.00 

G.M. Allowance $1,500.00, stenographer 

$300 1,800.00 



98 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

D.G.M. Allowance $670.00, postage 

$30.00 700.00 

Grand Secretary's travelling expenses 222.50 

Supervisor of Benevolence, expenses .... 235.15 
Representatives to other Grand Lodges, 

expenses 1,303.11 

Expenses Grand East, Conference, etc. 253.72 

Reviewer of Fraternal Correspondence 940.00 

Benevolent Committee, expenses 349.20 

Dedication expenses 1,326.99 

Conference fees, Washington 1,629.03 

Masonic Relief, U.S.A. and Canada .... 468.66 
Librarian Honorarium $750.00, expenses 

$358.70 1,108.70 

Masonic Education 88.80 

Floral tributes 103.65 

Honorarv Presentation Jewels 2,657.09 

Retiring'allowance W. J. Attig 2,400.00 

Regalia repairs 56.80 

G.L. Bulletin costs 5,439.95 

Canadian Conference, Trust Fund 5,500.00 

Moving expenses to new building 233.00 

Canadian BanK of Commerce, notes paid 68,000.00 

Donations: 

Canadian Masonic Research 100.00 

Bov Scouts (Ont. Division) 500.00 

Girl Guides (Ont. Division) 500.00 

Cancer Fund (Ontario) .... 500.00 

Heart Fund of Canada 500.00 

Ontario Crippled Children 500.00 



$ 2,600.00 



G.L. Meeting 1-960: 

Preliminary Reports $ 982.18 

Fraternal Reviews 853.92 

Proceedings 4.314.51 

Expense 14,887.75 



21 038 36 
G.L. Meeting 1961, expenses 1,218.15 22,256.51 

217,186.99 
Benevolent grants 59,182.34 

276,369.33 
Funds invested: 

Masonic Holdings Debentures 172,000.00 448,369.3-3 

27,495.77 
Overdraft in Canadian Bank of Com 
Less cash on hand 400.00 $27,495.7? 

merce $ 27,895.77 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 99 

GENERAL FUND 
INVESTMENT ACCOUNT — AT PAR VALUES 

Schedule, 1st June 1960 $ 900,500.00 

Matured or sold during year: 

Toronto Harbour Commission, 2y2%, 1960 .... 1,000.00 



899,500.00 
Purchased: 

Masonic Holdings Series "A" De- 
bentures, 5%, 1st June 1968 ....$ 130,000.00 

Masonic Holdings Series "B" De- 
bentures, 5%, 1st June 1968 42,000.00 172,000.00 



$ 1,071,500.00 

NOTE: On 31st May, 1961, General Fund Investments 
amounting to th;e par value of $458,500.00 were held 
by The Canada Permanent Trust Company for the 
account of Canadian Bank of Commerce, Hamilton, 
Ontario, as security for estimated loan requirement 
to finance new office building. The liability to 
Canadian Bank of Commerce represented by unpaid 
Demand Notes on 31st May, 1961 amounted to 
$187,000.00. 

GRAND LODGE A.F. & A.M. OF CANADA 
IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

COMBINED MEMORIAL AND SEMI-CEN'TENNIAL 
FUNDS 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
For the Year Ended 31st May, 1961 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance in Bank, 1st June, 1960 $ 17,014.13 

Add: Cheques cancelled issued previous years .... 60.00 



17,074.13 
Donations: 

Estate of John Coulson $ 2,084.76 

Estate of Chas. E. Sealey 5,000.00 

Clifford Lodge, No. 315 25.00 7,109.76 

Interest from investments — Capital 

Funds $ 20,940.95 

Interest from investments — Income 
Funds 382.50 21,323.45 

Investments matured: 
Toronto Harbour Commission, 214%, 

1 September, 1960 $ 1,000.00 



100 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



Canada Permanent Trust Co., 3V2 9c, 

15 September, 1960 25,000.00 

Saskatoon 57c, 1 May 1961 5,000.00 

District of North Vancouver in- 
stalment 94.41 31,094.41 



76,601.75 



DISBURSEMENTS: 

Canada Permanent Trust Co., 

Fees and disbursements ....$ 360.83 
Benevolent grants 6,175.00 6,535.83 

Funds invested — Capital Account: 
$29,000.00 Government of 

Canada AV2%, 1983 $ 27,550.00 

Funds invested — Income Account: 
$17,000.00 Government of 

Canada 4V2%, 1983 16,150.00 



43,700.0€ 
Accrued interest 79.40 43,779.40 50,315.23 



26,286.52 
Balance in Bank, 31st May, 1961: 

Memorial Fund — Capital Funds $ 14,912.32 

Memorial Fund — Income Funds 11,274.20 

Semi-Centennial Fund 100.00 $26,286.52 



GRAND LODGE A.F. & A.M. OF CANADA 
IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

COMBINED MEMORIAL AND SEMI-CENTENNIAL 
FUNDS 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
For the Year Ended 31st May, 1961 

Schedule, 1st June, 1960 „ $519,693.28 

Matured during year: 

Canada Permanent Mortgage Corp. 

3y2%, 1960 $ 25,000.00 

Toronto Harbour Commission, 

21^2%, 1960 „ 1,000.00 

City of Saskatoon, 5%, 1961 5,000.00 

District of North Vancouver, 
instalment _. 94.41 31,094.41 

488,598.87 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 101 

Purchased: 

Government of Canada, 4}/^%, 1983 

Capital Funds $ 29,000.00 

Income Funds 17,000.00 46,000.00 

Schedule, 31st May, 1961 $534,598.87 



GRAND LODGE A.F. & A.M. OF CANADA 
IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

SUMMARY OF RESOURCES 

As at 31st May, 1961 Compared with Previous Year 

Investment at Par Values: 1961 1960 

•General Fund $ 1,071,500.00 $ 900,500.00 

Memorial Fund 519,051.24 504,051.24 

Semi-Centennial Fund 15,547.63 15,642.04 

1,606,098.87 1,420,193.28 
Less: General Fund Bank Loan 187,000.00 50,000.00 

$ 1,419,098.87 $ 1,370,193.28 



Cash on hand and in Bank: 

•General Fund, Bank Balance ....$ 27,895.77 $ 1,245.95 

Memorial Fund, Bank Balance „ 26,186.52 16,914.13 
Semi-Centennial Fund, 

Bank Balance „ 100.00 100.00 

General Fund, Cash on Hand „..„ 400.00 400.00 



$ 1,209.25 $ 18,660.08 



Total all resources $ 1,417,889.62 $ 1,388,853.36 



•NOTE: The resources shown in General Fund Investment 
.Account of $1,071,500.00 less the overdraft in General Fund 
Bank Balance of $27,895.77, net $1,043,604.23, includes a sum 
of $96,420.63 which is available for benevolent purposes only 
in accordance with Section 245 (M) of the Constitution. 



102 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANl^UAL COMMUNICATION 

GRAND LODGE A.F. & A.M. OF CANADA 

IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

GENERAL FUND 

Schedule of Investments, 31st May, 1961 

% Due Par Value 

•Government of Canada 3% 1978 ? 89,000.00 

•Province of Ontario 2% 1969 15,000.00 

•Province of Ontario 3 1965 16,000.00 

•Province of Ontario 4 1972 5,000.00 

•Province of Ontario 4 1968 30,500.00 

•Province of Ontario 4^4. 1974 44,000.00 

•Province of Ontario A^'2 1976 45.000.00 

•The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 3 1965 20,000.00 

•The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 4 1967 10,000.00 

•The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 4 1968 41,000.00 

•The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 4^4 1967 5,000.00 

• The Hydro-Electric Pow Com. Ont. 4^4 1967 8,000.00 

• The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 4 1976 20,000.00 
.The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. iV2 1974 60,000.00 
.The Hvdro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 5 1977 20,000.00 
.The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 31/2 1979 30,000.00 

Metropolitan Toronto ^V2 1970 88,000.00 

Metropolitan Toronto SVa 1971 12.000.00 

Metropolitan Toronto 3% 1973 2,000.00 

Metropolitan Toronto S% 1974 3,000.00 

Metropolitan Toronto 3% 1975 10,000.00 

Metropolitan Toronto iVz 1976 13,000.00 

Metropolitan Toronto 5 1977 1,000.00 

The Governors of the Univ. Toronto 3 1970 25,000.00 

The Toronto Harbour Commission 2^'- 1960/62 2,000.00 

City of Hamilton 3% 1971 12.000.00 

City of Hamilton 3% 1972 13,000.00 

Citv of Hamilton 3% 1973 13.000.00 

City of Hamilton 3% 1974 12,000.0N 

City of Windsor, Debenture 3^2 1973 11,000.00 

Township of Sandwich East 2 1985 4,000.00 

Masonic Holdings Series "A" 

and "B" Debentures 5 1968 392,000.00 

Total par value $ 1,071,500.00 



NOTE: The Securities marked with an asterisk in above 
list are held by The Canada Permanent Trust 
Company for the account of Canadian Bank of 
Commerce, Hamilton, Ontao-io, as security for 
Bank Loans. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 103 

GRAND LODGE A.F. & A.M. OF CANADA 

IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

COMBINED MEMORIAL AND SEMI-CENTENNIAL 

FUNDS 

Schedule of Investments, 31st May, 1961 
PART ONE — MEMORIAL FUND 

% Due Par Value 

Government of Canada 3% 1978 $ 26,000.00 

Government of Canada 4V2 1983 46,000.00 

Province of Ontario 2% 1969 3,000.00 

Pro\nnce of Ontario 3 1965 18,000.00 

Province of Ontario 3 1965 25,000.00 

Province of Ontario 4 1961 15,000.00 

Province of Ontario 4 1972 22.000.00 

Pro\'ince of Ontario 4 1968 21,500.00 

Province of Ontario 4^ 1974 20.000.00 

Province of Ontario AV2 1976 5,000.00 

The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 2% 1971 5.000.00 

The Hvdro-Electric Pow Com. Ont. 3 1965 1,000.00 

The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 3 1969 10,000.00 

The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 4 1967 21,000.00 

The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 4 1968 28,000.00 

The Hvdro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 4% 1967 59,000.00 

The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 4% 1967 23,500.00 

The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 31/2 1979 30.000.00 

The Hvdro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont, 5 1977 49,000.00 

The Hydro-Electric Pow. Com. Ont. 6 1980 4,000.00 

Metropolitan Toronto 3y2 1971 20.000.00 

Metropolitan Toronto 5 1977 7,000.00 

The Toronto Harhour Commission 2V2 1961/62 2,000.00 

Citv of Hamilton 3% 1970 6,000.00 

City of Hamilton 3% 1974 3,000.00 

City of Windsor 3V^ 1963 20,051.24 

City of Windsor 3y2 1965 5,000.00 

Victoria and Grey Trust Co., 

Guaranteed Investment Certificate 5% 1964 24,000.00 

Total Par Value „ $519,051.24 



GRAND LODGE A.F. & A.M. OF CANADA 

IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

COMBINED MEMORIAL AND SEMI-CENTENNIAL 

FUNDS 

Schedule of Investments. 31st May, 1961 
PART TWO — SEMI-CENTENNIAL FUND 

% Due Par Value 

District of North Vancouver - 2^ 1970 $1,068.96 

Citv of Hamilton 5 1963 3,000.00 

Citv of Windsor Debenture 31^2 1973 6,478.67 

City of Windsor Debenture 3^/2 1963 1,000.00 

City of Windsor Debenture _ 3^2 1974 4,000.00 

$ 15,547.63 



104 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

On motion of the Deputy Grand Master, second- 
ed by the Grand Treasurer, the Report and the 
Auditor's Report were received and referred to the 
Committee on Audit and Finance. 

GRAND SECRETARY S REPORT 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro, George 
J. McQueen, Assistant to the Grand Secretary, in 
the absence of the Grand Secretary who was ill. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers 
and Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. 
of Canada, in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : 

I present herewith my annual report for 
the year ended May 31, 1961, containing a Sum- 
mary of Receipts from various sources placed in the 
General Fund; Details of Receipts in the General 
Fund and Ledger Balances as at May 31, 1961; a 
Summary of Receipts for the year; Details of the 
Returns of Lodges as at May 31, 1961, a Summary 
of the Receipts and Payments to the Grand Treas- 
urer on account of the Memorial and Semi-Centennial 
Funds; and a Statement of the Receipts and Dis- 
bursements on the Memorial and Semi-Centennial 
Funds Revenue Account. 

As an appendix to the Proceedings I have re- 
corded the details of the Returns of the 616 warrant- 
ed Lodges and the one Lodge under dispensation, as 
of December 31, 1960. 

For the nineteenth year in succession I am 
able to report a net gain in membership of 147, but 
this is a substantial drop in the gain of 802 reported 
last year. Our total membership, as of December 
31, 1960, again reached an all-time high of 136,413. 

Deaths this year exceed last year by 258; resig- 
nations increased by 81 and suspensions by 112. Can 
we not do something about resignations and sus- 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 105 

pensions by a personal interview with these mem- 
bers who perhaps do not appreciate the great privi- 
leges which membership brings and which may be 
SO lightly lost for so little? Wliy not a personal 
call on these members, not expressly for the purpose 
of collecting dues but to ascertain what is wrong 
and to endeavour to rekindle their interest in the 
Lodge ? 

Against these losses we record 3,842 initiations, 
down 120 ; 904 affiliations, down 60 ; and 207 restora- 
tions, down 2. 

Tliis year we constituted and consecrated three 
new Lodges and have one operating under dispensa- 
tion, giving a total of 617 Lodges, another all-time 
high. 

Recapitulation — December 31st, 1960 

Membership, December 31st, 1959 136,266 

Initiated 3,842 

Passed 3,718 

Raised 3.742 

Affiliated 904 

Reinstated 207 

141,219 

Deaths 2,783 

Resignations 1,029 

Suspensions 981 

Adjustments 13 4,806 



Membership, December 31st, 1960 136.413 

Number of active warranted Lodges 616 

Lodges under dispensation, June 30th, 1961 1 

Total number of Lodges, June 30th, 1961 . . 617 



106 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA AJWUAL COMMUNICATION 



As of 


Initi- 


Affili- 


Suspen- 


Member- 




Dec. 31&t 


ations 


ations 


sions 


ship 


Gain 


1945 


4862 


755 


393 


99509 


3238 


1946 


6244 


892 


393 


104400 


4891 


1947 


6139 


1115 


385 


109008 


4608 


1948 


5620 


1021 


529 


112781 


3773 


1949 


5776 


1060 


451 


116786 


4005 


1950 


5464 


1083 


597 


120136 


3350 


1951 


5199 


1005 


631 


123058 


2922 


1952 


5130 


1055 


662 


125596 


2538 


1953 


5205 


1076 


770 


128352 


2756 


1954 


4629 


879 


794 


130177 


1825 


1955 


4551 


1096 


780 


131992 


1815 


1956 


4542 


926 


809 


133398 


1406 


1957 


4360 


1070 


846 


134624 


1226 


1958 


4114 


1011 


864 


135464 


840 


1959 


3962 


964 


869 


136266 


802 


1960 


3842 


904 


981 


136413 


147 



OUR NEW MEMORIAL BUILDING 

On October 21st, 1960, our hopes were realized 
when we occupied our new building-, and on October 
31st the Grand Master, assisted by many Grand 
Lodg-e Officers, past and present, and in the presence 
of many members and their wives, despite the very 
inclement weather, unveiled the corner stone and 
dedicated the building-. At long- last, after 105 years, 
we have our own administration building- in which 
are now safely deposited in fire proof vaults all of our 
valuable records since the institution of Grand Lodge 
in 1855. It is a Memorial Building- of which we may 
all be very proud, in keeping v^ith the dignity and 
high position our Grand Lodge enjoys in the Masonic 
world. As T. have said so often, there are only ten 
Grand Lodges in the world, numerically larger than 
our Grand Lodge. 

To date many of our members with their wives 
have seen through our beautiful IMemorial and guests 
from South Africa, Australia, Germany, many of 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 107 

the United States and most of our Provinces have 
been received. I extend to all our menibers, their 
families and friends a most cordial invitation to come 
and see your building. All will be most welcome. 

The Grand Master and M.W. Bro. J. A. Hearn 
will make further reference to this lasting memorial 
to "Our brethren who gave their lives in the cause 
of freedom and our departed brethren who have 
contributed to the growth and vitality of Free- 
masonry." 

SEVENTY YEAR BAR 

This year we have pleasure in reporting the 
awarding of a Seventy Year Bar, in recognition of 
more than 70 years of membership in the Craft, to: 

Bro. J. A. Walker, Shuniah Lodge, No. 287, 

Port Aj'thur, and 
Bro. John Brown Liddell, Windsor Lodge, No. 

403, Windsor. 

FIFTY YEAR BAR 

We now have six veteran members living who 
have been awarded a bar to their Long Service Medal 
to mark fifty years of service as a Past District 
Deputy Grand Master. They are: 

R.W. Bro. A. J. WTiitby, Granite Lodge, No. 352, 

Pany Sound. 
R.W. Bro. J. E. Francis, Pa.tterson Lodge, No. 

265, Tliornhill. 
R.W. Bro. R. A. Willmott, Beaver Lodge No. 83, 

Strath rov. 
R.W. Bro. A. M. Fulton, Faithful Brethren 

Lodge, No. 77, Lindsay. 
R.W. Bro. T. Montgomery, Victoria Lodge, No. 

56, Sarnia. 
R.W. Bro. A. McLeod, Bay of Quinte, No. 620, 

Toronto. 

To them, once more, we extend our warmest 
congi'atulaticns and our very best wishes and wel- 
come the last two members to this group. 



108 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

SIXTY YEAR PINS 

During the year 31 of our members have receiv- 
ed Sixty Year Pins, in recognition of sixty years or 
more of membership. Since the adoption of this 
Pin 294 holders of our Veteran's Jubilee Medal and 
21 holders of our Long Service Medal, of whom four 
qualified again, this year, have received our Sixty 
Year Pin to their respective medals. We congratulate 
and pay tribute to these staunch veterans of the 
Craft. 

FIFTY YEAR MEDALS 

We are again pleased to note that there is an 
increase in members qualifying for our Veteran's 
Jubilee Medal (50 years a Mason). This year 400 
have qualified for and have received the Medal, and 
15 Past Masters have received our Long Service 
Medal (50 years a Past Master). 

WILLIAM MERCER WILSON MEDAL 

Since our last Annual Communication three 
members have been awarded the William Mercer 
Wilson Medal for Meritorious Service : 

Bro. J. T. Thomson, Kaministiquia Lodge, No, 

584, Fort William. 
Bro. E. Tavlor- Cope-Stone Lodge, No. 373, 

Welland. 
Bro. A. M. Hill, Civil Sei*vice Lodge, No. 148, 

Ottawa. 

In all 64 members have been awarded this dis- 
tinguished Medal since its inception in 1945. 

I wish to again record my deepest appreciation 
of the loyalty and devoted service given so whole- 
heartedly by every member of the staff. This year 
has been a very busy one for all as, in addition to the 
regular work, they have had to sort out. pack, move 
and relocate the supplies and equipment in addition 
to 105 years of books, files and other records. There 
was the fullest co-operation, and to them, individu- 
ally and collectively, I convey my sincerest thanks. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 109 

Details of Receipts of Grand Lodge on General 
Account and Ledger Balances, Year 

Ended May 31st, 1961 

Balance 

No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

2 Niagara Niagara - 301.65 1.00 

3 Ancient St. John's— Kingston 534.35 

5 Sussex Brockville 548.00 1.00 

6 Barton Hamilton 353.61 3.00 

7 Union Grimsbv - 357.45 

9 Union Napanee 329.75 3.80 

10 Norfolk. Simcoe 387.54 3.40 

11 Moira Belleville 821.05 2.00 

14 True Britons' ..Perth 381.75 24,77 

15 St. George's St. Catharines ... 416.80 1.40 

16 St. Andrew's Toronto 474.08 7.40 

17 St. John's Coburg „ 468.20 2.65 

18 Prince Edward —Picton 390.25 1.00 

20 St. John's London 624.65 12.20 

21aSt. John's _ Vankleek Hill ._ 137.13 

22 King Solomon's Toronto 464.21 3.00 

23 Richmond Richmond Hill ... 339.51 2.00 

24 St. Francis Smiths Falls 482.10 10.68 

25 Ionic Toronto 226.50 

26 Ontario Port Hope - 259.95 9.76 

27 Strict Observance..-,Hamilton - 589.05 12.30 

28 Mount Zion „„ —Kemptville 155.90 

29 United „ Brighton 240.00 

30 Composite _ Whitby 329.10 13.48 

31 Jerusalem Bowmanville 272.15 5.20 

32 Amity Dunnville 344.75 6.00 

33 Maitland Goderich _.... 244.55 7.08 

34 Thistle Amherstburg 253.85 2.00 

35 St. John's , Cavuga 213.83 9.68 

37 King Hiram Tngersoll 230.95 17.40 

38 Trent .-Trenton - 382.29 6.60 

39 Mount Zion Brooklin - 183.70 10.20 

40 St. John's Hamilton 590.91 12.68 

41 St. George's Kingsville 301.00 

42 St. George's London 285.25 6.40 

43 King Solomon's Woodstock 488.86 

44 St. Thomas St. Thomas 360.90 

45 Brant Brantford 502.06 1.00 

46 Wellington Chatham 382.49 

47 Great Western Windsor - 758.65 

48 Madoc Madoc 

50 Consecon Consecon -.. 

52 Dalhousie ——Ottawa - 

54 Vaughan Maple 

55 Merrickville .Merrickville 
66 Victoria Samia - 



758.65 


4.30 


187.80 


.60 


173.20 


1.00 


395.60 


15.42 


247.28 


12.48 


156.55 


11.90 


435.60 


5.80 



no GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



Balance 



No. Name of Lodge Location Amount 

57 Harmony Binbrook 141.41 

58 Doric Ottawa 385.35 

61 Acacia Hamilton 883.50 

62 St. Andrew's Caledonia 214.50 

63 St. John's Carleton Place .„ 232.68 

64 Kilwinning. London „ 672.25 

65 Rehoboam Toronto 441.36 

66 Durham Newcastle 148.94 

68 St. John's Ingersoll 228.45 

69 Stirling Stirling - 206.55 

72 Alma Gait 361.45 

73 St. James St. Marys -.. 356.03 

74 St. James South Augusta 154.20 

75 St. John's ^.Toronto 312.84 

76 Oxford „ ^Woodstock 548.20 

77 Faithful Brethren.._.Lindsav 441.60 

78 King Hiram Tillsonburg 462.92 

79 Simcoe Bradford 185.25 

81 St. John's Mount Brydges ... 109.20 

82 St. John's Paris 225.95 

83 Beaver Strathroy - 158 50 

84 Clinton Clinton - 284.60 

85 Rising Sun Athens 142.65 

86 Wilson Toronto 236.50 

87 Markham Union Markham 253.72 

88 St. George's™__„^Owen Sound 218.25 

90 Manito Co11inP-wnnd „.. 286.95 

91 Colbome Colborne 233.75 

92 Cataraqui Kingston 416.60 

93 Northern Light ^.Kincardine 291.65 

94 St. Mark's Port Stanley 178.65 

96 Corinthian Barrie 487.00 

97 Sharon Oueensville 180.15 

98 True Blue Bolton 227.55 

99 Tuscan Newmarket 301.99 

100 Valley™ Dundas _ 464.07 

101 Corinthian Peterborough 553.44 

103 Maple Leaf. St. Catharines ... 635.35 

104 St. John's .....Norwich 261.25 

105 St. Mark's Niagara Falls ... 382.00 

106 Burford Burford 170.95 

107 St. Paul's Lambeth S23.?8 

108 Blenheim Princeton 140.75 

109 Albion HarroAvsmith 266.45 

110 Central Prescott 233.60 

113 Wilson. Waterford 224.48 

114 Hope — Port Hope 202.65 

115 Ivy Beamsville 287.15 

116 Cassia Thedford 165.81 

118 Union Schomberg 181.50 

119 Maple Leaf Bath 160.55 



Dr. 

1.00 
21.26 
22.20 

2.40 

2.20 
17.50 
14.80 

2.00 
.05 

11.52 
4.56 

9.08 



6.50 
6.85 
4.65 
7.00 



2.26 
1.00 
1.00 
6.90 
1.00 
5.85 



2.20 

1.00 

8.50 

13.20 

5.24 

22.60 

11.80 

7.40 



6.50 

1.05 
6.40 
1.00 
10.15 
4.75 
2.00 



Cr. 



3.80 



2.20 



.60 
1.20 



1.00 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 



111 



Balance 



No. Name of Lodge 

120 Warren 

121 Doric„- 

122 Renfrew.. 



123 Belleville 

125 Cornwall 

126 Golden Rule. 

127 Franck 

128 Pembroke 



129 Rising Sun 

131 St. Lawrence 

133 Lebanon Forest- 

135 St. Clair 

136 Richardson 

137 Pythagoras 

139 Lebanon 

140 Malahide 

141 Tudor_ 

142 Excelsior 

143 Friendly Brothers 

144 Tecumseh 

145 J. B. Hall 

146 Prince of Wales— 

147 Mississippi 

148 Civil Sei-vice 

149 Erie 

151 Grand River 

153 Bums 

154 Irving. 

155 Peterborough 

156 York. 

157 Simpson „.... 

158 Alexandra _ 

159 Goodwood 

161 Perc V 

162 Forest 

164 Star in the East-.„ 

165 Burlington. 

166 Wentworth 

168 Merritt 

169 Macnab 

170 Britannia 

171 Prince of Wales™ 

172 Ayr..... 

174 Walsingham 

177 The Builders 

178 Platts^ille 

180 Speed- 

181 Oriental 

184 Old Light 

185 Enniskillen 



Location Amount 

Fingal ~ 91.20 

Brantford _. 533.85 

Renfrew 297.70 

Belleville 587.20 

Cornwall 491.95 

Campbellford „.... 363.30 

Frankford 270.30 

.Pembroke 376.55 

Aurora 198.68 

.Southampton 124.14 

.Exeter -. 269.00 

Milton 265.05 

.Stouffville - 258.03 

.Meaford — 151.20 

.Oshawa -.... 539.55 

.Aylmer 249.40 

.Mitchell 205.40 

.Morrisburg 193.35 

'Iroquois 146.00 

Stratford -.. 520.00 

.Millbrook 163.20 

.Newburgh - 93.45 

.Almonte - 228.90 

.Ottawa 271.65 

.Port Dover - 285.18 

.Kitchener 458.86 

.Wyoming 173.55 

.Lucan 195.95 

..Peterborough ... 557.00 

-Toronto ...„- 427.01 

.Newboro 107.95 

..Oil Springs -. 144.55 

-Richmond - 166.40 

-WarkAvorth 208.35 

-Wroxeter - 147.05 

.Wellington 218.91 

..Burlington 571.59 

-Stoney Creek 526.42 

.Welland 302.60 

-Port Colborne .„ 325.85 

..Seaforth 219.75 

..lona Station ...... 129.04 

_Avr 113.70 

.-Port Rowan 208.85 

-Ottawa -.. 319.75 

-Platts\alle 83.35 

..Guelph - — 643.70 

..Port Bur-vvell ...» 122.00 

-.T.ucknow 240.20 

York 102.00 



Dr. 

1.00 

5.50 

1.00 

10.15 

18.40 

13.00 
1.60 
5.50 
6.00 

5.40 



7.24 

5.40 
1.75 

5.45 

1.80 

6.40 

12.76 



Ct. 



21.20 



4.80 
1.00 
4.85 

.90 

5.76 

13.48 

6.40 

1.00 

.60 

1.05 

11.80 

12.10 

10.80 
.60 

4.50 



.03 



1.15 

1.80 

.20 



12.20 



112 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



No. Name of Lodge 
186 Plantagenet™ 
190 Belmont 


Location 

— Riceville 

.....Belmont 


Amount 

62.75 

190.55 

641.52 

208.60 

. 197.27 

263.87 

257.73 

193.99 

121.98 

250.55 

. 150.20 

87.55 

195.00 

. 110.60 

627.85 

151.05 

305.00 

271.57 

. 477.75 

292.48 

207.10 

251.65 

. 166.10 

93.95 

184.60 

. 265.65 

137.20 

467.50 

519.40 

392.00 

185.70 

. 219.06 

156.65 

123.45 

16550 

132.80 

. 141.25 

. 167.15 

. 114.75 

. 213.63 

. 164.60 

. 218.71 

. 336.45 

.. 175.07 

. 471.55 

. 453.70 

. 193.35 

. 136.85 

. 387.10 

. 384.45 

. 265.50 


Balance 
Dr. Cr. 


192 ri 11 i a 


—Orillia 




193 Scotland 

194 Petrolia. 


Scotland 

..—Petrolia ....._ 


11.68 


195 Tuscan 

196 Madawaska 

197 Saugeen_ . — 

200 St. Alban's 

201 Leeds 


— London 

.-- Arnprior 

Walkerton 

— Mount Forest .. 
.^.Gananoque 


1.00 
1.26 

1.00 
3.43 


203 Irvine .... 


...-Elora 




205 New Dominion„.. 

207 Lancaster 

209 Evergreen - 

209aSt. John's - 

215 Lake 

216 Harris 

217 Frederick. „.. „„ 

218 Stevenson™ 

219 Credit 


..™New Hamburg „ 

...Lancaster 

— Lanark 

-^.London „ 

...Ameliasburg 

— Orangeville 

..„Delhi 

Toronto 

Georgetown 


.70 

.60 

1.10 
9.85 

1.00 

13.37 
10.80 


220 Zeredatha. 

221 Mountain-...™ „. 

222 Marmora 


Uxbridge 

._Thorold 

. Marmora 


2.00 
1.00 
3.05 


223 Norwood 


Norwood 


5.40 


224 Huron 

225 Bernard 

228 Prince Arthur 


Hensall _. 

— Listowel 

Odessa 


5.40 
3 70 


229 Ionic. 


Brampton 


1.00 


230 Kerr. _. ... 


Barrie 


.60 


231 Fidelity. 


Ottawa 


1.00 


232 Cameron. 

233 Doria...- 

234 Beaver..... „.. 


Button 

..„ Parkhill 

Thornburv -.. 


1.00 
8.15 


235 Aldworth 


. Paislev 


11.80 


236 Manitoba. 


Cookstown 




237 Vienna. 


Vienna 




238 Havelock... 

239 Tweed 

242 Macov 


„.. Watford 

...Tweed 

Mallorvtown 


2.68 
1.60 


243 St. George, 

245 Tecumseh .„ .__ 


St. George 

Thamesville ... 


6.50 
4.38 


247 Ashlar. 

249 Caledonian 

250 Thistle 

253 Minden 

254 Clifton. 


Toronto _ 

^^Midland 

Bmbro 

Kingston 

.Niagara Falls . 


7.02 
7.63 


255 Svdenham 


.. Dresden 


9.40 


256 Farran-Awlt 

2-^7 r;ait 


..^Ingleside 

Gait 


5.40 
4.03 


258 Guelph _. 

259 Sorinerfield 


„Guelph .„ 

__ Springfield ™ 


3.40 
7.80 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 113 

Balance 

No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

260 Washington Petrolia 192.60 1.00 

261 Oak Branch „.Innerkip 140.90 1.00 

262 Harriston Harriston 197.20 9.75 

268 Forest _ Forest 152.05 

264 Chaudiere Ottawa .S31.01 12.80 

265 Patterson Thornhill - 368.57 1.55 

266 Northern Light -... Stavner 203..46 

267 Parthenon Chatham 495.85 31.35 

268 Verulam - _...Bohcageon 162.95 

269 Brougham Union._._Claremont -.- 117.95 12.64 

270 Cedar. Oshawa - 526.74 8.92 

271 Wellington Erin 199.70 4.25 

272 Sevmour. Ancaster - 367.91 13.38 

274 Kent Blenheim „ 289.50 

276 Teeswater. Teeswater 107.20 

277 Sevmour. Port Dalhousie „. 315.65 1.00 

279 New Hope He.^peler - 164.20 8.70 

282 Lome Glencoe 246.05 9.90 

283 Eureka Belleville - 636.72 16.50 

284 St. John's .Brussels 121.50 .20 

285 Seven Star. Alliston 337.01 .30 

286 Wingham Wingham 217.85 4.80 

287 Shuniah Port Arthur 535.20 8.40 

289 Doric -Lobo 172.85 1.00 

290 Leamington Leamington „ 746.75 

291 Dufferin West Flamboro 185.41 2.50 

292 Robertson _ King 190.55 1.00 

294 Moore Courtright — 136.00 

295 Conestogo Dravton 98.90 

296 Temple St. Catharines „. 424.54 13.60 

297 Preston Preston 297.80 

299 Victoria Centre\'ille 142.45 5.40 

300 Mount Olivet Thorndale - 233.20 7.40 

302 St.David's„ St. Thomas 492.00 11.60 

303 Blyth Blvth 95.45 

304 Minerva. Stroud 213.65 10.80 

305 Humber. We.<=ton 428.44 1.40 

306 Durham — Durham » 201.05 

307 Arkona. Arkona 102.90 3.70 

309 Morning Star. Carlow 129.05 .60 

311 Blackwood Woodbridge 220.45 7.24 

312 Pnyx _ Wallaceburg 315.05 2.45 

313 Clementi — Lakefield 213.10 

314 Blair.. Palmer?ton ..- 216.80 10.85 

315 Clifford Clifford 103.60 5.40 

316 Doric. Toronto 304.25 1.70 

318 Wilmot Baden 57.72 .60 

319 Hiram Hagersville 230.41 

320 Chesterville Chester\'ille 163.45 

B21 Walker Acton „ 278.50 1.00 

322 North Star Owen Sound 301.15 5.00 



114 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



Balance 



No. Name of Lodge 
323 Al'^np^'^n 


Location 
— Alvinston 


Amount 
122.60 
390.41 
183.25 
342.05 
107.25 

74.15 
133.93 
372.17 
119.93 
433.60 
182.50 
127.45 
149.95 
136.45 
109.50 
358.57 

77.05 
423.30 
159.00 
387.45 
608.10 
242.20 
104.38 
394.85 
105.30 
226.77 
370.90 
182.95 
138.90 
230.65 
444.78 
111.25 

93.10 
402.75 
782.65 
382.35 
160.95 
518.35 
350.81 
400.17 
116.15 
165.82 
279.70 
180.70 
503.90 
136.15 
645.50 
593.42 
1 74.25 
456.03 
151.55 


Dr. Cr. 
2.00 


3?4 Tf^mpl'" 


__ Hamilton 


8.08 


32.=; Ornnn 


r n 


1.00 


326 Zetland. . 

397 T!fi-m-mnri(i 


Toronto 

Wards\T)lle 


10.95 
.50 


328 TnmV _ 


„ Napier 


1.00 


329 King: Solomon ., 

330 Corinthian- 


Janis 

London ...» — 


4.00 


SSI "Fordwifh 


Fordwich 




332 Stratford 


„ Stratford 


9.65 


333 Prince Arthur 


Flesherton 


.70 


334 Prince Arthur 

336 Highgate 

337 Myrtlp 


_ Arthur 

..Highgate 

Port Robinson _ 


.16 

1.00 


338 Dnfr^^Hn 


Wellandport 


5.05 


339 OriPTit 


_ Toronto 


22.35 


341 Bruce _ 


Tiverton 




343 Georgina_. 


Toronto 


6.10 


344 Merrill ...._.. 


Dorchester 


6.40 


345 Nilestown- .... 


NilestowTi 


.60 


346 Occident 


Toronto 


16.00 


347 Mercer , 


.„Fergus . 


2.40 


348 Georgian 

352 Granite. . 


__Penetanguishene 
Parry Sound . 


11.40 
14.20 


354 Brock 

356 River Park 


„„Cannington 

_Streetsville .~ 


7.24 


357 Waterdown 


Millgrove 


2.00 


358 Delaware Valley- 

359 Vittoria. _ 


__D el aware 

Vittoria 


18.46 


360 Muskoka 


Braceb ridge _ 


4.60 


361 Waverley 


...Guelph „ 




362 Maple Leaf. 

364 Dufferin 


__Tara „ 

_Melbourne 


.45 

.60 


367 St. George 

Sf58 SaIptti , ,,, 


^Toronto „ _ 

_. Brockville „ 


18.75 
1.00 


369 Mimirr. 


Lambton Mills _ 


3.52 


370 Harmony 


_Delta 




371 Prince of Wales„.. 

372 P-nlmer 


Ottawa 

„Fort Erie 


1.00 
14.90 


373 Cope-stone 


_Welland _ „._ 




374 Keene 


Keene 


5.40 


375 Lome 


Omemee „ 


1.50 


376 Unitv 


_^HuntsvilIe 


8.05 


377 T.nmP 


Shelburnft 




378 King Solomon's London „ 

379 Middlesex Brvanston 

380 TTninn T.nrirlr>n 


.60 

8.45 
12.08 


382 DnriV 


Hamilton 




383 HpTiHprsnTi 


Winchester 


1 00 


384 Alpha 
RRfi .C5pry 


—■^oronto 

_ Beeton 


.74 
5.40 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 



115 



Balance 
No Name of Lodpre Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

386 McCoU West Lome „ 159.05 

387 Lansdowne Lansdowne lOO.OU 

388 Henderson .....Ilderton - 138.4o 

389 Cr>^stal Fountain....„North Augusta ... 160.90 ^-^^ 

390 Florence Florence -- ^29.43 

391 Howard Ridgetown 28o.6o ^-^^ 

392 Huron Camlachie - 146-82 3.^0 

393 Forest......... Cheslev - 204.-0 8./8 

394 King Solomon. _Thamesford 206.40 .10 

395 Parvaim .....Comber 119-9' J-J^ 

396 Cedar Wiarton -- 311.60 5.^5 

397 Leopold „.Brigden ^^^'ll ^ nh 

398 Victoria, Kirkfield -.. 139.15 i-"" 

399 Moffat Harrietsville 96.3o .90 

400 Oakville ....Oakville -... 404.o5 -b.40 

401 Craig _.Deseronto 207.-O 

402 Central Essex 3/6.98 1.00 

403 Windsor _.. Windsor - 489.90 16.84 

404 Lome-... Tamworth 101.00 8.bb 

405 Mattawa Mattawa 125.05 

406 Spry ...Fenelon Falls 237.23 

408 Murray Beaverton 1^8.41 14.40 

409 Golden Rule Gravenhurst 266.75 

410 Zeta -Toronto 406.70 2.00 

411 Rodney......... Rodney -.- lOS.Oo 4.30 

412 Kevstone --.Sault Ste. Marie 663.73 2.80 

413 Naphtali Tilbury „... 120.60 3.00 

414 Pequonga „ -.-Kenora 343.95 2.52 

415 Fort William Fort William ...502.^^5 1.00 

416 Lvn Lvn -.- 132.95 5.40 

417 Keewatin Kee\vatin 123.90 1-50 

418 MaxviUe Maxville 186.50 1-15 

419 Liberty Sarnia ''13.51 2.95 

420 Nipissing North Bay 423.45 13.40 

421 Scott Grand Valley 146.25 

422 Star of the East. — Bothwell -....- 132.75 1.00 

423 Strong.......... Sundridge 139.84 

424 Doric ..„. Pickering -.— .. 382.60 18.15 

425 St. Clair Sombra - 117.30 6.61 

426 Stanley Toronto -.. 436.90 -35 

427 Nickel Sudburv 628.80 1.05 

428 Fidelity ...- — Port Perrv -... 237.30 6.90 

429 Port Elgin Poi-t Elgin 155.25 

430 Acacia...... Toronto 380.65 36.65 

431 Morayian Cargill - 53.45 

432 Hanover Hanover - 121.35 3.36 

433 Bonnechere Eganville 184.70 6.71 

434 Algonquin Emsdale - 156.85 b 6o 

435 Havelock Havelock - ]'°-%^ 

436 Burns Hepwortk -.-... 105.80 

437 Tuscan -Sarnia — 5o3.41 16.6V 



116 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



No. Name of Lodg'e 

438 Harmony 

439 Alexandria™. 

440 Arcadia 

441 Westport 

442 Dyment 

443 Powassan - 

444 Nitetis 

445 Lake of the Woods 

446 Granite - ~ 

447 Sturgeon Falls., 

448 Xenophon 

449 Dundalk. 



Location 



Amount 



450 Hawkesbury 

451 Somerville 

452 Avonmore 

453 Royal...„ 



454 Corona 

455 Doric 

456 Elma. 

457 Century 

458 Wales 

459 Cobden 

460 Rideau 

461 I on i c _ 

462 Temiskaming- 

463 North Entrance 

464 King Edward 

465 Carleton _ 

466 Coronation 

467 Tottenham _ 

468 Peel 

469 Algoma 

470 Victoria 

471 King Edward VTL. 

472 Gore Bay 

473 The Beaches 

474 Victoria 

475 Dundum 

476 Corinthian 

477 Harding 

478 Milverton 

479 Russell 

480 Williamsburg. 

481 Corinthian 

482 Bancroft 

483 Granton 

484 Golden Star 

485 Haileybury 

486 Silver 

48'^ Penewobikong. 
488 King Edward. 



Toronto 174.76 

Alexandria 123.60 

Minden 171.15 

Westport 97.60 

.Thessalon 178.50 

.Powassan -. 182.95 

.Creemore - 168.80 

-Kenora 270.90 

-Fort Frances 309.70 

-Sturgeon Falls ... 90.95 

.Wheatley 211.70 

.^Dundalk 171.79 

.-Hawkesbury 101.20 

...Kinmount 80.70 

-Avonmore 134.40 

-Fort William 408.05 

_.Burk's Falls 116.95 

.-Little Current .. 149.02 

.-Monkton ~ 98.25 

.^Merlin 193.90 

.-Long Sault 255.35 

..Cobden 146.80 

...Seeley's Bay 154.45 

..Rainy River 192.60 

...New Liskeard .. 231.50 

-.Haliburton 200.25 

..-Sunderland 159.80 

.-Carp 106.45 

....Elmvale 189.22 

...Tottenham 96.55 

-Caledon East 212.80 

...Sault Ste. Marie 614.15 
...Victoria Harbour 108.05 

.Chippawa 165.24 

..Gore Bay 192.74 

..„Toronto 275.05 

.-Toronto 342.55 

...Hamilton 658.11 

....North Cower 130.20 

™Woodville 134.70 

.-.Milverton 147.25 

...Russell 169.50 

..„Williamsburg 104.45 

^Toronto 348.17 

^Bancroft 367.15 

Granton 120.40 

„Drvden 317.70 

.-Haileybury 90.22 

Cobalt 154.50 

Blind River 193.20 

Harrow 215.75 



Balance 
Dr. Or. 

1.00 

.55 

6.40 
12.80 

1.00 

1.00 

5.40 

9.00 
10.80 

5.40 

1.00 

1.00 



10.12 

1.20 

2.00 
1.00 



.05 
1.10 
4.70 
9.68 



12.64 

11.95 

11.64 

1.00 

12.00 

14.20 

3.52 

1.00 

1.50 

9.20 

10.76 

.60 
3.00 

5.40 
9.30 



3.60 



.10 



14.00 
1.70 



1.20 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



117 



No. Name of Lodpre 
489 Osiris 



490 Hiram 

491 Cardinal 

492 Karnak. 

494 Riverdale 

495 Electric 

496 University 

497 St. Andrew's 

498 King George V„... 

499 Port Arthur 

500 Rose 

501 Connaught — 

502 Coronation 

503 Inwood.... - 

504 Otter 

505 Lynden — 

506 Porcupine 

507 Elk Lake 

508 Ozias 

509 Twin City - - 

510 Parkdale 

511 Connaught 

512 Malone _ 

513 Corinthian 

514 St. Alban's 

515 Reba 

516 Enterprise 

517 Hazeldean 

518 Sioux Lookout — 

519 Onondaga 

520 Coronati 

521 Ontario - 

522 Mount Sinai 

523 Royal Arthur 

524 Mississauga — 

525 Temple 

526 Ionic 

^27 Espanola. 

528 Golden Beaver 

529 Myra — 

530 Cochrane 

531 High Park 

532 Canada. 

533 Shamrock 

534 Englehart 

635 Phoenix 

536 Algonquin 

537 Ulster „. „_ 

538 Earl Kitchener— 

539 Waterloo 



Location Amount 

-Smiths Falls 249.87 

-Markdale - — 118.60 

-Cardinal 110.23 

-Coldwater 165.95 

-.Toronto 305.38 

...Hamilton 584.65 

...Toronto 253.63 

-Arden 173.76 

,™Cobokonk 117.80 

.-Port Arthur 492.16 

-.Windsor 354.41 

...Mimico 473.50 

Smithville 164.90 

-Inwood _ ™ 132.80 

-Lombardy 61.35 

-Lynden 233.90 

—South Porcupine 176.55 

...Elk Lake 109.70 

-Brantford - 353.87 

-Kitchener 415.89 

-Toronto 218.06 

...Fort William 305.80 

••••Sutton 210.36 

••••Hamilton 495.95 

Toronto 330.75 

-Brantford 465.05 

•-Beachburg 125.00 

.-Hazeldean ....- 133.65 

....Sioux Lookout .. 250.60 

...Onondaga 177.00 

-Toronto 424.13 

-Windsor 600.09 

-Toronto 900.14 

....Peterborough 454.83 

-Port Credit 510.77 

.-Toronto 298.75 

.-.Ottawa 541.55 

-Espanola 258.40 

...Timmins 281.30 

...Komoka 83.55 

—Cochrane 170.05 

^Toronto 339.51 

.-Toronto 424.70 

—Toronto „„ 288.50 

,-Englehart 151.85 

-Fonthill - 277.20 

Cooper Cliff 377.90 

.-Toronto 801.85 

-Port McNicoU .„ 81.40 
-Waterloo 478.90 



Balance 
Dr. Cr. 

1.00 



14.43 

17.89 

.40 

1.00 

5.20 

11.17 

12.80 

11.80 

.95 

4.60 
.60 

11.78 

3.20 

16.56 

10.80 

11.80 

3.00 

4.20 

1.00 

12.57 

13.20 

15.32 
5.50 

14.80 
6.86 

37.80 

10.00 
3.00 
1.00 

11.80 
1.00 
6.40 
1.00 

16.32 

22.10 

.60 

1.00 

33.07 

22.38 
5.40 

17.70 



1.20 



1.00 



118 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMITNICATION 



Balajice 



No. Name of Lodge 
540 Abitibi 



541 Tuscan 

542 Metropolitan 

543 Imperial 

544 Lincoln 

545 John Ross Rob'son 

546 Talbot 

547 Victory 

548 General Mercer. 

549 Ionic 

550 Buchanan 

551 Tuscan 

552 Queen City 

553 Oakwood 

554 Border Cities 

555 Wardrope 

556 Nation 

557 Finch 

558 Sidney Alb't Luke.. 

559 Palestine 

560 St. Andrew's 

561 Acacia. 

562 Hamilton 

563 Victory 

564 Ashlar 

565 Kilwinning 

566 King Hiram 

567 St. Aidan's 

568 Hullett 

569 Doric 

570 Dufferin 

571 AntifjUitv 

572 Mizpah...' 

573 Adoniram 

574 Craig 

575 Fidelity 

576 Mimosa 

577 St. Clair 

578 Queen's 

579 Harmony 

580 Acacia..... 

581 Harcourt _., 

582 Sunnyside 

583 Transportation.... 

584 Kaministiquia _ 

585 Royal Edward - 

586 Remembrance 

587 Patricia 

588 National 

589 Grey 

590 Defenders 



Location 
.Iroquois Falls 

.Toronto -.. 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Abingdon -.. 

-Toronto -...- 

..St. Thoma.-? -, 

..Toronto 

.-Toronto .... 

-Hamilton 

-Hamilton 

-Hamilton 

-Toronto 

.-Toronto - — .. 

-Windsor 

-Hamilton 

-Spencerville — 

. Finch - 

Ottawa 

-Toronto 

-Ottav.'a 

-Ottawa — 

-Hamilton - 

-Chatham - 

-Ottawa 

-Toronto 

-Toronto 

-Toronto 

•Londesboro -... 

-Lakeside 

•Toronto 

-Toronto — 

-Toronto _.... 

-Niagara Falls 

■Ailsa Craig .. 

-Toronto 

-Toronto _.... 

-Toronto 

■Kingston -.. 

-Windsor 

London 

-Toronto - 

-Toronto 

•Toronto 

-Fort William 

•Kingston 

■Toronto — 

■Toronto 

■Capreol 

•Toronto 

.Ottawa 



Amount 
-. 195.00 
...- 314.75 

- 347.25 
._.. 565.15 
...„ 90.19 
.™ 472.25 

489.05 

.-„ 264.74 
™. 466.05 
..„ 566.10 
.„ 463.28 
..„ 823.99 

674.65 
,„ 500.16 
,„ 221.10 
.... 510.90 
..„. 96.95 
..„ 160.80 
.-. 355.41 

- 669.77 
.-.1276.86 
...- 428.07 
..- 380.77 
..„ 404.16 
„ 259.60 

- 607.62 
...- 350.15 
_ 214.21 
„ 92.30 

130.90 

.„ 356.85 

- 349.94 
.-. 343.45 

_. 272.20 
..- 121.25 
..„ 364.71 

- 386.60 

- 304.37 
.... 231.18 
..- 356.00 

- 818.55 
.-. 126.70 

- 541.20 
,-.. 454.95 
.- 284.30 
.... 315.90 
„ 534.85 
.- 370.10 
_ 181.65 
„ 255.06 
_ 320.20 



Dr. 

1.00 
10.08 

6.20 
14.90 

2.85 

14.46 

14.48 

11.40 

1.00 

1.00 

9.23 

6.25 

14.10 

5.40 

10.75 



2.86 
15.90 
15.68 
11.44 

1.00 
14.79 

1.00 
21.69 

1.00 
15.40 



20.80 
9.08 

.75 
7.55 
1.25 
1.60 
6.05 
4.70 
8.55 

.30 

6.40 
14.30 

1.20 
16.32 

2.00 
1.00 



Or. 



6.20 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



119 



No. Name of Lodge 

591 North Gate 

592 Fairbank 

593 St. Andrew's 

594 Hillcrest 

595 Rideaa 

596 Martintow 

597 Temple 

598 Dominion 

599 Mount Dennis— 

600 Maple Leaf 

601 St. Paul 

602 Hugh Murray-... 

603 Campbell 

604 Palace 

605 Melita™ 

606 Unity 

607 Golden Fleece.. 

608 Gothic. 

609 Tavistock. 

610 Ashlar.„ 

611 Huron-Bruce 

612 Birch Cliff. 

613 Fort Erie 

614 Adanac 

615 Dominion 

616 Perfection 

617 North Bay 

618 Thunder Bay 

619 Runnymede 

620 Bayo'f Quinte 

621 Frontenac 

622 Lome 

623 Doric 

624 Dereham 

625 Hatherly 

626 Stamford 

627 Pelee 

628 Glenrose 

629 Grenville 

630 Prince of Wales-. 

631 Manitou 

632 Long Branch 

633 Hastings 

634 Delta. 

635 Wellington 

636 Homepayne 

637 Caledonia 

^38 Bedford 

639 Beach 

640 Anthony Sayer_ 
fi41 Garden 



Location Amount 

-Toronto _ 420.20 

-Toronto 391.20 

.Hamilton — 977.61 

.Hamilton -.... 413.30 

-Ottawa - 370.85 

-Martintow-n - 84.20 

-London 351.13 

-Windsor - 340.72 

-Weston 630.05 

.Toronto ~ 377.20 

-Samia 360.72 

-Hamilton 641.90 

Xampbellville 170.60 

.Windsor 629.15 

-Toronto - - 319.17 

-Toronto 282.32 

-Toronto 329.73 

.Lindsay — 228.82 

.-Tavistock 171.60 

....Byron 242.80 

...Toronto 303.20 

-Toronto - 507.00 

-Fort Erie „ 254.05 

-Merritton 281.30 

—Ridgeway - 151.25 

-St. Catharines .- 292.81 

-North Bav 356.70 

-.Port Arthur 290.55 

.-Toronto 220.85 

-Toronto ...— 286.30 

.. Sharbot Lake 157.40 

Chapleau 198.05 

-Kirkland Lake .- 364.10 
-Mt. Eglin 139.50 

— .«?ault Ste. Marie 165.26 
.— Stamford Centre 378.50 

—Scudder 60.75 

—Elmira 150.52 

.-Toronto 362.20 

—Toronto 205.75 

— Emo - 145.05 

— Mimico 253.55 

.-Hastings - 102.35 

--Toronto - - 440.01 

—Toronto 37.3.80 

Hornepavne — 157.65 

—Toronto * - 723.35 

—Toronto 274.00 

—Hamilton Beach 349.81 

— Mimico 156.00 

— Windsor 304.12 



Balance 
Dr. Or. 
2.00 

22.00 
14.94 
15.00 

2.90 
.40 
7.24 

15.60 

1.00 
21.60 
15.30 

1.00 
11.80 

7.40 
11.80 

8.76 
12.80 

7.96 
12.80 
10.04 
12.00 

6.00 

6.66 

14.16 
17.80 

11.00 

32.08 

1.80 

9.00 
1.00 
4.80 
2.00 



11.00 
4.80 

18.00 
.95 

29.80 
3.00 
1.00 

25.40 

9.66 
14.32 



120 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA AKNUAL COMMUNICATION 



No. Name of Lodge 

642 St. Andrew's 

643 Cathedral 

644 Simcoe 

645 Lake Shore 

646 Rowlands 

647 Tedmorden 

648 Spi-uce Falls 

649 Temple 

650 Fidelity _ 

651 Dentonia 

652 Memorial 

653 Scarboro 

654 Ancient Landm'ks. 

655 Kingsway 

656 Kenogamisis „ , 

657 Corinthian 

658 Sudburv^ 

659 Equity 

660 Chukuni 

661 St. Andrew's 

662 Terrace Bay 

663 Brant... 

664 Sunnvlea 

665 Temple 

666 Temple 

667 Composite... 

668 Atikokan _ 

669 Corinthian . 

670 West Hill „. 

671 Westmount 

672 Superior 

673 Kempenfeldt - 

674 South Gate 

675 William James 

Dunlop _.... 

676 Kroy 



Location 

-Windsor 

-Toronto 

-Toronto 

-Mimico 

..Mt. Albert 

-Todmorden 

-Kapuskasing ». 

-Oshawa 

-Toledo 

-Toronto 

.Toronto — 

.. Agincourt 

-Hamilton _ 

-Lambton Mills 
-Geraldton 

• Kirkland Lake 

-Sudbury 

- Orillia 

• Red Lake _ 

-St. Catharines . 
-Terrace Bay .. 

-Burlington 

-Lambton Mills 

• Ottawa 

"Belle\alle 

•Hamilton 

-Atikokan _. 

-Cornwall 

-Agincourt 

-Hamilton 

-Red Rock 

-Barrie 

-Port Credit ..... 



Amount 

„ 301.10 
„ 279.35 
. 385.87 
.. 351.79 
. 108.53 
„ 344.50 
„ 295.95 
„ 462.30 
.. 83.40 
. 440.45 
. 374.37 
.. 423.58 
... 274.30 
„ 227.35 
.. 358.55 
. 217.27 
. 362.45 
,„ 255.60 
„ 174.15 
„ 219.60 
- 203.05 
.. 254.20 
_ 216..30 
. 190.51 
.. 197.17 
„ 247.45 
„ 163.25 
„ 163.25 
„ 300.24 
. 213.13 
„ 153.08 
. 212.82 
„ 155.63 



677 Coronation 

678 Mercer Wilson — 

679 Centennial 

680 Woodland 

681 Claude M. Kent ™ 

682 Astra „. 

683 Wexford 



684 Centennial 

685 Joseph A. Heam 

686 Atomic 

687 Meridian 

688 W^Tidham 

689 Flower City 

690 Temple 

691 Friendship. 



.- Peterborough ._ 

-Thornhill 

-Weston _ 

-Woodstock 

-Stamford Centre 

-Wawa 

-Oak\-ille - 

-Weston 

-Agincourt 

-London 

-Port Credit 

-Deep River 

-Dundas 

-Guelph 

-Brampton 

-Kitchener 

..Copper Cliff 



213.12 
243.55 
229.40 
178.55 
160.50 
128.90 
189.97 
210.80 
273.90 
251.25 
211.09 
158.60 
lOl.PO 
120.66 
149.95 
96.73 
87.52 



Balance 
Dr. Or. 

15.49 
1.00 



19.80 
11.80 
18.80 

3.60 
15.55 
13.72 
13.70 
17.50 
24.60 

1.00 



17.00 

30.64 

10.80 

2.28 

7.00 

12.24 

12.20 
2.90 

14.16 
1.00 
5.20 

27.80 

15.70 
3.34 

4.00 

14.40 

1.40 

2.52 

13.00 

9.00 

5.69 

1.00 

3.00 

10.60 

25.40 

1000 

7.25 

16.30 
1.00 
3.50 



.50 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 121 

Balance 
No. Name of Lodge Location Amount Dr. Cr. 

692 Thomas Hamilton 

Simpson Stoney Creek 128.97 

693 Baldoon Wallaceburg 134.65 15.32 

694 East Gate Agincourt 50.30 6.90 

695 Parkwood Oshawa 138.45 8.20 

696 Harry L. Martyn —Toronto - „ 127.85 4.52 

697 Grantham Port Dalhousie ... 159.22 11.80 

698 EUiot Lake Elliot Lake 277.83 

699 Bethel .Sudbury 138.87 

700 Corinthian Kintore 56.80 2.52 

701 Ashlar Tillsonburg 134.25 16.24 

702 Lodge of 

Fellowship Richmond Hill ... 127.62 11.00 

703 Lodge of The 

Pillars „Toronto „ 737.68 29.50 

UD Aurum Timmins 81.48 1.00 



173,901.99 3,412.73 146.49 

Receipts from Lodges $ 173,901.99 

Interest - 36,669.90 

Debentures Matured or Sold 1,000.00 

Refunds 770.22 

Sale of Histories 194.00 

Bank Exchange 86.84 

Loan from Canadian Bank of Com- 
merce 205,000.00 

Sundries 1,808.43 

$419,431.38 



GENERAL ACCOUNT 

Summary of Receipts year ended May 31st, 1961 

Fees, Registration of Initiations - -....$ 14,193.00 

Fees, Registration of Affiliations 981.55 

Dues 136,987.54 

Life member per capita 33. 25 

Certificates _.... „ 238.00 

Constitutions 3.892.05 

Ceremonies ....- ~...~ ~ 156.68 

Dispensations 1.208.00 

Commutation of Dues 14,848.50 

Musical Rituals - - 111.00 

Sale of Booklets - 639.71 

Sale of Manuals _ 696.48 

Sale of Histories ~ „ 194.00 



122 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Refunds : — 

Barton Lodge, No. 6 — 40.00 

Dalhousie Lodge, No. 52 — 150.00 

Birch Cliff Lodge, No. 612 _.... 270.00 

Ontario Lodge, No. 521 ~.~ 90.00 

Grand Lodge Meeting Expenses, 

1960 48.76 

Miscellaneous ....„ 1,982.96 2,581.72 



Interest on Investments: — 

Masonic Holdings 10,557.40 

Province of Ontario - — 6,207.50 

City of Hamilton — 1,875.00 

Municipality of Metro Toronto - 4,672.50 

Dominion of Canada — 3,337.50 

Governors of the Univ. of Toronto ~ 750.00 

Toronto Harbour Commissioners ~ 62.50 
Hydro Electric Power Comm. 

of Ontario 8,742.50 

Township of Sandwich East — 80.00 

City of Windsor — 385.00 



36,669.90 



Debentures Matured or Sold: — 

$1,000.00 Toronto Harbour Commissioners 



Loan from Canadian Bank of Commerce 



. 1,000.00 
. 205.000.00 

$419,431.3« 



MEMORIAL FUND 



John Coulson, Estate $ 2,084.76 

Charles E. Sealev, Estate -.. -.... 5,000.00 

Clifford Lodge, No. 315, Donation 25.00 

Debentures Matured or Sold: — 

$1,000.00 Toronto Harbour Commissioners — 1,000.00 

$5,000.00 Citv of Saskatoon — 5,000.00 

$25,000.00 Canada Permanent Mortgage Corp. 25,000.00 

District of N. Vancouver — . 94.41 

$ 38,204.17 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 123 

SExMI-CENTENNIAL & MEMORIAL FUND 

Revenue Account, year ended May 31st, 1961 

Victoria and Grey Trust Company $ 1,260.00 

Province of Ontario ....„ 4,787.50 

Hydro Electric Power Comm. of Ontai'io 9,673.75 

City of Hamilton 487.50 

Metropolitan Toronto 1,050.00 

Dominion of Canada 2,010.00 

Canada Permanent Mortgage Corp 437.50 

City of Saskatoon _..- 250.00 

Toronto Harbour Commissioners 62.50 

City of Windsor - 1,278.54 

District of N. Vancouver - - - 26.16 



$ 21,323.45 

Respectfully submitted. 




Grand Secretary 

On motion of the Deput}' Grand Master second- 
ed by R.W. Bro. McQueen, the report was received 
and referred to the Committee on Audit and Finance. 

MEDALS AND PINS AWARDED 

The following brethren have been awarded Medals and 
Pins during the year not hereinbefore fully set out. 

LONG SERVICE MEDAL 
(Fifty Years a Past Master) 
R.W. Bro. J. A. BroAvn, Lome No. 404, Tamworth. 
V.W. Bro. A. H. McKee, The Builders No. 177, Ottawa. 
V.W. Bro. A. M. Thome, Orient No. 339, Toronto. 
W. Bro. G. H. Clark, Doric No. 58, Ottawa. 

" C. L. Galloway, Keewatin No. 417, Keewatin. 

W. R. Gow, Mercer No. 347, Fergus. 
" G. H. Hollier. King Hiram No. 78, Tillsonburg. 
F. Kilkenny, Simcoe No. 79. Bradford. 
R. H. Martindale, Nickel No. 427, Sudbury. 
" P. J. McEwen, Avonmore No. 452, Avonmore. 
" D. A. McNaughton, Avonmore No. 452, Avonmore. 

P. A. Rice, Cope-Stone No. 373, Welland. 
" G. Tavlor. Hope No. 114, Port Hope. 

R. G. Varey, Maple Leaf No. 103, St. Catharines. 
" M. Wallace, King Hiram No. 37, Ingersoll. 



124 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

SIXTY YEAR PIN FOR LONG SERVICE MEDAL 

The following brethren have been awarded a Sixty Year 
Pin in recognition of sixty years' service as a Past Master: 

R.W. Bro. A. W. McLeod, Bay of Quinte No. 620. Toronto. 
R.W. Bro. A. S. Williams, Civil Service No. 148, Ottawa. 
W. Bro. A. J. Gilmore, Maple Leaf No. 103, St. Catharines. 
W. Bro. A. Jiohnson, Harmony No. 57, Binbrook. 

VETERAN JUBILEE MEDALS 
(Fifty Years a Masont 

R.W. Bro. S. Alexander, Zeta No. 410. Toronto. 

" A. Barclay, Pequonga No. 414, Kenora. 

" J. H. Burke. St. Mark's No. 94, Port Stanley. 

" R. J. Coley, Alpha No. 384, Toronto. 

" D. F. R. Downey, Corinthian No. 101, Peter- 

borough. 

" J. T. George, Hope No. 114. Port Hope. 

" H. Hill, Morning Star No. 309, Carlow. 

" G. A. James, Nilestown No. 345, Nilestown. 

" H. A. Johnson. Norfolk No. 10, Simcoe (postthum- 

ously). 

" W. E. Kidd, Ancient St. John's No. 3, Kingston. 

" J. E. Laur, Palmer No. 372, Fort Erie. 

" E. A. Mackenzie, Sussex No. 5, Brockville. 

" J. F. Marr, Waverley No. 361, Guelph. 

" R. E. Robertson, Manito No. 90, Collingwood. 

" D. G. Stevens, Nipissing No. 420, North Bay. 

" J. J. Watson, Albion No. 109, Harrowsmith. 

" C. B. Wilson, True Blue No. 98, Bolton. _ _^ 

V.W. Bro. W. J. Adams, Wingham No. 286, Wingham. 

R. C. Addison, Shuniah No. 287, Port Arthur. 

T. E. Armstrong, Howard No. 391, Ridgetown. 
" J. W. Brvan, King Solomon's No. 43, Woodstock. 

" C. Campbell, Belmont No. 190, Belmont. 

T. E. Cotton, Speed No. 180, Guelph. 
" K. R. Davis, Richardson No. 136, Stouffville. 

R. T. Dunlop, The Tuscan No. 195, London. 
" G. J. Emei-y, Clifton No. 254, Niagara Falls. 

" W. C. Farley, Ionic No. 526, Ottawa. 

" J. D. Galbraith, Prince of Wales No. 171, lona 

Station. 
" C. H. Hahnau, The Electric No. 495, Hamilton. 

" W. M. Hargraft, Ionic No. 25, Toronto. 

" R. M. Harcourt, Ionic No. 25, Toronto. 

" A. Irvine, Cathedral No. 643, Toronto. 

" A. W. Massie, King Solomon's No. 43, Woodstock. 

" C. W. Newell, St. John's No. 82, Paris. 

" F. Pew, Mountain No. 221, Thorold. 

" H. P. Phillips, Acacia No. 430, Toronto. 



I 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 126 

" G. H. Porritt, Golden Rule No. 409, Gravenhurst. 

" J. A. Reid, Chaudiere No. 264, Ottawa. 

" (Dr.) J. A. Simpson, Acacia No. 61, Hamilton. 

" R. Somerville, Patricia No. 587, Toronto. 

" J. H. Sullivan, Wellington No. 46, Chatham. 

" H. A. Wilson, Ionic No. 229, Brampton. 

" C. E. Woodstock, Stevenson No. 218, Toronto. 

W. Bro. W. A. Armstrong, Doric No. 58, Ottawa. 

D. E. Bell, Marmora No. 222, Marmora. 
" A. Bennett, Occident No. 346, Toronto. 
" T. G. Bishop, Cataraqui No. 92, Kingston. 
" L. J. Burrows, Orient No. 339, Toronto. 
" E. Chamberlain, Kilwinning No. 64, London, 
" J. E. Clegg, Tuscan No. 551, Hamilton. 

S. Coates, Orillia No. 192. Oriillia. 
" F. A. Coons, Henderson No. 383, Winchester. 
" C. A. Copp, Albion No. 109, Harrowsmith. 

D. T. Crawford, Maple Leaf No. 103, St. 
Catharines. 
" G. F. Davenport. Malahide No. 140, Aylmer. 
" W. Donaldson, Bernard No. 225, Listowel. 
" D H. Doyle, Century No. 457, Merlin. 
" P.' G. Edwards, St John's No. 20, London. 
" J. S. Ellacott, Elma No. 456, Monkton. 
" W. T. Fennell. Golden Rule No. 409. Gravenhurst. 
" J. E. Eraser. Pembroke No. 128, Pembroke. 
" M. J. Gordon. Maple Leaf No. 103. St. Catharines. 
" H. J. Haire, St. John's No. 82, Paris. 
" L. E. Haist. Phoenix No. 535, Fonthill. 
" F C. Harrison, Ionic No. 25, Toronto. 
" E. J. Hassard, Walker No. 321, Acton. 

W. Hitchins, Havelock No. 435, Havelock. 
" J. T. Homsby, Faithful Brethren No. 77, Lindsay. 
" F. J. Hughes', Rising Sun No. 129, Aurora. 
" J. H. Hughes, Wilson No. 86. Toronto. 
" W. J. Hughes, St. John's No. 63, Carleton Place. 
" W. W. Hurley, Lome No. 282, Glencoe. 
" T. M. Jamieson, New Hope No. 279, Hespeler. 
" F H. Kvdd, Jerusalem No. 31, Bowmanville. 

K. Mackav, Silver No. 486, Cobalt. 
" R. W. Meiklejohn, Sterling No. 69, Sterling. 

G. H. Mitchell, Beaver No. 234. Thornbury. 
" W. S. Montgomerv, Tecumseh No. 245, Thamesville. 
" A. Morrell, St. John's No. 40, Hamilton. 
" W. S. Murphy. Osiris No. 489, Smiths Falls. 
" L. T. McLaughlin. Jenisalem No. 31. Bowmanville. 
" J. G.' McLean. Huron No. 392, Camlachie. 
" A. G. Noxon, Grand River No. 151, Kitchener. 
" G. Packer, The Doric No. 382, Hamilton. 
" E. Read, Union No. 380, London. 
" H. Richardson, King Edward No. 488, Harrow. 

J. E Ritchie, Grev No. 589, Toronto. 



126 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

O. Roberts, Middlesex No. 379, Bryanston. 
W. J. Salter, Lebanon No. 139, Oshawa. 
J. G. Sands, St. Andrew's No. 593, Hamilton. 
H. D. Sherrin, Washin^on No. 260, Petrolia. 
J. C. Smith, The St. Thomas No. 44, St. Thomas. 
W, B. Snow, Prince of Wales No. 371, Ottawa. 

C. G. Taylor, Prince Arthur No. 228, Odessa. 

F. R. Taylor, Belmont No. 190, Belmont. 

G. A. Teeple, Erie No. 149, Port Dover. 
W. A. Thompson, Union No. 9, Napanee. 

D. C. Town, Durham No. 306, Durham. 
W. 0. Tudhope, Orillia No. 192, Orillia. 
R. W. Warwick, Doric No. 58, Ottawa. 
G. C. Webster, Durham No. 306, Durham, 
N, H. Wice, Minerva No. 304, Stroud. 
W. M. Wilkinson, Oakville No. 400, Oakville. 

Bro. G. J. Abbey, St. John's No. 75, Toronto. 

" R. Acland, The Doric No. 382, Hamilton, 

" R. C. Addison, The St. Thomas No. 44, St. Thomas. 

" G. W. Allan, St. John's No. 63, Carleton Place. 

" W. N. Anderson, North Star No. 322, Owen Sound. 

" J. Argue, York No. 156, Toronto. 

" E. Armstrong, Ionic No. 526, Ottawa. 

" J. Armstrong, York No. 156, Toronto. 

" W. G. Armstrong, The St. Thomas No. 44, St. Thomas. 

" G. A. Arnold, Orient No. 339, Toronto. 

" C. Aspinall, Rehoboam No. 65, Toronto. 

" J. Atkins, Clifton No. 254, Niagara Falls. 

" H. Bailey, Unity No, 376, Huntsville, 

" G. H. Bardawill, Kilwinning No. 64, London. 

" R. H. Barker, Burford No. 106, Burford. 

" R. Barnes, The Builders No. 177, Ottawa. 

" D. Barr, Westport No. 441, Westport. 

" W. Bates, Temple No. 324, Hamilton. 

" A. Beare. Acacia No. 61, Hamilton. 

" J. P. Bell, St. John's No. 209A, London, 

" C. Belton, Corinthian No, 96, Barrie, 

" 'G. A. Bennett, King Hiram No. 78, Tillsonburg. 

" W. T. Biggar, Fort William No. 415, Fort William. 

" E. R. Birchard, Dufferin No. 570, Toronto. 

" V. J. Blackwell, St. John's No. 209A, London. 

" H. R. Blade, Doric No. 58, Ottawa. 

" W. Boddy, Lebanon No. 139, Oshawa. 

" C. C Box, Ontario No. 26, Port Hope. 

" J. Bracken, J. Peel No. 468, Caledon East. 

" C. L. Bray, Civil Service No. 148, Ottawa. 

" F. G. Brennagh, Shuniah No. 287, Pt. Arthur. 

" C L. Brewer, Corinthian No. 101, Peterborough. 

" S. Brickell, The St. Thomas No. 44, St. Thomas. 

" S. W. Brittain, The Electric No. 495, Hamilton. 

" J. J. Brooks, Bums' No. 153, Wyoming. 

" G. C. Brown, Corinthian No. 96, Barrie. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 127 

W. C. Brown, Tuscan No. 99, Newmarket. 

W. L. Brown, Valley No. 100, Dundas, 

W. T. Brown, Oakville No. 400, Oakville. 

H. Brownlee. Ontario No. 26, Poil Hope. 

W. Bruce, Fort William No. 415, Fort William. 

L. W. Buck, The St. Thomas No. 44, St. Thomas. 

J. H. Bull, Corinthian No. 330, London. 

W. Bunton, Harmony No. 438, Toronto. 

L. E. Burley, Tuscan No. 551, Hamilton. 

J. Burns, Tuscan No. 541, Toronto. 

F. C. Butters, Havelock No. 435, Havelock. 
A. E. Cameron, Defenders No. 590, Ottawa. 
0. G. Cameron, Kerr No. 230, Barrie. 

R. N. Card, Royal No. 453, Fort William. 

'G. A. Carson, Tuscan No. 437, Sarnia. 

J. H. Caster, Brougham Union No. 269, Brougham. 

E. J. Catcher, Corinthian No. 96, Barrie. 

G. E. Chapman, Sussex No. 5, Brockville. 
J. Clayton, The Doric No. 382, Hamilton. 
J. P. Clayton, Rehoboam No. 65, Toronto. 
T. H. Clee, Stevenson No. 218, Toronto. 

J. E. Cole, Golden Star No. 484, Dryden. 

J. G. Collison, The St. Thomas No. 44, St. Thomas, 

F. M. Connell, Harcourt No. 581, Toronto. 
S. J. Cook, King Solomon's No. 378. London. 
W. J. Cook, King Solomon's No. 378, London. 
R. W. Comer, Acacia No. 61, Hamilton. 

W. H. Courtice. Civil Service No. 148. Ottawa. 

C. L. Cousins, Ashlar No. 247, Toronto. 

D. R. Cowan, St. George No. 367, Toronto. 
S. W. Crabb. Pembroke No. 128, Pembroke. 
G W. Craig, Silver No. 486, Cobalt. 

R. L. Crerar, Marmora No. 222, Marmora. 
A. Crowson, The Builders No. 177, Ottawa. 
W. Cunningham, Wilson No. 113, Waterford. 
O. M. Danby, Temple No. 324, Hamilton. 
W. F. Davidson. Adanac No. 614, Merritton. 
J. B. Davis, Orient No. 339, Toronto. 
R. S. Davis, Temple No. 324. Hamilton. 
R. Decker, Stevenson No. 218. Toronto. 

G. Deisenroth, York No. 156, Toronto. 

W. Y. Denison, Prince of Wales No. 371, Ottawa. 

H. Dixon, Temple No. 324, Hamilton. 

iS. J. Duffield. Tuscan No. 437, Sarnia. 

T. Dunbar, Erie No. 149, Port Dover. 

W. H. Dundas, Ir\ang No. 154, Lucan. 

J. H. G. Eccles, St. John's No. 40, Hamilton. 

W. S. Edwards, Alpha No. 384, Toronto. 

F. G. Elliott, Georgian No. 343, Toronto. 

H. W. Elliott, Oxford No. 76, Woodstock. 

J. A. Elliott, Corinthian No. 96, Barrie. 

M. T. Ellis, Zetland No. 326, Toronto. 

M. E. Elves, The St. Thomas No. 44, St. Thomas. 



128 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

" J. H, Emerton, Cope-Stone No. 373, Welland. 

" R. T, Evans, Peel No. 468, Caledon East. 

" E. A. Fairbaim, Central No. 110, Prescott. 

" S. A. Fay, Walsingham No. 174, Port Rowan. 

" J. H. Fee, Doric No. 58, Ottawa. 

" B. R. Ferguson, Crystal Fountain No. 389, North 

Augusta. 

" E. D. Fletcher, Washington No. 260, Petrolia. 

" W. J. J. Fletcher, Manitoba No. 236, Cookstown. 

" R. C. Flood. King Edward No. 488, Harrow. 

" G. Fraser, Union No. 380, London. 

" J. Freeborn, Temple No. 324, Hamilton. 

" A. Freeman, Burlington No. 165, Burlington. 

" R. I. Fry, York No. 156, Toronto. 

" R. FuUerton, Rehoboam No. 65, Toronto. 

" E. B. Gandier, Kilwinning No. 64, London. 

" R. R. Gatehouse, Preston No. 297, Preston. 

" A. T. Ghent, Burlington No. 165, Burlington. 

" J. F. S. Gildea, Shuniah No. 287, Port Arthur. 

" N. Glauser, Palmer No. 372, Fort Erie. 

" J. McK. Gordon, Rehoboam No. 65, Toronto. 

" R. A. Gordon, Cope-Stone No. 373, Welland. 

" D. D. Gray, The Builders No. 177, Ottawa. 

" W. A. Greenwood, MacNab No. 169, Port Colbome. 

" R. C. Guest, Sevenson No. 218, Toronto. 

" T. Guy, The St. Thomas No. 44, St. Thomas. 

" A. Haines, Corinthian No. 96, Barrie. 

" I. V. Hall, Wilson No. 113, Waterford. 

" J. M. Hall, Waterdown No. 357, Millgrove. 

" L. R. Hall, Moira No. 11, Belleville. 

" W. A. Hare, Doric No. 58, Ottawa. 

" R. J. Hart, Burns' No. 153, Wyoming. 

" L. J. HayNvood, Zetland No. 326, Toronto. 

" 0. Heath, Hammond No. 327, Wardsville. 

" W. N. Hemphill, Grey No. 589, Toronto. 

" A. Henderson, St. John No. 20, London. 

" W Henry, Mimosa No. 576, Toronto. 

" S. B. Herbert, Orient No. 339, Toronto. 

" F. Hill. King Solomon's No. 22. Toronto. 

" J. W. Holmes, Eureka No. 283, Belleville. 

" B. B. Horton, Manitoba No. 236, CookstowTi. 

" T. R. Houston, Georgian No. 343, Toronto, 

" L. H. Howard, Lancaster No. 207, Lancaster. 

" R. H. Howard, Ashlar No. 247, Toronto. 

" C. L. Howe, McCoy No. 242, Malloryto^\^l. 

" G. E. Howie, Kilwinning No. 565, Toronto. 

" G. E. Hummel, Cedar No. 396. Wiarton. 

" H. O. Hunt, King Solomon's No. 378, London. 

" H. M. Hunter, Bums' No. 153, Wyoming. 

" L. M. Hunter, Doric No. 58, Ottawa. 

" W. D. Hunter, Union No. 9, Napanee. 

" T. J. Hurst, Elma No. 456, Monkton. 

" W. B. Hyslop, Dufferin No. 291, West Flamboro. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 129 

" R. Ireton, Cobden No. 459. Cobden. 

" J. R. Jenkins, Great Western No. 47, Windsor. 

" A. Johnson, Seymour No. 277, Port Dalhousie. 

" F. Johnston, Hullett No. 568, Londesboro. 

" A. R. Keeler, St. George's No. 41, Kingsville. 

" W. G. Kent, Lodge of Fidelity No. 231. Ottawa. 

" G. W. Kerr, Acacia No. 430, Toronto. 

" G. M. Kerr, Windsor No. 403, Windsor 

" T. A. Kidd. Mount Zion No. 28, Kemptville. 
H. S. Kirkland, Osiris No. 489, Smiths Falls. 

" J. H. Langford, St. John's No. 209 A, London. 

" W. Lauder, York No. 156. Toronto. 

" 'G. A. Laughlen, Rehoboam No. 65, Toronto. 

" E. Lawrence, St. George's No. 41, Kingsville. 

' J. Leakey, Minerva No. 304, Stroud. 

" S. Lederman, Grand River No. 151, Kitchener. 

" C. Legg, Acacia No. 430, Toronto. 

" G. W. Legge, Prince of Wales No. 371, Ottawa. 

" G. S. Leitch, Tuscan No. 551, Hamilton. 

" H. H. Leitch. Maxville No. 418, Maxville. 

" E. J. Lennox, Friendly Brothers' No. 143, Iroquois. 

" W. J. W. Lennox, Manitboa No. 236, Cookstown. 

'"' W. Linklater, Temple No. 324, Hamilton. 

" T. H. Little, St. John's No. 209A, London. 

" D. A. Loomis, Peterborough No. 155, Peterborough 

" W. G. Loper. Doric No. 58, Ottawa. 

" G. M. Lyon, Chaudiere No, 264, Ottawa. 

" C. W. Manning, Dundurn No. 475, Hamilton. 

" F. B. Marble, The St. Thomas No. 44 St. Thomas. 

" T. Matheson, Tudor No. 141, Mitchell. 

" A. Maudsley, Cope-Stone No. 373, Welland. 

" ^G. Melrose. Bernard No. 225, Listowel, 

" P. K. Menzies, Ashlar No. 247, Toronto. 

" J. 0. Milks, Shuniah No. 287, Port Arthur. 

" W. C, Morton, Goodwood No. 159, Ottawa. 

" J, Munro, Alpha No. 384, Toronto. 

" J. F. Myers, Excelsior No. 142, Morrisburg. 

" T>. A. McCallum. Lome No. 282, Glencoe. 

" W. McCannan, Pequonga No. 414, Kenora. 

" P. M. McCarrell, Corinthian No. 101, Peterborough 

" F. E. McCauley, Corinthian No. 481. Toronto 

" J. McComish, St. Andrew's No. 560, Ottawa. 

" D. H. McCracken, McNab No. 169, Port Colbome. 

" E. McCreary. Eureka No. 283, Belleville. 

" R. R. McDonald, Leopold No. 397, Brigden. 

" J. W. McEwen, Georgina No. 343, Toronto. 

" C. C. McKnight, Lome No. 622. Chapleau. 

" D. H. Mclntyre, The St. Thomas No. 44, St Thomas 

" G. E. Mclntyre. St. Mark's No. 94, Port Stanley 

" E. P. McLean. Dalhousie No. 52. Ottawa. 

" R. J. McMillin, Corinthian No. 96, Barrie. 

" J. R. McNeill, Palmer No. 372, Fort Erie. 

" W. R. McQuade, The Rising Sun No. 129 Aurora. 



130 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

" T, McRobie, Cardinal No. 491, Cardinal. 

" L. H. Newman, Doric No. 58, Ottawa. 

" A. W. Newson. Temple No. 324, Hamilton. 

" B. E. Norrish, Civil Service No. 148, Ottawa. 

" €. A. Northey, Great Western No. 47, Windsor. 

" E. L. Oberg, Shuniah No. 287, Port Arthur. 

" H. J. Oliver, Doric No. 58, Ottawa. 

" H B. O'Neill, Queen City No. 552, Toronto. 

" C. G. Orton, Prince of Wales No. 371, Ottawa. 

" A. E. Pain. Prince of Wales No. 371, Ottawa. 

" W. Park, Bancroft No. 482, Bancroft. 

" R. P. Parker, The Doric No. 382, Hamilton. 

" A. Patterson, Bancroft No. 482, Bancroft. 

" W. R. Pattyson, Fort William No. 415. Fort William. 

" C. A. Peck, Rehoboam No. 65,. Toronto. 

" R. Perry, Mimico No. 369, Lambton Mills. 

" H. E. Porter, King Solomon's No. 43, Woodstock. 

" H. W. H. Powell, Oxford No. 76, Woodstock. 

" J. L. Price, The Beaches No. 473, Toronto. 

" C. A. Publow, Prince Edward No. 18, Picton. 

" C. Querrie. Wilson No. 86, Toronto. 

" J. E. Qurik, Bancroft No. 482, Bancroft. 

" R. J. Ralph, Shuniah No. 287, Port Arthur. 

" M, E. Rajmer, Waterdown No. 357, Millgrove. 

" C. A. Reeves, Walsingham No. 174, Port Rowan. 

" S. Rettie, Civil Ser\'ice No. 148, Ottawa. 

" R. B. Richardson, Bancroft No. 482, Bancroft. 

" J, A. Riddell, Clifton No. 254, Niagara Falls. 

" J. E. Riddell, St. John's No. 40, Hamilton. 

" J. H. RidgAvay, Prince of Wales No. 371, Ottawa. 

" R. Ritchie, Tuscan No. 551, Hamilton. 

" A. Robertson, St. Andrew's No. 16, Toronto. 

" A. J. Robertson, Tuscan No. 541, Toronto. 

" L. J. Robbins, The St. Thomas No. 44, St. Thomas. 

" R. Robinson, Zeta No. 410, Toronto. 

" N. H. Rogers, Tuscan No. 99, Newmarket. 

" S. G. Rose, Sussex No. 5, Brockville. 

" E. A. Round, King Hiram No. 78, Tillsonburg. 

" T. C. Rowe. Prince of Wales No. 371, Ottawa. 

" E. J. Ryan, Alpha No. 384, Toronto. 

" F. Ryckman, Huron No. 224, Hensall. 

" J. W. Sales, King Solomon No. 43. Woodstock, 

" J. E. Saker, Thistle No. 34, Amherstburg. 

" C. A. Sanders, Clifton No. 254, Niagara Falls. 

" A. S<;ott, King Hiram No. 78, Tillsonburg. 

" C. E. Scott, Georgian No. 348, Penetanguishene. 

" C. R. Secord, Pn\TC No. 312, Wallaceburg. 

" C. B. Sheldrick. Parthenon No. 267, Chatham. 

" J. L. Shields, Karaak No. 492, Coldwater. 

" R. C. Simpson, Cope-Stone No. 371. Welland. 

" W. T. Sloan, Georgina No. 343, Toronto. 

" A. S. Small, Temple No. 324, Hamilton. 

" J. A. Smiley, St. John's No. 40, Hamilton. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 131 

H. C. Smith, Central No. 110, Prescott. 
F. J. Smith, St. John's No. 40, Hamilton. 
St. C. Smith, The Beaches No. 473, Toronto. 
S. T. Smith, St. George No. 367, Toronto. 
R. H. Squire, Tudor No. 141, Mitchell. 
J. Q. Stanley, Nickel No. 427, Sudbury. 

D. J. Stewart, Maxville No. 418, Maxville. 

H. W. Stone, North Star No. 322, Owen Sound. 

F. R. Stover, St. Clair No. 425, Sombra. 

R. A. M. Stranghan, Morning Star No. 309 Carlow. 

C. R. Swayzie, St. John's No. 209A, London ' 

W. Sudlow, High Park No. 531, Toronto. ' 

T. B. Sykes, Kamak No. 492, Coldwater 

J. Tasker, Acacia No. 61, Hamilton. 

P. Taylor, St. George No. 367, Toronto. 

E. Thompson, Irving No. 154, Lucan. 

,ir'^in°"^P^°"' ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^- 382, Hamilton 
W. Thompson, Hope No. 114, Port Hope. 
W. Thompson, Orient No. 339, Toronto. 

G. Thoms, Prince Arthur No. 228, Odessa 
S. M. Thome, Orient No. 339, Toronto. 

T. G. C. Tichborne, Maitland No. 33, Goderich. 

W. L. Till, Rehoboam No. 65, Toronto. 

■F. J. Unger, Doric No. 121, Brantford. 

L. G. Utting, King Hiram No. 37, Ingersoll. 

C. S. Valleau, Bancroft No. 482, Bancroft 

K. G. VanWagoner, Great Western No. 47, Windsor. 

h,. Vincent, Ontario No. 26 Port Hope 

C. W Wagner, Doric No. 121, Brantford. 

W. H. Wakelin, Hope No. 114, Port Hope 

A" S" ^allace. St. John's No. 40, Hamilton. 

H. S. Wan\'ick, Cataraqui No. 92, Kingston 

T. J._Wat?on, Clementi No. 313, Lakefield. 

F. E. Watt, Cope-Stone No. 373 Welland. 

G. A. Weese, Bancroft No. 482, Bancroft. 

£• r T^^!^^^ ^^^"^ ^i^'^r No. 151, Kitchener. 

F. J. Wells. The Builders No. 177, Ottawa. 

^- H. Wells, Walsingham No. 174, Port Rowan. 

W. J. White, Bums No. 436, Hepworth. 

K. A. Wilken, Maitland No. 33. Goderich. 

C. E. Williams. Faithful Brethren No. 77, Lindsay. 

F. C. Wilson, St. John's No. 209A, London 

J. Wilson. Mountain No. 221, Thorold. 

M. 0. Wilson. Lome No. 622, Chapleau. 

W. Wilson, The Electric No. 495, Hamilton. 

W. A. Woodhouse, Valley No. 100, Dundas 

A. Woosey, Temple No. 324. Hamilton. 

F. Wright, King Edward No. 488, Harrow 

J. C. C. Wright, Prince of Wales No. 371, Ottawa. 

W. L. Yates, Victoria No. 56, Samia. 



132 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

SIXTY YEAR PIN FOR VETERAN JUBILEE MEDAL 

The following' brethren have been awarded a Sixty 
Year Pin in recognition of sixty years' service as a Mason: 



R.W 



Bro. C. J. Halliday, Forest No. 393, Chesley. 



R.W. Bro. T. Montgomery, Victoria No. 56, Samia, 
V.W. Bro. J. Eyre, Grenville No. 629. Toronto. 
R. Ferguson, York No. 156, Toronto. 
A. F. Sprott, Harmony No. 438, Toronto. 
W. Bro. W. A. Campbell, Wingham No. 286, Wingham. 
W. I. Dick, St. Clair No. 135, Milton. 
A. J. Gilmore, Maple Leaf No. 103. St. Catharines. 
J. W. Harvey, The Doric No. 382, Hamilton. 
J, W. Patterson. St. John's No. 63, Carleton Place. 
F. T. Pattison, Palmer No. 372, Fort Erie. 
R. G. Varey, Maple Leaf No. 103, St. Catharines. 
A. S. Williams, Civil Service No. 148, Ottawa. 
Bro. H. Bloom, Star-of-the-East No. 422, Bothwell. 
" H. Brownlee, Ontario No. 26, Port Hope. 
" R. D. Buchanan, Acacia No. 430, Toronto. 
" W. A. Burns, Civil Service No. 148, Ottawa. 
" C. W. Carley. Corinthian No. 96, Barrie. 
" A. T. Darrag-h. Wilson No. 86. Toronto. 
" W. R. Follis, Stanley No. 426, Toronto. 
" A. A. Hallett, Caledonian No. 249, Midland. 
" D. C. McMillan. Victoria No. 56. Samia. 
" A. H. Neville, King Hiram No. 78, Tillsonburg. 
" C. L. Painter. The St. Thomas No. 44. St. Thomas. 
" G. H. Scott, Oxford No. 76. Woodstock. 
" J. Sheridan, Occident No. 346, Toronto, 
" A. H. Staneland. Harmony No. 438, Toronto. 
" F. H. Stevens, Cope-Stone No. 373. Welland. 
" G. E. Waller, Acacia No. 61, Hamilton. 
" R. H. Wilson, King Hiram No. 7«, Tillsonburg. 

COMMITTEE OF SCRUTINEERS 

The Grand Master appointed V.W. Bro. Robert 
Straohan, Chairman of the Committee of Scrutin- 
eers to supervise and count the vote at the election 
of Grand Lodge officers, with power to name the 
members of the Committee. 

REPORTS OF THE DISTRICT DEPUTY 
GRAND MASTERS 

The reports of the thirty-seven District Deputy 
Grand Masters were presented by the Assistant to 
the Grand Secretary and on motion of the Deputy 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1961 1«3 

Grand Master, seconded by the Assistant to the 
Grand Secretary, they were received and referred 
to the Board of General Purposes. 

Tlie Report of every District Deputy Grand 
Master is addressed to "The Most Worshipful the 
Grand Master, Officers and Members of the Grand 
Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada in the Pix)vince of 
Ontario." Each begins, "Most Worshipful Sir and 
Brethren," and every one ends, quite rightly, "Res- 
pectfully and fraternally submitted." To save space 
these formalities are omitted from the beginning 
and end of each Report. 

ALGOMA DISTRICT 

For me to have had the privilege of serving my brethren 
in Algoma District has been indeed a most wonderful ex- 
perience, and may I now express my appreciation for this 
distinguished honour which has been bestowed upon me. 

The cordial and gracious reception extended in each 
of the eleven Lodges is evidence of the high esteem and 
loyalty of the brethren of this District for the Grand Master 
and Grand Lodge. 

The first pleasant engagement after the summer recess, 
was the reception and banquet for our Grand Master, M.W. 
Bro. C. M. Pitts, which was held in Trinity Hall, Port Arthur, 
on September 9th. M.W. Bro. Pitts gave a very inspiring 
address which was deeply appreciated by all the brethren 
present. The brethren of Algoma were pleased to have the 
brethren from Atikokan Lodge of Western District join with 
them for this occasion. 

During the early autumn. Divine Services were held 
throughout the District, the first being a combined Sei^ice 
for all the Fort William Lodges to the Westfort Baptist 
Church on October 16th. The Lodges in Port Arthur com- 
bined a Service, in Trinity United Church on November 13th, 
with Bro. Rev. Russell A. Peden, the District Chaplain taldng 
the Service. The Lodges in the outlying area of the District 
held their Church Sei-vuces in turn, each attending the Church 
of their choice and with their local clergyman conducting 
the Service. I am happy to report that all Services were 
well attended, which confirms the old adage that "to be a good 
Mason, one must also be a good churchman." 

During the official visits to the Lodges, I was greatly 
impressed with the high calibre of the degree work being 



134 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

done throughout the District. In each Lodge, I found the 
officers, assisted by the Past Masters, carrying out their 
duties most efficiently and with sincerity and dignity. 
Business during the meeting was dispatched with carefulness, 
and the financial condition of the Lrodges throughout the 
area is sound. 

Fraternal visits between the Lodges of Algoma and 
counterparts in the State of Minnesota, U.S.A. seem to be 
highlights for some of the Lodges, and five of them make 
this interchange of visits annually. 

In the matter of blood donations, it was found that the 
company tov/ns of the District still head the list per capita, 
although there has been a great increase in the number of 
donors throughout the whole area. My sincere thanks and 
appreciation go to Bro. Harold Lockwocd, the Fire Chief of 
Fort William, who chaired the committee this year. 

In the matter of Masonic Education, I found that each 
Lodge had made progress in this field, due to the inter- 
change of speakers which at present is prevailing within 
the District. This, along with the papers presented and 
accompanying the "Travelling Square", which also travels 
from one Lodge to another, has created great interest in 
the area and continues to foster a greater bond between the 
distant Lodges. 

There were many highlights during the year, but those 
of greatest magnitude were : — the presentation of the William 
Mercer Wilson Medal to Bro. Jock Thomson of Kaministiquia 
Lodge, No. 584, which is the first one of the District; also 
the unofficial visit of R. W. Bro. Dr. Eric W. Nancekivell of 
Hamilton "B" who flew in 900 miles to be present at the 
initiation of his brother. Dr. Keith Nancekivell into Kam 
Lodge, Fort William; the visitation of all the Past Grand 
Lodge Officers of this District, some 28 in number, to Port 
Arthur Lodge, No. 499, on April 10th; and finally the present- 
ation to Bro. John A. Walker of Shuniah Lodge, No. 287, of 
the Seventy Year Bar to his Veteran Jubilee Medal on May 
2nd of this year. 

To the following I must express my sincere appreciation 
for their very capable assistance during my term of office: — 
Wor. Bro. W. E. Shaw, District Secretary; Wor. Bro. A. M. 
Allan, District Supervisor of Masonic Education; Bro. Rev. 
Russell A. Peden, District Chaplain; and V. Wor. Bro. R. H. 
Scowen, Grand Steward. My sincere thanks also to the 
many brethren who have done so much to make my year in 
office pleasant, as well as contributing towards the well- 
being and advancement of Masonry throughout the District. 

STEWART I. KNOX, DJ).G.M. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 135 

BRANT DISTRICT 

It was a great honour and a pleasure to have served 
in this historic Brant District during the past year, and I 
wish to express my gratitude to the Grand Master and to 
my brethren of the District for having made this possible. 

Early in the year, Brant District was greatly privileged 
to extend a welcome to the Most Worshipful, the Grand 
Master, on the occasion of the One Hundredth Anniversary 
of Wilson Lodge. No. 113, and District Reception. This event, 
held in the Waterford High School, was largely attended 
and, thanks to a most active committee from Wilson Lodge, 
the programme was highly successful. The Grand Master's 
address was the highlight of the evening. 

It is gratifying to report a most successful Masonic 
year, with harmony existing to a high degree and lodge 
matters in good hands. Congratulations are due the Masters 
and their officers for the excellent manner in which the 
degrees were exemplified. I am sure the candidates in every 
instance must have been greatly impressed. Special mention 
must be made of the Lodge Secretaries who are giving so 
liberally of their time and ability in keeping the affairs 
of the various Lodges in such good condition. 

The loyalty, enthusiasm, and support of the District 
Officers was of great assistance. I was pleased to have 
Wor. Bro. Marshall Murphy act as District Secretary and 
no one could have showTi greater devotion to duty in the 
arranging and completion of so many details. 

In like manner Bro. Rev. Dr. J. P. Pryse performed his 
duties as District Chaplain. He w^as in attendance at aU 
official visits and contributed to the ceremonies by reading 
a portion from the Volume of the Sacred Law and leading 
in a brief prayer. Bro. Pryse also contributed grreatly in 
assisting in the arrangements for the District Divine Service 
held in the Church of St. John the Divine, Cayuga. The 
Service was in charge of Bro. Percival Mayes with the 
address being given by Bro. Pryse on the subject "In Whom 
Do We Trust". There was a very large attendance and the 
church was packed to the doors. 

Wor. Bro. H. E. Jones, as Superv'isor of Ma?onic Edu- 
cation, gave a demonstration at each official visit on what 
can be done in a two minute talk on various items of Masonic 
lore. Wor. Bro. Jones also assisted in making arrangements 
for the holding of a Lodge of Instru^ction. Through the kind- 
ness of the Master and officers of Scotland Lodge, the First 
Degree was exemplified at this Lodge of Instruction in a 
masterful and impressive manner. Ever>^ opportunitv was 
taken to draw attention to essential points as the work pro- 



138 GHAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

gressed. This event was also largely attended with an 
overflow crowd in the anteroom. A special word of ap- 
preciation should go to Rt. Wor. Bro. R. W. E. McFadden 
and Wor. Bro. Len Taylor, as well as the Master and officers 
of the Lodge, and the Masters', Past Masters' and Wardens' 
Association for making the whole evening so successful and 
worthwhile. 

Brant District has a very active Masters', Past Masters' 
and Wardens' Association with Wor. Bro. William Ferguson, 
having been President during the past year. In addition to 
the event just mentioned above, this organization was for- 
tunate in having Rt. Wor. Bro. John H. Eydt of Hamilton 
address the Annual Meeting when he gave a most inspiring 
address on Masonic matters. 

It was a great pleasure to attend the 100th Installation 
Ceremony conducted by Rt. Wor. Bro. Bert Stobbs at St. 
George Lodge. This distinguished brother, who has served 
his own Lodge and Masonry in general so well, has achieved 
an enviable record of service as Installing Master. The 
large attendance on this occasion by representatives of so 
many Lodges, both in and out of the District, testified to 
the high esteem in which Rt. Wor. Bro. iStobbs is held. 

Approximately $1,000.00 was paid out in relief by var- 
ious Lodges of the District. All known cases were given 
careful attention. Arrearages and suspensions for non-pay- 
ment of dues have caused some concern. This may in a 
measure be a reflection of the times but the situation is not 
out of control and Lodges are doing everything in their 
power to effect a remedy. 

This report would not be complete without mentioning 
two other activities. Rt. Wor. Bro. S. E. Painter readily 
accepted the Chairmanship of the Remembrance Memorial 
Fund and urged the brethren of the District to support this 
worthy cause. The donations were not as high as anticipated 
but extenuating circumstances in some cases at least did 
interfere. The other activity was in connection with the 
Blood Donors' Committee, V. Wor. Bro. Wes. Clark assumed 
the Chairmanship of this work and made a special and direct 
appeal to each member in the District to contribute in this 
way. Great credit is due him for his efforts. 

Lodge premises have been found in good repair and 
adequately covered with insurance. 

In conclusion, I am pleased to report that Masonic Lodges 
in Brant District are making a real contribution to the life 
of the Community in which they ser\'e. It has been my 
earnest hope to have promoted a deeper interest in making 
Masonry an integral part of the life of each member. 

A. GORDON SKINNER, D.D.G.M. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 137 

BRUCE DISTRICT 

As one begins the year of District Deputy for the Grand 
Master, one first thinks of the obligations he took at the 
time of installation. Will he be worthy of the confidence 
th_e Brethren placed in him, and can he add anything- to the 
principles of Masonry which his predecessors had exemplified ? 
However, after spending a few hours with Past Grand 
Master Bro. Harry L. Martyn, Custodian of the Work, one 
felt encourag-ed and strengthened to adapt himself to the 
duties of this highly esteemed office to which the Brethren 
had elected him. Now, as my year of office ends, it is my 
duty to give a report of my stewardship, hoping that I have 
proved a favorable representative of our Grand Master in 
the District of Bruce. 

I was accompanied on all my visits by Wor. Bro. Robt. 
Cruick?hank, a life member of Burns Lodge, whom I ap- 
pointed District Secretary. His reports were favorable for 
all Lodges and showed increases in membership in eleven, 
with all Lodges showing a desire to encourage high standards 
of efficipncy in their work. Most lodge rooms were neatly 
decorated and well lighted, gi^^ng an appeal of welcome to 
all Brethren. 

I was favored in having Bro. Rev, Clifford Manning as 
District Chaplain. His past experience far excelled his ap- 
pointment this year, as he was Grand Chaplain of the Grand 
Lodge in Quebec during 1958-59. It was an honored occasion 
for me to invest him with a Past Grand Chaplains' Jewel in 
St. Lawrence Lodge, Southampton on February 14th. 

Wor. Bro. G. Walker, District Treasurer, took care of 
the finances of the District in a capable manner. Wor. Bro. 
John Veals, whom I appointed District Supervisor of Masonic 
Education, and a group of Brethren, with special mention 
going to Bro. Stoppard of Hanover Lodge, visited every 
Lodge in the District and gave educational talks. 

Many Lodges throughout the District held Ladies' Night. 
While not being able to attend all, owing to some being held 
on the same night, my wife and I are very grateful for the 
kind hospitality v.-e received as honored guests. Several 
Lodges in Bruce District held local Divine Services, which I 
also tried to attend, and all report a good attendance. Our 
District Divine Service held on June 4th in Hepworth United 
Church with Bro, Manning officiating, was attended by 
Brethren from every Lodge in the District. 

On October 31st, I was privileged to attend Grand Lodge 
in Hamilton at the Unveiling of the Comer-Stone and Dedi- 
cation of our new Memorial Building, which every Brother 
is urged to visit at his first opxwrtunity. I was honored in 



138 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

assisting Most Worshipful Bro. Pitts in laying the comer- 
stone at the ne^Y Public School in Palmerston on May 18. 
This was followed by a banquet in Lucknow in the evening- 
being a guest of Rt. Wor. Bro. J. Little of North Huron 
District. I also assisted Past Grand Master Bro. Harry L. 
Martyn, in the dedication of the new lodge rooms in Mount 
Forest, Grey District, the guest of Rt. Wor. Bro. P. McTavish. 

A favorable response has been given to the Memorial 
Fund and also to the Blood Donors' Bank, both worthwhile 
efforts which I stressed on all official visits. It has been 
very helpful having Rt. Wor. Bro. S. MacKenzie, Member of 
Board of General Purposes, attend many of my official visits. 
I also presented Wor. Bro. John White of Burns Lodge with 
a Fifty Year Medal. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank the Wor. Masters, Secre- 
taries, and Brethren of Bruce District for their faithful 
support and co-operation in making this a year to be re- 
membered by me, looking for a bright future for Masonry 
in Bruce District. 

WILLIS I. SPENCER. D.D.G.M. 



CHATHAM DISTRICT 

In submitting my report on the year's activities I would 
like first of all to acknowledge with gratitude the honour 
of representing the Grand Master in our District. It has 
been a rewarding experience and one of the happiest years 
of my life. To the Wor. Masters, officers and members who 
made it so I extend my thanks. 

Of great interest to me, at the start of my term, was 
the meeting called by Most Wor. Bro. Harry Martyn, at which 
we were given a wealth of instruction and had an opportunity 
of becoming better acquainted with our neighbouring District 
Deputies. 

My District Secretary, Wor. Bro. W. A. Munro, carried 
out his duties in a very commendable manner, and accom- 
panied me on all my official visits. We are happy to report 
all the Lodges have their work up well and have their books 
in good order. Many are readjusting their dues and fees to 
cope with rising costs and expenses. Several of our Lodges 
are enjoying new or renovated quarters, and others are 
planning changes which augers well for the future of 
Masonry. 

I had the honour of presenting a 60-year Pin to Wor. 
Bro. Henry Bloom of Bothwell, No. 422. There were also 
several 50 Year Medals presented during the year and on 
one occasion, Dyer Doyle of Merlin, No. 457, had his son 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 189 

and grandson, both of whom are active in his o^vn Lodffe, 
present. I am also happy to report that Lome Lodge, No. 
282's centenarian member (age 103) now residing in Michigan 
paid a visit to his home Lodge and is still getting about 
very well. 

Our District was saddened by the passing to the Grand 
Lodge Above of our Senior D.D.GjM. of Chatham District, 
Rt. Wor. Bro. Angus Graham of Thamesville, No. 245, also 
V. Wor. Bro. Harry Harvey of Wardsville, No. 327. To 
their families and all those bereaved throughout the year 
we extend our sympathy. We cherish their memory in our 
hearts. 

Wor. Bro. Alex McKellar, Chairman on Masonic Edu- 
cation, reports that this phase of Masonic Work is finding 
increased favour among our Lodges, and we would recom- 
mend that it be continued as it gives an opportunity for 
more members to assist the regular officers in lodge work; 
and to stimulate interest. 

Our schedule was so arranged that we were able to 
accept many invitations to our neighbouring districts which 
included several receptions for our Grand Master which we 
enjoyed most heartily. This was climaxed when seven 
District Deputies paid a return visit to our District on the 
occasion of the Reception for our Grand Master when they 
and 300 brethren sat down to a banquet in his honour on 
April 25. M. Wor. Bro. C. MacLeod Pitts, addressed the 
gathering in his very capable manner with wit and inspir- 
ation. 

My wife and I are most fateful for the kindnesses 
accorded us when we were honoured at the Social Evenings 
and Ladies' Nights at the various Lodges. 

A fitting climax to a wonderful year was the District 
Divine Service on May 28, at the Glencoe United Church, 
where our District Chaplain Wor. Bro. Rev. Harry Mahoney, 
chose as his subject "Strength and Beauty in Masonry". 

I would be remiss if I completed my report without a 
word of thanks to the 28 Lome Lodge members, (one of the 
largest groups registered at Grand Lodge) for their most 
capable support at the meeting, and to all the brethren of the 
District who have so ably supported me throughout the year. 
My only hope is that I have fulfilled my duties and in some 
way contributed a bit to the future of Masonry. 

I extend my sincere good -wishes to my successor and 
his officers. 

H. W. BAUER, D.D.G3f. 



140 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

EASTERN DISTRICT 

The rewarding experience of serving as D.D.G.M. in 
this the home District of the Grand Master has been an ex- 
perience I shall cherish with pleasure and gratification. 

The cordial and gracious reception extended by the 
Lodges is evidence of the fraternal feeling and affection the 
Masons of Eastern District have for the Grand Master as 
well as the Grand Lodge. This was particularly evident in 
Hawkesbury, No. 450, the mother Lodge of our Most Wor- 
shipful Grand Master, 

The appointments of Wor. Bro. Graham Garlough, as 
District Secretary, and Wor. Bro. Rev. E. B. Bugden, as 
District Chaplain, proved to be excellent choices. 

To my District Secretary who gave so generously of his 
time to accompany me on all visits, I give special thanks for 
his assistance. 

To the District Chaplain my sincerest commendation for 
his advice and guidance. 

Due to illness I was unable to conduct my scheduled 
official visit at Vankleek Hill and so warmest thanks to Rt. 
Wor. Bro. F. T. Shaver of Farran Ault Lodge, Ingleside, who 
assisted me on that occasion. 

My District Secretary reports that the records and 
finances of the Lodges are in excellent condition, with a 
minimum of member in arrears. 

I am pleased to report that Masonry in this District is 
enjoying prosperity and the lodges are under capable leader- 
ship which has a direct relationship to the excellence of our 
institution and the qualifications of its members. 

The work as observed throughout the year was of uni- 
formly high standard and with few exceptions evidence of 
careful preparation. 

I feel that special mention should be given Henderson 
Lodge, No. 383, and Friendly Brothers' Lodge, No. 143, each of 
which are building Masonic Temples this year. I have recent- 
ly visited both sites and find construction well advanced and 
that each expect to be ready for dedication this fall. 

I would like to pay tribute to Rt. Wor. Bro. F. T. Eaton 
of Cornwall for the excellent work he is doing in connection 
with the Past Masters' Association. 

;Divine Service was also a highlight of the year and I 
mention it specifically in order to bring special attention to 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 141 

Wor. Bro. Rev. Bug-den who has been so outstanding in ex- 
emplifying Masonry in its true light. I have received several 
communications of congratulations for the exceptionally 
impressive Divine Service which he conducted at the United 
Church, Williamsburg. 

Finally I am happy to state that a fine spirit of friend- 
ship and brotherly love prevails throughout the District. 

WILL W. SMAIL, D.D.G.M. 
FRONTENAC DISTRICT 

I beg to submit herewith my report on the condition 
of Masonry in Frontenac District. 

It was a privilege and an honour to serve as the D.D.G.M. 
of Frontenac District during the past year. I made many 
new Masonic friends and I hope these friendships will grow 
steadily over the vears as we meet about the Altar of 
"Brotherly Love". 

I was indeed, fortunate to have the following ardent and 
well-skilled brethren serve as District Officers: 

District Secretary — W. Bro. E. G. Caimichael 

District Chaplain — W. Bro. J. A. MacLeod 

Supei-\'isor of Masonic Education — R.W. Bro. T. J. 

Donnelly 
Chairman, District Blood Donors' Committee — Bfo. 

Leonard E. Ede. 

I wish to thank the?e brethren for the service they rendered 
to Frontenac District and for the help and co-operation they 
gave me in trying to make this a successful year. 

The District Secretary accompanied me on all my official 
visits at which times he inspected the records of each Lodge 
with the willing assistance of the Secretaries concerned. He 
reported that the records and registers were kept carefully 
and neatly and that the financial position of each Lodge ap- 
peared to be sound. Lodge reports showed a low number of 
suspensions for non-payment of dues, no suspensions for 
other causes, benevolent assistance granted wherever need 
was found, increased attention given to Masonic Education 
and a general increase in membership. 

The District Chaplain also accompanied me on all 
my official visits and on most of them he gave a short talk 
on Masonic Education. The subjects of his talks were chosen 
carefully to suit his office as Chaplain and all were well 
received by the brethren. He organized a very successful 
District Divine Sei-vice at the Church of the Redeemer, 



142 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Kingston, on Afpril 23rd, and was also present at a number 
of Divine Services held by the various Lodges. 

I am pleased to report that Masonry is in a healthful and 
thriving condition throughout the District. I was courteously 
received and thoughtfully treated on all occasions. All Lodges 
have capable and enthusiastic officers who are upholding the 
highest tradition of our fraternity. On my official visits 
the meetings were started on time; the work was done cor- 
rectly and promptly; and the evenings were brought to a 
close at a respectable hour. During each visit I gave the 
Lodges the benefit of the very useful knowledge I had gain- 
ed from M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn, Custodian of the Work, so 
that the uniformity of the Work was promoted throughout 
the District. Also, as a member of the Committee on Masonic 
Education, I emphasized the importance of this matter and 
suggested numerous sources of information, including the 
excellent bulletins sent out by R.W. Bro. W. K. Bailey. I 
made a point of talking with the candidates before each meet- 
ing and of addressing a few remarks to them in open Lodge 
at the end of the degree work. I took every opportunity to 
urge the brethren to support the Remembrance Memorial 
Fund as a token of their respect for those who died for out 
freedom and also as a token of their respect for Grand Lodge. 
I found all Lodge premises to be in good order and properly 
covered by insurance, 

I stressed the importance of punctuality, of planning the 
meeting carefully beforehand, and of allowing the brethren 
to get home at a reasonable hour. I endeavoured to set an 
example by having my remarks well prepared and to the 
point and most of all by speaking for no longer than fifteen 
minutes during my main address. The effectiveness of tids 
procedure was sho^vn in some measure, by the exceptionally 
good attendance at the meetings at which the D.D.G.M. 
made his official visit. 

I attended the centennial celebrations of Prince of Wales 
Lodge, No. 146, at Newburgh, in April of this year. Although 
small in numbers, the officers and members of this Lodge 
deserve credit for marking the one hundredth year of their 
existence by holding a special Church Service and Banquet. 
Also, during the year I had the honour of presenting several 
Veteran Jubilee Medals to deserving brethren of the District. 
I attended as many Lodge Divine Services as time and circum- 
stances i)ermitted. 

The Masons of Frontenac District were saddened by the 
death of three past D.D.G.M. 's during the year in the persons 
of R.W. Bro. Hayden Stanton of Rideau Lodge, No. 460; R.W. 
Bro. Harvey J. Milne of Minden Lodge, No. 253; and R.W. 
Bro. P. G. C. Campbell of The Ancient St. Johns Lodge, No. 
3 and Queen's Lodge No. 578. The contribution these worthy 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 143 

brethren made to Masonry in this District will not be soon 
forgotten. May they rest in peace. 

Mrs. Whiting: and I appreciated the invitations of the 
various Lodges to attend their "Ladies' Nights". While it was 
not possible to accept them all, we did appreciate being asked 
and, when we were able to attend, we enjoyed ourselves 
thoroughly. 

This has been a busy but happy and fruitful year thanks 
to the wonderful support given to me by the Past D.D.G.M.'s, 
the District Officers, the W.M. and Officers of Queen's Lodge 
and all the brethren of the District. I have benefitted greatly 
from experiences of the past year and hope that I have ful- 
filled the duties of D.D.G.M. to the satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. 

JAMES F. WHITING, D.D.G.M. 



GEORGIAN DISTRICT 



I wish to report a very inspiring year as D.D.G.M. of 
Georgian District. 

As soon as possible after assumption of office, I ap- 
pointed W. Bro. G. R. Lane of Karnak Lodge, No. 492, Cold- 
water, as my District Secretary, Bro. Robert Wilson as my 
District Chaplain and W. Bro. Dennis Athron as my Director 
of Masonic Education. 

On October .31st, 1960, my District Secretary, W. Bro. 
Lane, and T attended the unveiling of the Comer Stone 
and Dedication of the Grand Lodge Memorial Building at 
Hamilton and were both much impressed with the beautiful 
building and service of Dedication. 

I have attempted to impress the brethren of the various 
Lodges visited of the v.-orthiness and importance of the Grand 
Lodge Memorial Fund and hope that my efforts have met 
with success. 

Accompanied by my Secretary. I \'isited all the Lodges 
in the District at least once and at all meetings I was im- 
pressed by the enthusiastic reception received. At each of 
the meetincTs one of the three deerees was conferred and I 
am pleased to report that the officers and members of the 
various Lodges show re^l enthusiasm in their work, which 
was for the most part of a very high calibre. 



144 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

It is gratifying to know that Northern Light, Stayner, is 
completing new lodge buildings, which I understand they are 
starting this fall. 

W. Bro. Lane and I attended several Ladies' Nights ac- 
companied by our wives and enjoyed the evenings very much. 

Several 50 Year Medals were presented and one 60 Year 
Pin. It was very gratifying to participate in honouring these 
older brethren, who have done so much for the welfare of 
their Lodges in years past. 

On November 28th a District Reception to M.W. Bro. 
C. M. Pitts was held at the Stephen Leacock Pavillion in 
Orillia. This meeting was well attended by all the Lodges of 
the District and the Masters of all but two Lodges were 
present and received real inspiration from the fine address 
delivered by the Grand Master. 

The Masonic Officers' Association was again under the 
Chairmanship of Bro. (W) Mallion and has_ been active in 
prom.oting instruction and inter-Lodge visitation. 

At the request of R.W, Bro. Shannon, I appointed W. 
Bro. J. M. Heslip, of Nitetis Lodge, Creemore, as Chairman 
of the Masonic Blood Donors' Committee for the District and 
wish to thank him for the capable manner in which he has 
handled this project. 

The District Director of Masonic Education reports that 
19 of the 20 Lodges in the District have Comniittees on 
Masonic Education and are making progress in this import- 
ant branch of Masonry. The importance of Masonic education 
was stressed at my regular inspections. 

My District Secretary accompanied me on all but one of 
my visits and reports that the finances of the various Lodges 
in the District are in a healthy condition with two or three 
exceptions. Efforts are being made to improve conditions in 
the latter. 

On June 11th, a District Divine Service was held at 
Coldwater United Church under the able direction of Bro. 
Rev. Robert Wilson, District Chaplain. A very fine Service 
was participated in by Masons from all parts of Georgian 
District. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank all the brethren of the 
District who have given me their whole-hearted support. 
I specially wish to thank W. Bro. Lane for the very capable 
way he handled the office of District Secretary. 

GEORGE W. HALL, D.D.G.I(L 



TOROJJTO, ONTARIO, 1961 U3 

GREY DISTRICT 

I have the honour and pleasure to present herewdth my 
report on the condition of Masonry in Grey District for the 
past Masonic year. 

May I first of all be permitted to express my very deep 
appreciation of the high honour conferred upon me by the 
brethren of the District in electing me to the important 
office of District Deputy Grand Master. I wish also to thank 
the brethren of my own Lodge for proposing and supporting 
me at my election and during the past year. 

The reception accorded to me on my official visits was 
most courteous and sincere in each of the twelve Lodges. 
This I believe, is an indication of the esteem that the frater- 
nity holds for the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master and 
the Grand Lodge, of which we are a part. In particular, the 
Masters of the Lodges and their Secretaries are to be com- 
mended for their co-operation. 

I have been ably assisted by Wor. Bro. Stanley Goulding, 
District Secretary, who accompanied me on all visits. Wor. 
Bro. Leonard Kerr filled the office of Supervisor of Masonic 
Education and a layman, Wor. Bro. Allan Snowe, capably 
performed the duties of District Chaplain. To these brethren 
I wish to record my thanks. 

At eleven of the official inspections a degree was con- 
ferred and the work of the officers and those assisting was 
very well done. The ritual was strictly maintained and only 
constructive suggestions could be offered. On one \'isit 
Masonic education was the work of the evening and this was 
exceptionally Avell presented and well received. Usually the 
theme of my own remarks at the banquet table was an 
endeavour to associate the application of Freemasonry to 
the problems of the world of to-day. At several of my 
visits it was my pleasure to have with me one or two 
D.D.G.M.'s from adjacent Districts and it was aiso my 
pleasure to visit with them. 

On May 26th St. Alban's Lodge, Mount Forest, dedicated 
their new lodge building. M. Wor'. Bro. H. L. Martyn very 
ably represented M. Wor. Bro. Pitts who was unable to be 
present. I am grateful to M. Wor. Bro. MartjTi, the Grand 
Secretary's office, and the many present and past Grand 
Lodge officers who made this ceremony the success that it 
was. My congratulations also to the officers and brethren 
of St. Alban's Lodge on their accomplishment. Two more 
new lodge buildings are in the planning stages in this 
District. 

On June 4th the Annual District Church Service was held 
in St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Arthur. We were 



146 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

honoured to have the Grand Chaplain, Rt. Wor. Bro. Hazle- 
wood, present to give us an excellent sermon on the three 
well known truths of Masonry, "Faith, Hope and Charity". 
There was a good representation from most of the Lodges 
of the District and the social hour that followed the Service 
added greatly to the enjoyment of the occasion. 

At the beginning of my term I had hopes of continuing 
the work of Rt. Wor. Bro. Fyfe in forming a Masters', Past 
Masters' and Wardens' Association in Grey District. Due 
to the pressure of my private duties and the lack of en- 
thusiasm of some of the brethren contacted I have made little 
progress. I hope I may lend assistance in the future to this 
worthy project which has been discussed in this District for 
over twenty-five years. 

In conclusion, let me say that the year just past has 
been the highlight in my Masonic experience and will ever 
remain in my memory and be considered as such. I would 
bespeak for my successor the same wholehearted encourage- 
ment and support which has been so generously accorded to 
me. The condition of Masonry in Grey District is good and 
I am confident that every member will strive to keep it so. 

PETER C. McTAVISH, D.D.G.M. 



HAMILTON "A" DISTRICT 

As my term rapidly draws to a close and I look back upoH) 
this Masonic year I do so with many fond memories. To me 
this past year has been one of experience and satisfaction. 
One only receives out of Masonry what one puts into it. This 
can be very well applied to everyday living; if a job is worth 
doing at all, it is certainly worth doing well. 

I was most fortunate in having W. Bro. R. C. Cunningham 
accept the office of District Secretary. R.W. Bro. W. L. 

Sommerville kindly consented to act as chairman for Masonic 
Education. W. Bro. Fred Scott acted as chairman for the 
Blood Donors' Committee. R.W. Bro. John E. Piercy took 
command of the Grand Lodge Memorial Building Fund. Bro. 
The Reverend Lockie Royal accepted the duties of District 
Chaplain assisted by Bro. John McKay. These brethren 
mentioned above certainly have been a tower of strength to 
me. However, I am very sorry to report that Bro. Royal 
departed from our midst in the middle of December on re- 
ceiving a call from the Presbytery in the Town of Goderich. 
This was certainly a sad loss for me, but what has been our 
loss in Hamilton District "A" will certaily be a decided gain 
for the District of South Huron. 

I visited each of the nineteen Lodges in my District at 
least once, and several of them again on special occasions. 



TORO>JTO, ONTARIO. 1961 147 

On the evening- of my official visit one of the three degrees 
was conferred in a manner which was good to excellent. 
The greater majority of the Lodges allocate the work of the 
degree in such a manner that by the time an officer reaches 
the Master's Chair he has derived a commanding- knowledge 
of the work. A short talk on Masonic Education was given at 
practically every meeting and the Manual for the instruction 
of the candidate was presented with few exceptions at the 
completion of the degree. It was also quite apparent that 
many of the Lodges include their young members in their 
work. I was accompanied on each official I'isit by a rural 
Lodge to an urban Lodge, and vice versa by an unrban Lodge 
to a rural Lodge, which I think tends to promote a feeling 
of good will between city and country. Divine Services were 
held by the Lodg-es many of which I had the privilege to 
attend in my own District, and also in other Districts. 

In the field of Masonic Education, three meetings were 
held under the supervision of R.W. Bro. W. L. Sommerville. 
The first of these took place in October in Claude M. Kent 
Lodge, No. 681, Oak\'ill€, when R.W. Bro. W. K. Bailey the 
Chairman of the Grand Lodge Committee for Masonic Edu- 
cation was the guest speaker. During the month of Feb- 
ruary a second meeting was held in Waterdovra Lodge, No. 
357, MillgTove, where the speaker of the evening was R.W. 
Bro. Reverend Gordon Hazlewood, Grand Chaplain. The third 
meeting was the locale of my Mother Lodge, St. Clair, No. 
13'5, Milton, and on that occasion M.W. Bro. C. P. Seeley, 
Past Grand Master of The Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan, 
addressed the brethren. At these three meetings there was 
an attendance of four hundred and fifteen brethren. 

A Lodge of Instruction on the First Degree was held on 
June 2nd in Burlington Lodge, No. 165, under the supervision 
of R.W. Bro. J. N. Creen, R.W. Bro. D. K. Wright, and 
W. Bro. C. D. Reading. The attendance was most gratifying. 
The purpose of the meeting was to correct any deviations 
which mig-ht creep in. 

The many "at Homes" held by the various Lodges of the 
two Hamilton Districts, which Mrs. Cunningham and I at- 
tended and thoroughly enjoyed, were some of the most 
pleasant activities of my year. I have had many invitations 
to other Districts where I was welcomed most graciously. 
I have accompanied the Ontario Provincial Police Degree 
Team for District No. 3 on occasions when they have initiat- 
ed one of their oaxti men into the Craft. Several fraternal 
visits were exchanged with our brethren in the United States 
where Masons from this Grand Jurisdiction are held in very 
high esteem. 

The resjponse to The Grand Lodge Memorial Fund has 
not been as great as anticipated, but we hope it will steadily 
increase before the closing date. 



148 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

I have had the pleasure of presenting several Fifty Year 
Medals to our brethren of declining years, to whom we owe 
a debt of gratitude for long ser\'ice in the Craft. They are 
the real pillars of Masonry, who dispatch light and know- 
ledge to our younger brethren, and who lend a helping hand 
in whatever field they are called upon. We regret that 
some members of the Craft have of necessity been suspended 
for non-payment of dues, and we deeply regret the sudden 
passing of several to the Grand Lodge Above. 

In the two Hamilton Districts the Past Masters' Assoc- 
iation with its President W. Bro. G. B. Cowan, and Secretary 
V.W. Bro. Robt. Strachan and the Masters' and Wardens' 
Association under the Presidency of V/. Bro. R. F. Billington 
for 1960 and W. Bro. Len Hewitt for 1961 have contributed 
much to the advancement of Masonry, and have supported 
me whole heartedly. The manner in which they supervised 
the reception to M.W. Bro. Clarence MacLeod Pitts is certain- 
ly to be commended. 

The following are a few of the many highlights of my 
year. 

On the 29th of September, M.W. Bro. C. M. Pitts visited 
my Mother Lodge, St. Clair, No. 135, on the occasion of its 
one Hundredth Anniversary. 

October 31st. The unveiling of the Comer Stone and 
Dedication of the Grand Lodge Memorial Building in Han:iil- 
ton. This was not only a very impressive and educative 
cerem.ony as carried out by the Grand Lodge Officers, but 
also gave the many visitors from other Districts an oppor- 
tunity to witness for themselves, how it can rain in the 
ambitious city when it so desires. 

December 5th. The celebration in Claude M. Kent Lodge, 
No. 681, Oakville, of her fifth anniversary. 

January 25th. The remembrance ceremony of Robbie 
Burns' two hundred and second birthday in St. Andrew's 
Lodge, No. 593, Hamilton. 

April 6th. The official visit to my own Mother Lodge, 
St. Clair, No. 135, Milton was an evening I will remember 
and cherish in the years to come. W. Bro. Charles Fay 
welcomed the visitors to our midst on that occasion. Of 
the nineteen Lodges in my District, seventeen were repre- 
sented by their Masters. There were thirty-seven Lodges 
represented and many of the visitors were present and past 
Grand Lodge Officers. The total attendance was over two 
hundred. 

April 7th. The two Hamilton Districts held a reception 
for M.W. Bro. C. M. Pitts, when over four hundred Masons 
were on hand to greet him, many coming from other Districts. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 149 

In conclusion, may I express to the officers of Grand 
Lodge, every Mason in my District, as well as those in other 
Districts my sincere thanks and appreciation for the many 
courtesies extended to me during my term of office. 

"May each one of you be endowed ^^^th every good and 
perfect gift, while travelling along the rugged path of life. 
And may God be with us all until we meet again". 

J. C. CUNNINGHAM, D.D.G.M. 



HAMILTON "B" DISTRICT' 

May I submit my report on Hamilton Masonic District 
"B"' and say what a rare privilege and rewarding experience 
it has been to represent our Grand Master in this area. 

I was most fortunate in mychoice of District Officers 
this year which were as follows: District Secretary, Wor. Bro. 
Tom Bacon; District Chaplain, Bro. the Rev. W. H. Simpson; 
Assistant District Chaplain, Wor. Bro. George Abel, and 
District Supei-visor of Masonic Education, Wor. Bro. Frank 
Shoebridge. Wor. Bro. Bacon accompanied me on every 
one of my 20 official visits and was always ready to perform 
any task requested of him. 

Rt. Wor. Bro. Harrison Martindale was chairman of the 
Grand Lodge Remembrance Memorial Fund and Bro. Mervyn 
Bolstad continued on as Chairman of the Blood Donors' Com- 
mittee. To both of these brethren, we are greatly indebted. 

I visited each Lodge in my District officially and was 
received always with great respect and honour. My ■w'ife 
and I also were pleased to be present at approximately 
twenty Ladies' Nights. We enjoyed these evenings immensely 
and particularly appreciated the flowers sent to my wife. 

I was able to attend eight of nine Divine Ser\"ices held, 
and at most of them was honoured to read a lesson. The 
religious as{>ect of Masonry in this area is flourishing as 
witnessed by the good attendance at these Services. 

I attended three receptions to our Grand Master, two of 
which were centennial celebrations at Waterford and Port 
Dover, and the other was our own Hamilton Reception. The 
deep respect in which our Grand Master is held, and the 
great admiration for his ready wit and tremendous vitality 
were much in evidence. 

I had occasion to visit our Deputy Grand Master, Rt. 
Wor. Bro. R. W. Treleaven on several occasions and to ob- 



150 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

serve how eminently well-fitted he is to occupy the highest 
office of Masonry. May I wish him health, happiness and a 
deep sense of achievement in the two years which lie ahead. 

One of the happiest duties of my year of office was to 
travel to Fort William and assist in initiating my brother 
Keith, who is a surgeon, into Kaministiquia Lodge, No. 584. 

We are very fortunate in Hamilton in having in our city 
the Grand Lodge Administrative Building and I would like to 
acknowledge gratefully the ready counsel and advice freely 
given by our Grand Secretary, Rt. Wor. Bro. E. G. Dixon, 
and his assistant, Rt. Wor. Bro. George McQueen. We in 
Hamilton are extremely proud of our beautiful new building 
and the Memorial to our departed brethren which it repre- 
sents. 

It may not be too much to hope that in the not too 
distant future a new Hamilton Masonic Hall may be erected 
in that area. 

There are functioning in this area two very active and 
efficient Masonic organizations, the Past Masters' Association 
and the Masters' and Wardens' Association and it has been 
my privilege to work closely with them this year. 

Hamilton Masonic District "B" held a night of Masonic 
Education this year on the 31st of May and the evening was 
devoted to "The Music of the Ritual". It was well attended 
and an excellent address was presented by Wor. Bro. F. 
Shoebridge. An idea was presented to form a Hamilton 
Masonic Choir and this I heartily endorse. 

May I, as a doctor, conclude by pronouncing the Body of 
Masonry in Hamilton Masonic District "B" very fit indeed 
and further state that the prognosis is excellent. 

If I have, during my term of office, done anything to 
reflect the enthusiasm and dedication to Masonic Principles 
which our Grand Master, M. Wor. Bro. Pitts, epitomizes, then 
I am profoundly grateful to the Great Architect of the 
Universe who guides and directs us in all that we think and 
say and do. 

ERIC W. NANCEKIVELL, DJ).G.M. 



LONDON DISTRICT 

Every Mason is taught that Masonry is a progressive 
science. It therefore becomes every Mason's duty and re- 
sponsibility to make an evaluation of his stewardship in this 
great Fraternity, and record any progress which Masonry 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 151 

has made because of his daily advancement in the Order. 
As my term in the London District draws to a close, it is 
my pleasure to report theprogress of Masonry in this District. 

Foremost in my mind is the devotion and enthusiasm of 
the Worsshipful Masters and Officers of the twenty-four 
Lodg-es of this District. They are serving their Lodges faith- 
fully, diligently guarding the ancient landmarks of the Order 
and always attempting to perform the ritual in an accurate 
and dignified manner. Candidates cannot help but be deeply 
impressed when degrees are conferred with such excellence. 

Equally as impressive to the initiates and visitors of the 
various Lodges is the spirit of brotherly love which they 
experience. A friendly handshake and a kindly greeting 
are always extended to them. 

The care and protection which the brethren are continu- 
ing to give to their Masonic Temples, lodge rooms and 
furnishings clearly reflect their great pride for Masonry. 
During the past year many of the Lodges have made com- 
mendable improvements to their premises and are planning 
more during the coming year. 

One of the gi*eat concerns of the ^Grand Master is the 
great loss the Craft suffers through suspensions. It is most 
gratifying to note that the number of suspensions in the 
London District is steadily decreasing. Fourteen of the 
Lodges reported no suspensions. At the time of my inspec- 
tion many of these same Lodges reported a relatively small 
number of members who were twelve months in arrears in 
their dues. Of the three Lodges who had no dues in arrears, 
one was a large city Lodge, and another was a Lodge which 
for seven consecutive years has had no arrears in dues. 
Those Lodges experiencing some difficulty in this regard 
would be well-advised to examine the effective methods em- 
ployed by these three Lodges. 

In the London District, as well as in many of the other 
Districts, one of the great problems of each Worshipful 
Master is that of the attendance at lodge meetings. Various 
means have been used to try to maintain the interest of 
those who attend regularly, and to revive the interest of 
those who have not attended Lodge for some time. Roll 
Call _ and Memorial Sein-ices, members' degree teams and 
visiting degree teams, interesting educational programmes, 
and fraternal visits among the Lodges of this District and 
surrounding Districts have contributed greatly in this regard. 
One of the Lodges honoured all members who had twenty- 
five or more years of continuous membership in the Craft. 
This stimulated great interest especially among these older 
brethren. The Worshipful Masters are to be commended for 
their resourcefulness in the careful planning of such meet- 
ings. 



152 GRAND LODGE OF C-\^'ADA ANNUAL COMMUNaCATION 

The District Super\-isor of Masonic Education, Wor. 
Bro. John Higgins, and his committee are to be congratulated 
on the fine leadership which they gave in Masonic Education. 
•Our thanks go out to the Worshipful Master, Officers and 
Members of Nilesto\\-n Lodge, No. 345, for being host for 
our District Masonic Education Meeting. We are most grate- 
ful to R. Wor. Bro. J. E. Piercy of Hamilton for his excellent 
address, and to the panel members for their part in the pro- 
gramme. 

There has always been an intimate relationship between 
Masonry and the Church. Most of the Lodges^ of the District 
are continuing to foster this close association by holding 
Divine Ser^-ices. It was a pleasure to attend these. The 
District Divine Service was held in Calvary United Church, 
London, Sunday evening, May 7th. The District Chaplain, 
Rev. Wor. Bro.' Harold Snell ,who has given such fine spirit- 
ual leadership during his term of office, gave a most inspir- 
ing message to the large congregation of brethren, their 
families and friends. He Avas ably assisted in the Service 
bv tAvo former District Chaplains. Bro. Rev. Dr. E. G. 
Tumbull, minister of Calvary United Church, and V. Wor. 
Bro. Walter Kiteley. 

We are fortunate in the London District to have a very 
active Past Masters', Masters' and Wardens' Association. It 
has continued the monthly visitations to the Deamess Home 
for Senior Citizens, and has also sponsored, a Masonic Blood 
Donors' Clinic. This first clinic proved very successful, and 
regular clinics are being planned for the future. 

The London District Reception for the Most Worshipful 
the Grand Master highlighted the Masonic Year. The 
brethren of this District and the large number of visitors 
from other Masonic Districts were greatly inspired by the 
challenging addsress delivered so eloquently by Most Wor. 
Bro. C. M. Pitts. 

Reference was made earlier to the fine contribution 
made by Rev. Wor. Bro. Harold Snell, District Chaplain, and 
Wor. Bro. John Higgins, District Super\isor of Masonic 
Eduucation. I would also like to pay tribute to the District 
Secretary, Wor. Bro. Jack Atkins, for his loyal support and 
capable assitance. I value highly the opportunity of work- 
ing so closely with such congenial and faithful Masons. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank most sincerely the Grand 
Master and the brethren of the London District for granting 
m.e this privilege of serving Masonry in this District. I am 
most grateful to the Present and Past Grand Lodge Officers, 
the Past Masters, the Worshipful Masters, the Officers and 
members of the twenty-four Li)dges for their inspiration and 
support. The many courtesies and kindnesses extended to 



TORONTO, O>rrARI0. 1961 153 

my wife and myself on so many occasions were greatly ap- 
preciated. I sincerely hope that my stewardship in this 
office has proved worthy of your confidence, 

A. CARMAN WHITMORE, D.D.G.M. 



MUSKOKA - PARRY SOUND DISTRICT 

My year as representative of the Most Worshipful The 
Grand Master has been most satisfying. No D.D.G.M, 
could have received better support from the members than I. 
My District Secretaiy, Wor, Bro, J, W, Nickalls, relieved me 
of much of the detail of the work by his efficient handling 
of the secretarial duties and by assisting at each official 
meeting, 

Rt. Wor. Bro. Rev. H. O. Hutcheson, District Chaplain, 
with his great Masonic experience and his ability, was a 
guiding hand to me and to the District. Unfortunately R.W. 
Bro. Hutcheson became ill during the year and has been 
unable to accompany me since April 1st, but his advice has 
enabled me to carry on to a successful conclusion. 

Wor. Bro. W. W. Johns, Director of Benevolence, has 
also been of great assistance having assisted at each meeting 
with a talk on behalf of the Blood Donors' Committee, 

At each meeting the brethren were reminded of the 
Masonic Memorial Building in Hamilton, All Lodges of the 
District have now made contributions to this building. They 
were also asked to make contributions of blood for the Blood 
Bank, There was also a plea for better attendance at Grand 
Lodge at the Annual Communication. Already 30 members 
have signified their intention of attending. Last year 13 was 
the total attendance. 

During the year I had the honour of presenting several 
of the Past Masters with their jewels as well as presenting 
50 Year Veteran Jubilee Medals to Wor. Bro. W Fennel! 
of Golden Rule Lodge, Gravenhurst and to Bro. Henry Bailey 
of Unity Lodge, Huntsville. 

One event of significance took place during the year, 
which was unique. Algonquin Lodge. Emsdale, initiated three 
Marshall brothers in one evening. This is the second time 
three brothers have been initiated in this Lodge at the same 
time; the previous occasion was in October, 1908, when the 
three McPhail brothers were initiated, on this occasion none 
of the brothers knew the others had applied. 

The work in all the Lodges of the District was excellent. 
The officers are, in the main, young, vigorous men who are 



154 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

all a credit to the Craft. I found the sons of many of our 
Past Masters and of three of the past D.D.G.M.'s preparing 
themselves to be Masters of their Lodges. 

At my official visit to my own Lodge, Unity, I was 
honoured by the presence of Rt. Wor. Bro. Hector E. Wilson, 
Grand Senior Warden, whose visit was greatly appreciated. 
The message he delivered on that occasion was well received 
by the brethren. 

A Lodge of Instruction, under the direction of Wor. 
Bro. E. V. Ellliott, was held from 2.00 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. 
Wednesday, May 17th, in the auditorium of the Huntsville 
Memorial Community Centre. There were 180 in attendance 
from all parts of the District and it was most successful. 
The co-operation of M.W. Bro. Harry L. Martyn in arranging 
this very instructive function is greatly appreciated. 

The highlight of this day was the visit of The Grand 
Master, M.W. Bro. C. M. Pitts. Wor. Bro. J. D. Nickalls, 
District Secretary, and I had the privilege of entertaining 
him in the afternoon preceding the banquet in his honour. 
TTie attendance at this banquet was large and enthusiastic. 
The address was excellent. Muskoka^Parry Sound District 
was honoured by his presence. M.W. Bro. Pitts was ac- 
companied by V.W. Bro. W. E. Meldrum, Grand Director of 
Ceremonies. 

I sincerely hope that Grand Lodge Officers will continue 
the practice of visiting this District in the future, as they 
have this year. In the past these visits have been few and 
far between. Their visits are great morale builders for us 
and a great benefit to the Craft. 

The individual Church Services were well attended. The 
District Church Serrice was outstanding. This was held 
Sunday, June 4th, at 7.30 p.m. at Trinity United Chuurch, 
Huntsville. Bro. Rev. Norman Thomas of Granite Lodge, 
Parry Sound, delivered the sermon, his text "The Golden 
Bowl". This Service was well attended. Many Masons 
brought their wives and it was gratifying to have them with 
us. 

My year as District Deputy Grand Master was most 
gratifying because of the loyal support of the officers and 
members of the Lodges of the District, of my own Lodge, of 
the Wardens', Masters' and Past Masters' Association and 
the Grand Master, the Custodian of the Work and the other 
Grand Lodge Officers who gave their assistance. For all 
this I am humbly grateful. 

SIDNEY G. AVERY, D D.G.M. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 155 

NIAGARA "A ' DISTRICT 

It has been e very rewarding- experience for me to serve 
as D.D.G.M. during the year. The esteem and respect for 
the Grand Master is reflected by the sincerity with which I 
was received throughout the District. 

The appointment of W. Bro. Edward R. Lewis as District 
Secretary proved to be a most excellent choice. He perform- 
ed the duties of his office with an enthusiasm that merited 
every promise and trust which I had for him and he has 
certainly won for himself the sincere esteem of his brethren. 
While the D.D.G.M. perhaps, is the recipient of great honour, 
we must not forget the great contribution to the District 
which is given by the District Secretarj% 

Wor. Bro. Rev. James L. Blair consented to act as 
District Chaplain, and our Annual District Divine Service was 
held May 7th in Grace Anglican Church, St. Catharines. 

Wor. Bro. A. V. Hammond acted as District Chairman of 
Masonic Education, and was most enthusiastic in the dis- 
charge of his duties. 

On all of my official visits I was greeted with well filled 
lodge rooms. I noticed an increasing number of the brethren 
taking part in the work, which had added to the interest, 
while the Past Masters were ever ready to assist the Wor- 
shipful Master in his labours and to instruct their junior 
members. 

The Secretaries of the District continue to give outstand- 
ing service to their individual Lodges and also, give the 
finest leadership at all times. 

I visited each Lodge several times during the year, and 
have been impressed with the very excellent degree work 
done in this District; the standard is exceptionally high. 
Along with my Secretary and our wives we have been happy 
to accept invitations to many social functions in the District, 
and we have enjoyed very much the oppoi-tunity of meeting 
so many of the brethren and their ladies. We will certainly 
retain the most pleasant recollections for years to come, 
from the friendship in evidence at these occasions. 

As a climax to our year Niagara "A" DiBtrict joined 
with the brethren of Niagara "B" District on April 24th, 
when we had the Grand Master's Banquet and Reception. 
The splendid talk by our Most Worshipful Brother Clarence 
MacLeod Pitts, will long be remembered bv the members of 
Niagara Districts. Ovir only regret was, that Rt. Wor. Bro. 
E. G. Dixon, our Grand Secretary, who, through sickness, 
was unable to be present. 



156 GRANT) LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

In conclusion, may I say that I appreciate so much the 
genuine and sincere co-operation which I have received during 
the year. The many friends which I have made, and the 
kindness of so many brethren have given me great encourage- 
ment, and I sincerely wish to thank my brethren for the great 
privilege which has been mine. 

FRED R. ALLISON, D.D.G.M. 



NIAGARA "B" DISTRICT 

In a very short while, my term as D.D.'G.M. will pass 
into history, thus- bringing to a close the most inspiring, 
educational and pleasurable year that I have ever experienced 
in Masonry. For me to have had this happy privilege to 
serve the Lodges in Niagara District "B" has indeed been a 
most wonderful and rewarding experience. 

My year of office has been made most pleasant by the 
sincere co-operation and understanding of the Masters and 
Officers of each Lodge in the District. The cordial and 
gracious reception accorded me on my official and fraternal 
visits to each of the fourteen Lodges, is sincerely and grate- 
fully acknowledged. 

I feel greatly indebted to Wor. Bro. G. K. Chapman, 
who served me as my Senior Warden during my year as 
Master, and has served me once more, and most capably, as 
the District Secretary. Sincere and devoted to the duties 
of his office, Wor. Bro. Chapman has added in no small 
measure to any success which may have been attained. He 
accompanied me on all my official visits and I do appreciate 
his untiring assistance. 

Brother, Rev. T. E. Hancock of Seymour Lodge, No. 272, 
Ancaster and now residing in Fort Erie, and Minister of 
Central Ave. United Church, acted as the District Chaplain. 
He accompanied me on as many occasions as his duties would 
permit and endeared himself to all. On our visit to Centenn- 
ial Lodge, No. 679, he dedicated an Altar Cloth donated by 
the father and mother of their late son who had been a 
member of the Lodge less than a year. Bro. Hancock also 
conducted the District Divine Service in his and my church 
on Sunday afternoon, May 28th, with a splendid attendance. 
Bro. Hancock chose as his subject "The Certainty of God", 
and delivered a most inspiring address. Also assisting in 
the Service, my daughter, Faye Cornell, sang a solo, which 
was much appreciated by Dad and the brethren. 

I apiwinted Wor. Bro. E. W. Spencer of Palmer Lodge 
to act as the Super\'isor of Masonic Education. Wor. Bro. 
Spencer accompanied me on most of my \nsits and gave in- 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 157 

formative talks on Masonic E<lucation. He was also invited 
to individual Lodges to give Educational addresses, which he 
did most credibly. 

I appointed V. Wor. Bro. F. E. Wilson of Adoniram 
Lodge, Niagara Falls, to act as Chainnan of the Blood 
Donors' Committee for the District, and he has this work 
much better and more fully organized than previously. 

I visited each of the fourteen Lodges once officially, and 
most of them a second time fraternally. On the occasion of 
each visit I was much impressed with the dignity with which 
the Masters of each Lodge, assisted by the Past Masters and 
Officers, conferred the three degrees. Practically every 
Officer was sincere and created an impression on the candi- 
dates. I also make favourable comment regarding the care 
and exactness with which the candidates had prepared their 
work for advancement to the Fellowcraft and Master Mason 
Degrees. It was indicative of the fine tutoring which they 
had received. 

The books and records of all Lodges were inspected and 
were found to be well kept and in order. The Secretaries 
are to be commended for the manner in which they zealously 
perform their duties. 

The Masters' and Wardens' Association held two meet- 
ings during the year which were both well attended. Last 
Fall one was held in Palmer Lodge. Fort Erie, at which 
P.D.D.G.M. W. E. McDonald of Mountain Lodge, Thorold, gave 
a most interesting and inspiring address. At the Spring 
meeting, held in Clifton Lodge, Niagara Falls, we were 
privileged to have P.D.D.G.M. A. W. Bedwell of Hamilton 
speak on "Ancient Masonry", and this was most inspiring and 
educational. 

Every Lodge holds its individual Divine Serv'ice either 
in the Spring or Fall of the year and the attendance at all 
these Services is most gratifying. 

On April 24th, the two Niagara Districts "A" and "B" 
were hiighly honored with a \nsit from the Grand Master, 
M.W. Bro. C. MacLeod Pitts, and this was truly the highlight 
of my term of Office. This reception and dinner, which 
was held in Niagara Falls, was well attended, and the address 
of the Grand Master, together A\ith his dynamic personality, 
made a lasting impression on everyone present. 

The majority of the Lodges in the District, held "Ladies' 
Nights". Mrs. Cornell and I, as well as the District Secre- 
tary and Mrs. Chapman, appreciate the numerous invitations 
to join the Lodges on these occasions and, while we were not 
able to attend all of these, we certainly did enjoy the genuine 
hospitality extended to us when we were able to be present. 



158 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

During the year, I had the happy privilege to present a 
Sixty Year Pin to Wor. Bro. F. T. Pattison of Palmer Lodge; 
a Fifty Year Past Master's Long Ser\'ice Medal to Wor. Bro. 
P. A. Rice of Cope-Stone Lodge; also eight Fifty Year 
Veteran's Jubilee Medals throughout the District. The 
reminiscences of these Brethren were very enlightening. 

_ Several International visits with our Brethren of the 
United States further cemented our already friendly Masonic 
relations. The highlight in this regard was at Fort Erie 
Lodge, when the Wor. Ma.ster held a "Hands Across the 
Border" night. The Wor. Masters and the three D.D.G.M.'s 
of the three Erie Districts of Buffalo were invited to Fort 
Erie Lodge, when the Wor. Masters of Niagara District "B" 
occupied the Chairs and very efficiently conferred the First 
Degree. This was a nev,- venture but it was so well thought 
of we are hoping to make it an annual function. 

I am very grateful to Rt. Wor. Bro. E. G. Dixon, Grand 
Secretary, and his office staff, for their valu-ed assistance 
throughout the year. Many thanks are extended also to 
those many faithful Brethren throughout the District who 
accompanied me on my Official Visits. Masonry in this 
District is indeed in good hands. 

In conclusion, I should like to sincerely thank the 
Brethren of Niagara "B" Di.=trict for the honour and privilege 
of serving as their D.D.G.M. The Masters, Officers and 
members of all Lodges have made for me a year that will 
always be remembered. The many kindnesses extended to 
me are deeply appreciated and it is my sincere hope that I 
have, in some small way, strengthened the bonds of friendship 
among the Lodges of Niagara District "B". "The Most 
High Has Prospered our United Endeavours". 

G. ERLE CORNELL, D.D.G.M. 

NIPISSING EAST DISTRICT 

As my term of office is fast drawing to a close, I take 
this opportunity of expressing my very sincere appreciation 
for the privilege of presenting this report. 

The courtesies and welcomes I have received at all times 
reflect the dignity and respect our District holds toward the 
Grand Master and Grand Lodge in general. 

The highlight of the year was our privilege of extending 
a welcome to the Most Worshioful the Grand Master, Most 
Wor. Bro. Clarence MacLeod Pitt?, at a banquet held in the 
United Church at Haileybury in his honour on Ootober 28th. 
A reasonable number of the brethren from the District 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 159 

attended and enjoyed a very intei-esting address given by the 
Grand Master, 

It was most fortunate that I had as District Secretary, 
Wor. Bro. H. C. Coull, who accompanied me on all my visits 
less one, and was able to obtain all necessary information 
from the Secretaries of the Lodges. 

Rev. Bro. Wilmut Wipprecht, Pastor of Cobalt United 
Church, accepted the position of District Chaplain and carried 
out his duties in a very efficient manner. 

Rt. Wor. Bro. J. S. Smorthwaite of North Bay Lodge, 
No. 617, accepted the position of Chairman of Masonic Edu- 
cation for the four Southern Lodges in the District, Very 
Wor. Bro. G. E. McKelvie of Temiskaming Lodge accepted 
the same position for the four Northern Lodges. Both these 
men did much to create a better understanding of the 
principles of Masonry, as well as making our regular meet- 
ings more interesting. 

A special meeting was held in Haileybury Lodge in 
which the entire evening was devoted to Masonic education. 
Short addresses were given by well skilled brethren from 
various Lodges which was- followed by a panel discussion on 
each subject. Some very interesting information was de- 
rived from this and I would like to see this kind of a meet- 
ing continued so that the brethren may become acquainted 
and that attendance at our regular meetings might be in- 
creased. 

During the year, four Past District Deputy Grand 
Masters have passed to Grand Lodge Above. Their passing 
has caused a distinct loss in the District, as well as a 
challenge to those of us who are left to carry on the good 
work. We cherish their memories in our hearts. 

A District Divine Service was held on May 28th in 
Cobalt United Church for the four Northern Lodges which 
was attended by forty-three of the brethren, Bro. Rev, W. 
Wipprecht delivered a very interesting sermon. 

A Divine Service is planned for the Southern section 
of the District on June 18th in North Bay, at which the 
District Chaplain will deliver the address. I am pleased to 
note that all Lodges have at least one Divine Service each 
year. 

Senior Wardens' Night was held in North Bay Lodge on 
May 12th at which time I attended and found it very suc- 
cessful. 

All Lodges in the District appear to have had a very 
busy and successful year and the calibre of applicants coming 



160 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

into the Order at the present time will no doubt reflect 
credit to our Fraternity. 

In closing, I wish to thank all those who assisted me 
during my term of office. I will always remain a faithful 
sei-v-ant of the Craft and will have very happy memories 
of my Masonic career. 

THOMAS G. TULLOCH, D.D.GJ\I. 



NIPISSING WEST DISTRICT 

To have been District Deputy Grand Master for Nipissing 
West District during this past year has been a wonderful, 
challenging, rewarding, and, quite frankly, a very pleasant 
experience. Therefore it is with a great deal of pleasure that 
I submit this report of the year's activities in this great and 
vigorous Disti'ict. I have many pleasant memories of the 
evenings spent on my official visits to the seventeen Lodges 
of Nipissing West District. The warm and cordial receptions 
on all occasions, the fraternal atmosphere could not but help 
to strengthen the knowledge that Masonry is strong and 
flourishing in this District. 

The appointment of Wor. Bro. Onni J. Timber as District 
Secretary was most fortunate as he was of the utmost assist- 
ance, accompanying me on all official visits and performing 
his duties in a most capable manner. The records of each 
Lodge were carefully examined and found to be in good order. 
The general financial structure of the Lodges was excellent 
and the insurance where necessary seemed adequate. The 
three Lodges in Sudbury, Nickel, No. 427, Sudbury, No. 658, 
and Bethel, No. 699, ha\e since found it necessary to try to 
increase their membership dues. It was noted that in some 
Lodges the life memberships may in the future impose a 
financial burden on these Lodges and a suggestion was made 
that a more realistic attitude should be considered towards 
this problem. 

Rt. Wor. Bro. .James F. Boucher, District Supervisor of 
'Masonic Education, accomr)anied me on most occasions and 
was of great assistance. Bro. Canon S. M. Craymer, District 
Chaplain, accompanied me on several xasits, but due to serious 
illness was forced to curtail his activities. He is now on the 
way to recovery and I wish him better health in the future. 

Rt. Wor. Bro. M. F. Lees, my immediate predecessor, 
graciously consented to act as District Chairman of the Re- 
membrance Memorial Building Fund, and in this capacity 
he worked^ unceasingly, visiting with me on many occasions, 
and for this and his advice and assistance I am indeed grate- 
ful. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 161 

It wa& a pleasure and a privilege to have visit with me 
many of the District Past Grand Lodge Officers and their 
zeal and wisdom made these events an inspiring experience. 

T,r • ^L^"^^^^ ?, ^i^'^}^^^ pleasure to assist M.W. Bro. W. L 
Wright P.G.M. dedicate the new temple of Elliot Lake Lodge, 
No. 698, on May 20th. On this occasion nearly every Lodge 
"? ^^e^District was represented, with Rt. Wor. Bro. Canon 
t . W. Colloton again performing the duties of Grand Chaplain 
so rp.e-.di'Uy. Thr brethren of Elliot Lake Lodge on this 
occasion were highly praised for their excellent work on their 
new quarters and for the well organized and well attended 
banquet ^^'^^re the brethren heard an inspiring address from 
(M.W. Bro. W. L. Wright the principal speaker. 

The visit of M.W. Bro. C. MacL. Pitts, G.M. to a District 
Reception in his honour at Sudbury on Mav 13th was another 
great event for the Masons of our District. The words of 
wisdom of the Grand Master were an inspiration to all the 
brethren and will long be remembered. 

On all official visits I witnessed degree work with only 
one exception and in most Lodges it was conducted in a very 
capable manner. I noticed a great many doing work besides 
officers and Past Masters, which is a very good trend for the 
future in this District. Attendance at some Lodges could 
be improved. Masters should try to see that the brethren 
can be out of the banquet room by 11 o'clock. On special 
occasions the practice of having the banquet before the lodge 
meeting, rather than after as is noAv the custom, would be a 
great help to the older brethren and those who have to 
travel a long way home. 

The groArth of Masonry in Nipissing West District is 
prDgressing steadily and solidly as each year passes, and as 
we look to the future a number of brethren in the Levack 
area are inquiring as to the procedure in starting a Lodge 
and are investigating the possibility of lodge quarters. The 
brethren of Woodland Lodge are considering plans to enlarge 
their present quarters and the Masons of Sudbury area are 
also giving thought to some changes in their lodge facilities 
in the foreseeable future. 

In conclusion, I wish for my successor the same loyal 
support that was extended to me. I shall rernember this 
year as the highlight of my Masonic career. I wish to thank 
the Grand Master and my brethren for the honour they have 
bestowed on me, and I hope, from a very humble and thank- 
ful heart, that I have been of some small senice to them 
during my teiTn of office. 

KEN. R. SHORE, D.D.G.M. 



lea GRAND lyODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

NORTH HURON DISTRICT 

I am pleased to offer the following report on Masonry 
in North Huron District. I would like to offer my appreci- 
ation to the Brethren of North Huron District for giving me 
the privilege of acting as D.D.G.M. of North Huron. 

One of my first duties was to appoint Wor. Bro. W. E. 
Collyer as District Secretary; he has carried out his duties 
very carefully and thoroughly and has been a great help to 
me, as well as an enthusiastic worker for the good of Masonry 
in the District. 

I appointed Bro. W. L. MacKenzie as Chairman of 
Masonic Education for the District, a position in which he 
has distinguished himself vei-y much as he has been requested 
by members of the Lodges outside our District to give talks 
to them during the coming year on Masonic Education. 

Wor. Bro. Rev. H. W. Strapp kindly accepted the position 
of District Chaplain and has fulfilled it in a very creditable 
way. 

R.W. Bro. H. Linklater kindly continued in his position 
as Chairman of the Blood Donors and reports that he has 
had an increase in the number of donors this year, over the 
previous year, giving proof of his capable leadership. 

R.W. Bro. Ken. Saxton kindly accepted the position as 
Chairman of the Remembrance Memorial Fund and, under 
his guidance, the Fund has shown a substantial growth this 
year. 

The Officers of North Huron District and I had the 
pleasure of being in attendance at Centennial Celebrations 
and the Grand Master's Reception of Tudor Lodge, Mitchell, 
where we enjoyed the address of the Grand Master very 
much. 

During my official visit to the twelve Lodges of the 
District, I found that whatever work was put on, the officers 
and members of each Lodge did it in a dignified truly Mas- 
onic manner and each Master seemed to be an enthusiastic 
Mason. 

During my official visits, the District Secretary ex- 
amined the books, etc., of each Lodge and found that the 
Lodges in the District were in a healthy condition. Some 
of the Lodges have found it necessary to increase their fees; 
this will enable them to present a better financial statement 
in the future. 

The Chairman of Masonic Education accompanied me on 
all official visits, except one due to illness, and gave a talk 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1961 163 

on Masonic Education to each Lodge, usually on something 
relating to the degree that had been exemplified that evening. 

The District Chaplain accompanied me on all but one 
official visit and gave a short talk on each visit. 

The Chairman of the Memorial Fund and the Chairman 
of the Blood Donors accompanied me whenever they could 
and gave talks on their respective work. 

I had the pleasure of visiting with R.W. Bro. Joe Bryan 
of South Huron District on six different occasions, at differ- 
ent meetings in his District, and I had the pleasure of welcom- 
ing him at some of my meetings in North Huron. I visited 
twice in London District with R.W. Bro. Carman Whitmore 
and he was able to be with me twice in North Huron. I 
visited twice in Bruce District with R.W. Bro. Willis Spencer, 
and had the pleasure of welcoming him twice to North Huron. 
I visited with R.W. Bro. Herman Bauer of Chatham District 
on the evening of their Reception for the Grand Master and 
again heard a wonderful address from our Grand Master. 
R.W. Bro. Bauer was able to be with me in North Huron. 
I visited R.W. Bro. Peter McTavish of Grey District during 
the dedication of the new Lodge Hall at Mt. Forest which 
was carried out by Past Grand Master H. L. Martyn in a 
very dignified manner. R.W. Bro. Peter McTavish was also 
able to be with me in North Huron. 

I presented a Fifty-year Jewel to Wor. Bro. Wm. 
Donaldson of Bernard Lodge, Listowel, and also the sad duty 
of attending several Masonic Funeral Services for Brethren 
of the different Lodges in the District. 

The high-light of my year was on May 18th. In the after- 
noon I was with the Grand Master at the Laying of a 
Corner Stone of a new Public School at Palmerston. In the 
evening, we had the pleasure of a Reception in Lucknow in 
honour of our Grand Master, accompanied by Very Wor. Bro. 
Meldi-um, Grand Director of Ceremonies. The Grand Master 
gave a very instructive talk on Masonry which was enjoyed 
by all. 

Our District Divine Service was held on May 28th in 
Lucknow United Church at 11 a.m. when our District 
Chaplain. W. Bro. H. Strapp, gave an inspiring address on 
"the Hidden Quarries". I attended several Church Services 
of the different Lodges in the District. 

Two Past Masters' meetings were held, one in Fordwich, 
where R.W. Bro. Geo. Jeffry of Clinton gave an interesting 
talk on the Number Three, the other in Tiverton where 
Kincardine Lodge put on the Second Degree. Both meetings 
were well attended. 



164 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

In closing, I wish to thank all the Officers and members 
of each Lodge for the wonderful support they gave me, 
giving me a year I shall never forget. 

JAMES E. LITTLE, D.D.G.M. 



ONTARIO DISTRICT 

During the past Masonic year, I have been deeply en- 
riched and rewarded. My receptions in the District Lodges 
were a reflection of the deeip feeling of love, and respect of 
the brethren, for the office, and deep appreciation for the 
responsibilities of the Most Worshipful the Grand Master. 

Freemasonry is in a healthy state in Ontario District. 
On my csfficial visits, all Lodges were found to be in good 
financial standing. Dues were, for the most part, up to date, 
with a minimum of non-payments outstanding. It was found 
necessary to urge one Lodge to take measures to collect a 
disturbing amount of outstanding dues. 

I have been rather discouraged at the slowness of the 
brethren to resipond to the appeal for donations to the Re- 
membrance Memorial Fund. In all fairness, I must report 
that a number of the Lodges have done well. 

I retained the Chairmanship of the Blood Donors' Com- 
mittee, and received encouraging figures throughout the 
District. 

Having visited Lodges with different starting hours, I 
can heai'tily endorse the early and punctual opening hour. 
With regard to conformity in ritual, I found the Lodges 
generally to be excellent. It was found necessary to make 
very few corrections. Particularly pleasing were the efforts 
of the Worshipful Masters to create a balance of Past 
Masters and brethren in the work. 

A very successful Lodge of Instruction in the First 
Degree was held under the auspices of Ontario Lodge, No. 26, 
with Rt. Wor. Bro. E. J. McKeever in charge. 

During the year a Wardens' Association was formed 
and received excellent advice for future Worshipful Masters 
from Rt. Wor. Bro. James Jackson, P.D.D.G.M., and Rt. Wor. 
Bro. W. K. Bailey, our Grand Lodge Chairman of Masonic 
Education. 

The District Di\'ine Service was held. May 28th, in St. 
Peter's Anglican Church, Cobourg. A very fine sermon was 
preached by the District Chaplain, Bro. Rev. J. D. C. Jack. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 165 

Two Disti-ict Lodges, Hope, No. 114 and Lebanon, No. 139, 
celebrated their centennial year. We deeply appreciate the 
honour of having: the opportunity to receive the Most Wor- 
shipful the Grand Master on these two memorable occasions. 

I am indebted to the Lodges for being able to share with 
my wife the hospitality of "Ladies' Nights". We were sorry 
that conflicting dates made it impossible to visit more. 

I had the privilege of attending the centennial of Franck 
Lodge, No. 127, and the Dedication of their new Temple. 
The ceremony was conducted by the Grand Master and it was 
a rewarding \isit to Prince Edward District. 

I entertained and attended Lodge with Rt. Wor. Bro. 
Frank Peek, Past District Grand Junior Deancon of the 
District Grand Lodge of Canterbury, New Zealand. It proved 
to be an evening well-spent with a delightful brother Mason 
from the Antipodes on a visit to Canada. 

During the year the District suffered the loss of two 
distinguished Masons, Rt. Wor. Bro. Har\'ey Mitchell and 
Rt. Wor. Bro. Charles Tyrrell, both Past District Deputy 
Grand Masters of Ontario District. 

I feel bound to say a grateful "thank you" to all who 
assisted me during the year; to Wor. Bro. H. R. Quantrill, 
District Secretary, Wor. Bro. Ben Spicer, Director of Masonic 
Education and to Bro. J. D. C. Jack, who accompanied me as 
often as his pastoral duties would allow. 

I must also express my gratitude to the brethren of the 
District who accampanied me on my visits. Their continued 
presence had a most stimulating effect. 

In my talks to the brethren I endeavoured to speak on an 
educational topic and received many favourable comments, 
thereby sensing a feeling of some accomplishment. 

In conclusion, may I express my appreciation to all who 
helped to make the past Masonic year &o richly rewarding 
in so many ways. 

W. C. WAKELIN, D.D.G.M. 



OTTAWA DISTRICT 

It was a great honour for me to be elected D.D.G.M. 
of the Ottawa District, one which I shall cherish always. 
It was a most rewarding experience, and I was proud to 
represent our Grand Master in his own District. I was very 
happy to have Wor. Bro. R. J. Parlee accept the office of 



166 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

District Secretary. I also appointed Bro. Rev. Dr. J. D. 
McCrae as District Chaplain and Wor. Bro. W. G. Strong as 
District Supervisor of Masonic Education. 

One of the highlights of the year was the visit of Most 
Wor. Bro. Harry L. MartjTi to OttWa, on November 5, 1960, 
when he conducted a Lodge of Instruction. This consisted of 
an exemplification of all three degrees with a very detailed 
explanation of the symbolism and floor work connected with 
each. This meeting was very well attended by representatives 
of all the Lodges and throughout the year it was a great 
satisfaction to me to see how all the Masters and officers 
had profited by Most Wor. Bro. Martyn's instruction. 

Two District Divine Services were conducted by the Dis- 
trict Chaplain, one in Chalmers United Church, Ottawa, and 
the other in Almonte United Church, both of which were very 
well attended. In addition Divine Services were held by 
many of the Lodges, all of which were of an inspiring natxire. 

I held two meetings of instruction for the Lodge Masters, 
one in Ottawa and the other in Amprior, at which I passed 
on, as much as possible, the instruction given to me both at 
Toronto and at a subsequent meeting with neighbouring 
D.D.G.M.'s in Brockville. In addition Wor. Bro. Strong dis- 
tributed about twenty-five short talks' on Masonry to all the 
Lodges. 

Among the highlights of the year were the centennial 
celebrations of Pembroke Lodge, No. 128, and Civil Ser\'ice 
Lodge, No. 148. Pembroke Lodge observed its centennary 
with a week of activities commencing with Divine Service 
on September 25. An R.C.M.P. degree team conferred 

a First Degree on Monday evening, a team of Grand Lodge 
officers a Second Degree on Wednesday, and a team of Past 
Masters of the Lodge a Third Degree on Thursday. The 
celebration was concluded by a banquet and reception to the 
Grand Master, Most Wor. Bro. C. M. Pitts. Civil Service 
Lodge, No. 148, started its celebration with a Divine Service 
in the Masonic Temple, Ottawa, on Sunday, May 14th (the 
actual date of its centenary). The Service was conducted 
by the District Chaplain, Bro. Rev. Dr. J. D. McCrae, and 
the sermon was preached by Most Wor. Bro. Canon Crothers, 
Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Quebec. On 
Monday, May 15th, a banquet and reception was held, and on 
Tuesday the regular Lodge meeting was held at which the 
new regalia and furnishings were consecrated and the officers 
and members rededicated themselves to the service of Free- 
masonry. The Grand Master, Most Wor. Bro. C. M. Pitts, 
was present at all three events. 

The Past Masters', Masters' and Wardens' Association 
was most active and enjoyed a very successful year under the 
presidency of Wor. Bro. C. C. Dale. At one of its assemblies 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1961 1«7 

members were honoured by ha\ing the Deputy Grand Master, 
Rt. Wor. Bro. R. W. Treleaven, as the guest speaker. Under 
the auspices of this Association a committee on Masonic 
Education has been formed which works in conjunction with 
the District Super^'isor of iMasonic Education. It also ar- 
ranged with the Red Cross to have a blood donors' clinic at 
the Ottawa Temple. 

I addressed the Senior Wardens of the year at their 
annual dinner and it was most gratifying to see how they 
were preparing for and looking forward with anticipation to 
their year as Masters. 

The annual Masonic Ball was a great success, with 
almost seven hundred brethren and their ladies in attend- 
ance. Again it was a great joy to have Most Wor. Bro. Pitts 
present. 

I paid official visits to all twenty-nine Lodges and found 
the work of a very high standard and it was a pleasure to 
witness all three degrees. All Lodges are in good financial 
condition, the books well kept and, observing the calibre of 
the junior officers, I feel sure that Masonry in this District 
is in good hands for many years to oome. 

I was present at twenty-seven Ladies' Nights accom- 
panied by my wife, and the cordial reception extended to us 
will long be remembered. The District Secretary and Mrs. 
Parlee also accompanied me on these occasions. 

I was very happy to accept the invitation of Rt. Wor. 
Bro. Geo. Jackson, D.D.G.M. of the St. Lawrence District to 
be present at the d«dication of the new lodge rooms at 
Merrickrvnlle and. Lanark. I was also present at the dedi- 
cation of the new Grand Lodge Building in Hamilton, and, 
despite the rain, it will be an evening long remembered. 

During the year it was my privilege to present a number 
of Veteran's Jubilee Medals, but the highlights in this re- 
spect were when I had the pleasure of pinning a 60-year pin 
to the Past Master's Medal of Wor. Bro. Angus S. Williams 
of Civil Ser\'ice Lodge and of presenting a 50-year Past 
Master's Medal to our dean of D.D.GjM.'s, Rt. Wor. Bro. 
A. H. McKee, of The Builders Lodge. 

In closing, may I express my deep appreciation to the 
Masters, their wives, the District Secretary, the District 
Chaplain and the District Supennsor of Masonic Education 
for their great help and many courtesies which all helped 
to make this a most memorable year. 

E. D. BERRY, D.D.GJVf. 



163 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

PETERBOROUGH DISTRICT 

It has been an honour and a great prmlege for me to 
have served as the representative of the Grand Master in 
the Peterborough District. The many courtesies, the gracious 
hospitality, the co-operation and support I have received from 
the officers and brethren on my official and fraternal visits 
are gratefully and sincerely acknowledged and will long be 
remembered. 

I am also indebted to the District Officers for their 
support, encouragement and assistance. The District Secre- 
tary, Wor. Bro. George Brooks, accompanied me on all my 
official visits and performed the duties of his office with 
fidelity. The information contained in his repoits was of 
invaluable assistance to me. 

The work done by R.W. Bro. Chas. B. Plant, the District 
Supervisor of Masonic Education, was outstanding. He also 
accompanied me on all my visits and, in addition to distrib- 
uting the Bulletins from Grand Lodge, he sent out monthly 
short talks on various Masonic subjects. R.W. Bro. Plant is 
a keen student of Masonic history, philosophy and symbolism, 
and his talks were widely used and enjoyed by all the Lodges 
in the District, I am pleased to report that all Lodges have 
an active committee on Masonic Education and are doing 
excellent woi'k in this important field. 

The District Chaplain, Bro. Rev. J. Stanley Gibson, gave 
unselfishly of his time in the interests of the Craft. He con- 
ducted the District Divine Service in St. Andrew's United 
Church and delivered a very inspiring sermon. We were 
honoured by the presence of R.W. Bro. H. Haggarty, D.D.G.M-. 
of Prince Edward District who assisted at the Seiwice. Many 
of the Lodges in the District also held Divine Services and 
these were well attended. 

I appointed W. Bro. Percy Moore Chairman of the Blood 
Donors' Committee and, although he has been in the hospital 
for some time, he has taken a keen interest in this endeavour 
and reports that many members actively support this worthy 
project. 

I visited each Lodge at least once and most of them on 
two or more occasions. I was greatly impressed by the 
sincerity of the officers and the interest of the members. 
The conferring of the various degrees was, almost without 
exception, done in a most efficient and impressive manner. 
It was gratifying to see, not only the officers, but the Past 
Masters and the Master Masons taking an active part in the 
work. I am pleased to report that attendance has improved 
considerably, particularly in the smaller Lodges. This is 
probably due to the increased inter-lodge visiting, the intro- 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 169 

duction of special nights and the emphasis placed on Masonic 
Education, 

The lodge buildings throughout the District are well 
equipped and maintained. All but four Lodges in the District 
own their own buildings. Three Lodges, Percy, No. 161, 
Havelock, No. 435, and Keene, No. 374, have recently com- 
pleted extensive repairs and improvements to their premises. 

The number of candidates being admitted to the Lodges 
does not appear to have decreased materially. I was greatly 
impressed by the high calibre and the receptive attitude of 
the candidates. At my official visit to J. B. Hall Lodge a 
father and son were initiated, a rather unusual event. 

When visiting a Lodge, it was my practise to present to 
the candidates, a copy of The Histor>^ of Grand Lodge, with 
the hope that a year hence we will have at least fifteen 
'Masons in the District who are well-infoiTned on the history 
of our Grand Lodge. 

The District has been saddened by the passing of many 
of our most faithful members. We remember particularly 
M. Wor. Bro. William James Dunlop. one of the great men of 
our time, Avho was initiated into Masonry in Peterborough 
Lodge, No. 155, in 1908. His name and memory will be per- 
petuated by the youngest Lodge in the District, William 
James Dunlop Lodge, No. 675. He was very interested in 
this Lodge and always took an active part at its anniversary 
celebration. He will be sadly missed, not only in our District 
but throughout the whole jurisdiction. 

In re^■iewing the reports of the Lodges, it is disturbing 
to note that the expenses almost equals the income. It 
would appear that the financial standing of the Lodges would 
be greatly improved if the dues and initiation fees were 
raised to a level more in keeping with economic conditions. 

The highlight of the vear was the official visit to the 
District of our Grand Master, M. Wor. Bro. C. MacL. Pitts. 
This was combined with the Centennial Celebration of J. B. 
Hall Lodge, No. 145, Millbrook. The large attendance at 
this meeting was ample evidence of the esteem in which 
our beloved Grand Master is held. His visit has done much 
to advance the interests of Masonry in this District. 

Several meetings held during the year are worthy of 
note. The seventh Anniversary of William James Dunlop 
Lodge, No. 675. was held, as usual, in October. At this 
meeting the P.D.D.G.M.'s conferred the E. A. Degree. Our 
only regret was that M. Wor. Bro. Dunlop, for the first 
time since the Lodge was instituted, was unable to be present. 



170 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

In February Corinthian Lodge, No. 101, was host to a 
rather unique degree team composed of members of Supreme 
Council of the A. & A.S.R. under the direction of R. Wor. 
Bro. R. F. Downey. At this meeting I presented a Fifty 
Year Medal to R. Wor. Bro. Downey. In March the same 
Lodge invited the Wor. Masters of the District to confer the 
E.A. Degree. This meeting met with such enthusiastic 
support that it was deceided to make it an annual event. 
It v:\\\ be held next year in Golden Rule Lodge, No. 126, 
Campbellford. 

Finally, I would like to express my sincere appreciation 
to the Grand Master for the honour and privilege of rep- 
resenting him in this District, to M. Wor. Bro. H. L. Martyn, 
the Custodian of the Work, for the helpful instruction he so 
kindly gave me and to the Grand Secretary, R. Wor. Bro. 
E. G. Dixon, and his staff for their direction, guidance and 
co-operation. As long as such men continue to give so un- 
selfishly of their time and talents to Freemasonry the future 
of our beloved Craft is assured. 

W. H. MORTLOCK, D.D.G.M. 



PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT 

The privilege of having been the representative of the 
Grand Master in Prince Edward District has been a pleasure 
and high honour, and I would like to take this opportunity 
to thank all those who made it possible. 

I appointed Wor. Bro. Preston Chase as District Secre- 
tary and Wor. Bro. Edward Nelson as District Chaplain. 
They accompanied me on almost all my inspections. How- 
ever, I am sorry to report that Wor. Bro. Nelson suffered a 
severe illness in April and is still in hospital. I also appoint- 
ed Wor. Bro. Charles Fair as District Chairman of Masonic 
Education and Wor. Bro. James Pow as District Chairman 
of the Blood Donors' Committee. 

I made an official inspection of each of the seventeen 
Lodges in the District and was received very cordially in all 
cases. I witnessed all degrees on these occasions, and would 
diescribe the wori: as from very good to excellent in fifteen 
Lodges. However, I feel that two Lodges need a little guid- 
ance, and possibly one of them, a little more effort. I dis- 
cussed this with them after the Lodge was closed. I am 
pleased to report that the minutes and records of all Lodges 
were found to be exceptionally well kept and also that ad- 
equate insurance is carried in the case of all buildings owned 
by the Lodges. 

The highlight of my year was on December 16th. when 
my Mother Lodge Franck, No. 127, had a reception for the 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 171 

Grand Master, Most Worshipful Bro. C. M. Pitts, on the 
occasion of celebrating- our 100th anniversary', and also for 
the purpose of dedicating our new Masonic Temple. This 
momentous occasion was attended by an exceptionally good 
number of Grand Lodge Officers. 

Belleville Lodge, No. 123, was completing the celebrating 
of its 100th anniversary, and also M'oira Lodge, No. 11, 
celebrated its 160th anniversary, as well as Prince Edward 
Lodge, No. 18, its 150th anniversary. M.W. Bro. Harry L. 
(Martyn was the griest speaker at both the latter occasions, 
and I would like to give a special thanks to M.W. Bro. 
Martyn for attending these functions and also for his as- 
sistance as Custodian of the Work throughout the year. 

The fact that the Grand Junior Warden, R.W. Bro. J. 
R. Grant, was a member of Moira Lodge, No. 11, was cause 
for special nights which I enjoyed to the utmost. One of the 
pleasant duties which I was asked to perform was to present 
W, Bro. Dave Bell of Marmora Lodge, No. 222, with his 
Medal as 50 years a Past Master. 

We have a very active, Past Masters' Masters' and 
Wardens' Association, and in March we held our annual 
meeting, sponsored by Lake Lodge, No. 215, which was at- 
tended by 128 members of the Association. 

During my term I xasited nine Districts and one other 
Grand Jurisdiction. Besides many regular nights I attended 
seven installations and Mrs. Haggarty and I were warmly 
received at eight Ladies' Nights. On May 28th, we held 
our District Divine Service in Wooler United Church, when 
the Grand Chaplain, Rt. Wor. Bro. Rev. R. G. Hazlewood, 
delivered the sermon. There were about 300 Masons in at- 
tendance. 

On June 6th, United Lodge. No. 29. sponsored a P.D.D. 
G.M.'s Night, which was attended by 17 Past District Deputies 
of Prince Edward District, as well as many from other 
districts. 

As I finish this report, I have just returned from my 
father's funeral. — the saddest event in my life thus far. 
T want to thank the Masons of the various districts for the 
fine tribute they paid to my father, last night, when they 
held a Masonic Sei-vuce, which was attended by 225 brethren. 

In conclusion, may I say that I hope my endeavours this 
oast year have in some way benefited Masonry in this District. 
To all my brethren of Prince Edward District, my very 
sincere thanks. 

H. D. HAGGARTY, DJD.GJM. 



172 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

SARNIA DISTRICT 

It has been a pleasure and source of valuable experience 
for me to serve as the representative of the Grand Master 
for Samia District for the past year. 

The enthusiasm with which I was received on all official 
visits reflects the loyalty and esteem in which Grand Lodge 
is held. 

The hig'hlights of the Masonic Year in the Samia Dis- 
trict were many. The first one was held early in the fall at 
Petrolia, in which the two Lodges at Petrolia played host to 
the Masters and Senior Wardens of the District at a dinner 
in which they were presented to the new D.D.G.M. It was a 
pleasure to meet them personally and plan the work of the 
year before I paid my official visit. 

I had the pleasure of presenting Rt. Wor. Bro. Tom 
Montgomery of Victoria Lodge, No. 56, with a bar for his 
Long Service Medal to mark fifty years of service as a Past 
District Deputy Grand Master and he was eligible to receive 
his pin in May for sixty years of service in the Craft. As he is 
still in Bei-muda, he has not received it as yet. Several other 
members received their Fifty Year Medals. 

I appointed Wor. Bro. Evan Denning as my Diistrict 
Secretai-y and he reports that the books and records of the 
various Lodges are kept in a most efficient manner. I am 
greatly indebted to him for his assistance and co-operation 
throughout the year as he was with me on all my official 
\'isits. 

Wor. Bro. Clarence Winter has done an excellent job 
as Chairman of Masonic Education. Under his guidance and 
help in securing speakers, Masonic Education has made 
splendid progress in the District. 

Rev. Bro. H. L. Jost, Th.B., as District Chaplain, con- 
ducted the District Divine Service at Ahanston Presbyterian 
Church on Sunday, May 21, when he gave an inspiring 
address on the "History in the Making and Masonry." _ The 
attendance from all over the District was a splendid tribute 
to Bro. Jost, who is very active in Masonic circles as a 
speaker on Masonic Education. 

Rt. Wor. Bro. Harry Russell, Chairman of the Blood 
Donors' Committee, reported a very good response to his 
appeal. He urged all brethren who are physically able to 
support the various blood banks. 

The Past Masters', Masters' and Wardens' Association 
held three very successful meetings in the District. Rt. Wor. 
Bro. J. C. Waiden is the President. At the first meeting a 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 1T3 

degree was conferred by the Past Grand Lodge Officers. The 
vsecond was a night of Masonic Education, with addresses by 
prominent speakers in the District. The third was held in 
my Mother Lodge, Ionic 328, when we had the pleasure of 
hearing an address by Rt. Wor. Bro. J. A. Irvine of London. 

I visited the twenty-one Lodges in the District and was 
most cordially received on every occasion. I witnessed degree 
work in each Lodge and have found the work to be done in a 
capable manner with a great degree of accuracy and pre- 
cision and felt it was veiy impressive to the candidate. I 
was particularly pleased to see the Junior Officei's and the 
Young Members giving the lectures in the three degrees 
instead of having the Past Masters do the work. 

The majority of the Lodges held "Ladies' Nights" most 
of which Mrs. Rowe and I were able to attend. The warm 
welcome and hospitality made these visits more pleasant 
and added enjoyment to my year. 

Each Lodge held its own Divine Service, the majority of 
which I attended also. 

Although we did not have the honour of having the 
Most Worshipful the Grand Master in our District this 
year. I had the pleasure of being in six other Districts in 
which he was so honoured. 

I had five District Deputy Grand Masters visit with me 
on several occasions in my District. It was my privilege 
to return those visits whenever time would allow. 

As our communities grow, so do our Lodges, and un- 
fortunately as our Lodges grow, a smaller percentage of 
its members have the opportunity to participate in the 
work of the Lodges. I have tried to impress on each Lodge 
the importance of giving the junior members some small 
part in the degree work, or give a short talk on Masonic 
Education, so as to make them more interested, so that a 
closer bond of fellowship may be established. Masonry 
has too many virtues to exclude a brother from playing his 
part in the work of the Craft. 

The ready assistance, co-operation, and fraternal feeling 
which I have encountered, clearly indicates the splendid 
Masonic spirit that prevails iin Samia District. 

In closing, I wish to thank Samia District for gi\nnsr me 
the pri\ilege and pleasure of serving them as District Deputy 
Grand Master. 

STEWART C. ROWE. D.D.G.M. 



iT4 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

SOUTH HURON DISTRICT 

During this year it has been my desire to especially 
encourage participation by all the District Lodges in the 
Grand Master's Remembrance Memorial Fund, the establish- 
ment of Local Benevolent Funds, encourage Masonic Edu- 
cation, encourage a closer bond between the District Churches 
and Lodges, and encourage inter-iodige visitations. Co- 
operation has been outstanding in all these projects. Re- 
lationships within the District and with the adjoining Dis- 
tricts are exceptionally good. 

Attendance at the Official Visits was most gratifying 
with the average attendance taken over the 17 Lodges of 
over 100. The secretarial duties in every Lodge are being 
capably handled. There is an earnest desire on the part of 
every Secretary to maintain a high standard of efficiency. 
The Craft may sometimes tend to overlook the faithful 
service of the Lodge Secretaries who quietly and efficiently 
keep the many records of our Lodges. 

The Grand Ma^er, Most Wor. Bro. C. M. Pitts, honoured 
South Huron at the celebration of the Centennial of Tudor 
Lodge, No. 141, Mitchell, by his presence in the lodge room 
and at the banquet that followed. 

I was present at Lebanon Forest Lodge, No. 133, Exeter, 
when my eldest son-in-law, Bro. Lome Ford was initiated 
into Masonry. Later, on the occasion of my official visit 
to my Mother Lodge, Granton, No. 483, I had my other 
son-in-law, Bro. Jack Riddell, initiated iinto our beloved 
Craft. 

Illness struck two of my most faithful brethren during 
the year. Our District Chairman of Masonic Education, 
V. Wor. Bro. Sid Goring of Tavistock Lodge, No. 609, was 
laid up with a heart condition. Our District Chaplain, Rev. 
Bro. Wm. J. Maines, was also laid up mth a heart con- 
dition. I am pleased to report that, thanks to the Great 
Architect, both of these beloved brethren are now well on 
the road to recovery. 

While the facilities of all the District Lodges are clean 
and comfortable, I feel that particular attention should be 
drawn to the refurbishing of Huron Lodge, No. 224, Hensall. 
When their present programme of renovation is completed 
they will have a most modem centre of Masonic activity. 

The Worshipful Masters and Senior Wardens gathered 
together at an open air barbecue at my farm early last Fall 
so that we might get to know one another. This created a 
fellowship that carried through the year and I especially 
appreciate the loyal following led by these brethren that 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1961 1T5 

inspired me on my visitations. No D.D.G.M. could hope to 
have better support from the Officers of his District. 

I presented Grand Lodge Regalia to V. Wor. Bro. 
James Feagan at Morning Star Lodge, No. 309, Carlow, 
and to V. Wor. Bro. Kenneth Hodgrins at Lebanon Forest 
Lodge, No. 133, Exeter, and I complimented V. Wor. Bro. 
Freeman Hodgins of Doric Lodge, No. 233, Parkhill, on his 
appointment to Grand Steward. The presentation of Fifty 
Year Medals was also a pleasure I shall never forget as I 
participated in the presentation of this outstanding award 
to two old faithfuls at Morning Star Lodge, No. 309, Carlow, 
in the persons of R.W. Bro. Hugh Hill and V. Wor. Bro. J. 
Robertson, at one of the most colourful Masonic meetings of 
the year. On my official visit to Elma Lodge, No. 456, 
Monicton, I presented this Medal to Bro. Thomas Hurst, a 
brother who, through the years, has been a great source of 
strength to Masonry. 

Our Past Masters' Association held their Annual District 
Ladies' Night at St. Marys, It was very well attended, al- 
though we regret to state that just prior to the Meeting our 
Guest Speaker Rev. Bro. Alex Nimmo passed away. R. Wor. 
Bro. Bruce Foster graciously came to our aid and presented a 
very interesting talk and challenge to us as Masons to en- 
courage education. Our sincere sympathy is extended to the 
family of the late Rev. Bro. Nimmo. 

During the year our Past Masters' Association has been 
active developing the thought that the time could be ap- 
proaching when the name of an outstanding District Mason 
should be offered to Grand Lodge for possible election to 
the Board of General Purposes. It is my sincere desire that 
this be the case as interest in Grand Lodge is keen in this 
District and we have many worthy Masons who could serve 
the Craft on a higher level. The Past Masters' Association 
also sponsored a Lodge of Instruction at Stratford under the 
d'rection of Rt. Wor. Bro. Molson Cain. This wa<? most 
educational and the large attendance justified the effort to 
make this evening possible. 

The District Divine Service was held in the Granton 
United Church and, in the absence of the District Chaplain, 
Rev. Bro. Wm. J. Maines, due to illness, we were most 
fortunate to have the Service under the direction of Rt. Wor. 
Bro. D. M. Gue.'t. Past Grand Chaplain. He was ably 
assistpd by Wor. Bro. Padre Moore of Centralia Airport and 
Rev. Bro. Alex Campbell of St. Marys. This Service was 
very well attended and I am happv to report as well that 
most District Lodges have also held Divine Services. 

Family and Ladies' Nights were held in many of the 
District Lodges and these were successful and operated on 
the highest level of propriety. 



176 GRA^T) LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

In concluding- this report, I wish to thank Grand Lodge 
for their ready assistance in all matters requiring clarifica- 
tion, Rev. Bro. Wm. J. Maines for his inspirational presence 
and guidance, and my efficient Secretary, Wor. Bro. Bruce 
Grant, for his willing and very capable assistance. 

JOSEPH E. BRYAN, DJ>.G.M. 



ST. LAWRENCE DISTRICT 

The honour of serving as the representative of the Grand 
Master in St. Lawrence District has been a distinct pleasure 
and a very rewarding experience. The esteem and regard 
for the Grand Master was clearly shown by the cordial 
reception and support I enjoyed on my visits to the nineteen 
Lodges iin the District. 

I was pleased to appoint "Wor. Bro. R. L. Patterson as 
District Secretaiy, Bro. Rev. S. Kerrison as District Chap- 
Iain, Rt. Wor. Bro. O. E. Keene as District Chairman of 
Masonic Education, and Wor. Bro. C. E. Marshall as the 
District Chairman of the Blood Donors' Committee. 

The District Secretary and the District Chaplain ac- 
co.mpanied me on all my \'isits with only one exception. I am 
especially grateful for the very capable assistance I received 
from these bre^thren during- the year. 

The need for Masonic Education was stressed very 
forcibly throughout the year and, under the able guidance 
of the District Chairman, a very notable iincrease of interest 
in this phase of our work was evident. The District was 
di\nded into four sections geographically, and for each section 
a Supervisor was appointed. It was his duty to assist the 
local Chairman in his particular area of the District. This 
arrangement worked very smoothly with the result that all 
the nineteen Lodges devoted some period to Masonic Edu- 
cation at their meetings. 

On my official visits to all the nineteen Lodges I found 
the degree work to be exemplified in a very efficient m.anner. 
The officers and other brethren taking part iin the ritual 
were very proficient and I can say in all sincerity that 
Masonry in St. Lawrence District is in a very healthy 
condition. 

The calibre of the brethren being admitted to our great 
fraternity is of a high standard and there is no doubt at all 
that Masonry in this District will be in very capable hands 
in later years just as it is at the present time. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 1"7 

It was indeed a pleasure and a pri\nlege to have three 
visits to the District by the Grand Master during- my term 
of office. The District of St. Lawrence entertained Most 
Worshipful Brother C. M. Pitts at a reception held at Perth 
on November 2nd. This reception was very well attended 
despite the time of the year. The Grand Master's address 
on thiis occasion was, as always, an inspiration to all those 
who were privileged to hear him and he was accorded a 
standing ovation by all present at the completion of his 
message. 

I was particularly pleased to have assisted the Grand 
Master on the occasion of the Dedication of my Lodge, 
Merrickville, No. 55. The Grand Master was accompanied 
by a number of past and present Grand Lodge officers and 
in spite of the inclement weather a very good attendance 
was recorded. Merrickville Lodge has now been completely 
restored after a very disastrous fire (the work of an arsonist) 
which destroyed our premises, records and regalia. 

Another highlight of the year was the Dedication of 
Evergreen Lodge, No. 209, Lanark, by the Grand Master and 
again I had the pleasure of assisting in the ceremony. On 
this occasion the Grand Senior Warden and the Grand Junior 
Warden were present together with Rt. Wor. Bro. Geo. 
McQueen and other present and past Grand Lodge offiicers. 
Prior to the ceremony of Dedication a very delightful ban- 
auet was enjoyed in the banquet room of the Temple. On 
this occasion the Grand Senior Warden. Rt. Wor. Brother 
H. E. Wilson, presented to the Grand Master a gavel which 
was hand tooled and carved by an old craftsman and is indeed 
a masterpiece of an almost lost art. Durinr the course of 
the banquet it was pointed out this was the first occasion in 
ninety-two years that a Grand Master had visited with his 
brethren of Evergreen Lodge. I would be very remiss if I 
did not commend the brethren of Evergreen on their new 
Temple. The old Lodge was lost during the very disastrous 
fire which destroyed more than half of the Villare of 
Lanark. Despite this great loss the spirit of Freemasonry 
was still strong and the new Temple will be an everlasting 
memorial to those who took upon themselves the almost 
impossible task of re-building. St. Lawrence District is 
deeply grateful to our beloved Grand Master for the three 
visits, especially when we assess the amount of time and 
travelling involved throughout this Grand Jurisdiction during 
his tenure of office. 

Throughout the entire District complete harmony pre- 
vails and the interchange of visits between Lodges is cement- 
ing more closely the fraternal friendship and brotherly love 
which are the buhvarks of our ancient fraternity. 

All the nineteen Lodges in the District held a Church 
Service, and on May 28th, the District Divine Service was 



178 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

held in Merrickville. The Service was conducted by the 
District Chaplain and there was a good attendance. His 
address was most impressive and a challenge to those who 
were present. 

The District Blood Donors' Committee is still doing a 
splendid job under the able guidance of Wor. Bro. C. E. 
Marshall and further donations of blood have been made this 
year. 

The Masters', Past Masters' and Wardens' Association 
is very active under a very capable Secretary, Rt. Wor. Bro. 
F. J. Latham, and a strong executive drawn from all sections 
of the District, in further promoting the cause of Free- 
masonry throughout the Diistrict. 

It was my pleasure, accompanied by Mrs. Jackson, to 
attend several 'At Homes' together with my District Chaplain 
and his wife and also the District Secretary and his wife. 
I am most gi-ateful for the many courtesies shown us during 
these visits and particularly those I was permitted to share 
wi'th my wife. 

Finally, Most Worshipful Sir, I say thank you for the 
privilege of having represented you in the District of St. 
Lawrence and I will continue in my efforts to serve Free- 
masonry to the best of my ability. To the brethren of St. 
Lawrence District my sincere thanks for the very high 
honour conferred on me. My sincere thanks, also, to the 
Grand Secretary and his staff for the prompt and efficient 
action given to my correspondence and queries. To the 
Custodian of the Work, for his patience and counselling 
when instructing the incoming D.DjGM., I offer my sincere 
appreciation. 

GEORGE JACKSON, D.D.G.M. 



ST. THOMAS DISTRICT 

It has been a very pleasant experience for me, during 
the past year, to make an official visit to each of the eleven 
Lodges in the St. Thomas District, and to record my sincere 
appreciation of the warm welcome and loyal support given 
me by all the Lodges in the District. 

My appointments were District Secretary, Wor. Bro. W. 
Gordon Agar, District Chaplain, Wor. Bro. Earl Fulmer, 
and Director of Masonic Education, Wor. Bro. Hugh Silcox. 
These brethren assisted me very much and were with me on 
most all my official visits. 

All Lodges in the St. Thomas District, except one, have 
their own Temple Building and two Lodges are debt free, 
which I am very proud of. 



TORONTO, ONT.AJIIO. 1961 179 

For the District Divine Service in Central Baptist Church 
in St. Thomas there was a large turn out and the Church 
was well filled. Rev. Harmer, not being a member of the 
Craft, brought us a wonderful message. After the Service 
we were addressed by Rt. Wor. Bro. John Ryan, P.G.S.W. 
from Chatham Some Lodges also held a Service of their own. 

Masonic Education was taken care of by the District 
Chairman, Wor. Bro. Hugh Silcox, in a very good manner 
and he spoke at a number of meetings during the winter. 
He also had one special meeting where he had all the Lodges 
in the District take part drawing a large turn out, but making 
a long evening. 

Many veterans were honored during my year. The first 
official visit I had at St. Thomas Lodge. No. 44, I presented 
nine Fifty Year Medals and one Sixty Year Pin which rep- 
resented a total of 510 years of Masonry. 

The real highlight for the year was the Centennial of 
Malahide Lodge, No. 140, at Aylmer. On this occasion we 
had with us the Grand Master, C. M. Pitts, who dedicated 
their gold braid regalia. This makes four one hundred 
year Lodges out of eleven in St. Thomas District. 

I was with the Grand Master on his visit to London 
District and Chatham District. His address on all these 
visits was very helpful and enlightening. He has a way 
with him which seems to give one such a good understanding 
and is a great help in one's work. 

I visited -with the D.D.G.M.'s of South Huron. London, 
Samia and Chatham Districts. They all visited back in the 
District with me. 

During my term I have seen degrees conferred in all the 
Lodges except one. This Lodge raised and lowered in the 
three degrees in a very satisfactory manner. Work through- 
out the DiS'trict is kept veiy close to the ritual as we have a 
number of old P.D.D.G.M's who are very active and alert. 

A number of the Lodges held Ladies' Nights which Mrs. 
Tolman and I had the pleasure of attending and associating 
with the brethren and their wives. 

We have a Past Masters' and Wardens' Association in 
the District which I feel is a great help to the brethren. 
The Association is also a great help in keeping our ritual 
uniform in he District. 

I cannot conclude without expressing my deep thanks 
to the Masters and Secretaries of the District for their kind 
support in helping me to perform my duties as D.D.GJ^., 



180 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA AN-NUAL COMMUNICATION 

also to M. Wor. Bro. H. L. Martyn and Rt. Wor. 
E. G. Dixon for the way they have helped and instructed me. 

The year being at an end it has been a great honor for 
me to have had the pleasure of sendng in the St. Thomas 
District. I am sure it will be one year of my life which I 
shall never forget. 

JOHN 0. TOLMAN, D.D.GM. 



TEMISKAMING DISTRICT 

I have the honour to submit herewith my report on the 
condition of Masonry in the District of Temiskaming. 

My duties commenced with the appointment of W'or. Bro. 
William G. Little as District Secretaiy and he has handled 
the duties of his office most capably, renewing and making 
a host of friendships along the way. 

Wor. Bro. L. C. Murphy was appointed District Chair- 
man of Masonic Education and his work in bringing this 
subject to the attention of the brethren on each official visit 
by way of a short talk was most outstanding. These interest- 
ing lectures (10 in all) were later prepared in bound form 
and made available to all Lodges and to the many individual 
members who expressed interest in them. Wor. Bro. Murphy's 
work in this regard is most welcome and commendable. 

Bro. Rev. R. E. Adams was appointed District Chaplain 
and conducted Divine Worship at two District Church Ser- 
vices, one held in Kirkland Lake under the auspices of 
Corinthian Lodge, No. 657, for the southern part of the 
District, and the other in Cochrane under the auspices of 
Cochrane Lodge, No. 530, covering the northern section. 
I am happy to report that both these functions were most 
successful. 

Continuing a petition signed by members of Golden 
Beaver Lodge. No. 528, and others last year and presented 
through Rt. Wor. Bro. D. J. Paterson for the creation of a 
new Lodge, I was happy to receive from the Grand Master 
a dispensation creating a new Lodge and the ceremony of 
instituting this new Lodge to be known as "AURUM" was 
duly carried out on October 5, 1960, with Wor. Bro. A. K. 
(Archie) Graham as the first Master. This is the first new 
Lodge instituted in this District in fourteen years and the 
skill and zeal of their officers and Masters augers well for 
the new Lod'ge's future. 

I visited all Lodges in the District officially once and 
and some of the Lodges unofficially more often, and without 
exception I found the degree work being performed in a 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 181 

most impressive manner and in accordance with the highest 
traditions of the Craft. 

On November 14 I was received in Englehart Lodge, No. 
534, working under Wor. Bro. E. Vipond, the Master. During 
the evening Grand Lodge regalia was presented to Very 
Wor. Bro. Lloyd Netherton, Grand Steward, following which 
Very Wor. Bro. Netherton led the brethren in a memorial 
service for those who had journeyed to the Grand Lodge 
Above. This Lodge had just added a new natural gas heating 
unit to their building and the Lodge and their members are 
a credit to the Community. 

On December 1, I visited South Porcupine Lodge, No. .506, 
working under their Master, Wor. Bro. W. J. Marshall, and 
his officers who conferred the First Degree in a most ex- 
cellent manner. 

Corinthian Lodge, No. 657, Kirkland Lake, was visited 
on December 6 and their work under the Master Wor. Bro. 
W. Ray Jones was outstanding. 

I was received in my mother Lodge, Cochrane, No. 5S0, 
on December 9, where the degree work under the Master, 
Wor. Bro. E. M. Taeger, is of a high calibre. 

Doric Lodge, No. 623, Kii'kland Lake, working under 
the Master, William J. Beard, was visited January 12 and a 
most enjoyable evening was spent in their midst. This Lodge 
occupies the Temple jointly with their Sister Lodge, Corinth- 
ian, and are noted for their many special nights with the 
work being performed by Masons who are closely allied with 
the candidate. Their efforts in continually creating special 
interest in the work and the efforts of their members in the 
affairs of their community are worthy of si>ecial mention. 

I was received into Abitibi Lodge, No. 540, working 
under the Master, E. C. Jack, on January 20. They proceeded 
to confer a Second Degree in a most acceptable way. Their 
lodge quarters have been newly decorated and indicate the 
interest the membei'ship has in the Craft. 

Golden Beaver Lodge, No. 528, Timmins, occupies the 
Temple jointly with Aurum Lodge, U.D. and I was received 
by their Master, Wor. Bro. Harry Poole on April 12. The 
work of their members in extending the principles of the 
Craft into their daily lives cannot fail to benefit the town 
of Timmins. 

The Grand Master,, Clarence MacLeod Pitts, honoured 
the District with an official ^^sit and was tendered a recep- 
tion at the Mclntyre Arena on Friday, May 5th. sponsored 
by the Lodges in the northern section of the District. The 



182 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL, COMMUNICATION 

fallowing day the Grand Master travelled to Kirkland Lake 
where a similar reception was held by the Lodge in the 
southern section. On both these occasions the Grand Master 
received an enthusiastic welcome and the addresses he de- 
livered on both these nights enshrined him in the hearts of 
his brethren. 

My final visit was made to Spruce Falls Lodge, No. 648, 
at Kapus'kasing, where I was received by the Master, Wor. 
Bro. E, Kennedy, on May 8th. This, our most westerly Lodge 
serves an ever increasing territory now expanding to the 
north where the Ontario Hydro is developing the power site 
at Little Long Rapids. A visitor to this Lodge cannot fail 
but be impressed by the friendliness and sincerity of the 
membership. 

iSpecial mention of the work of Wor. Bro, Karl H. 
Redden as District Chairman of our Blood Bank services 
should be made. This is the second year his services' in this 
capacity have been used and he has performed his duties with 
distinction. 

Under the direction of competent Masters and officers, 
aided by a membership inspired by the high principles of the 
Craft, Masonry has steadily forged ahead in contributing to 
the rapid development of this vast northland. 

WALTER H. QUINN, D.DXtJI. 

TORONTO DISTRICT "1" 

As I review the many activities of Toronto District "1" 
during the past year I am conscious of the fact that one 
cannot possibly put into words the degree of fellowship 
and the feeling of welcome enjoyed by the representative 
of the M.W. the Grand Master during this year of office. 
Nor is it possible to express the very great admiration and 
respect in which Grand Lodge is held throughout this District. 

My duties and responsibilities were made easier and 
much more enjoyable by the wonderful cooperation and as- 
sistance of the District Secretary, Wor. Bro. George E. 
Boydell, the District Chaplain, Wor. Bro. Joseph W. Stewart, 
the Chairman, Wor. Bro. C. W. Wonfor, and the Secretary, 
Wor. Bro. E. H. Smith of the Committee on Masonic Edu- 
cation for the District and Wor. Bro. W. A. Campbell, Chair- 
man of the Blood Donors' Committee. My thanks and ap- 
preciation as well as those of the whole District are extended 
to these faithful brethren. 

There are 19 Lodges in Toronto District "1" and on 
each and every one of 19 visits with the District Secretary, 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1961 183 

it was most gratifying- to find that a near perfection of word 
and movement, as well as a ti-ue sincerity of portrayal was 
achieved in every degree. The enthusiastic support and 
participation of Past Masters, Officers and Members, is being 
reflected in a slow but constantly increasing attendance at 
both regular and emergent meetings. In every case the 
District Secretaiy found a well-planned effort towards a wise 
control of lodge finances and all books and records very well 
kept. 

The Annual Divine Service was held Sunday evening, 
April 16th, at Wesley United Church, Mimico, under the 
direction of Wor. Bro. Joseph W. Stewart, District Chaplain. 
This was an exceptionally well attended senice and a most 
inspirational sermon was delivered by the District Chaplain. 

Another highlight of the year was the Annual Education- 
al Night held December 28th in the Annette Street Temple. 
So great a crowd was in attendance that only a very small 
floor area was available for the actual work of the evening. 
The program was most informative and was pi'esented in a 
very interesting manner. Credit for this great event should 
be given to the Committee on Masonic Education who re- 
ceived the utmost cooperation and support from Toronto 
District "2" and the Wardens' Associations of both Districts. 
A special note of thanks is extended to Rt. Wor. Bro. Jack 
Irvine who travelled from London, Ontario, to be the speaker 
at the banquet hour and he made an outstanding contri- 
bution to the success of this occasion. 

Most of the Lodges and brethren of Toronto District "1" 
were conscious of their responsibility to the Remembrance 
Memorial Building Fund and have taken the opportunity of 
having a personal part in this very worthy memorial. 

The limitations of space prevent a full report on all the 
events of the past vear but it was my very enjoyable privilege 
to have had Most Wor. Bro. Harry L. Martyn present in the 
District on several occasions. The District Church Sen-ice, 
the presentation of Long Service Medals in Anthony Sayer 
Lodge and the Past Masters' Night in Memorial Lodge are but 
a few such occasions. I recall with a great deal of pleasure 
two evenings as well as Ladies' Ni?ht in Kilwinning Lodge 
when one of their members, Bro. Tom Ross, was present. 
This very regular attender at Kilwinning Lodge celebrated 
his 100th birthday last Christmas and is still regular in his 
attendance at his Lodge. 

Both Mrs. Stewart and I had the pleasure of attending 
many of the Ladies' Nights throughout the District. These 
were most enjoyable and certainly were conducted in a man- 
ner to reflect credit on all Masons and their ladies. 



184 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Among the many rewards received during this year of 
office was the cooperation and the resulting warm personal 
friendships that have developed between all the District 
Deputy Grand Masters of the Toronto Districts and this, 
plus the rewarding experience of becoming closer in friend- 
ship and felloAvship with all of my brethren of Toronto 
District "1", represent just a part of the benefit I have 
derived from the great invaluable privilege of serving as the 
representative of the Grand Master in Toronto District "1". 

For this memorable year I extend my thanks and ap- 
preciation to all my brethren. 

WM. A. STEWART, D.D.G.M. 



TORONTO DISTRICT "2" 

It has been a great honor to represent the Grand Master 
in Toronto District "2". and will always be remembered as a 
most happy and rewarding year. 

The friendly and gracious reception extended in every 
Lodge was a definte indication of the affection and esteem 
in which the Grand Master and Grand Lodge is held by the 
brethren in this District. 

Immediately upon assuming my duties it was my privi- 
lege to appoint a group of outstanding Masons to assist on 
the various committees, so important to the efficiency of any 
District. 

For the outstanding contribution made in the advance- 
ment of Masonry in Toronto "2", my sincere appreciation and 
thanks is extended to W. Bro. Percy C. Bolton, District 
Secretary, Bro. the Rev. Gordon 'C. Smj^h, District Chaplain, 
W. Bro. Leslie Salisbury, W. Bro. David Forrester, W. Bro. 
Harvey Weston. W. Bro. Andrew Nesbitt, Jr., and W. Bro. 
M, Buckingham. 

The ready assistance and sound counsel of M.W. Bro. 
Harry L. Martyn, in his capacity of Custodian of the Work, 
V7ere very much appreciated and contributed greatly in mak- 
ing the past year one of profit and pleasure. 

I attended the Dedication Ceremony of the Remembrance 
Memorial Building in Hamilton on October 31. Truly it is 
an edifice of which evers?- Mason in our Grand Jurisdiction 
may be justly proud. 

On November 29th, it was my privilege to assist M.W. 
Bro. Joseph A. Hearn in the Consecration of The Lodge of 
the Pillars, A.F. & A.M. No. 703 in Weston Temple and to 
welcome this fine Lodge into the fold of Toronto District "2". 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 185 

I visited every Lodge in the District at least twice, re- 
ceiving a warm and friendly welcome on each visit. 

I am most happy to report, after obser\-ing all 18 Lodges 
at labour, that the standard of Masonry as practiced by all 
Lodges in Toronto District "2", is of a very high standard. 
The work is conducted with sincerity and enthusiasm, and I 
sense a great thirst for Masonic knowledge, particularly 
among the officer?. All Lodges are showing a great deal 
of concern, regarding poor attendance, and the majority 
either have or are instituting plans they hope will bring 
their members out in greater numbers. 

I made every attempt to stimulate the interest of the 
brethren in contributing to the Remembrance Memorial Build- 
ing Fund and, while the initial response was slow, I feel 
confident that, when the final figures are tabulated, this 
District will have made a very creditable contribution. 

Toronto Districts "1" and "2" combined, on two occasions, 
holding a District Educational Meeting, organized and con- 
ducted by the District Educational Committees with the as- 
sistance of the Wardens of both Districts. The first com- 
bined meeting was held in Annette Street Temple on Dec- 
ember 29th, under the auspices of Toronto District "1" with 
Temple, No. 525 as the host Lodge. The second combined 
Disti'ict Educational Meeting was held in York Temple, spon- 
sored by Toronto District "2", with Transportation, No. 583, 
as the host Lodge. This meeting, for Master Mason? only, 
followed the theme, "What every newly raised Master Mason 
should know." We were fortunate in obtaining R.W. Bro. 
Arthur V. Piggott, P.D.D.G.M. of the Grand Lodge of Man- 
itoba, Winnipeg District 1, as the speaker at the banquet 
hour. Both District Meetings were exceptionally well at- 
tended, straining the facilities at both Temples to the full. 

Out Divine Sei-vice, held at Yonge Street United Church 
on Palm Sunday, under the leadership of our District Chap- 
lain, Bro. the Rev. Goixion C. Smyth, v.-as an outstanding 
event, with the Church filled to near capacity. 

I was able to attend the majority of Installation Cere- 
monies in the District, missing only those where the dates 
conflicted. 

My year as your representative finished on a very high 
note, having the privilege of initiating both of my sons into 
Freemasonry, at Fidelity Lodge, No. 575, on May 17th. 

Assisting me in this ceremony were M.W. Bro. Harrj- 
L. Martyn, all Toronto District Deputv Grand Masters and 
R.W. Bro. Hector E. Wilson, the Grand Senior Warden. 



186 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL OOMMUNIGATION 



«o» 



I am very proud of the Lodges in Toronto District "2 , 
as without exception they are striving to advance the prin- 
ciples of Freemasonry and to maintain its high standard. 

May I thank you sincerely for permitting me to serve 
as your representative in Toronto District "2" during the 
past year. I have tried to serve you well and trust the year 
has met with some measure of success. 

WALTER E. SILLS, DJ).G.M. 

TORONTO DISTRICT "3" 

To have served as the first District Deputy Grand 
Master of Toronto District "3" has indeed been a rewarding 
and wonderful experience. Everywhere I visited in the 
fifteen Lodges of this District my reception was most cordial, 
and the warmth of true Masonic fraternal fellowship was 
always in evidence. Full respect was accorded to the Grand 
Master and Grand Lodge at all times. 

After my installation, I made the following District ap- 
pointments: 

Wor. Bro. H. V. Watson — District Secretary 

Bro. Rev. Hugh Macdonald, M.A. — District Chaplain 

Wor. Bro, W. Furlong — Chairman of District Masonic 

Education 
Wor. Bro. J. Watt — Secretary of District Masonic 

Education 
Rt. Wor. Bro. T. H. W. (Salmon, P.D.D.G.M. — Chairman 

of the Blood Donors' Committee 
Rt. Wor. Bro. T. J. Arthur, P.D.D.GJVI. — District Chair- 
man of the Remembrance Memorial Building Fund 
for Grand Lodge. 

These brethren have been most helpful to me in the dis- 
charge of my duties and have given generously of their time. 

During the year I paid one official visit to each Lodge 
in the District, was present at all Lodges for the Installations, 
and made other unofficial visits. On each official visit I 
witnessed a degree being conferred and, without exception, 
found the work of the highest order and in accordance with 
that approved by Grand Lodge. 

The Diptrict Secretary, Wor. Bro. H. V. Watson, after 
inspection of records of each Lodge, reported that all books, 
records and registers were carefully and neatly kept and that 
he had received every assistance from the Secretaries. All 
of the Lodges in the District appear to be in a fairly sound 
financial position. Fire protection in most of the Lodges 
is satisfactory, but. unfortunately, not in all. In such cases, 
it has been brought to their attention. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 187 

During the yeax- Toronto Districts "3" and "4" held two 
joint educational meetings; one in the Fall under the Chair- 
manship of Wor. Bro. Stanley Cecil, Past Master of Dentonia 
Lodge, District "4", assisted by Wor. Bro. W. Furlong, Past 
Master of Orient Lodge, District "3", at John Ross Robertson 
Lodge; the second meeting in the Spring at Richardson Lodge, 
under the Chairmanship of Wor. Bro. W. Furlong, District 
"3", assited by Wor. Bro. S. Cecil, District "4". On both 
occasions these brethren were assisted by Wor. Bro. Jas. 
Watt, of Caledonia Lodge and Wor. Bro. F. Vigus of John 
Ross Robertson Lodge, secretaries of their i-espective Districts 
Both of these Masonic educational meetings were interesting 
and instructive, and were well attended. Our sincere thanks 
and appreciation to all brethren who took part. 

During the first part of my year I had the privilege of 
representing Toronto District "3" at the receptions given 
to the District Deputy Grand Masters in Toronto Districts, 
1-2-4-5 and 7, and in return they honoured District "3". 

At a regular meeting in September, Richardson Lodge, 
No. 136, Stouffville, celebrated their Centennial. The higl;- 
light of the evening was the presence of the Grand Master, 
M.W. Bro. C. MacL. Pitts, who was presented with a Life 
Membership in Richardson Lodge by Rt. Wor. Bro. A. E. 
Weldon, P.D.D.G.M. 



At the end of October, I represented Toronto District 
"3" at the Official Unveiling of the Corner Stone and Dedi- 
cation of the Grand Lodge Memorial Building in Hamilton. 

My association with the Masters and Wardens of District 
"3" has been a close and happy one. Their help and as- 
sistance during the year has been invaluable to me. 

The District Divine Service was held in Trinity United 
Church, Uxbridge, on Sunday, April 30. Bro. Rev, Hugh 
Macdonald, the District Chaplain of Fallingbrook Presby- 
terian Church, Scarborough, conducted the Sei-vice. Rt. Wor. 
Bro. L. S. Beak, D.D.G.M. of Toronto District "4" also as- 
sisted in the Service which was largely attended 

I presented a Long Service Medal to V.W. Bro. A. 
Thome of Orient Lodge, No. 339. This was the first Long 
Sei^ice Medal to be presented in Orient Lodge. Five 
Veteran Jubilee Medals were also presented during the year 
in Distri<;t "3". These are the brethren who have made 
Masonry respected both inside and outside of the Lodge. 

On March 15 Toronto Districts "3" - "4" - "7" had the 
honour of tendering a joint reception to the Grand Master. 
This reception and banquet was attended by many present 
and past Grand Lodge Officers. About four hundred and 



1S8 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNTTAL COMMUNICATION 

fifty brethren demonstrated their loyalty and esteem by 
presenting the Grand Master with a cheque in aid of the 
Remembrance Building Fund. The brethren were richly 
rewarded bv a most interesting address ably delivered by 
M.W. Bro. C. MacL. Pitts. 

Early in February we were saddened with the sudden 
passing of the Dean of our Past Grand Masters, M.W. Bro. 
William J. Dunlop. A loss so great cannot fail to be severely 
felt throughout our Grand Jurisdiction. 

Mrs. Gould and I, as well as the District Secretary and 
Mrs. Watson, appreciate the numerous invitations received 
to attend "Ladies' Nights". These we accepted and we enjoyed 
the wonderful hospitality extended to us on all occasions. 

I can say that Masonry throughout Toronto District "3" 
is in splendid condition. The Worshipful Masters and the 
officers are carrying out their duties with honour and 
dignity. 

Fulfilling the office of District Deputy Grand Master 
of Toronto District "3" has been a most exciting and pleasant 
experience and one that I shall always remember. 

W. H. GOULD, D.D.G.M. 



TORONTO DISTRICT "4" 

It is with feelings of much regret and great humility that 
I approach the end of my tenure of office in Toronto District 
"4". The experience gained in performing my duties has 
considerably broadened my understanding of the true mean- 
ings of Freemasonry and the inner workings of the Craft. 



I feel that I must express my thanks to the Grand Master 
for the privilege and honour of being his representative, and 
I am firmly convinced that my personal associations with 
him have left a memorable and distinctive impression upon 
me, which I hope, wnll enable me to expand my contribution 
to the Craft. 

To the Present and Past Grand Lodge Officers, the Wor- 
shipful Masters, Past Masters, Officers and brethren of the 
Lodges in Toronto District "4", my appreciation for their 
many kindnesses, assistance, co-operation and forebearance. 

I appointed W. Bro. Wm. L. Strieker as District Secre- 
tary, Bro. Rev. B Brightling as District Chaplain, and W. 
Bro. Stanley Cecil as Chairman of the Educational Committee. 

Throughout the year I witnessed the performing of all 
three degrees, and the uniformity of the work si>eaks highly 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 189 

of the supei-vision in the past. It was noticed, on several 
occasions, that the participation of the members was being 
encouraged, and this, I believe, cannot help but result in 
better attendance recoi'ds. 

The District Secretary reported that the books and 
records of the Lodge Secretaries and Treasurers were being 
kept in a clear and efficient manner. While on the whole the 
Lodges were in very good financial condition, we were con- 
cerned with the amount of outstanding dues, and advised 
them to make a determined effort to correct these delin- 
quencies and to return the lost brethren to the fraternal 
fold. 

The reports of the District Secretary also confirm the 
general trend of a decline, or at least a slow down, in the 
progress of our membership, and though the majority of th^ 
older Lodges suffered losses in memberships, the rapid ex- 
pansion of the younger Lodges more than offset them. The 
end result was that the District as a whole, enjoyed a net 
gain of approximately 30 members. 

The annual District Divine Sei-vice was held on October 
16th, in the Church of the Resurrection, Woodbine Avenue, 
Toronto, and it was most gratifying to have such an attend- 
ance as to almost fill the Church. 

In conjunction with Toronto District "3", tAvo Education- 
al Nights were held, one in the City of Toronto and one in 
the Village of Stouffville. The attendance at these meetings 
was approximately 428, and at this time I wish to acknow- 
ledge the very worthwhile contributions of W. Bro. G. W. 
Furlong and W. Bro. Stanley Cecil. Chairmen of the Educa- 
tional Committees of Districts "3" and "4". 

Unquestionably the highlight of a ver>' active year, was 
the Reception of our Grand Master. M.W. Bro. Clarence 
MacLeod Pitts, which was held on March 17th in the Thomson 
Collegiate on Lawrence Avenue East, Scarborough. Toronto 
Districts "3". "4" and "7" participated in this memorable 
occasion, and the more than 400 brethren present were 
tremendously impressed by the enthusiasm, dignity, poise 
and sincerity with which our Gi-and Master is performing 
the duties of his high office. 

On Monday. April 24th, M.W. Bro. Harrj- L. Martyn 
officiated at the "Sodturning Ceremonies" for the new 
Scarborough Masonic Temple, construction of which is now 
underway and is expected to be completed before the end of 
the present year. Later, on the same evening, M.W. Bro. 
Martyn addressed the brethren of Scarboro Lodge, No. 
653, and many visitors, and during his most enthusing, stir- 
ing, inspiring talk, he stated that the challenge encountered 



190 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

in a project such as this invariably resulted in greatly in- 
creased Masonic activities and interest. This appears to be 
confirmed, for I have since been approached with a petition 
for a dispensation to form a new Lodg-e, to be called Universe 
Lodge, and it can be expected that the next 12 months will 
see the formation of yet another Craft Lodge, as well as a 
unit of one of the other corporate bodies of our Fraternity. 

In all, I have found Masonry worthy of its high ideals, 
abounding in good fellowship, and it is my most earnest 
prayer that I be granted health and strength that I may 
continue to be of service to our great Fraternity for the 
many privileges it has bestowed upon me. 

LEWIS S. BEAK, D.D.GJM. 



TORONTO DISTRICT "5" 

It is indeed an honour to report to you on the condition 
of Masonry in Toronto District "5". It has been a great 
privilege to sei've my brethren. The cordial reception given 
me on all occasions evinced the loyalty and esteem of the 
brethren for the Grand Master and Grand Lodge. I wish to 
thank all those who have made this year a most rewarding 
year for me. 

Toronto District "5" is now composed of thirty Lodges 
with approximately seven thousand members. During the 
year I made an official visit to each Lodge, and I am pleased 
to report that Masonry throughout the District is of a very 
high calibre. All Lodges are working in the authorized man- 
ner, and there is a great desire for excellence in the degree 
work. This I tried to encourage when speaking to the 
brethren in the lodge rooms. 

Early in the year I had the pleasure of appointing Wor. 
Bro. W. Stewart Blizzard, a Past Master of Rowland Lodge, 
as District Secretary. Bro. Rev. Duncan White as Dist- 
rict Chaplain, Wor. Bro. Robert T. Moore as Chairman of 
Masonic Education, and Wor. Bro. James Manuel as Chair- 
man of the Blood Donors' Committee. Wor. Bro. Blizzard, 
who served as my Senior Warden during my year as Master, 
accompanied me on all official visits and assisted me greatly 
in the discharge of my duties. His thorough examination 
of the records of the various Lodges enabled me to make 
useful and accurate comments when I summai'ized the find- 
ings to the brethren. 

In September I had the honour of accompanying Most 
Worshipful Bro. Harry L. Martyn and assisting in the con- 
stituting and consecrating of the Lodge of Fellowship. I am 
also pleased to report that Patterson and Kroy Lodges have 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1961 l&l 

built a new Temple at Thornhill. It is a very fine building; 
the Lodge room has a seating capacity of approximately 140 
permanent seats; the basement is finished as a banquet room; 
there are parking facilities for 150 cars. I will again have 
the privilege of accompanying Most Worshipful Bro. Martyn 
on June 16th when he will be dedicating the new Temple. 

During the year I attended most of the Church Services 
held by the Lodges in the District. On these occasions I 
was called upon to read the lesson. A District Church Service 
was held in Trinity United Church at Newmarket, the Church 
of our District Chaplain, Bro. Rev. Duncan White, who 
conducted the Service. It was well supported by the brethren 
of the District and their families. There were two District 
meetings on Masonic education. One was held in a city 
Lodge and the other in a suburban Lodge. Most meetings 
were well supported with approximately four hundred at- 
tending. I also found that in every Lodge in the District 
there is some program on Masonic education. At the District 
meeting in July, 1960, a committee of five P.D.D.G.M.'s were 
appointed to draft a plan for dividing the District. A draft 
of the proposed redistribution was presented to the Masters, 
Past Masters and Wardens for discussion at a meeting in 
January. It was regularly moved that the plan be accepted 
and that each Lodge be polled by letter. Most of the Lodges 
reported favourably. The proposed plan now awaits the ap- 
proval of Grand Lodge. During the year my wife and I 
attended many Ladies' Nights with the District Secretaiy 
and Mrs. Blizzard. We were graciously received on all oc- 
casions. May I express to the brethren of these Lodges our 
appreciation for the many courtesies extended to us. The 
Past Masters', Masters' and Wardens' Associations are very 
active. I believe this speaks well for the harmony that exists 
among and within the Lodges of the District. 

I wish to pay tribute to all those wVio were always ready 
and willing to assist wherever possible, to the Masonic 
Education Committee. M.W. Bro. H. L. Mart>Ti. Custodian 
of the Work, to the Masters, Wardens and brethren of the 
District, to one and all my very sincere thanks. 

Finally, Most Worshipful Sir. thank you for the privilege 
of having: represented you in this District. It is a year that 
I shall cherish and remember as long as I live. 

J. ALLAN CRONE, D.D.G.M. 



TORONTO DISTRICT "7" 

The la^t few trains of sand are slowly tricklin.sr away in 
the hour glass that measures my vear as the representative 
of the Most Worshipful the Grand Master in Toronto Dist- 
rict "7". It is with mixed emotions that I write this report, 



192 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

my final duty to as fine a group of men as it has ever been 
my privilege to serv^e — the brethren of Toronto District "7". 
The honour that has been bestowed on my Mother Lodge, 
Mizpah, No. 572, in giving it the first District Deputy Grand 
Master in its 40 year history' will be long remembered and 
appreciated, and I, as the one to carry this honour, have 
incurred a debt that I shall never be able to repay. My 
memories of all the gracious and friendly welcomes in the 
Lodges of this District shall remain forever green as re- 
minders of my indebtedness and of the spirit of goodwill 
and brotherly love that exists in such abundance in our Craft. 

My duties were made very much easier by the District 
Secretary, Wor. Bro. T. J. A. Gamey, who accompanied me 
on all occasions and provided the encouragement and friendly 
advice that one so often needs, in addition to carrying out 
the particular requirements of his own office. His wise 
counsel and ready assistance made him invaluable to me, and 
I am most grateful to him. 

The duties of Chairman of Masonic Education were 
carried out in a very commendable manner by Wor. Bro, 
George Lennox of Simcoe Lodge, No. 644. He proved by his 
own enthusiasm and leadership that this office can enjoy 
a successful term, and made this especially apparent by hold- 
ing a well-planned and executed meeting for the District 
under the auspices of Remembrance Lodge by dispensation 
granted to Wor. Bro. W. A. King, its Master, to whom I offer 
my sincere thanks on our behalf. I felt from the information 
contained in the reports from the Lodges on this subject that 
Masonic Education had received added stimulus and had 
made very satisfactoiy progress. 

We had the very good fortune to have Rev. Charles 
C. Murray, a member of Huron-Bruce Lodge, No. 611, as our 
District Chaplain. A very well attended District Divine 
Service was held in his church, Leaside United, on March 
12th, the fourth Sunday in Lent, followed by a social hour in 
the church auditorium. Most Wor. Bro. Harry L. Martyn 
and the D.D.G.M. took part in the Service. I was also able 
to attend seven other Divine Services both in and out of the 
District. 

The Blood Donors' Sersuce was very capably handled by 
V. Wor. Bro. Victor Ridgway, of Tuscan Lodge, No. 541, as- 
sisted by Wor. Bro. George Rider of Alpha Lodge, No. .384. 
Many appeals and contacts were made throughout the Dis- 
trict bv these representatives and a very substantial increase 
in donors was the rev.-ard of their efforts, and I thank them 
for their generous assistance and trust that their efforts may 
be continued in the future since this is a veiy worthwhile 
service. The number of donors registered at the time of 
this report is 523, an increase of 69 over the previous year — 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 193 

approx. 15.3%. Congratulations to V. Wor. Bro, Ridgway 
and Wor. Bro. G, A. Rider. 

I would offer my sincere thanks to my immediate pre- 
decessor, Rt. Wor. Bro. A. E. Calverley, for his splendid 
management of the Remembrance Memorial Building Fund. 
Without mentioning figures, I feel that Most Wor. Bro.. C. 
MacLeod Pitts, our Grand Master, will be very pleased with 
the contribution submitted by Toronto District "7" at the 
time of final reckoning. It would be of great delight to me 
if this Fund reached the goal set for this District, but, if it 
doesn't, I know it will come very close, and would like to 
express my appreciation to all the Lodges and their Fund 
Chairmen for their efforts and congratulate them on their 
success. 

Many pleasant and rewarding experiences were enjoyed 
as the year progressed, starting with the visit of Most 
Worshipful Bro. Pitts to Union Lodge, No. 118, on the oc- 
casion of their 100th Anniversary, September 7, 1960. It 
was my pleasure to accompany the Grand Master on this trip 
and to listen to his inspiring remarks and feel that the 
warmth with which we were received by the brethren will 
long be remembered by us. Another meeting of great import 
was the celebration of University Lodge's 50th Anniversary, 
However, this bright milestone in her history was to be 
dimmed by the loss of one of her greatest Masons in the 
person of Most Wor. Bro. W. J. Dunlop. University's loss 
has been and is being deeply felt throughout the whole 
jurisdiction and in the public life of our whole community 
in general and we all mourn the passing of a great man and 
a greater Mason. We are the richer for having known him 
and for his great contribution to all of us. Space does not 
permit recounting the many courtesies and pleasant associa- 
tions of the year just closing, but one of the many highlights 
was an evening spent in Fidelity Lodge. This was the 
occasion when Rt. Wor. Bro. Walter Sills, D.D.G.M. of Tor- 
onto District "2", initiated his two sons and the D.D.G.M.'s 
of Districts "1", "3", "4", "5" and "7" all took part in the 
ceremony in company with many other Past and Present 
Grand Lodge officers. I think this occasion is unique in the 
annals of Masonry. A very interesting and informative 
address was delivered by Most Wor. Bro. H. L. Martj-n at the 
banquet hour. 

This year Toronto District "7", in conjunction with Dist- 
rict's "3" and "4", held a reception in honour of the Grand 
Master. A very fine attendance enjoyed the dinner and the 
programme following. New sui-roundings and a somewhat 
different handling of the evening drew many favourable com- 
ments from those who attended. 

It is with considerable pride and pleasure that I report 
on the splendid manner in which the Masters and officers 



194 CRAXD LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

of the Lodges of Toronto District "7' are carrying out the 
work of their respective offices as witnessed at the inspec- 
tions, all of which I was granted health to carry out. Very 
little criticism was required by me in my remarks concerning 
the work. Very fine attendances by the Past Masters are 
being enjoyed, and the enthusiasm of the officers is having 
the gratifying effect of increasing the attendance of mem- 
bers. The work is being carried out with dignity and sin- 
cerity without allowing the evening to carry on to a late 
hour in most cases. 

The District Secretary was able to report that the Lodge 
Secretaries are most co-operative and are keeping splendid 
and complete reports of all matters pertaining to their 
office. The issuing of lodge summonses to the District 
Secretary and myself were punctual and regular, and I offer 
our sincere thanks for this and other courtesies all through 
the year. 

In company with the District Secretary several Ladies' 
Nights were attended on invitations extended by the Lodges 
of the District, and we both found that these were conducted 
in a manner that would meet with the approval of the most 
severe critic. This was also true in connection with the 
banquet held by the Senior Wardens' Association after their 
meeting to organize for the year. Considerable agitation is 
afoot regarding Temple facilities with a few groups actually 
in the process of planning or building new Temples. The 
same reasons for these activities exist as in former j'^ears — 
poor parking — increasing rents — present accommodation, etc. 
On the other hand, most Lodges are reconstructing their fin- 
ances to try and catch up with their present expenses and so 
attempt to have a better balanced budget. Increases in dues 
and initiations are being imposed as part of the answer to 
their problems. 

I would conclud-e my report by saying that in my opinion 
Masonry in Toronto District "7" is enjoying renewed health 
and vigor and is endeavouring to comply with all the rules 
laid down by the Constitution, and that those participating 
in the work are performing a very commendable service. My 
only hope is that in some small way I may have contributed 
something to the promotion of our great art. and that I have 
not lowered the dignity of the office that I have been per- 
mitted to occupy through the generosity and courtesy of my 
brethren. 

In closinrr I give you this homely farewell: "May you 
always take the right turn at the fork in the road. May the 
wind always be at your back and may the Good Lord take a 
likin' to you — but not too soon". 

J. HOWARD GAHAGAN, D.D.G.M. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 195 

VICTORIA DISTRICT 

I have the honour to submit herewith for your consider- 
ation mv report on the condition of Masonry in Victoria 
District for the year 1960-61. 

I express my appreciation to the brethren of my Mother 
Lodge, Verulam, No. 2G8, Bobcaygeon, for selecting me as 
their candidate for this high office, to the brethren of 
Victoria District for electing me District Deputy Grand 
Master and to you, Most Worshipful Sir, for your confirm- 
ation of that election. 

My first official duty was to appoint Wor. Bro. A. E. 
Woollard as District Secretary. He accompanied me on my 
official visits and his assistance and co-operation, so cheer- 
fully given, have been a real value and I sincerely appreci- 
ated his loyal suppoi't. It was also my privilege to appoint 
Bro. R. C. Hopkins as District Chaplain and his assistance 
was greatly appreciated. For the Director of Masonic Edu- 
cation I selected V. Wor. Bro. Kenneth Johnson who in the 
past has contributed a great deal to Masonic education in 
Victoria District. 

Wor. Bro. Dr. W. D. Thomas was appointed District 
Blood Donor Chairman. While no results were obtained in this 
field of human endeavours his efforts may accomplish future 
results. 

During my term of office I visited the thirteen Lodges 
in the District and on every occasion received warm and 
fraternal welcomes. In almost every Lodge I witnessed 
degrees conferred in which the Masters and officers seem 
to take a great interest. One thing that impressed me most 
was the number of young officers carrying on the work of 
the Lodges. Indications on eveiy hand pointed to a high 
standard of degree work in all Lodges of the District. Masonic 
Education has been promoted as far as possible throughout 
the District. I have found that most of the Lodges have been 
pressed for the necessary time to give proper attention to 
this important subject, due to the extent of degree work that 
was exemplified. The Secretary, Wor. Bro. A. E. Woollard 
examined the records, by-laws, Auditors' reports and the 
Examining Board's report of all Lodges. Insurance coverages, 
financial statements and minute books were found in excellent 
order in all instances. 

Divine Ser\'ices have been held by the majority of the 
Lodges in the District during the year and showed a marked 
increase in attendance. A District Church Service was held 
May 21, at the United Church, Bobcaygeon. A most gratify- 
ing representation from the Lodges of the District attended 
this Sers'ice. The District Chaplain. Bro. R. C. Hopkins, gave 
the brethren a very educational message. 



196 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Invitations to attend various functions were extended to 
me from practically every Lodge in the District, and I regret 
that I was unable to attend all such events due to the pressure 
of personal and other Masonic duties. When I was able to 
attend these enjoyable events I found the same approved 
Masonic conduct prevailing that Grand Lodge desires. Such 
social gatherings assist to build goodwill among the brethren 
of the various Lodges. 

During the year it was my sad duty to report the pas- 
sing of Past District Deputy Grand Master Rt. Wor. Bro. G. 
C. Graham of Spry Lodge, No. 406, Fenelon Falls. This 
brother was well kno\\Ti and highly respected in the District. 
Verulam Lodge, No. 268, Bobcaygeon, lost the oldest member 
in the passing of Wor. Bro. W. A. Davis. He was initiated 
February 24, 1893, a member of the Craft for 67 years and 
a Past Master for 60 years. His memory will be cherished 
by Verulam Lodge. Wor. Bro. John Revell, Master of Vic- 
toria Lodge, No. 398, Kirkfield, passed away in December, 
1960. He will be remembered throughout the District for 
his activities in Masonry. Several other brethren of the 
District passed to the Grand Lodge Above. We cherish their 
memory. 

It is of interest to mention that the District has four 
Pp=t District Deputy Grand Masters and two Very Worship- 
ful Grand Stewards acting as secretaries. The guidance and 
continued interest in the Craft of these Grand Lodge members 
has prom.oted a hig-h standard of degree work and efficiency 
in their particular Lodges and throughout the District. 

It was with sincere regret that I learned early in my 
year that our District would not be visited by our Grand 
Master this year. Victoria District will be looking forward 
to this pleasure during the coming year. 

To the brethren of Victoria District, the guest speakers 
at my official visits and Grand Lodge Officials. I extend my 
sincere thanks with the hope that the same fine spirit of 
fraternal help may be afforded my successor. 

WILLIAM J. MULLIGAN, DJ).G.M. 



WELLINGTON DISTRICT 

Surrounded and supported by a host of Past Grand 
I.odTe Officers, very active Worshipful Masters and Junior 
Offi^'ers and keen brethren in all the Lodges of Wellington 
District, the year, since my election at Grand Lodge, has 
been a very enriching experience for me, and has inspired me 
to greater efforts in all my duties. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 197 

Without exception, all who were chosen for specific 
responsibilities have fulfilled their tasks to the utmost and it 
has been a rewarding fellowship working together. 

The appointment of Wor. Bro. L. W. (Len) Lovell as my 
District Secretary proved to be a good choice, Len has not 
only given unstintingly of his time, but has been a friend and 
counsellor on all our official and fraternal visits throughout 
the District. His records and books have been up-to-date at 
all times and I found him just as dependable and trustworthy 
as when he was my Senior Warden in 1952 when I was the 
honoured Worshipful Master of Walker Lodge, No. 321. 

The re-appointment of Wor. Bro. A T. Prestwich for a 
second term as Supervisor of Masonic Education was a 
wise one both for the District and myself. He chose for his 
theme "A search for Masonic Knowledge", giving ample 
scope for a variety of subjects. Five well attended meetings, 
consisting of smaller groups (four or five Lodges) convened 
by a sub-district chairman, were held in November. Twenty- 
six brethren presented the various topics for discussion which 
took place at all meetings, and a great deal of interest was 
created. On May 24th a "District Masonic Education Meet- 
ing"' was held in Speed Lodge, Guelph, presided over by 
Wor. Bro. Prestwich, who outlined a suggested approach 
to enlist the talents of newly initiated members in the field of 
Masonic Education. Wor. Bros. Thos. Niven and Jim Spark 
arranged an exemplification of four sections of the ritual in 
the First Degree to demonstrate a uniformity of performance 
on the floor of these particular parts of the work. Rt. Wor. 
Bro. George McQueen gave a vei-y impressive and thought- 
provoking discourse on our responsibility as Masons as we 
make our "Search for Masonic Knowledge". Every Lodge 
has a committee on Masonic Education and many Lodges 
make this a part of every meeting. It is our hope that 
progress has been made in this most important part of our 
Masonic life. 

Bro. (Rev.) Andrew H, McKenzie, as District Chaplain, 
gave freely of his help and guidance at all times, accompany- 
ing me on many of my official visits. At the "District Divine 
Service" in Knox Presbyterian Church, Acton, on May 14th, 
he delivered a timely and inspiring message to one of our 
largest congregations of Masons and friends. We are grate- 
ful to Speed Lodge Masonic Choir, which assisted in the 
musical portion of the Service. A number of Di\ine Sennces 
were held in the District and were well attended. 

Our Past Masters', Masters' and Wardens' Association 
is a very active groun in this District, working diligently to 
promote goodwill. This Association was a prime project 
of the late Very Wor. Bro. Amos Shoemaker, whose untimely 
death in January shocked the District. A 'Senior Wardens' 



198 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Night' in Gait last fall planned by this Association was very- 
successful and every one was pleased to welcome Rt. Wor. 
Bro. Hector Wilson, G.S.W., Toronto. This Association meets 
on fixed dates during Fall and Spring and procedure for much 
of our District Masonic work is planned and approved by 
them. Wor. Bro. Earl Wilson is at present President, and 
Wor. Bro. William Murphy is Immediate Past President. I 
am very grateful to this group for their help this past year. 

Very Wor. Bro. Lyle Miller, Baden, sei-ved faitfuUy as 
Chairman of the Blood Donors' Committee and reported that 
results were on a par with last year. 

Among the highlights of the year were: 

The visit of the Grand Master, Most Wor. Bro. C. McL. 
Pitts, to Wellington District at a reception and banquet held 
at the Royal Hotel, Guelph, and capably convened by Rt. Wor. 
Bro. Bruce Omand. All Lodges, except one, were represent- 
ed by the Worshipful Master and many distinguished guests 
and brethren attended. It was my privilege to attend four 
similar receptions, and on each occasion the Grand Master 
inspired us with his personality and challenging message. 

The unveiling of the comer stone and the dedication of 
the Grand Lodge Memorial Building on October 31 was a 
thrilling experience I shall not soon forget. 

The installation ceremony of Wellington Lodge, Toronto, 
and seven similar installation ceremonies in Wellingion 
District were happy fellowships at the New Year time. 

The reunion of the brethren, with their ladies, of the 
eight Temple Lodges of Ontario, held at Kitchener on May 
27th, was a memorable day for all, climaxing in a banquet 
at the Granite Club, with Canon Robert P. Dann, St. Paul's 
Cathedral, Toronto, as guest speaker. All eight Lodges 
took part in conferring a First Degree in Waterloo Lodge. 

The attendance, with my wife, at some Ladies' Nights, 
was .jrreatly enjoyed, and the hospitality and kindness ex- 
tended to us were appreciated. 

Masonry in this District is in capable hands and in good 
condition in every way. There has been a faithful attendance, 
particularly of the Officers. Past Masters and many of the 
members, and all are participating and contributing in some 
way for the betterment of Masonry. It was a privilege to 
serve on the Benevolent Committee as your D.D.G.M. 

In conclusion, may I express my sincere gratitude to the 
Grand Master for confirming my election, to Rt. Wor. Bro. 
Dixon and his associates, and all brethren of the District 
for their assistance and co-operation; and especially to Wor. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 199 

Bro. Wingate, of my own Walker Lodge, who arranged for 
transportation on all my official visits; and to all who 
graciously volunteered to carry out this task. As I earnestly 
believe that as man soweth. so doth he reap, it is my hope 
that some of the 'seeds for thought' that I have tried to sow 
on each official visit may have fallen on receptive hearts 
so that my humble contribution may produce some good for 
Masonry. 

ALLAN J. BUCHANAN, D.D.G.M. 



WESTERN DISTRICT 

To be District Deputy Grand Master for Western 
District has been a pleasant experience, an honour I ap- 
preciate very much. 

Early last fall, we, in Western District, were fortunate 
in having a visit by our Grand Master, Most Worshipful 
Brother C. MacLeod Pitts, accompanied by Right Worshipful 
Brother E. G. Dixon, Grand Secretary, and Bro. N. Byrne. 
A Reception and Dinner was held at Fort Frances on Sep- 
tember 15th and at Keewatin on September 16th. This gave 
the brethren in the South and North an opportunity to meet 
our distinguished brother and hear his interesting and in- 
formative addresses. We are grateful for the time he took 
to come so far to be with us. 

Upon assuming office, I appointed Wor. Bro. D. Henry as 
District Secretary and he has fulfilled his duties in a very 
capable manner. Visiting the various Lodges, he has ex- 
amined the books, obtained the Pre-visit Forms and supplied 
me with the information required. 

Wor. Bro. Rev. L. H. Sanders, Minister of the church 
I am a member of, was District Chaplain. He was in charge 
of the District Divine Service at Emo and preached a Sermon 
which will be remembered by all. 

Wor. Bro. M. F. Hemmens was District Supen-isor of 
Masonic Education and Bro. F. R. Taylor, Diistrict Chairman 
of the Blood Donors' Committee and both are deserving of 
my appreciation. 

My visits to Lodges throughout the District have been 
gratifying indeed. There seems to be an air of enthus'asm 
and sincere friendship and certainly respect for Grand 
Lodge. I was received with respect and dienity in each 
Lodge. I visited each Lodge once and some twice. Distances 
here are great and therefore it is difficult to make many 
visits. 



200 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

I witnessed work in all degrees and would say that, the 
work is quite uniform and of high quality. The Officers 
have shown proficiency in their work and encouragement 
has been given brethren on the sidelines by having many of 
them take part in the work. I have been impressed by the 
Junior Officers in many Lodges, which indicates that the 
immediate futui'e of Masonry is in good hands throughout 
the District. The financial condition of all Lodges is good. 
Attendance has been good at all meetings I have attended 
and the over-all percentage appears good. Yet most Lodges 
are concerning themselves with better attendance. Evidence 
of good fellowship was demonstrated in each Lodge. This 
could not escape my attention. I have i-ecommended to all 
Lodges that more attention should be given towards inter- 
lodge visitations, especially between those farthest apart, 
such as Red Lake and Rainy River, Sioux Lookout and Fort 
Frances. These I feel, would tend to stimulate interest and 
a desire to excel in the degree work. 

When competition for the Past Masters' Shield was held 
at Keewatin, I attended and feel this form of Masonic Edu- 
cation (Question and Answer) is excellent. The Competition 
was between Pequonga. Keewatin and Lake of the Woods 
Lodges with Keewatin the winner this year, 

I have given some thought to Masonic Education and 
have suggested to the brethren that Western District form 
a Past Masters' and Wardens' Association which could meet 
once or twice each year even though distances are great. 
The time spent would give great rewards as it would be a 
means, perhaps, of more co-ordination with respect to Mas- 
onic Education, Grand Lodge and District projects. 

On September 24th, I attended the Grand Lodge of 
Minnesota Area Conference at International Falls, Minn. Wor. 
Bro. Rev. Sanders, District Chaplain, gave the invocation at 
the afternoon meeting and at the evenine banquet. Most 
Worshipful Brother Clyde E. Hegman, P.G.M. and other 
Crand Lodge Officers were in attendance. I expressed the 
deen regrets of Grand Lodge at their loss in the passing 
of Rt. Wor. Bro. E. Gruber, D.G.M. of the Grand Lodge of 
Minnesota, informing them our Grand Master had paid his 
respects personally at the Church in Duluth on September 
15th, the day of the funeral. 

On November 4th, I visited Hematite Lodge, Chisholm, 
Minn, and again extended personal greetings to the brethren 
assembled. 

The Masons of this District have to date contributed 183 
bottles of blood. It is gratifying to see the brethren respond- 
ing so well. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 201 

Members of all Lodges have contributed to the Remem- 
brance Memorial Fund. An amount of $548. has been re- 
mitted and we trust more will be contributed by June 30th. 

I would be remiss if I did not express my appreciation 
to Most Worshipful Brother H. L. Martyn, P.G.M., Custodian 
of the Work for his instruction and guidance. 

Even though distances are great (I have travelled ap- 
proxiamtely 3,1-50 Miles in visits and District Meetings) I 
feel there is a feeling of nearness with all Lodges. Although 
my term is at an end, I will say that I desire to visit with 
the brethren in all Lodges whenever the opportunity allows 
me to do so. I trust I may be able to contribute to Masonry 
for many years to come, something worthwhile and helpful. 

NORMAN E. JOHNSON, D.D.G.M. 



WILSON DISTRICT 

It has been my privilege to represent the Grand Master 
as D.D.G.M. for the past year and it has been a most reward- 
ing experience. The courteous manner in which I was re- 
ceived in each of the twenty-three Lodges in Wilson District 
clearly demonstarted the high esteem and affection the 
brethren have for the Grand Master and Grand Lodge. 

I appointed Wor. Bro. Harold R. Scruton, District Secre- 
tary, and he fulfilled all his duties in a most capable manner. 
His sincere attention to every detail of his office was much 
appreciated. Wor. Bro. Elmer W. Lewis accepted the office 
of District Chaplain and accompanied me on all my visits 
except one. He received valuable advice and assistance from 
Very Wor. Bro. Canon D. J. Cornish, a Past Assistant Grand 
Chaplain, which aided him greatly in his work throughout 
the District. 

The appointment of Wor. Bro. H. J. H. Barrett as Dir- 
ector of Masonic Education proved a wise choice as he did 
great work in the Lodges, giving short lectures on the 
different degrees which were appreciated by the brethren. 
We have tried on each of our visits to stress the need for 
more Masonic Education and feel that our efforts have been 
AvortJi while. 

Each Lodge conferred a degree on my official visit and 
the work was well exemplified in each Lodge. The Masters 
and their Officers take pride in their work and I feel that 
the work in the District is of high standard. 

At the regular meeting of Erie Lodge, No. 149, Port 
Dover, on September 19th, I had the pleasure of presenting 



202 GRAJ^D LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

a Fifty Year Medal to Wor, Bro. Guy Teeple, one of our 
oldest and most respected Past Masters. Again, on March 
27th I presented a Fifty Year Medal to Bro. Thos. Dunbar, 
also of Erie Lodge. 

One of the highlights of the year was the ceremony of 
Constituting and Consecrating Ashlar Lodge, No. 701, Tillson- 
burg. The Grand Master, with several Grand Lodge and 
Past Grand Lodge Officers, conducted the ceremony in a 
very impressive manner. 

Several of the Lodges held Ladies' Nights and Mrs. 
Smith and I were privileged to attend some of these pleasant 
gatherings. We were made very welcome on all occasions 
and thoroughly enjoyed meeting the brethren and their 
ladies. Also, several of the Lodges held Church Services 
which were well attended. 

There is an active Past Masters' and Wardens' Associ- 
ation in our District and I appreciated the assistance they 
have given me and the Lodges throughout the District. At 
their meeting on May 1st a Lodge of Instruction was held, 
the First Degree being exemplified by a number of Past 
Masters under the direction of Very Wor. Bro. Jas Long of 
Oak Branch Lodge, Innerkip. The Question and Answer 
period, following the Degree, brought out some interesting 
ideas. 

On Sundav, May 14th, the District Church Service was 
held in Grace United Church, Port Dover, which was attended 
by a large number of brethren. We were pleased to have 
the Grand Chaplain, Rt. Wor. Bro. R. Gordon Hazlewood, 
present to deliver the sermon. 

The most enjoyable event of the year was held in Port 
Dover on May 20th, when 250 brethren gathered in the Public 
School Auditorium to greet the Grand Master on the occasion 
of the Wilson District Reception to the Grand Master, Most 
Wor. Bro. C. M. Pitts, and the One Hundredth Anniversary 
of Erie Lodge, No. 149. After a delicious fish dinner the 
usual Toast List was given with the Gr.and Master delivering 
a wonderful address to the brethren. This meeting proved a 
fitting climax to a most enjoyable year, in which I have 
endeavoured to contribute something to Masonry in Wilson 
District. I trust that I have succeeded in some small 
measure. 

I wish to thank Erie Lodge. No. 149, and Wilson 
District for giving me the honour of serving as D.D.G.M. and 
express my thanks to the Grand Secretary and his staff for 
their kind assistance which was much appreciated. 

W. HAROLD SMITH, D.D.G.M. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1961 203 

WINDSOR DISTRICT 

The honour of serving as D.D.G.M. for Windsor District 
has been a very gratifying and rewarding experience for me. 
I would like at this time to take the opportunity of thanking 
the brethren for the faith they have had in electing me to 
that office to represent the Grand Master, Mo?t Wor. Bro. 
Clarence MacLeod Pitts. 

I appointed Wor. Bro. Albert H. Shaw, Tilbury, as my 
District Secretary and Rev. Canon B. A. Silcox, Windsor, as 
District Chaplain. I am deeply indebted to these brethren 
for their help and support. 

I appointed Wor. Bro. J. Jarrett. Windsor, Chairman for 
the city Lodges and Wor. Bro. Robert McAlorum. Tilbury 
for the county Lodges for Masonic Education, who did excel- 
lent in their field of endeavour. 

Early in September I had the pleasure of \asiting Palace 
Lodge, No. 604, Windsor, and seeing Cleveland Lodge from 
Ohio exemplify the First Degree which impressed me and 
which was entirely different. In talking to the Wor. Master 
of Cleveland Lodge he said that in Pennsylvania which 
borders their state the work is entirely different. 

On my official visit to King Edward Lodge, No. 488, 
Harrow, I had a very pleasant duty to perform, at the end 
of the lodge meeting in having to pin two Fifty Year Medals 
on two brethren who were initiated the same night and both 
are in fairly good health. 

I attended Windsor Lodge, No. 403. when they had a 
Senior Warden Night for the District. They will make very 
good Masters for the coming year as they performed excel- 
lently. 

I was invited to Glencoe by Rt. Wor. Bro. Herman Bauer 
to attend a dinner in honour of the Grand Master. There 
were eight D.D.G.M.'s at the dinner. 

On May 27th. Naohtali Lodge, No. 413, Tilbury, cele- 
>^ated their 75th Anniversary with a dinner held in the 
T'nited Church Hall, delightfullv served by the ladies of the 
rhurch. Our guest speakei-. Dr. A. B. Lucas, of London, 
Director of Education, gave a very interesting talk of his 
early days of education and as Inspector of Schools, and 
also on Masonry. Members were present from Chatham, 
London and Windsor. 

On the following morning May 28th, our own Lodge 
attended Church Service at Valetta Presbyterian Church, a 
small community near Tilbury, which is the home church 
of several of our brethren. That evening the District Church 



204 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Service was held sX St. Paul's Anglican Church, Windsor, and 
was conducted by Rev. Canon B. A. Silcox, our District 
Chaplain. All District Lodges were represented and a very 
interesting sermon was enjoyed by all- 
in conclusion, I would like to say at this time condition 
of Masonry thi-oughout Windsor District is in very good 
hands. I stressed very strongly on Masonic Education 
throughout the District. I suggested that each Lodge should 
have a chairman and two other brethren active in Masonic 
Education, I think this will take a year or two to materialize 
before there will be good results. 

WILLLA.M E. LUMLEY, D.D.G.M. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
WARRANTS 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro. J. A. 
Irvine. Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. Allan, it was 
received and adopted. 

\ 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master. Officers and 
Members of Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Your Committee on Warrants begs to present its report 
for the year ended May 31st, 1961. 

It is unfortunate that we had only one application 
during the vear. Aurum Lodge U.D.' of Timmins was 
granted a dispensation by the Most Worshipful the Grand 
Master. 

Without trespassing on the domain of the Committee 
on the Condition of Masonry, which Committee is so ably 
chaired by Rt. Wor. Brother B. B. Foster, may we respect- 
fullv suggest that there is a great opportunity for the in- 
ception of new Lodges. A quick glance at our Proceedings 
of 1960 indicates that we have som.e 56 Lodges with a mem- 
bership of over four hundred, and one with as many as 
seven hundred and thirty-five members. Lodges of this 
size are verv unwieldy to administer, and present limited 
opportunity for the new member to become an active part 
of the Craft. It is the feeling of this Committee that we 
would be in a muoh stronger position with the institution 
of fifty or more Lodges in the immediate future. 



TORO>fTO, ONTARIO. 1961 205 

If your Lodg'e is one of these mentioned, we suggest 
that you give thought toward taking immediate steps leading 
to the formation of a new Lodge. 

The Petition, Books and Records of the one Lodge under 
dispensation, making application for warrant, have been 
examined and we are pleased to recommend that a warrant 
be granted to: 

Aurum Lodge U.D., Timmins, Instituted October 5th, 
1960, to be numbered 704 and to be placed in Temiskaming 
District. 

We again repeat some of the important recommend- 
ations made by Rt. Wor. Bro. J. N. Allan and his Committee 
of last year. We believe them to be of major importance : 

1. To remind all Secretaries of the advantages of always 
starting at the top of the page to record the minutes of 
each meeting, and likewise of the desirability of making 
marginal notes indicating the subject matter of each 
paragraph. This practice will prove exceedingly useful 
in ascertaining information regarding items recorded in 
the minutes. 

2. That copies of lodge summonses should be retained and 
periodically bound. This is a small effort and enables 
such interesting data in connection with the Lodge to be 
available in an easily accessible form. 

3. That new Lodges appoint an interested and well qualified 
brother to record the history of the Lodge each year. We 
suggest that a plan be developed which will assure that 
such historical notes will be completed each year and 
placed with the records of the Lodge. 

4. That consideration be given by every new Lodge to the 
pi'ovision of a fireproof receptacle which will accommodate 
the Warrant, the minute book, the by-laws and the 
history of the Lodge. The V/arrant and the records 
of the Lodge become increasingly valuable as the years 
pass. It must be realized that the originals can never be 
replaced. 

May we congratulate the members of Aurum Lodge and 
welcome them to this Grand Lodge. We wish for them 
that the Sunlight of Masonic Brotherhood may forever shine 
brightly upon them and assist their officers in dispensing 
Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth, 



Respectfully and fraternally submitted. 



A. IRVINE. 

Chairman. 



206 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

CALLED OFF 

Grand Lodg-e adjourned at 12.45 p.m. 

CALLED ON 

Grand Lodge resumed Labor at 2.50 p.m., the 
Grand Master on the Throne. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 
ON BENEVOLENCE 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro. J. N. 
Allan, and on motion of the Deputy Grand Master, 
seconded by R.W. Bro. Allan, it was received and 
adopted. 



To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I am pleased to submit the report of the Committee on 
Benevolence for the year ended May 31, 1961. 

Details of the Grants are as follows: 

275 Grants approved and authorized by Grand 

Lodge in July, 1960 $ 64.475.36 

Interim Grants during the year 3.650.00 

$ 68,125.36 
Less cancellations and reductions 3,625.00 

$ 64,500.36 
Emergency Grants 893.42 

Total Grants $ 65,393.78 

It is expected $500 advanced as an Emergency Grant 
will be repaid to Grand Lodge. 

The usual Pre Grand Lodge meeting of the Committee 
was held in our new Remembrance Memorial Building in 
Hamilton. General approval of this innovation was expressed 
by all Members of the Committee. The attendance was ex- 
cellent. We seemed to feel at home and the environment was 
conducive to thorough and sympathetic consideration of all 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 207 

applications. We had also the pleasure of lunching with our 
rfeputy Grand Master, R.W. Bro. R. W. Treleaven, and our 
Grand Secretary, R.W. Bro. E G Dixon, at The Scottish Rite 
Club. 

R.W. Bro. Geo. McQueen, our Supervisor of Benevolence, 
presented 259 applications for consideration; 40 were new 
ones, some of which had received an interim grant during the 
year. The total number of applications was 16 less than last 
year. I would like to assure you, however, that every ap- 
plication considered worthy of a grant was approved. 

Your Committee wishes to express their hearty and sin- 
cere appreciation to R.W. Bro. McQueen for his never-tiring 
interest in the welfare of those who receive benevolence and 
also for the faithful and capable discharge of his duties. 
R.W. Bro. McQueen's parish is a very large one — extending 
as it does over the entire Province. We, therefore, suggest 
that officers of the Lodge and Members of Committees be 
diligent in their effort to cooperate with and assist our Super- 
visor of Benevolence in his work. 

R.W. Bro. McQueen, in his report to your Committee, 
emphasized the gi'eat value of sympathetic guidance and 
assistance provided in many instances by officers of the Lodge 
and by Committee Members on behalf of dependents. He 
stated that he was deeply appreciative of this service. He 
was grateful too for the cooperation of those Brethren who 
regularly forward information with respect to individual cases 
and thereby enable him to keep his file up-to-date. 

Your Committee learned with regret at their June 
meeting that, in some instances, Application for Benevolence 
Forms were not completed as fully and as carefully as they 
should have been. I have been asked to urge Lodge Officers 
to exercise the greatest possible care in this regard. Lack 
of information or a return received too late may result in 
hardship for the applicant, while full information received 
in good time, enables the Committee to give prompt and 
thorough consideration to the application. 

Your Committee commends many individual Lodges for 
their generous grants to dependents for whom they are 
responsible. This, of course, is as it should be. It is, there- 
fore, with regret that we find it necessary to state that in 
a few instances this is not so. We are confident that the 
Lodge will benefit from sharing in all Benevolent efforts. It 
is, therefore, the hope of your Committee that they will be 
able to state at the next Annual Communication of Grand 
Lodge that every Lodge in our Grand Jurisdiction is co- 
operating with Grand Lodge in the support of their depend- 
ents. 



208 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Information presently at hand indicates that grants for 
Benevolence in the coming year will be approximately of the 
same order as during the year just past which amount is 
considerably less than was provided a few years back. It 
would appear that the overall decrease is brought about 
through the implementation of the improved services pro- 
vided by the several levels of Government, in the provision 
of hospital and medical care, as well as up-to-date and low 
rental housing in many parts of our Province, particularly 
for our senior citizens. This, along with improved allow- 
ances and pensions, has been the chief contributing factor 
in relieving the distress and general need of our dependents 
as well as providing a greater sense and source of security. 

Your Committee has considered all applications with the 
utmost care and recommends that the sum of $72,00€ be 
provided for Benevolence in the year 1961-62. 

We wish also to record our appreciation for the following 
contributions and bequests received: 

Estate of John Coulson $2,084.76 

Estate of Charles E. Sealey $5,000.00 

Bro. Frank B. Wenger $ 25.00 

We also recommend the continuance of out membership 
in the Masonic Relief Association of the United States and 
Canada. 

I have deeply appreciated the thoughtful guidance and 
assistance of all Members of the Committee and express to 
them my sincere thanks. 

All of which is respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

On behalf of the Committee, 

JAMES N. ALLAN, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE 
CONDITION OF MASONRY 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro. B. B. 
Foster, Chainnan, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. Foster, it was 
received and adopted. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 209 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. and A.M. of Canada in 
the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

It is my privilege, on behalf of the Committee, to present 
the report on the Condition of Masonry in this Grand Juris- 
diction at this One Hundred and Sixth Communication of 
Grand Lodge. 

Outlining the Masonic highlights in our Fraternity during 
the past year is a pleasure because of the exemplary co- 
operation of the District Deputy Grand Masters. Their 
reports present a detailed picture of events throughout the 
Jurisdiction. 

All District reports speak of the indispensable work 
done by the District Secretaries. They look after the routine 
details and thus make it possible for the District Deputy 
'Grand Masters to concentrate on the larger issues. The 
faithful service of Masters and Officers is highly praise- 
worthy. Appreciation is also given to Lodge Secretaries and 
Treasurers for their continued efforts on behalf of their 
Brethren. 

The gracious receptions tendered the M.W. the Grand 
Master on his many visits exemplify the loyalty and affec- 
tion he is accorded by his Brethren. A t>'pical statement 
made by the D.D.G.M. of Hamilton District 'B" can be said 
to represent those from other reports when he stated, "the 
deep respect in which our Grand Master is held, the great 
admiration for his ready wit and tremendous vitality were 
much in evidence". Attendance at District receptions. Cen- 
tennial celebrations, Dedications, and Divine Services illus- 
trate the great devotion to duty that our Grand Master has 
maintained. He has travelled an astounding number of 
miles during these past two years. 

The number of Ladies' Nights reported indicates that 
the social side of our fraternity is being adequately looked 
after. Most of these reviews tell of the pleasure accruing 
from these activities to all who attended. Apparently we 
have not changed too much since the days Milton speak? of 
in "L'Allegro" when he describes the enjoyment of the 
company of 

"Ladies, whose bright eyes 

Rain influence, and judge the prize". 

One could not write a report on the Condition of Mason- 
ry without expressing the sense of loss felt by the entire 
membership, and mentioned in many of the reports, at the 
passing of still another of our Past Grand Masters in the 



210 GRAND LOEKJE OF CANADA ANNUAL, COMMUNICATION 

person of M.W. Bro. W. J. Dunlop. Our regret was made 
more acute because he had participated in those phases of 
Masonic activity that touched the lives of so many members 
of the Craft. We will miss his advice and his enthusiasm. 

It is gratifying- to note that there is a continuing check 
on the candidates who seek admission to membership in our 
Lodg-es, that only those who are known to believe in and 
support the basic principles of our Craft are permitted to 
knock at our doors and ask permission to enter, and that 
care is taken to see that when they have entered, they are 
taught the philosophy of the Fraternity. 

In all districts reporting, the ritualistic work is de- 
scribed as excellent. The several Lodges of Instruction held 
last year will certainly contribute to the perfection of the 
work. We congratulate all those who took part in this act- 
ivity. The officers of the great majority of Lodges are 
cons'tantly showing their resourcefulness in planning for 
future meetings. This is a most commendable state of 
affairs for the fundamental ingredient which promotes 
interest in our Masonic society is a well prepared programme. 
Some Lodges might benefit perceptibly from the suggestion 
that their officers meet once a month to discuss the work 
to be done during the following month. By doing so, the 
junior officers learn to plan ahead and the Lodge will profit 
from the conferences. 

Lodge attendance occupies a prominent place in many 
reports. Several suggestions are offered to implement a 
revival of interest in the work of the Fraternity. From 
London comes this: "Roll call and Memorial Services, mem- 
bers' and visiting degree teams, interesting educational 
programmes, and fraternal visits among Lodges contribute 
greatly in this regard." One Lodge honoured all members 
who had twenty-five or more years of continuous member- 
ship in the Craft. The following suggestions come from 
letters sent to me by the Grand Lodge Librarian: "formation 
of choirs to lead in the musical ritual, personal letters by 
active members to absentees, and a grreater participation by 
members in the business of the Lodge." 

The sound financial position of most Lodges is reassur- 
ing to all in authority. I hasten, however, to draw attention 
to a cautionary thought from Peterborough District: "It is 
disturbing to note that the expenses almost equal the income. 
It would appear that the financial standing of the Lodges 
would be greatly improved if the dues and initiation fees 
were raised to a level in keeping with economic conditions." 
From this statement we must conclude that there are still a 
few Lodges which might profitably review their financial 
position. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 211 

Masonic Education goes forward at varying rates of 
speed in the several districts. The pace varies with the en- 
thusiam and leadership given by the Lodge Chairmen. The 
Grand Lodge Committee, under the capable leadership of 
R.W. Bro. W. K. Bailey, has continued to furnish material 
and ideas for the improvement of the programme. All Dis- 
trict reports indicate that there is an expanding use of this 
and other materials in the cause of educating our brethren. 
In an effort to refute the repeated excuse of lack of time for 
Masonic Education, the D.D.G.M. of Brant District says, "At 
each visit the Superv'isor of Masonic Education gave a demon- 
stration of what can be done in a two-minute talk on various 
items of Masonic lore". Perhaps this course might be fol- 
lowed in some other districts next year. 

The reports of this committee in 1956-57-58 and 60 men- 
tion the problem of the Lodge with a large membership. On 
checking this year we find that we have forty-nine Lodges 
with a membership between 400 and 499, eleven between 500 
and 599, six between 600 and 699, and one over 700. The 
success of any organization is proportional to the number of 
members who are 'active'. We must conclude, therefore, that 
the smaller the group which can economically operate, the 
more successful it becomes. We must further conclude that a 
small Lodge where dues and initiation fees are adjusted to 
sound financial practices will make a greater contribution to 
the true education and enlightenment of the individual Mason 
than a larger one. 

We are happy to record the continuing efforts of the 
Blood Donors'* Committee. This is one area in which all 
Masons might display their greatest charity for they are 
giving only of themselves. Western District reports contri- 
butions averaging one in every ten members, an excellent 
record. 

Past Masters', Masters' and Wardens' Associations con- 
tinue to lead in many fields of Masonic endeavour. Those 
mentioned are Lodges of Instruction, Masonic Education, 
Blood Donors' Clinics, planning Receptions to the Grand 
Master, and monthly visitations to Homes for Senior Citizens. 
Active Past Masters' Associations thus give much guidance to 
individual Lodges and their Officers and furnish a place for 
more Masons to be engaged in Masonic endeavours. 

All the District Deputy Grand Masters report their 
pleasure in the presentation of Long Ser\'ice Medals to our 
Masonic veterans. It is heartening to learn that most of 
these still attend their Lodge meetings regularly and take 
part in them. 



212 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

The Grand Lodge Bulletin remains a xmifying force 
among the Lodges of the Jurisdiction. The messages from 
the M.W. the Grand Master, and other members of Grand 
Lodge renew our determination to further the interests of the 
Craft. The news items contained in the Bulletin keep us all 
aware of interesting occurrences which we all like to share. 
E.W. Bro. A. E. MacGregor, the Grand Lodge Librarian, de- 
serves our appreciation and applause for his unceasing efforts 
to disseminate this news and for his efficient operation of 
the Grand Lodge Library. We would do well to remember, 
in this connection, Sir William Osier's comment that 'Money 
invested in a library gives much better returns than mining 
stock". 

The completion and Dedication of our new Grand Lodge 
Memorial Building during the past year has increased our 
pride in the accomplishments of our Order. This building 
will stand as a monument to those Masons who laboured so 
hard to bring this to fruition. We owe a great debt of grati- 
tude to R.W. Bro. R. C. Berkin&haw, Chairman of the Special 
Building Committee and to R.W. Bro. E. G. Dixon for their 
untiring efforts on our behalf in the construction and furnish- 
ing of this fine structure. 

Every District report indicates that each Lodge is accept- 
ing its obligation and privilege of attending Divine Services. 
It is satisfying to see that each D.D.G.M. has appointed a 
District Chaplain to lead the Brethren in their quest for 
light. Many of these have accompanied the D.D.G.M. 's on 
their visits of inspection and have taken an active part in the 
evening. Large attendances are reported at all District and 
local Divine Services and serve to show our constant devo- 
tion to the Most High. Rt. W. Bro. R. Gordon Hazlewood, 
the Grand Chaplain, has filled the office with distinction. He 
has contributed much by his presence at Dedications, and his 
fine messages at District Divine Services have strengrthened 
our belief in the external Fatherhood of God. 

Masonry has progressed in this Grand Jurisdiction, even 
though the increase in number may be small. We most cer- 
tainly must accept our responsibilities to our Faith and our 
Craft that we may move forward in the future and become a 
part of our 'adventure in development'. Let us be a part of 
a flowing tide and not of a wave. The wave recedes but the 
tide keeps moving in. Let us continue to obey the admoni- 
tion: "Let there be Light." 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted, 

B. B. FOSTER, 

Chairman. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 213 

REPORT OF ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
ON LODGE BUILDINGS 

This report was presented by V.W. Bro. Geo. 
T. Evans, Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by V.W. Bro. Evans, it was 
received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge A.F. & AM. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

I bepT to present the fourth annual report of the Advisory 
Committee on Lodge Buildings. 

As most of you are aware, in 1958 M.W. Bro. Harry L. 
Martyn, the then Grand Master, recommended that a com- 
mittee be set up to formulate requirements and regTilations 
to govern the erection of new Masonic Temples, or the re- 
modelling of existing ones. 

Since its inception, our committee has examined plan.'» 
for 63 lodges which have been built, are being built, or are 
to be altered or added to. This is an average of 31 a year 
which is very gratifying. 

Out procedure is, that the lodge contemplating new 
building work shall first submit a rough sketch of what they 
propose to do. This sketch is carefully examined and any 
required alterations are marked directly on the sketch with 
explanatory notations and returned to the lodge for revision. 

In some cases where the sketch plan seems hopelessly 
out of line or can be re-arranged to better advantage, we 
prepare a rough draft sketch plan showing our suggested 
changes. 

In every case a written comment accompanies the cor- 
rected sketch outlining the reason for the required changes 
and explaining the advantages of following our suggestions. 
In some cases we are able to suggest types of construction to 
meet unusual conditions. After the lodge makes the re- 
quired changes to the sketch or plan it is then resubmitted 
to our committee and if found to be satisfactory, it is ap- 
proved. 

Some cases can be disposed of quickly with but two or 
three letters and a few changes to the plan. In other cases, 
the work is protracted over many months with several plans 
and many letters passing between the lodge and our com- 
mittee. 



214 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

In order to assist the lodges in preparing plans, \s.e will 
supply to them, on request through the Grand Secretary, 
several bulletins termed "Requirements for Lodge Buildings", 
explaining in detail the points to be observed in preparing 
plans. These bulletins cover such items as the planning 
and the required ceiling heights of the lodge room, the 
anteroom, banquet room and kitchen, also the requirements 
regarding fire escapes, stairs, toilet rooms, furnace rooms, 
lighting, ventilating and other matters having to do with 
the safety, convenience and comfort of the brethren. 

The Lodge Building Bulletins which we furnish are as 
follows: 

L.B.2 — dealing with the planning and construction of 

the building. 

L.B.3 — dealing ^-ith the PROCEDURE to be followed 
by building comnvittees, and outlining the various steps 
to be taken from the appointing of the initial committee 
on planning down through the securing of the property, 
financing, the submission of plans, the securing of 
tenders and final approval. 

L.B.4, our most recent bulletin — deals with electrical 
work and is accompanied by a diagram plan showing 
all the necessary outlets for general lighting, altar 
lights, Master and Wardens lights, exit lights, and 
other special lights required in a properly equipped 
lodge room. 

Regarding the submission of plans, we repeat what we 
have stated in all of our previous Annual Reports, that it is 
necessary for lodges contemplating new buildings or alter- 
ing existing ones, or making even minor changes in buildings, 
to FIRST write to the Grand Secretary requesting copies of 
the various bulletins aforementioned BEFORE any move is 
made to prepare sketches or set up financial arrangements. 
This will save the lodge officers much time and effort and 
will save the Advisory Committee many hours in trying to 
revise unsuitable plans and explain details which are already 
set out in the various bulletins. 

Another point we wish to stress is, that unfortunately, 
there have been one or two cases in which lodge committees 
have not seen fit to follow our directives. Whether this is 
from thoughtlessness, wilfulness or plain defiance, we can- 
not be certain, but we DO know our requirements are reason- 
able and in the best interests of the safety and comfort of 
the brethren. We have many letters and p'ersonal messages 
from so many lodges expressing their appreciation of the 
assistance and guidance given by our committee in their, 
building problems. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 215 

To any lodge committee which thinks our requirements 
are unrealistic, or are going to work a hardship, we strongly 
urge that they arrange, through the Grand Secretary, for a 
meeting with our committee before they embark on any 
undertaking which could prove to be to the detriment of their 
lodge. 

We congratulate the many lodges on their efforts to 
improve their temples and wish them much pleasure and 
satisfaction in their endeavours. 

We solicit inquiries from all lodges contemplating build- 
ing and assure them of our constant desire to offer them 
every assistance. Needless to say, there is no charge for 
such services. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted, 

GEO. T. EVANS, 

Chairman. 

At the conclusion of the Report the Grand 
Master expressed to V.W. Bro. Evans the appreci- 
ation of the members and of himself for the valuable 
services rendered by the Committee, and particularly 
to Bro. Evans, as architect, in the planning and 
supervision of the erection and completion of our 
beautiful Grand Lodge Memorial Building, The 
brethren joined in this expression with applause. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
MASONIC EDUCATION 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro. W. K. 
Bailey, Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. Bailey it was 
received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, in the 
Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Your Committee on Masonic Education for the vear 
1960-1 composed of M.W. Bros. W. J. Dunlop, W. L. Wright, 
H. L. Martyn, R.W. Bros. E. G. Dixon. B. B. Foster. M. C. 
Cain, H. E. Wilson, Wellington Smith, R. G. Hazlewood, 
A. C. Whitmore, W. A. Stewart. E. D. Berrv. S. C. Rowe, 
J. F. Whiting, W. H. Quinn, W. E. Sills, G. J. Patterson, and 
W. K. Bailey as Chairman, beg to present the report to the 



216 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

One Hundred and Sixth Annual Communication of Grand 
Lodge. 

With deep regret we record the passing during the year 
of a very valued member of the Committee, M,W. Bro. W. J. 
Dunlop, Past Grand Master. M.W. Bro. Dunlop was chair- 
man of the committee appointed by M.W. Bro. J. S. Martin 
in 1929 to study the problem of Masonic Education. On his 
election to the Board of General Purposes in 1931, he was 
appointed as Chairman of the Committee on Masonic Edu- 
cation and continued in this capacity until his election as 
Deputy Grand Master in 1935. His contribution to the ex- 
pansion and effectiveness of the work of this Committee in 
thirty years of service cannot be overestimated and certainly 
will scarcely ever be equalled. 

M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn, Custodian of the Work, and a 
member of this Committee, has done a great deal through 
the instructional meetings with the District Deputy Grand 
Masters to set the stage for the promotion of Masonic Edu- 
cation throughout the thirty-seven Districts. From his per- 
sonal and first hand knowledge of the particular areas and 
their problems in connection with Masonic Education over 
the years, he was in a position to make specific and concrete 
suggestions. 

During the year five general communications have been 
forwarded from the Chairman's office to the Members of the 
Committee and to the District Deputy Grand Masters. Suffi- 
cient copies were supplied to the latter to make a copy avail- 
able to each District Supei-visor and Lodge Chairman. Copies 
of the two issues of the "Syllabus of Instruction" have been 
distributed through the Grand Secretary's office. We are 
indebted to M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn, R.W. Bros. 
G. J. Patterson and A. C. Whitmore, members of this Com- 
mittee, for preparation of three of these communications. 
Thanks are extended to the Grand Secretary for arrange- 
ments for printing and mailing the copies of Syllabus of 
Instructions. 

It would appear from the District reports that these 
publications are being used to good advantage by at least 
two-thirds of the Lodges in this Grand Jurisdiction. It is 
especially encouraging to note that the syllabus is being used 
to guide and direct tJie study groups of younger Masons in 
many of the Lodges. We commend perusal and contempla- 
tion of the publications of Grand Lodge, Book of 'Constitu- 
tion, Manual for Instructors and Students, History of Grand 
Lodge and Grand Lodge Proceedings. 

The general success of the Masonic Educat'on programme 
carried on in each District is largely attributable to the wise 
selection of the District Supervisor, and to the generous sup- 
port by the District Deputy Grand Master. On the_ local 
Lodge level in working with small groups the responsibility 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 217 

rests with the Lodge Chairman and Worshipful Master. The 
Committee would like to expi-ess its sincere appreciation to 
the District Deputy Grand Masters, the District Supervisors, 
Lodge Chairmen, and all the brethren who have assis^ted us 
this year. 

A study of the reports on Masonic Education as sub- 
mitted by the District Deputy Grand Masters shows that there 
has been a maz-ked increase in the numbers of meetings 
which included some Masonic Education and also in those 
devoted entirely to this facet of Masonry. The most fre- 
quent suggestions for the promotion of Masonic Education 
were short talks and question and answer periods. 

One report suggested that the District Deputy Grand 
Master and District Super\asor should meet early in the 
year with the Worshipful Masters, Lodge Chairmen, and 
Wardens of the Lodges to acquaint them with the overall 
programme for the year. All too often we direct our educa- 
tion towards the neophji;e Mason and neglect the instruction 
and induction of the Worshipful Master, Officers, Com- 
mittee members and older Masons. It calls for much per- 
sistence and patience on the part of those who do the teach- 
ing and it includes a willingness to be taught on the part of 
the neophyte. And all the indoctrinating will have been in 
vain if it fails to bring about this final keystone of the arch, 
the thing that we pray for in our Lodges "let us practise 
outside the Lodge those excellent precepts which are ever 
inculcated within it." 

It is the responsibility of a Masonic Education Commit- 
tee — wherever its labours are expended in Local Lodge, 
District Committee or Grand Lodge — to constantly en- 
deavour to improve our understanding of Masonry. Second- 
ly, we need to be constantly improving the methods by which 
we impart this knowledge to the officers, leaders, and mem- 
bers of the Craft. The Grand Lodge Committee is primarily 
concerned with assisting the local and district committees to 
plan and carry out an effective Masonic Education pro- 
gramme. 

Brethren, the future of Masonry is in the hearts and 
minds of each one of us today. We, who have seen the light 
of Freemasonry and are willing to be guided by it, must pass 
the torch of freedom of learning and thought to our younger 
Masons. These men who are in our Order now and those 
who will be entering during the next few years will be oc- 
cupying our places to-morrow and will be charged with the 
leadership of our Craft. 

Can we whose souls are lighted 
By wisdom from on high 
Can we to men benighted 
The Light of Masonn,' deny? 

Respectfullv and fraternally submitted, 

W. K. BAILEY, 
Chairman. 



218 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

REPORT OF THE BLOOD DONORS' COMMITTEE 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro. F. D. 
Shannon. Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand ]\Iaster. seconded by R.W. Bro. Shannon, it 
was received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Your Blood Donors' Committee begs to present the 
report of its actiAaties for the year 1960-61. 

There was a definite increase in numbers over last year 
amounting to 282 donors, bringing the grand total to 4,518 
The follo\\-ing is a list of the districts, together with the 
District Deputy Grand Masters, the District ChaiiTnen, and 
the number of donors reported from each district, compared 
with last year's report: 

REPORT FOR YEAR ENDING MAY 31, 1961 
W'ith comparative figures for previous year. 



DISTRICT 



Algoma — 

Brant 

Bruce 

Chatham — 

Eaotevn 

Frontenac - 

Georgian 

Grey 

Hamilton A 
Hamilton B 
London 



.R.W. 
_R.W. 
_R.W. 
-R.W. 
-R.W. 
-R.W. 
_R.W. 
_R.W. 
-R.W. 
_R.W. 
_R.W. 



Mu.skoka-P. Sound R.W. 

Niagara A R.W. 

Niagara B RW. 

Nipissing East R.W. 

Nipissing West _R.W. 

North Huron R.W. 

Ontario ^R.W. 

Ottawa R.W. 

Peterborough RW. 

Prirce Edward RW. 

Samia R.W. 

South Huron RW. 

St. T.awrence R.W. 

St. Thomas R.W. 

TemLskaming t? w 

Toronto 1 R.W. 

Torom.o 2 R.W. 

Toronto 3 ".W^ 

Toronto 4 R.W. 



Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
fero. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bre. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 



D.D.G.M. 



I. Knox 

A. Skinner 



1960 1961 



J. Spencer 

W. Bauer 

W. Smail 

F. Whiting 

G. W. Hall 

C. McTavish 

C. Cunningham 

E. W. Nancekivell 
C. Whitmore 

G. Avery .__ 

R. Allison 

E. Cornell 

G. Tullock 

R. Shore 

E. Little 

C. Wakelin 

D. B^rry 

H. Mortlock 

P. Haggarty 

C. Rowe _... 
E. Bryan ._ 
J. .Tackson 
O. Tolman 

H. Quinn 

A. Stewart 

E. Sills _ 

H. Gr^uld . 
S. Beak 



82 


425 




4 




76 


161 


140 


199 


156 


113 




394 


289 


320 


381 


21 


110 


170 


94 


482 


516 


237 


81 


97 


136 




347 




266 


132 


IKS 




122 


320 






52 


137 


71 




128 




270 


212 


217 




6C 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 219 

Toronto 5 R.W. Bro. J. A. Crone 43 162 

Toronto 7 R.W. Bro. J. H. Gahagan 454 

Victoria R.W. Bro. W. J. Mullisran 

WeUingrton R.W. Bro. A. J. Buchanan 299 148 

Western R.W. Bro. N. E. Johnson 222 119 

Wilson R.W. Bro. W. H. Smith 

Windsor R.W. Bro. W. E. Lumley 190 

423.5 4515 

Out of a membership of 136,266 this constitutes one 
donor in every 30 Masons. Surely there are more in this 
^eat Brotherhood of Men who can spare a little blood, that 
someone else might live. 

Let us briefly consider the above table: 

For the second year in succession Niagara A has headed 
the list, and we commend W. Bro. C. R. Buss, the District 
Chairman, on his excellent work. 17 Districts showed an 
increase in donors, 8 reported a decrease, and 12 districts 
failed to report any donors. Ten District Chairmen, appoint- 
ed in good faith by the District Deputy, failed even to 
acknowledge their appointment, while 2 District Deputies 
took no action and failed to have the courtesy to answer our 
letters. Some of the representatives, along with the pressure 
of their regular duties, filled the position of Chairman as 
well while others contributed very greatly to the program, 
and we heartily commend them for their assistance. Rt. 
W. Bro. S. I. Knox of Algoma District is to be particularly 
congratulated. His district is one of the more scattered, 
where travel is difficult, and yet, largely by his own efforts, 
he was able to produce 425, or the second largest number 
of donors in the jurisdiction. Toronto 7 was in second place 
last year but failed to produce any this year. In spite of 
this, the Toronto Districts as a whole, still showed an increase 
of 124. 

Our thanks and gratitude go to all who have assisted 
in any way in the preparation of this report. The District 
Deputy Grand Masters have been most helpful in their 
addresses, and in their careful selection of Chairmen. The 
Chairmen have, for the most part, been pillars of strength, 
and we hope their experiences have been both enjoyable and 
stimulating. Finally, our appreciation goes to the Grand 
Secretary and his staff for many services rendered during 
the year. 

In these troubled times of threatened nuclear warfare, 
let us prepare ourselves against whatever may befall in the 
future. Let us develop the habit of giving blood. The Red 
Cross is still unable to keep up the necessary supply. Let 
us practice this greatest of all Masonic Charities, and as we 
do so, let us have faith and hope that Freedom to do so, 
may prevail in our land from generation to generation 
Let us ever remember, that THE PINT YOU GIVE TOD\Y 
MAY SAVE YOUR LIFE TOMORROW. 



220 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Since this report was submitted to the Grand Master 
for his consideration, seven further reports^ have been re- 
ceived, and I present this appendage to bring the figures 
up to date. 

District Previous New Report 

Brant 4 130 

Georgian 156 188 

Niagara "B" 81 239 

North Huron 135 138 

Peterborough 220 

Western 119 158 

Toronto "7" 623 

This last figure was received since the beginning of this 
Grand Lodge Communication, and places Toronto "7" at the 
head of the list, and gives the Toronto Districts an increase 
of 77% over last year. 

The total number of Masonic Donors in Ontario, then, 
for the year 1960-61 is 5,609, compared with 4,235 for the 
previous year, or an increase of 32%. This indicates one 
Donor in every 24 Masons. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted, 

FRANK SHANNON, M.D., 
Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
CONSTITUTION AND LAWS 

This report was presented by M.W. Bro. W. L. 
Wrig-ht. in the absence through illness of M.W. Bro. 
T. H. Simpson, Chairman, and on motion of the 
Deputy Grand Master, seconded by M.W. Bro. 
Wrig-ht, it was received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

The Committee on Constitution and Laws begs leave to 
report as follows: 

1. No notices of proposed amendments to the Constitution 
have been presented to your Committee. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 221 

2. Robertson Lodge, No. 292, King City, in Toronto District 
No. 7, has petitioned asking that it be granted concurrent 
jurisdiction with those Lodges in the Citj' of Toronto and 
in the Metropolitan Area of Toronto which now have 
concurrent jurisdiction. Ninety-seven of the Lodges in 
the area have approved of the petition. Three have not 
approved but have asked for informaition regarding 
initiation fee and annual dues. None has objected. The 
vast majority of the Lodges in the area have already 
approved. Your Committee, therefore, recommends that 
Robertson Lodge, No. 292, King City, be granted con- 
current jurisdiction with all the Lodges in the City of 
Toronto and in the Metorpolitan Area of Toronto which 
now have concurrent jurisdiction, such change to be 
effective forthwith. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted, 

T. H. SIMPSON, 

Chairman. 

REPORT OF FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 

M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn, CliaiiTnan, presented 
this report and read the Foreword to the Reviews. 
The Deputy Grand Master then moved, seconded by 
M.W. Bro. Martyn. that the report be received and 
adopted. The motion was carried. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
FRATERNAL RELATIONS 

This report was presented by M.W. Bro. H. L. 
Martyn. Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by M.W. Bro. Martyn it was 
received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

In presenting this report to Grand Lodge the Committee 
would like to record the deep sense of loss we feel in the 
passing of our senior member, M.W. Bro. W. J. Du-nlop. 
His wide knowledge of the Masonic world rendered his sei-vice 
to the work of this Committee invaluable. We miss him very 
much. 



222 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



During the year the Committee have examined requests 
for recognition from several Grand Lodges. Some of these 
are new and some have been laid over from other years. 
We recommend that recognition be accorded the following 
Grand Lodges: 

1. The United Grand Lodges of Germany. In 1957 we 
recognized the United Grand Lodge of Germany which was 
a revival of the Masonic Lodges in West GeiTnany that had 
existed before World War II. Since 1957 a Union has been 
effected between the United Grand Lodge of Germany and 
the Land Grand Lodge (Swedish Rite). The united body 
has taken the name "United Grand Lodges of Germany". 

2. The Grand Lodge of F. & A. Masons in Finland. 
This Grand Lodge was consecrated by the Grand Lodge of 
New York in 1923. It has been working regularly since its 
inception and it is widely recognized. Its recognition include 
fourteen Grand Lodges in the United States, Nova Scotia 
and Prince Edward Island in Canada, and England, Ireland 
and Scotland in Europe. 

3. The Grand Lodge of Greece. This is one of the 
Grand Lodges that suffered during the time of World War 
IT. In 1947 the Masonic Lodges of Greece were revived, 
particularly through the generous efforts of the English 
and American Masons. It? recognitions include 46 Grand 
Lodges in the United States, Quebec and Nova Scotia in 
Canada, and England, Ireland and Scotland in Europe. 

4. The Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of 
Japan. This Grand Lodge was organized in 1957. At their 
Annual Communication held March 17, 1961, it was reported 
that there were 2,766 Master Masons on the rolls. A charter 
for Lodge No. 17 was issued to the newest Lodge. ' The 
request for recognition came befoz*e our Committee in 1968. 
At that time our Committee reported, "The newly fonned 
Grand Lodge of Japan is still at odds with the Grand Lodge 
of the Phillipines. We shall be glad to learn that the 
difficulty has been amicably adjusted." At the present 
time recognition has been accorded this Grand Lodge by all 
Grand Lodges in the United States except Maine, four of the 
Canadian Grand Lodges, the Grand Lodge of Scotland and 
the Grand Lodge of the Phillipines. 

The Committee recommend that requests for recognition 
from the Grand Lodge of Belgium and the Grand Lodge of 
Colombia- Occidental Call, be laid over for further examin- 
ation and investigation. 

We have received disturbing information about the 
Masonic situation in Cuba. At the present time we can only 
report the situation in the light of the reports we have from 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 228 

the Commission on Information for Recognition as they 
reported it to the Grand Masters' Conference last February. 
Late in 1960 "the Grand Master .of Cuba after conference 
with all the Past Grand Masters, deemed it advisable to 
declare the constituent Lodges in recess, depart from Cuba 
to the United States, and seek to set up a Grand Lodge of 
Cuba in Exile. Since that time the Grand Master of Florida 
has issued a proclamation to all his Lodges which reads in 
part; "and the Grand Lodge of Cuba be, and it is hereby 
granted permission t.3 have its official residence and home 
within the boundaries of the Grand Jurisdiction of Florida, 
and the Most Worshipful Grand Master of Masons in Cuba 
and the Grand Lodge of Cuba be, and they are hereby 
authorized and permitted to take such official and fraternal 
action in Masonic affairs as is appropriate under the circum- 
stances to the same extent and in full measure as they 
would or could do within the boundaries of the Grand 
Jurisdiction of Cuba." 

In the meantime it v/ould seem that Masonry in Cuba 
continues under "leadership presumed to be dominated by 
influences not in accord with Masonic principles, with the 
former Senior Grand Warden acting as the Grand Master." 
I think that one further quote from the Commission's report 
will express the position we find ourselves in at the present 
time in relation to this matter. "Certainly it seems that our 
Grand Lodges cannot accept communications coming from the 
Havana group as coming from a recognized Grand Lodge. 
Perhaps in time a Grand Lodge in Exile can be recognized, 
but in our opinion it would be well for our Grand Lodges to 
let more time elapse before final commitments are made." 
Your Committee on Fraternal Relations subscribe to the idea 
expressed in this last quotation. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted, 

H. L. MARTYN, 

Chairman. 



PRINTING AND SUPPLIES 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro. W, H. 
Gibson, ChaiiTnan, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand iMaster. seconded by R.W. Bro. Gibson, it 
was received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge. A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 



224 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Your Committee on Printing and Supplies begs leave to 
report the expenditures for printing and supplies for the 
year ended May 31st, 1961 as follows: 

(1) Constitutions for re-sale $ 3,570.09 

(2) Booklets, Works, Installation Ceremonies, 

for re-sale 1,730.59* 

(3) Proceedings and postage 4,428.21 

(4) Grand Lodge Bulletins (3 issues and postage) 5,439.95 

(5) Printed forms, circulars, records, office 

stationery and supplies 6,199.33* 

(6) Syllabus for Masonic Education (2 issues) „ 88.80 

(7) Fraternal Re^-ie\vs (2,900) 853.92 

(8) Preliminary Reports (3,300) 982.18 



3.004 Masters' Booklets 
6,050 Booklets No. 1 
6,000 Booklets No. 2 
6,025 Booklets No. 3 
6,030 Booklets No. 4 



$ 23,293.07 



..$ 1,730.59* 



26,750 Master Mason Certificates $ 3,149.90 

7,000 Copies of Grand Lodge Returns 248.64 

5,000 Brochures (including engravings) 

New Building 273.06 

28,000 Envelopes 204.80 

Miscellaneous _.._ 2,322.93 



$ 6,199.33 



We would point out that we have purchased approxi- 
mately a five years' supply of lithographed M.M. Certifi- 
cates, a supply of Grand Lodge Returns and the special bro- 
chures on the new building as well as a supply of envelopes, 
which will not recur annually, but makes our total larger 
than the total last year. 

We wish to thank the Chairmen of the various commit- 
tees for their co-operation in forwarding their reports so 
promptly. 

This Committee is deeply appreciative of the fine, will- 
ing and efficient services of our very capable Grand Secre- 
tary who has been most helpful and co-operative. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

WALTER H. GIBSON, 

Chairman. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 225 

REPORT OF THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

This report was presented by M.W. Bro. J. A. 
Hearn, for M.W. Bro. J. P. Maher, who was absent 
on account of illness. On motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by M.W. Bro. Hearn, it was 
received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshiipful Sir and Brethren: 

Your Library Committee have pleasure in submitting 
this, our 29th Annual Report. Its members appreciate the 
honor and the opportunity to serve, and we feel certain that 
we can assure you that our Library has served the Craft 
well and truly over the year just passed. 

A studious Brother in New South Wales has given us 
this thought: "Like all systems of philosophy, Masonry is 
concerned principally with the purpose and aim of life, and 
incidentally with the individual and group conduct of peoples. 
Our first duty as Craftsmen is, therefore, to become familiar 
with the Masonic conception of life, and to this end it is 
necessary that we first acquire, at least, an elementary 
knowledge of all the powerful forces which, common to and 
inherent in all men, constitute the means by which the 
human race is impelled towards its distant, unknown goal." 

"Advancement without sustained effort is impossible, 
and effort without direction is wasted; therefore Masonry 
emphasizes in every part of its practice the need for the 
individual Craftsman to apply himself, with zeal to the 
problems of life. The brain is like a muscle, — use gives it 
increasing strength and power, — and conversely, lack of its 
use will cause it to atrophy. Only the work we perfonn 
ourselves will build our bodies, and only the knowledge we 
acquire by our own independent efforts will strengthen and 
develop our minds." 

The foregoing sentences surely are a sound brief or 
justification for the continued and improving use of our 
Library. Our task is to aid and inspire the enquiring mind 
of any of those who seek our help. To accomplish this, we 
have on our shelves the best Masonic lore, whether it be two 
or two hundred years old. 

It is quite proper to point out that our Library-, while 
permanently situated in Toronto, sei-ves the Craft in that 



226 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

metropolitan area as well as Lodges throughout the length 
and breadth of this Jurisdiction. It also has frequent and 
friendly contacts with not only those others in Canada, but 
Vv'ith many near and far in English speaking Grand Lodges. 
We have visitors come to see us from many parts of the 
republic to our south; we receive, and have on file, the 
printed records of research societies and Lodges, not only 
here in Canada, but in Britain, Australasia and the United 
States. These are our valuable possessions and resources. 

Our Library functions as an information centre for the 
Craft at large. Daily, we have enquiries by telephone, letter, 
or personal visit from members of the Craft who may be 
visiting our city, — (this is particularly so during the summer 
months,) — and to all of these we are able to give definite 
help. And it should also be mentioned that quite frequently 
our office receives a call from someone, not yet a member 
of the Order, who wishes to have some suggestions as to what 
he has to do to apply for membership. 

Perhaps the best way to sum up these activities is to 
give it in figures, and these are from our records: 

Books loaned out to Toronto Lodges 674 

Books loaned out to others in Ontario 238 

Letters written in reply to enquiries 94 

Visitors registered on our record 670 

Donations: We have received donations and valuable 
books from the estates of our last Past Grand Masters, 
Hamilton, Hart and Dunlop. Other donations which we are 
pleased to acknowledge are these from Wor. Bro. John Fox 
on behalf of the estate of the late William P. Ryrie, and a 
number of other generously disposed members of the Craft. 

Your Committee is also pleased to report that it was 
host to the .30th meeting of the Canadian Masonic Research 
Association on May 16th. Your Librarian is a member of 
this Association, and also is one of the Correspondence Circle 
of Lodge 2076 Quatuor Coronati, the premier research Lodge 
in the Masonic world. He will be pleased to give details of 
the necessary requirements for membership in this, and 
also for the research Lodges of Leicester in England and 
Sydney in Australia. Membership dues in all of these is 
but a nominal fee. 

Your Committee find that there are quite a number of 
books in our Library that are duplicates of those in custom- 
ary circulation. It is thought that if these are not actually 
needed for our use, that such books might be sent out on 
permanent loans to Lodges anywhere in the Jurisdiction 
that might be interested in setting up a Lodge Library, 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 227 

Your Committee also feel that they should call the 
attention of all borrowers to the Library rule regarding 
return of books at the proper time. It has been found that 
every year a number of books have not been returned and in 
consequence, some other would-be borrower has been unable 
to obtain the book of his choice. 

The Committee expresses their grateful appreciation of 
the services of our Librarian, R.W. Bro. MacGregor. What 
began, some eleven years ago, as a part time function has 
now developed to an almost full-time ?er\uce. The increased 
demands for the use of the Library facilities by members of 
the Craft who are pursuing some avenue of research, or 
some particular field of information, is fast becoming an 
every day affair. Our Librarian, however, cheerfully carries 
on in his devotion to his task. 

And in conclusion, your Committee would like to voice 
their confirmation of a writer of years gone by who said 
that "a good book is the precious life-blood of a mastei 
spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life 
beyond life. You, books, are the golden vessels of the 
temple, — ^burning lights to be held ever in the hand." 

Your Committee has been proud of the opportunity over 
this past year to have acted for you as your right hand in 
dissemination of Masonic learning. 

Respectfully submitted on their behalf, 

JAMES P. MAKER, P.G.M., 

Acting Chairman 

Members of the Committee: 

J. A. HEARN, P.G.M. 
L. S. BEAK, D.D.G.M. Toronto District 4 
J. R. CRONE, D.D.G.M. Toronto District 5 
J. H. GAHAGAN, D.D.G.M., Toronto District 7 
W. H. GOULD, D.D.G.M. Toronto District 3 
W. E. SILLS, D.D.G.M. Toronto District 2 
W. A. STEWART, D.D.G.M. Toronto District 1 

CALLED OFF 

At 4.45 p.m. the Grand Master declared the 
afternoon session of Grand Lodge closed, to resume 
labor at 9.00 a.m. on the following morning. 

GALLED ON 

Grand Lodge resumed labor at 9.15 a.m., Thurs- 
day, July 20th, the Grand Master on the Throne. 



228 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
CREDENTIALS 

The report was presented by R.W. Bro. J. W. 
Hamilton, Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. Hamilton, it 
was received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of Grand Lodge, A,F. & A^. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Your Committee on Credentials begs to report: 

There are on the Register of Grand Lodge 617 Warranted 
Lodges. 

Represented at this Communication: 

By Regular Officers 508 

By Proxies 70 

By Past Masters 18 

Total Lodges Represented 596 



Total Number of Delegates Registered 3318 

With a total vote of 3949 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

J. W. HAMILTON, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF 
SCRUTINEERS 

V.W. Bro. Robert Strachan, Chairman, present- 
ed the Report of the Committee of Scrutineers, and 
on motion of the Deputy Grand Master, seconded 
by V.W. Bro. Strachan, it was received and adopted. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 229 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Your Committee of Scrutineers, having been duly sworn 
in by R.W. Bro. G. J. McQueen, begs to report the result 
of the Elections as follows: 

Grand Master R.W. Bro. R. W. Treleaven 

Deputy Grand Master R.W. Bro. J. A. Irvine 

Grajid' Senior Warden W. Bro. G. C. Bennett 

Grand Junior Warden W. Bro. W. M. Prentice 

Grand Chaplain W. Bro. A. J. Anderson 

Grand Secretary R.W. Bro. E. G. Dixon 

Grand Registrar W. Bro. F. L. Barrett 

BOARD OF GENERAL PURPOSES 

R.W. Bro. J. N. Allan Dunnville 

R.W. Bro. B. B. Foster Ridgetown 

R.W. Bro. Wellington Smith Fort Frances 

R.W. Bro. W. K. Bailev Toronto 

V.W. Bro. G. T. Evans Hamilton 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

ROBERT STRACHAN, 

Chairman. 

The Grand Master declared the above brethren 
duly elected. 

Before Bros. Hamilton and Strachan left the 
dais he conveyed to them the very grateful thanks 
of the members of Grand Lodge for the great service 
they had rendered in supei^vising registration of 
members and the election of Grand Lodge Officers. 
The brethren showed their appreciation by applaud- 
ing most heartily. 

REPORT ON THE REDISTRIBUTION 
OF TORONTO DISTRICT "5" 

The report of the Special Committee on the 
redistribution of Toronto District "5" was presented 
by R.W. Bro. W. K. Bailey, and on motion of the 
Deputy Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. Bailey, 
it was received and adopted. 



230 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Your Committee to consider the proposed redistribution 
of Toronto District "5", composed of M.W. Bros. J. P. Maher, 
J. A. Hearn, and H. L. Martyn; R.W. Bros. D. J. Gunn, M. 
C. Hooper and W. K. Bailey begs to present their report. 

At a meeting held on May 8, 1961, the Committee ex- 
amined all the documents presented in support of the petition 
to divide Toronto District "5" into two districts. Having 
had the experience of the Committees which had recommend- 
ed the division of Toronto District "A" in 1954, and Toronto. 
-District "B" in 1956, and since the requested redistribution 
follows the pattern adopted in these districts, the Committee 
found the task comparatively routine. 

A word of commendation is due R.W. Bros. F. C. Cook, 
H. A. Jackson, F. E. Malcolm, J. B. Stevenson and H. T. 
Blumsom, (Chairman) for the excellent way in M'hich they 
had carried out their assignment and had prepared the docu- 
ments for presentation to this Committee. 

The documents support the facts that of the 30 Lodges 
in the District, 29 Lodges are in unanimous agreement with 
the proposed division, and one favourable to the proposed 
redistribution, pi'oviding there is a minimum of confliction 
in regular meeting nights. R.W. Bro. Blumsom and his Com- 
mittee discussed this question and were unanimously agreed 
that due consideration had been given to the few conflictions 
of lodge communications. 

Having due regard to the foregoing information this 
Committee recommends to the Grand Master, the Board of 
General Purposes and to Grand Lodge as follows: 

1. That Toronto District "5' be divided into Toronto Dis- 
trict "5", and Toronto District "6". 

2. That this division be effective at the Annual Communic- 
ation of Grand Lodge in 1962. 

3. That these Districts be composed of the following Lodges: 
Toronto District "5" Toronto District "6" 

No. Name of Ixxlge Membership No. Name of Lodge Membership 

(Dec. 1959) (Dec. 1959) 

22 King Solomon's 340 129 Rising Sun 192 

23 Richmond 219 156 York 371 

6-5 Rehoboam 440 265 Patterson 309 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



79 Simcoe 148 

86 Wilson 270 

97 Sharon 148 

99 Tuscan 216 

247 Ashlar 237 

326 Zetland 302 

438 Harmony 221 

481 Corinthian 340 

577 St. Clair 255 

581 Harcourt 95 

629 Grenville 307 

702 The Lodge of 

Fellowship .... 26 

3^564 



512 Malone 179 

542 Metropolitan .... 240 

553 Oakwood 339 

591 North Gate 329 

592 Fairbank 267 

606 Unity 241 

607 Golden Fleece .... 231 

634 Delta 326 

638 Bedford 232 

646 Rowland 78 

676 Krov 144 

696 H. L. Martyn .... 66 

3,544 



Fraternally and respectfully submitted, 



W. K. BAILEY, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
FRATERNAL DEAD 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro. D. J. 
Gunn. Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. Gunn, it was 
received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

On July 9th, 1856, M.W. Bro. William Mercer Wilson 
presided at" the first annual communication of this Grand 
Lodge meeting in the City of Hamilton, when there were 
fifty-one delegates present representing thirty-three lodges. 
On July 20th, 1960, M.W. Bro. Clarence MacLeod Pitts pre- 
sided at the one hundred and fifth annual communication 
meeting in the Citv of Toronto, when there were three thous- 
and two hundred and ninety-five delegates registered repre 
senting six hundred and three lodges. 

The mere recital of these significant figures testifies 
most eloquentlv to the faithful and devoted service of farmer 
members of this Grand Lodge who in their day and genera- 
tion gave so freely of their time, talents and substance and 
helped to make possible the Masonic inheritance which is ours 
today. It is therefore most fitting that at each annual com- 
munication the living members should endeavour to pay tri- 



232 GRAND LOEKJE OF CANADA ANN'UAL COMMUKICATION 

bute to the great host of spiritual witnesses by which we are 
surrounded and gratefully remember our debt to those who 
have gone before. 

Once again it i^ the sad duty of this committee to record 
the passing to the Grand Lodge Above of stalwart Masons 
who had been our companions in other years and whose wise 
counsel and genial personalities v.-ill be sorely missed. As 
ahvays, some of these brethren were among the leaders of 
the Craft, also many others who were happy in serving their 
ovv-n lodges and districts. We must never forget that healthy 
Craft lodges are the foundation of Masonry, and those ardent 
and unselfish Masons who were the pillars of their own 
lodges are worthy of our grateful remembrance. 

The ranks of our past Grand Masters, already sadly 
reduced in the previous year, suffered a further loss in the 
death of M.W. Bro. W. J. Dunlop in February of this year. 
No doubt the Most Worshipful the Grand Master will deal 
more fully in his report v.-ith the life and achievements of our 
late distinguished Past Grand Master. While not enjojing 
the close association with our late brother that his colleagues 
in the Grand East were privileged to have, the Chairman of 
this Committee wishes to record pleasant memories of the 
unfailing courtesy and kindly help received on num.erous 
occasions fi'om the late M.W. Bro. Dunlop. Not only this 
Grand Lodge but also a host of Masons whom he was ever 
ready to encourage and counsel mourn his passing after a 
long and notable career as a widely known educationist, out- 
standing Mason and devoted Churchman. 

It is most fitting that we pay our tribute of esteem and 
respect to those who have laboured with the working tools 
of Masonry in their symbolic sense and by precept and ex- 
ample have removed many of the sharper edges from the 
rough Ashlars of their minds and characters. It is beyond 
the capacity of any man to achieve even a close likeness to 
the perfect Ashlar, but who of our number has not witnessed 
a steady chipping away of the rough corners of a fellow 
Mason's personality when by devotion to the Craft and ab- 
sorption of its teaching he has given our great fraternity 
the opportunity it must have have to do its work effectively. 
Our sense of loss as we mourn for those devoted brethren is 
all the greater because we realize that an outstanding Mason 
is the product of years of growing in Masonic knowledge 
and therefore in grace of character. 

Man, we are told, and know full well, has but a short 
time to live and sooner or later each of us must stand before 
the Great Architect to give an account of our lives and 
actions. Here let us state again that Masonry is not a re- 
ligion and makes no claims to the salvation of the human 
soul. However, it is a s{plendid and inspiring philosophy of 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 233 

life and countless thousands of men have been greatly in- 
fluenced by the teachings concealed in its symbols and alle- 
gories. 

In this day and age of space missiles and the strenuous 
and untiring efforts of philosophies alien to our traditions 
and beliefs to capture the minds of a large portion of the 
world's population, it is well for us to be sure that we ad- 
here most firmly to the teachings of the Craft. Surely it was 
never more important for Masons to support the institution 
to which each of us owes so much for the lessons we have 
been taught and the eternal principles which our ritual so 
eloquently expresses. 

At this time we might profitably recall to our minds a 
few of the fundamental truths that our Craft has impressed 
upon us. First, a belief in a Supreme Being — a belief denied 
by millions of our fellow men. Without this rock on which 
we stand, there could be no Freemasonry as we know it and 
all Masons should so govern themselves, both in deeds and in 
words, that the world at large may be in no doubt as to 
where we stand. 

Secondly, a belief in the worth and dignity of every man 
regardless of colour, creed or material possessions. We know 
too well that all men were not created equal in abilities or 
opportunities. It is our firm conviction, however, that every 
man is entitled to our respect and that the state was made 
for man and his betterment. We deny most strongly the 
false gospel that man's chief end is to serve his temporal 
rulers and that individually he counts for nothing. 

Thirdly, the development of the mental capacities of 
every Mason so as to utilize as much as possible of the in- 
herent abilities with vv'hich the Creator has endowed us. 
Along with this duty is the further obligation to endeavour 
to progressively improve the soundness of our judgment and 
to be ever mindful of the wealth of significance underlying 
the four cardinal virtues. 

If this report appears to speak more to the living than of 
our departed brethren, it is because we believe that the un- 
seen cloud of witnesses, whose presence we feel this day, 
would not wish us to spend our time in undue mouraing. 
Rather, having paid our respects to their memories and grate- 
fully acknowledged their contribution to the cause of Free- 
masonry in their lifetime, they would perhaps impatiently 
remind us of the tasks uncompleted, of Masonic duties yet 
before us, and urge us in the strongest terms to press on- 
ward. Let us therefore heed their admonition and obey their 
unspoken challenge to us all. 



234 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Thus, we say our farewell to those who have laboured 
well and gone to their eternal reward in the Grand Lodge 
above. May we remember the words of the poet: 

"How fast they fall, those we have knowTi, 
As leaves from Autumn branches blown so quickly sear. 
Yes, one by one they drop away 
As leaves that fall, and stray and disappear. 
Sleep on, dear friends, such lives as thine 
Have not been lived in vain. 
But shed an influence rare, divine. 
On those who here remain." 

Let us now pay a silent tribute to our Departed Brethren 
as we bear in mind the following: 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 235 



2Il|csp Slabkt ^agrs 

arc inacribih anb frjitfrually bebicutch 
in mimnrg nf 



M.W. BRO. WILUAM JAMES DUNLOP 
Grand Master, 1937-39 
Born in Durham. Ontario, 1881. 
Died. February 2. 1961. 

Initiated in Peterboro^iKh Lodge, No. 155, Peterborough , 1908. 
Affiliated with University Lodge, No. 496, Toronto, 1914. 
Worshipful Master of University Lodge, 1922. 
Charter Member of William James Dunlop Lodge, No. 675. 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1927. 
Grand Trea.surer, 1941-59. 

M.W. BRO. JAMES PATTERSON MAHER 
Grand Master, 1949-50. 

Born in Toronto, Ontario, 1890. 

Died, August 2, 1961. 

Initiated in York Lodge, No. 156, Toronto, 1912. 

Worshipful Master of York Lodge, 1930. 

District Deputy Grand Master, 1934. 

R.W. BRO. CLARENCE E. ASHiBURY 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1953. 

Born in St. Thomas. Ontario, 1902. 

Died, October 14, 1960. 

Initiated in St. David's Lodge. No. 302, St. Thomas, 1927. 

Worshipful Master of St. David's Lodge, 1935. 

R.W. BRO. PERCY GERALD CADOGAN CAMPBELL 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1936. 

Born in Calais, France, 1878. 

Died. November 13, 1960. 

Initiated in The Ancient St. John's Lodge, No. 3, Kingston. 

1915. 
Worshipful Master of The Ancient St. John's Lodge. 1920-21. 

R.W. BRO. WILBERT THOMAS CLAYTON 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1947. 

Born in Toronto. Ontario. 1903. 

Died. October 19. 1960. 

Initiated in North Gate Lodge, No. 591, Toronto, 1925. 

Worshipful Master cf North Gate Lodge, 1934 and 1944. 

R.W. BRO. CARL DUKE CROSBY 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1949. 

Born in Prince Edward County, 1901 

Died. August 24, 1960. 

Initiated in The Belleville Lodge, No. 123, Belleville, 1926. 

Worshipful Master of The Belleville Lodge, 1934. 



236 GRA^rt) LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



R.W. BRO. WILLIAM JAMES FULLER 
District Deputy Gr&nd Master, 1942. 

Bom in Mitchell, Ontario. 

Died, January 28, 1961. 

Initiated in Temiskaming Lodge, No. 462, New Liskeard, 1915. 

Worshipful Master of TemiBkaming Lodge, 1920. 

R.W. BRO. ANGUS GRAHAM 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1923, 
Bom in Edfrid Township, Middlesex County, Ontario, 1884. 
Died, November 5, 1960. 

Initiated in Tecumseh Lodge, No. 245, Thamesville. 1905. 
Worshipful Master of Tecumseh Lodge, 1912. 

R.W. BRO. ROY A. GUEST 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1935 

Born in London Township, Ontario, 1893. 

Died, July 8, 1961. 

Initiarted in Acacia Lodge, No. 580, London, 1921. 

Affiliated with Moffat Lodge, No. 399. Harrietsville, 1931. 

Worshipful Master of Moffat Lodge, 1936. 

R.W. BRO. HERBERT J. HALL 
District Dqputy Grand Master, 1931 

Born in Warwick Township, Ontario, 1878. 
Died, December 31. 1960. 
Initiated in Arkona Lodge, No. 307, 1907. 
Worshipful Master of Arkona, 1911. 

R.W. BRO. LINCOLN W. H. INGALL 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1929. 

Born in 1866. 

Died. May 31, 1961. 

Initiated in Gait Lodge. No. 257. Gait. 1907. 

Worshipful Master of Gait Lodge, 1919. 

R.W. BRO. LEWIS HALLISTER INGRAM 

Distric* Deputy Grand Master, 1952. 
Bom in Manvers Township, Bethany, Ontario, 1892. 
Died, March 30, 1960. 

Initiated in Royal Arthur Lodge, No. 52.3. Peterborough. 1915. 
Charter Membor of William James Dunlop Lodge, No. 675. 
Worshipful Master of Royal Arthur Lodge, 1939. 

R.W. BRO. RICHARD HENRY IRWIN 

District Deputy Grand Master, 1958. 

Born in Ireland. 

Died. May 19. 1961. 

Tiitiated in Temiskaming Lodge, No. 462, New Liskeard, 1932. 

Worshipful Master of Temiskaming Lodge. 1940. 

R.W. BRO. HUGH JOHNSON 
Grand Registrar, 1931. 

Rorn iin Binbrook. Ontario, 1875. 

Died, May 23. 1961. 

Initiated in Harmony Ix>dge, No. 57, Binbrook, 1908. 

Worshipful Ma-ster of Harmony Lodge. 1912. 

R.W. BRO. CHARLES HENRY LORD 

District Grand Master, 1935. > 

Bom in Nor*h Cower, Ontario, 1885. 

Died, June M. 1961. 

Initiated in ^''igh Park Lodge, No. 531, Toronto, 1921. 

Charter Mf^irber of Melita Lodge, No. 605, 1922. 

Worshipful Master cf Melita Lodge, 1927. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 2S7 



R.W. BRO. MAX MANDEL 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1955. 
Born in Hungary. 1898. 

Died. August 20. 1960. ..,<,. v u. iqq9 

Initiated in Sturgeon Falls Lodge. No. 447. Sturgeon Falls. 1938. 
Worshipful Mafrter of Sturgeon Falls Lodge, 1941. 

R.W. BRO. HARVEY MILNE 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1927. 

Born in Quebec City. Quebec. 

Died, December 24. 1960. ^. ,„„, 

Initiated in Minden Lodge. No. 253. Kingston, 1907. 
Worshipful Master of Minden Lodge, 1917. 

R.W. BRO. HARVEY WESLEY MITCHELL 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1939. 
Born in Sarnia, Ontario. 1879. 
Died. October 13. 1960. 

Initiated in Ontario Lodge, No. 26, Port Hope, 1904. 
Worshipful Master of Ontario Lodge, 1923. 

R.W. BRO. (DR.) JAMES HOWARD MUNRO 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1942. 

Born in Maxville, Ontario. 1881. 

IMed. November 5, 1960. 

Initiated in Maxville Lodge, No. 418, Maxville, 1904. 

Worshipful Master of Maxville Lodge, 192o. 

R.W. BRO. ARTHUR S. NEIL 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1936. 

Born in Thornlie Bank, Scotland, 1897. 

Died. August 4. 1961. ^ ., ,„„„ 

Initiated in Hugh Murray Lodge. No. 602, Hamilton, 1923. 
Wcrshipful Master of Hugh Murray Lodge, 1931. 

R.W, BRO. HERBERT MILTON SOMERVILLE 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1946. 

Bom in Bryson. Quebec, 1888. 

Died, March 13, 1961. 

Initiated in Elk Lak" Lodge, No. 507. Elk Lake, 1913. 

Worshipful Master of Elk Lake Lodge, 1922-23. 

R.W. BRO. HAYDEN STANTON 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1952. 

Born in Crosby. Ontario, 1898. 

Died. December 14. 1960. 

Initiated in Rideau Lodge. No. 460. Secley's Bay, 1940. 

Worshipful Master cf Rideau Lodge. 1951-52. 

R.W. BRO. HENRY ALLAN STEWART 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1952. 
Born in Toronto, Ontario. 1903. 
Died. August 29. 1960. 

Initiated in Ulster Lodge. No. 537. Toronto. 1934. 
Worshipful Master of Ulster Lodge. 1944. 

R.W. BRO. WILLIAM HARRISON THORNBURROW 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1935. 
Born in Kendall. England. 1872. 
Died. October 15, 1960. 
Initiated in Connaught Lodge, No. 511. West Fort William. 

1913. 
Worshipful Master of Connaught Lodge. 1919. 



238 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



R.W. BRO. CHARLES B. TYRRELL 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1948. 

Born in Toronto, Ontario, 1909. 

Died, February 16, 1961. 

Initiated in Orono Lodge, No. 325, Orono, 1933. 

Affiliated with University Lodge, No. 496. 1937. 

Worshipful Masiter of Orono Lodge, 1944. 

R.W. BRO. THOMAS HENRY WILLIAMSON 
D'istrict Deputy Grand Master, 1948. 

Born in Harriston, Ontario, 1894. 

Diied, Februai-y 26, 1961. 

Initiated in Grey Lodge, No. 589. Toronto, 1929. 

Worshipful Master of Grey Lodge, 1941. 

R.W. BRO. EDGAR TROY WOOD 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1944. 

Born in Brockville, Ontario, 1890. 

Died. March 23, 1961. 

Initiated in Enterprise Ledge. No. 516, Beachburg, 1923. 

Affiliated with Pembroke Lodge, No. 128, 1959. 

Worshipful Master of Enterpri.se Lodge, 1931. 

R.W. BRO. GORDON YOUNG 
District Deputy Grand Master, 1931. 

Born in Cargill, Ontario, 1890. 

Died. February 3, 1961. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge, No. 104, Norwich, 1917. 

Affiliated with King Solomon's Lodge, No. 43. Woodstock, 1918. 

Wcrshiuful Ma-ster of St. John's Lodge, 1927-28. 

V.W. BRO. ALFRED W. ANGELL 

Grand Steward, 1949. 

Born in Guelph, Ontario, 1879. 

Died, November 4, 1960. 

Initiated in Preston Lodge, No. 297, Preston, 1910. 

Worshipful! Master of Preston Lodge, 1918. 

V.W. BRO. ALFRED N. ARNOLD 
AsEtiistant Grand Director of Ceremonies, 1949. 

Born in Hamilton, Ontario, 1904. 

Died, July 26, 1961. 

Initiated in Hugh Murray Lodge, No. 602, Hamilton, 1927. 

Worshipful Master of Hugh Murray Lodge, 1938. 

V.W. BRO. JAMES PARKER SMITH BALLANTYNE 
Grand Steward, 1945. 

Born in Nova Scctia. 1879. 

Died, October 24, 1960. 

Initiated in Temiskaming Lodge, No. 462, New Liskeard, 1912. 

Affiliated with Spruce Falls Lodge, No. 648, Kapuskasing, 1928. 

Worshipful Master of Sruce Falls Lodge, 1929. 

V.W. BRO. FRANK JOHN CALBECK 
Grand Steward, 1943. 

Born in 1871. 

Died, November 1, 1960. 

Initiated in Brant Lodge, No. 45, Brantford, 1903. 

Affiliated with Ozias Lo^ge, No. 508. Brantford, 1940, 

Worehiful Master of Brant Lodge, 1907. 

V.W. BRO. DAVID A. CAMERON 
Grand Steward, 1939. 

Born in Caledon, Ontario, 1895. 

Died, November 19, 1960. 

Initiated in Queen's Lodge, No. 578, Kingston, 1921. 

Affiliated with Adanac Lodge, No. 614, Merritton, 1926. 

Worshipful Master of Adanac Lodge, 1937. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1961 239 



V.W. BRO. FRANCIS STUART CAMPBELL 
Grand Steward, 1946. 

Born in Fife-ihire, Scotland, 1877. 

Died. January 21, 1961. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge, No. 209A. London, 1909. 

Worshipful Master of St. John's Lodge, 1918. 

V.W. BRO. ARTHUR GWRISTIE 
Grand Steward, 1948. 
Born in Winchester, Ontario, 1878. 
Died. July 25, 1960. 

Initiated in Henderson Lodge, No. 383, Winchester, 1917. 
Worshipful Master of Henderson Lodge, 1921 and 1932. 

V.W. BRO. ERNEST EDWARD CLARKE 
Grand Steward, 1957 
Boi-n in Suffolk, England, 1884. 
Died May 20, 1961 

Initiated in Humber Lodge, No. 305, Weston, 1921. 
Charter Member of Mount Dennis Lodge, No. 599, 1922. 
Worshipful Master of Mount Dennis Lodge, 1930. 

V.W. BRO. CHARLES CRAMMOND 
Grand SUndard Bearer. 1951. 

Born in 1889. 

Died November 29, 1960. 

Initiated in Kenmuir Lodge, No. 570, Scotland. 

Affiliated with Fidelity Lodge, No. 575, Toronto, 1921. 

Worshipful Master of Fidelity Lodge, 1932. 

V.W. BRO. HENRY J. H. DEEDMAN 
Grand Steward, 1938. 
Born in Wandsworth, Surrey, England, 1875. 
Died, January 24, 1961. 

Initiated in Zetland Lodge, No. 326. Toronto. 1903. 
Worshipful! Master of Zetland Lodge. 1932. 

V.W. BRO. ROBERT J. FERGUSON 
Grand Standard Bearer, 1955. 
Born in South Dorchester, 1878. 
Died, July 23, 1960. 

Initiated in Belmont Lodge, No. 190, Bellmont, 1914. 
Affiliated with Mfilnhide Lodge. No. 140, .A.ylmer, 1951. 
Worshipfu Master of Belmont Lodge, 1928-29. 

V.W. BRO. JOHN McLEAN FLEMING 
Asss.stant Grand Chaplain, 1953. 

Born in Scotland. 1882. 

Died. December 22, 1960. 

Initiated in .Mexandria Lodge, No. 439, Alexandria, 1945. 

Affiliated with .\rcadia Lodge. No. 440. Minden, 1950. 

Worshipful Master of Alexandria Lodge, 1948. 

V.W. BRO. WILLIAM EDMUND GILES 
Grand Steward. 1930. 
Born in Haliburton, Ontario, 1897. 
Died. March 26. 1961. 

Initiated in Doric Lodge, No. 316, Toronto. 1928. 
Affiliat-d with Runnymede Lodge, No. 619. Toronto, 1932. 
Worshipful Master of Runnymede Lodge. 1948. 

V.W. BRO. WILLIAM JACOB GRUNDER 
Grand tSeward, 1925. 
Born in Kincardine Town-ship, Ontario ,1895. 
Died. October 19. I960. 

Initiated in Bruce Lodge. No. 341. T'vorton, 1918. 
Worshipful Master of Bruce Lodge, 1925. 



240 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



V.W. BRO. THOMAS JAMES HACKETT 
Grand Paisaivant, 1941. 

Bom in Cookstown, Ireland. 1888. 

Died, March 5, 1961. 

Initiated in Unity Lodge, No. 606, Toronto, 1917. 

Affiliated with Ulster Lodge. No. 537. Toronto, 1922. 

Worshipful Master of Unity Lodge, 1982. 

V.W. BRO. JOHN PORTER HARRIS 
Grand Steward, 1945. 

Born in Holywood, Northern Ireland, 1882. 

Died, March 2, 1961. 

Initiated in Seymour Lodge, No. 277, Port Dalhousie, 1932. 

Worshipful Master of Seymovir Lodge, 1942. 

V.W. BRO. HARRY HARVEY 
Grand Standard Bearer, 1947. 

Bom in Eynesbury, County Huntington, England, 1874. 
Died. August 26, 1960. 

Initiated in Hammond Lodge, No. 327, Wardsville, 1922. 
Worshipful Master of Hammond Lodge, 1928. 

V.W. BRO. HENRY C. HIGHAM 

Grand Steward, 1960 
Born in Toronto, Ontario, 1892. 
Died, July 17, 1961. 

Initiated in Runnymede Lodge, No. 619, Toronto, 1925, 
Worshipful Master of Runnymede Lodge, 1951. 

V.W. BRO. REV. HARRY H. HILLS 
Assistant Grand Chaplain, 1952. 

Bom in Toledo, Ontario, 1878. 

Died, February 9, 1961. 

Initiated in Plantagenet Lodge, No. 186. Riceville, 1913. 

Worshipful Master of Plantagenet Lodge, 1916. 

Affiliated with The Belleville Lodge, No. 123, Belleville, 1951. 

V.W. BRO. JOHN STANLEY HOWELL 
Grand Steward, 1948. 
Born in Jerseyville, Ontario, 1889. 
Died, April 11, 1961. 

Initiated in Lynden Lodge, No. 505, Lynden, 1915. 
Worshipful Master of Lynden Lodge, 1923. 

V.W. BRO. WILLIAM JAMIESON 
Grand Steward, 1942. 
Bom in Ancaster, Ontario, 1886. 
Died, December 26. 1960. 

Initiated in King Solomon's Lodge, No. 394, Thamesford, 1932. 
Worshipful Ma.ster of King Solomon's Lodge, 1941. 

V.W. BRO. HERMAN SAMUEL KING 
Grand Steward, 1932. 

Born in Whitby, Ontario, 1871. 

Died, January 8, 1961. 

Initiated in Srt. John's Lodge, No. 75, 1894. 

Worshipful Master of St. John's Lodge, 1901. 

V.W. BRO. JOHN HAROLD KINGSTONE 
Grand Steward, 1950. 
Born in Liverpool, England, 1900. 
Died, January 21, 1961. 

Initiated in Sussex Lodge, No. 5, Brockville, 1925. 
Worshipful Master of Sussex Lodge, 1948. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 241 



V.W. BRO. REV. WALTER M. KITELEY 
Assistant Grand Chaplain, 1957. 

Born in Peel Township, Ontario, 1882. 

Died, July 5, 1961. 

Initiated in Florence Lodge, No. 390, Florence, 1915. 

Affiliated with McColl Lodge, No. 386, West Lome, 1927. 

WorshipfuU Master McColl Lodge, 1931. 

V.W. BRO. HERBERT CRIDGE LAUNDY 
Grand Steward, 1941. 

Born in Victoria, B.C., 1895. 

Died, April 8, 1961. 

Initiated in North Star Lodge, No. 322, Owen Sound, 1924. 

Charter Member of Terrace Bay Lodge, No. 672, Terrace Bay. 

Charter Member of Spruce Falls Lodge, No. 648. 

Worshipful Master of Spruce Falls Lodge, 1932. 

V.W. BRO. ERNEST MANIFOLD 
Gand Steward, 1940. 
Born in Toronto, Ontario, 1891, 
Died. May 8. 1961. 

Initiated in King Solomon's Lodge, No. 22, Toronto, 1914. 
Worshipful Master of King Solomon's Lodge, 1926, 1930-31. 

V.W. BRO. JOHN E. MARSH 
Grand Pnrsaivxmt, 1953 
Born in Belleville, Ontario, 1906. 
Died, June 17, 1961. 

Initiajted in Moira Lodge, No. 11, Belleville, 1929. 
Worshipful Master of Moira Lodge, 1943. 

Charter Member of Temple Lodge, No. 666, Belleville, 1951, 
and First Master. 

V.W. BRO. SAMUEL McCOY 
Grand Steward, 1927. 

Born in 1893. 

Died, December 28, 1960. 

Initiated in King Solomon's Lodge, No. 378, London, 1917. 

Worshipful Master of King Solomon's Lodge, 1926. 

V.W. BRO. SAMLTEL HERBERT McELWAIN 
Grand Steward, 1930. 
Born in Peterborough, Ontario, 1884. 
Died, April 22. 1961. 

Initiated in Oakwood Lodge, No. 553, Toronto, 1920. 
Worshipful Master of Oakwood Lodge, 1928. 

V.W. BRO. WILLIAM A. McMASTER 
Grand Steward, 1945. 

Born in Toronto, Ontario, 1S80. 

Died. March 4, 1961. 

Initiated in Victoria Lodge, No. 474, Toronto. 1906. 

Charter Member cf Prince of Wales Lodge. No. 630, 1925. 

Worshipful Master of Prince of Wales Lodge, 1945. 

V.W. BRO. FREDERICK POWER 
Gand Steward, 1946. 

Bom in Brechin, Ontario, 1877. 

Dipd. Novem"ber 7. 1960. 

Initiated in High Park Lodge. No. 531, Toronto, 1916. 

Charter Member cf Sunnyside Lodge, No. 582. 

Worshipful Master of Sunnyside Lodge, 1924. 



242 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



V.W. BRO. JOHN E. ROGERS 
Grand Steward, 1959. 
Born in Dorchester, Ontario, 1900. 
Died, July 13, 1960. 

Initiated in Merrill Lodge, No. 344, Dorchester, 1931. 
Worshipful Master of Merrill Lodge, 1941. 

V.W. BRO. WILUAM A. ROSS 
Grand Superintendent of Works, 1929. 

Born in Peebles, Scotland, 1876. 
Died, December 14, 1960. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge, No. 75. Toron-to, 1908. 
Charter Member cf Kilwinning Lodge, No. 565, Toronto, 1920. 
Worshipful Master of Kilwinning Lodge, 1924. 

V.W. BRO. ELMORE ROUTLEDGE 
Grand Sword Bearer, 1925. 

Born in Middlesex County, Ontario, 1870. 

Died. March 16, 1961. 

Initiated in St. Paul's Lodge, No. 107. Lambeth, 1904, 

Worshipful Master of St. Paul's Lodge, 1907. 

V.W. BRO. JAMES CATTONACH SANDERSON 
Grand Steward, 1957. 

Born in Strabane, Ontario, 1892 

Died, April 5. 1961. 

Initiated in Waterdown Lodge, No. 357, Millgrove, 1920. 

Worshipful Master of Waterdown Lodge, 1930-31. 

V.W. BRO. THOMAS SAUNDERS 
Grand Steward, 1919. 

Born in 1872. 
Died, July 24. 1960. 

Initiated in Chaudiere Lodge, No. 264. Ottawa, 1896. 
Charter Member of Ionic Lodge, No. 526, Ottawa. 
Worshipful Master of Chaudiere Lodge, 1909, and Ionic Lodse. 
1915-16. 

V.W. BRO. AMOS B. SHOEMAKER 
Grand Steward, 1947. 

Born in Woolwich Township, Ontario, 1897. 

Died, January 23. 1961. 

Initiated in Twin City Ledge, No. 509, Kitchener, 1932. 

Worshipful Ma.ster of Twin City Lodge, 1944. 

V.W. BRO. MURRAY EDWARD STEELE 
Assistant Grand Secretary, 1945. 
Born in Toronto. Ontario, 1888. 
Died. December 28, 1960. 

Initialled in Acacia Lodge, No. 430, Toronto, 1914. 
Worshipful Master, Acacia Lodge, 1930. 
Secretary of Acacia Lodge for 25 years. 

V.W. BRO. THOMAS JOHN STEELE 
Grand Steward, 1954. 

Born in Carleton Place. Ontario, 1898. 

Died, November 18, 1960. 

Initiated in St. John's Lodge, No. 63, Carleton Place, 1940. 

Worshipful Master of St. John's Lodge, 1946. 

V.W. BRO. WILLIAM EARL SUTHERLAND 
Grand Steward. 1950. 
Born in Mount Bridges, Ontario, 1883. 
Died. December 23, 1960. 

Initiated in Frederick Lodge, No. 217, Delhi. 1910. 
Worshipful Master of Frederick Lodge, 1925. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



243 



V.W. BRO. JOSEPH WILLIAM TUCKER 
Grand Steward, 1945. 
Born in Arteme-sia Township, Grey County, Ontario, 1883. 
Initiated in Prince Arthur LodKe. No. 333, Flesherton, 1906. 
Worshipful Master of Hiram Lodge, No. 490, Markdale, 1912. 

V.W. BRO. JAMES TURNBULL 
Grand Steward, 1953. 

Born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1898. 

Died, April 20, 1961. 

Initiated in Royal Arthur Lodge, No. 523, Peterborough, 1924. 

Worshipful Master of Royal Arthur Lodge, 1938. 

V.W. BRO. ERNEST J. WALKER 
Grand Steward, 1949 
Born in Piccadilly, 1884. 
Died, January 14, 1961. 
Initiated in Renfrew Lodge, No. 121. 
Affiliated with Frontenac Lodge, No. 621, 1937. 
Worshipful Master of Frontenac Lodge. 1940. 

V.W. BRO. JOHN L. WILUAMS 
Grand Steward, 1934. 

Born in Enniskillen Township, Ontario, 1897. 
Died, March 21, 1961. 

Initiated in Petrolia Lodge, No. 194, 1923. 
Worshipful Master of Petrolia Lodge, 1929. 



The thanks- of this Committee is extended to the Grand 
Secretary, the District Deputy Grand Masters, and all others 
who have assisted in supplying the necessary information. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

DONALD J. GUNN, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
GRIEVANCES AND APPEALS 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro. M. C. 
Hooper, Acting- Chairman, in the absence through 
illness, of R.W. Bro. J. R. Rumball, Chairman. On 
motion of the Deputy Grand Master, seconded by 
R.W. Bro. Hooper, it was received and adopted. 



To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 



244 GRAJTO LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

The Committee on Grievances and Appeals submits its 
report in the following parts: 

1. SIMCOE LODGE, No. 644, versus BRO. IVAN B. 
GRQSE. 

In the Proceedings of this Grand Lodge for the year 
1959, p. 202, it is recorded that Bro. Ivan B. Grose, a mem- 
ber of Simcoe Lodge, No. 644, had pleaded guilty to a charge 
of armed robbery on December 20, 1958, and had been 
sentenced to a term of three years in Kingston Penetentiary. 
On the basis there stated it was determined that Bro. Grose 
was guilty of unmasonic conduct. He was accordingly siis- 
pended and notified to appear at the Annual Communication 
of Grand Lodge in 1960 to show cause why he shoidd not be 
expelled. 

At the time of such Annual Communication Bro. Grose, 
having been paroled after serving 18 months of his term 
and parole having expired, was in hospital following an oper- 
ation. Representations were made on his behalf and, as a 
result, action regarding expulsion was deferred until this 
Annual Communication of Grand Lodge, and in the meantime 
his suspension was continued. 

A petition has now been received from Bro. Grose for 
restoration to membership. The petition states that Bro. 
'Grose has been reunited -v^ath his family for the past year 
and a half and that he has reestablished himself in the com- 
munity in all respects except one — presumably his member- 
ship in Masonry. 

The petition has been submitted to Simcoe Lodge, No. 
644, after consideration by its Committee of General Purposes, 
and was balloted on and passed at a Regular Meeting of the 
Lodge held in May 11, 1961. 

In addition to the resolution of his Lodge your Com- 
mittee has received a Communication from Dr. M. A. Fischer, 
the psychiatrist who examined Bro. Grose shortly after the 
offence occurred. Bro. Grose has also been invited to appear 
before your Committee and has appeared with two of his 
Past Masters who informed us that the meeting of the Lodge 
on May 11, 1961, was well attended after due notice and 
that the vote in favour of restoration was practically unani- 
mous. 

Your Committee is of the opinion that Bro. Ivan B. 
Grose made a courageous return to his place in the Com- 
munity and should be permitted to complete the process by 
resuming his membership in the Craft. Your Committee 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 145 

therefore recommend? that the suspension of Bro. Grose be 
lifted and that he be permitted to resume his membership in 
his Lodge. 

2. CORINTHIAN LODGE, No. 669 versus BRO. 
WALTER EARL LASHWAY. 

The Proceedings of Grand Lodge for the year 1960 (page 
227) record that Bro. Walter Earl Lashway, initiated in 
Eureka Lodge, No. 283, Belleville, in 1952, and an affiliated 
member of Corinthian Lodge, Cornwall, in 1957, had been ac- 
cused of an offence under the Criminal Code in that he did in 
the City of Comwall — between October, 1957, and July, 1958, 
by fraudulent conversion to his own use of the sum of 
^500.00 thereby steal the same contrary to the Criminal 
Code. 

The accused pleaded guilty at the trial in the County 
Judge's Criminal Court and was released upon suspended 
sentence upon entering into certain recognizances, 

A charge of unmasonic conduct having been laid and 
accepted in Corinthian Lodge, a Committee appointed under 
Rule 20 reported that the charge of unmasonic conduct laid 
against Bro. Lashway under Rules l(n) and (p) was fully 
substantiated. 

Prior convictions of the accused were on record extend- 
ing from October, 1940, to April, 1958. Concern is here 
expressed that a number of these convictions antedate Bro. 
Lashway's entry into Masonry and evidently were not 
disclosed to or discovered by Eureka Lodge at the time of 
his application for membership, nor by Corinthian Lodge 
prior to his affiliation. 

The decision of the Lodge, based on the report of its 
Committee, was that Bro. Lashway was guilty of the charge 
as laid and recommended that he be expelled from the Craft. 

This Committee, a year ago, concurred in the finding 
of the Lodge and recommended that Bro. Lashway be notified 
to appear at this Communication of Grand Lodge to show 
cause why he should not be expelled. He has been so notified. 
He has not appeared. 

Your Committee now recommends that Bro. Walter Earl 
Lashway be expelled. 

3. SIMCOE LODGE, No. 644 versus BRO. ROBERT 
HUNT. 

The Proceedings of this Grand Lodge for 1960, p. 228, 
contain the report of previous proceedings in this case. 



246 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Bro. Robert Hunt, a member of Simcoe Lodge, No. 644, 
was convicted of indecent assault under the Criminal Code 
and sentenced to six months' imprisonment, psychiatric 
treatment being suggested by the Magistrate. 

A charge of unmasonic conduct was laid in the Lodge 
under Rule l_(s) and, on the request of the Lodge, the charge 
was dealt with by a Commission appointed by the Grand 
Master. The Commission found the accused guilty of the 
charge and recommended indefinite suspension from the 
Craft. 

Grand Lodge acting on the recommendation of this Com- 
mittee one year ago ordered that Bro. Hunt be notified to 
appear before this Annual Communication of Grand Lodge 
to show cause why he should not be expelled and suspension 
was continued in the meantime. 

He has been so notified. He has not appeared. 

Your Committee therefore recommends that Bro. Robert 
Hunt be expelled., 

4. HAMMOND LODGE, No. 327, versus W. BRO ALVEN 
V. ESSELTINE. 

W. Bro. Alvin V. Esseltine. the Treasurer of Hammond 
Lodge, No. 327, in the year 1959, was found by the Auditor 
of the Lodge to be short in his accounts to the extent of 
$578.44. On December 18, 1960, the succeeding Treasurer 
charged W. Bro. Esseltine with the theft by conversion of 
funds belonging to Hammond Lodge during his term of 
office as Treasurer. No charge was laid in the Courts. 

The • charge was printed in full in the lodge summons 
for January, 1961, and, presumably, was read and accepted 
by the Lodge at its regular meeting on January 16, 1961. A 
special meeting was ordered for the trial of W. Bro. Esseltine 
on March 13. 1961, and at such meeting 14 members of the 
Lodge v\-ere in attendance. The accused did not attend the 
meeting and the material before this Committee discloses that 
he was duly served with an attested copy of the charge and of 
the time and place of trial thereof. 

The Minutes of the meeting state that "W. Bro. Essel- 
tine was absent and no reason given". 

The Master appointed a Past Master to act os renresent- 
ative of the accused and the trial was proceeded with. The 
evidence consisted of the Auditor's report for the year 1959, 
disclosing a shortage of $578.44 in lodge funds. The suc- 
ceeding Treasurer of the Lodge in evidence reported admis- 
sions of misappropriation made by the accused to the Treas- 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 247 

urer and Secretary together and promises of restitution, 
presumably never fulfilled. 

The Lodge found W. Bro. Esseltine guilty and ordered 
his indefinte suspension with a recommendation of expulsion. 

This Committee has carefully considered the proceedings 
in Hammond Lodge and agrees in the finding of guilt made 
by the Lodge. 

Your Committee therefore recommends that Wor. Bro. 
Alvin V. Esseltine be notified to appear at the next Annual 
Communication of this Grand Lodge to show cause why he 
should not be expelled, and that in the meantime his sus- 
pension be continued. 

5. DORIC LODGE, No. 382, versus BRO. SYDNEY A. 
McCRACKEN. 

Bro. Sydney A. McCracken, a member of Doric Lodge, 
No. 382, w^as charged in Magistrates Court in Hamilton that 
he did without colour of right convert to his ovm use sums 
of money varying in amounts from $37.67 to $482.96 from 
seven different individuals within one year prior to February 
8, 1%8. The trial took place in Magistrates' Court and on 
April 11, 1958, he was found guilty on six charges and 
sentenced on April 16. 1958, to three months in gaol con- 
current on all charges. 

Subsequently a charge of unmasonic condu<;t was laid 
under Rule l(p) in Doric Lodge. No. 382. Notice to appear 
at the meeting of the Lodge on June 20, 1960, to show cause 
why he should not be suspended for unmasonic conduct was 
ser\'ed by registered mail at the last kno\^Ti place of address 
of Bro. McCracken under Rule 5. The letter was returned 
undelivered and Bro. McCracken did not attend the meeting. 
A trial was ordered and a certificate of conviction from the 
Magistrates' Court was produced. 

The Lodge found Bro. McCracken guilty of a Masonic 
offence as charged and by a ballot resolved that he be 
suspended indefinitely. 

This Committee has carefullv considered the record 
of the proceedings in the Court and in the Lodge and finds 
lack of compliance with the Rules of Procedure of Grand 
Lodsre in certain particulars. Following the practice adopted 
by this Committee, with the approval of Grand Lodge in 
certain cases previously decided, when all the requirements 
of the Constitution and Rules of Procedure have not been 
observed, but where guilt has been established beyond 
ouestion bv conviction in a Court of competent jurisdiction, 
this Committee recommends that the Grand Master and Grand 



248 GRAND LOiDGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Lodge by virtue of the inherent power and jurisdiction 
vested in them do confirm the suspension of Sydney A. 
McCracken imposed by the Lodge, and further recommends 
that he be notified to appear at the next Annual Communi- 
cation of this Grand Lodge to show cause why he should not 
be expelled, and that in the meantime the suspension be 
continued. 



6. TUSCAN LODGE. No. 541, versus W. BRO. WILLIAM 
H. HARRIS. 



A charge was laid in Tuscan Lodge, No. 541 against W. 
Bro. William H. Harris of carrying on a continuous adulter- 
ous association with the wife of another member of Tuscan 
Lodge. The charge was accepted by the Lodge which re- 
quested that the Grand Master appoint a Commission to deal 
with the charge. 



At the hearing the accused brother was present and 
pleaded not guilty. Oral evidence was heard "in Camera" but 
in the presence of the accused wherein the said wife of a 
member of Tuscan Lodge voluntarily stated under oath that 
she had engaged in numerous acts of adultery with the 
accused in the period and at the places alleged in the charge. 
The complainant stated on his honour that the accused had 
admitted the offence to the complainant. 

The accused declined to make a statement. 



The Commission found the accused guilty of the charge, 
such being a Masonic offence under Rule l(s) and suspended 
him from Masonry until this Annual Communication of 
Grand Lodge. 

The Commission also recommends that W. Bro. William 
H. Harris be expelled. 

This Committee concurs in the finding of guilt made 
by the Commission and recommends that W. Bro. Wm. H. 
Harris be notified to appear at the next Annual Communic- 
ation of Grand Lodge to show cause why he should not be 
expelled, and that in the meantime his suspension be con- 
tinued. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted, 

M. CLEEVE HOOPER, 

Acting Chairman- 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 24» 

GUESTS SPEAK 

During the sessions the following- distinguished 
guests, at the request of the Grand Master, address- 
ed] Grand Lodge : 

M. Puissant R. L. Loyd, Sovereign Grand 'Com- 
mander of the A. & A.S. Rite for England. 

R.W. Bro. Max F. Baloom, Grand Master of 
Pennsylvania. 

R.W. Bro. Thomas A. Booth, Deputy Grand 
Master of Massachusetts. 

M.W. Bro. Charles D. Dickison, Grand Master 
of New Brunswick. 

M.W. Bro. Carl W. Peterson, Grand Master of 
New York. 

M.W. Bro. Charles E. Daniels, Grand Master of 
Delaware. 

M.W. Bro. W. Everett Moseley, Grand Master 
of Nova Scotia. 

M.W. Bro. N. Dean Rowe, Grand Master of 
Vermont. 

M. Ex. Comp. Charles W. Emmett, Grand First 
Principal, Royal Arch Masons of Canada in the Prov- 
ince of Ontario. 

M.W. Bro. B. Stuart Parker, Grand Master of 
Manitoba. 

M.W. Bro. H. W. Earl, Grand Master of New 
Jersey. 

M.W. Bro. Martin H. Kinsinger, Grand Master 
of Maryland. 

M.W. Bro. H. S. Jackson, Grand Master of 
Indiana. 

M.W. Bro. Paul D. Collier, Grand Master of 
Connecticut. 

M.W. Bro. J. Stafford Allen, Grand Master of 
Rhode Island. 

M.W. Bro. A. J. M. Wannamaker, Past Grand 
Master of South Carolina. 

M.W. Bro. James W. Brewer, Grand Master of 
North Carolina. 



250 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

R.W. Bro. David E. Palmer, Grand Secretary 
of Minnesota. 

M.W. Bro. J. E. Burt, Grand Master of Saskatch- 
ewan. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
AUDIT AND FINANCE 

Tliis report was presented by R.W. Bro. R. C. 
Berkinshaw, Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. Berkinshaw, 
it was received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lrodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

This Committee has reviewed the reports of the Grand 
Treasurer, the Grand Secretary and the Auditor, which have 
been referred to it for consiaeration at this Annual Com- 
munication of Grand Lodge. 

These reports appear to fully and accurately set out all 
pertinent derails relative to the financial position of this 
Grand Lodge for the year ended May 31, 1961, including all 
items of Receipts and Disbursements in respect to the Gen- 
eral Fund and the Combined Memorial and Semi-Centennial 
Funds, full details of all transactions and changes in the 
Capital Account which have occurred during the year under 
review and complete schedules of the securities in which 
Grand Lodge funds were invested as of the above mentioned 
date. 

Receipts in the General Account for Fees on initiation, 
per capita dues, commutations of fees, interest on invest- 
ments, etc., but not including bank loans, amounted to 
$212,227.61, or $7,272.39 less than estimates submitted" a year 
ago, mainly because the amendments to Section 245 of the 
Constitution approved by Grand Lodge at its Annual Com- 
munication in July 1960 did not take effect over the full 
period of the past fiscal year and the increase in interest 
from investments over the estimates did not entirely offset 
these lower revenues. 

Subject to some variation, as far as individual items are 
concerned, total disbursements under the General Account 
are reasonably in line with the budget, considering the fact 
that the extraordinary circumstances marking the completion 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 251 

and moving' into the new Grand Lodge Memorial preniises 
under entirely new conditions of occupancy made it difficult 
to accurately forecast the amount required by Grand Lodge 
to meet its financial obligations for the fiscal year which 
ended on May 31, 1961. 

The audited statements pi'esented by the Grand Treas- 
urer show total disbursements under the General Account 
of $276,369.33, including demand notes paid to the Canadian 
Bank of Commerce in the amount of $68,000.00. If these 
payments are excluded, all other expenditures, including 
rent paid to Masonic Holdings and the purchase of equipment 
and furnishings for the new Grand Lodge Memorial Building, 
were actually less than estimated by over $12,000.00. 

It should be noted that the par value of total invest- 
ments under the General, Memorial and Semi-Centennial 
Funds was $189,905.00 over that of the previous year and 
that the resources of this Grand Lodge show an over-all 
increase of $29,036.00. Considering the exceptional conditions 
prevailing during the past year, this is a very commendable 
result. 

We draw to the attention of the members of Grand 
Lodge — 

(a) that the schedule of investments under the General 
Fund, as of May 31, 1961, includes Series A and B 5% 
Debentures of Masonic Holdings to the extent of 
$392,000.00; 

(b) that on May 31, 1961. General Fund investments to the 
par value of $458,500.00 were held by The Canada 
Permanent Trust Company for the account of The 
Canadian Bank of Commerce, Hamilton, Ontario, as 
security for estimated loan requirements to finance the 
new Grand Lodge Memorial Building and that as of the 
above mentioned date, the liability to this bank covered 
by demand notes amounted to $187,000.00. 

(c) that the net resources shown in the General Fund Invest- 
ment Account include a sum of $96,420.63, which is 
available for benevolent pui'poses only, in accordance 
with Section 245 (M) of the Constitution. 

Grants for benevolent purposes amounted to $65,357.34, 
as compared with $64,784.00 for the previous year. These 
were paid out of the General Account, \\-ith the exception 
of an amount of $6,175.00, which was disbursed from the 
Memorial Fund. 

Requirements for benevolent grants for the current year 
are estimated at $72,000.00 and although these could all be 



252 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

paid out of the General Account, your Committee recommends 
the following apportionment: 

from the General Fund $ 50,000.00 

from the income and invested income 
of the Combined Memorial and Semi- 
centennial Funds 22,000.00 

in order to reduce in so far as practicable the extent of such 
bank borrowings as may be necessary until the financing 
of the new Grand Lodge Memorial Building has been com- 
I»let«l. Estimates of Income and Expenditures for the cur- 
rent year, as appended to this report, provide for an ap- 
portionment on the above basis. 

We record our support of the Grand Treasurer's recom- 
mendation that a study be made at an early date of the 
funds held and applied or to be applied by Grand Lodge for 
Benevolent Purposes only vis-a-\'is its possible future obli- 
gations and commitments in these respects under conditions 
which are likely to prevail for some years to come. 

It is appropriate that we should again record the ap- 
preciation of this Grand Lodge for the kindly, conscientious 
and considerate manner in which these important activities 
are administered by the Chairman and members of the Com- 
mittee on Benevolence, with special reference to the Super- 
visor, R.W. Bro. George J. McQueen. 

Your Committee recommends approval of the six 
donations totalling $2,600.00, as reported by our Grand 
Master and itemized in the audited statement. 

Your Committee has reviewed the details of insurance 
coverage placed by Grand Lodge and is satisfied that all 
necessary precaution is taken to ensure that Grand Lodge 
property, wherever it may be situated, is adequately covered 
against loss by fire, theft or other hazards. 

In its review of the matters covered by this report, 
your Committee has received the fullest co-operation and 
assistance from the Grand Secretary, the Grand Treasurer 
and the Auditor and formally recommends to Grand Lodge 
the adoption, ^vithout amendment, of the reports submitted 
by the above mentioned officers. They are to be commended 
on the consci-'ntious and faithful performance of the duties 
of their respective offices. The interesting, informative 
statements which they have presented deserve the thoughtful 
consideration of all Brethren in this Jurisdiction. 

Following the customary practice, your Committee now 
suibmits for consideration and approval an estimate of 
Income and Expenditures for the year ending May 31, 1962: 



TOROXTO, ONTARIO. 1961 



ESTIMATED INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

MAY 31, 1962 

INCO^IE 



Initiations 

A f f i 1 i a t i on s 

Certificates 

Ceremonies 

Dispensations 

Commutations 

Constitution, etc., Sales of 

Miscellaneous _. 

Refunds 

Interest on investments — 



Total Estimated Income 



..$ 16,000.00 

1,000.00 

,. 143,000.00 

200.00 

150.00 

1,200.00 

17,000.00 

3,500.00 

3,000.00 

2,600.00 

36,500.00 

..$ 224,150.00 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Salaries: 

Grand Treasurer's Clerk $ 800.00 

Grand Secretary $ 11,000.00 

Supervisor of Benevolence and Ass't. to Grand 

Secretary „ 8,000.00 

Staff — Grand Secretary's Office 16,660.00 

Staff Dues — Ontario Hospital Commission — 176.40 

Printing, Stationery and Supplies - 4,000.00 

Special Printing for Resale - 10,000.00 

Postage -.. 1,800.00 

Furniture and Equipment (normal replacement) 1,200.00 

Canada Permanent Trust Co. Fees 685.00 

Fidelity Bond and General Insurance Premiums lOO.OO 

Contingent Liability Insurance — 3-year Premium 12,682.20 

Auditor — - 1,500.00 

Grand Master's Allowance - 1,500.00 

Stenographer 300.00 

Deputy Grand Master — Allowance 670.00 

Postage 30.00 

Supervisor of Benevolence — Travelling Expenses 500.00 

Committee on Masonic Education 300.00 

Review of Fraternal Correspondence 660.00 

Masonic Relief Association — U.S.A. - Canada .... 500.00 

Library — General Expenses 400.00 

— Librarian's Honorarium — 750.00 

Honorary Presentation of Jewels 2,600.00 

Grand Master's Regalia 1,100.00 

Regalia Bags - 120.00 

Testimonial to Retiring G.M 500.00 

Allowance — W. J. Attig - 2,400.00 

Portraits — Grand Masters — 1,200.00 

Representatives to other Grand Lodges 3,500.00 



254 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Conference Fees, etc. — Washington 1,500.00 

Grand Lodge Bulletin ..„ 4,000.00 

Publication Fraternal Reviews 900.00 

Grand Lodge — Preliminary Reports - ...- 900.00 

Grand Lodge Proceedings 4,500.00 

Grand Lodge 1961 Meeting Expenses - ..-. 15,000.00 

Grand Lodge — Advance Expenses 1962 Meeting 1,200.00 
Account MASONIC HOLDINGS re rental new 

Grand Lodge Premises 36,000.00 

Appi-opriation to Reserve for Benevolent Grants 50,000.00 

Allowance for Special Donations 2,500.00 

Miscellaneous, including interest on Bank loans 11,000.00 

Total Estimated Expenditures $ 213,133.60 

SUMMARY 

Estimated Income $ 224,150.00 

Estimated Expenditures . 213,133.60 

Estimated Surplus Income over Expenditures $ 11,016.40 



Your Committee believes it has made provisions in these 
estimates for all items which might reasonably be foreseen 
and required to meet all Grand Lodge responsibilities, obli- 
gations and commitments for the current fiscal year. 

All of which is respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

On behalf of the Committee, 

R. C. BERKINSHAW, 

Chairman. 

GRAND CHAPLAIN'S REPORT 

This report was presented by R.W. Bro. R. G. 
Hazlewood. Grand Chaplain, and on motion of the 
Deputy Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. 
Hazkwoad, it was received and adopted. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

To have been chosen to serve as Grand Chaplain in this 
Grand Jurisdiction has been an honour and a privilege. I 
am most grateful to have had the opportunity. It has been 
an experience that I will always cherish and remember with 
joy. The many acts of kindness,, the courtesy and the cordial 
reception accorded me at all times are acknowledged with 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1961 255 

gratitude. I hope that I have been able to uphold the trad- 
itions and standards of Grand Lodge. 

To the District Deputy Grand Masters I express my 
sincere appreciation for their assistance. In the majority of 
Districts the District Deputy Grand Masters were able to 
appoint ordained clergymen as District Chaplains, and where 
this was impossible the laymen chosen were of high calibre, 
respected and revered in their home communities, men hold- 
ing high place in the church of their choice. On behalf of 
Grand Lodge I thank the District Chaplains for their fine 
leadership. 

During the year I had many opportunities of having 
fellov/ship with my brethren .on special occasions. Included 
in these were Constituting and Consecrating of new Lodges, 
Dedication of new Temples and Lodge Rooms, and the 
Ceremony of the laying .of the Corner Stone of the Public 
School at Palmer.'ton. The last Dedication of a new Temple 
in which I took part was that of St. Alban's Lodge, Mount 
Forest. This was unique in that a few years ago I was a 
member of St. Alban's. I was the speaker at a number of 
Lodges and a number of Ladies' Night Banquets. The high 
light of the year was the Dedication of the new Grand Lodge 
Building in Hamilton, on October 31st. It was indeed an 
honour to be Grand Chaplain in the year of the Dedication 
and to have had a part in it. 

A custom that is becoming almost universal in this 
Grand Jurisdiction, a custom which cannot be too highly 
commended, is that of holding District Divine Services. I 
had the privilege of preaching at three District Services, 
Wilson. Prince Edward and Grey Districts. What an op- 
portunity for Masions to witness to their fundamental faith 
in the Great Architect of the Universe. I alfo had the 
honour of being the special speaker at the Service of Wor- 
ship during the Centennial Celebration of Tudor Lodge, No. 
141, Mitchell, and the regular Divine Service of Tuscan Lodge, 
Hai^ilton. I am sorry that I was unable to accept certain 
other invitations because of the call of duty in my own 
church; I hope the brethren will understand. 

To the Grand Secretary' and his staff I express my deep 
appreciation. Always they were ready to help me and ad^ise 
me in the performance of mv duties. I will always hold in 
high esteem their personal friendship. 

To my successor I offer my sincere congratulations. 
May his term of office bring him much joy and happines.« in 
the great work of Masonry. I hone he will feel free to call 
upon me at any time if I can be of assistance to him. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted, 

R. GORDON HAZLEWOOD, 

Grand Chaplain. 



256 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL. COMMUNICATION 



REPORT ON THE NEW GRAND LODGE OFFICES 

This report was presented by M.W. Bro. J. A. 
Hearn, and on his motion, seconded by the Deputy 
Grand Master, it was received and adopted. 

MASONIC HOLDINGS REPORT 

Many of you will remember that at our last Annual 
Communication I remarked that I hoped our Grand Lodge 
Memorial Building should be ready for occupancy by late 
October. 

You will be pleased to know that Grand Lodge is now in 
full possession of the ground floor and basement since Oct- 
ober 31st, 1960, marking the final step of a home of our own 
for the first time. 

The upper floor is now being made ready for two in- 
coming tenants. The laying .of the floor tile, the installation 
of the ceiling and electrical fixtures are proceeding rapidly. 

In order to facilitate two tenants it was necessary to 
subdivide into two areas. The leases will run for three years 
plus an option to renew for two years. 

At a meeting of Masonic Holdings held at the close of 
Grand Lodge, Thursday July 20th, 1961, the following 
directors were elected: 

Jas. N. Allan, R. C. Berkinshaw, E. G. Dixon, Q.C., Geo. 
T. Evans, Walter H. Gibson, J. A. Hearn, H. L. Martyn, C. 
M. Pitts, T. H. Simpson, Q.C., Grand Master, Ex-Officio, 
Deputy Grand Master, Ex-Officio. 

At a subsequent meeting the following officers were 
elected: 

President. J. A. Hearn; Vice-President, R. C. Berkinshaw; 
Vice-President, H. L. Martyn; Secretary-Treasurer, E, G. 
Dixon, Q.C.; Auditors, H. Vigeon and Company. 

The following members were named to the Special 
Building Committee: 

R. C. Berkinshaw, Chairman; E. G. Dixon, Q.C.; W. H. 
Gibson; C. M. Pitts; President of the Board of Directors, 
ex-officio; Grand Master, ex-officio; Deputy Grand Master, 
ex-officLo. 

There is an open invitation to members of the fraternity 
to visit your new Memorial Building. It is well worth seeing. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. HEARN, 

President, Masonic Holdings 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 257 

REPORT ON THE REMEMBRANCE 
MEMORIAL FUND 

This report was presented by R.W, Bro, W. H. 
Gibson, Chairman, and on motion of the Deputy 
Grand Master, seconded by R.W. Bro. Gibson, the 
report was received and adopted. 

To the Miost Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Your Remembrance Memorial Fund Committee is able 
to report that now almost all of the Lodges have participated 
in the Fund and we are deeply grateful to those District 
Deputy Grand Masters and Immediate Past District Deputy 
Grand Masters who have assisted in bringing the Fund before 
our membership. 

On July 17th, 1961, our Fund totalled $57,718.33 and, 
while it was intended that the Fund should be closed at this 
time, there have been so many requests received that the 
date be extended, the Grand Master has consented to hold 
the Fund open until December 31st of this year, when it will 
definitely close. 

The Committee would urge therefore that each Lodge 
publicize this extension to its members and endeavour to 
forward all monies received from our members to the Grand 
Secretary by December 31st, 1961. 

Respectfully and fraternally submitted. 

WALTER H. GIBSON, 

Chairman. 



INSTALLATION OF THE GRAND MASTER 

The installation of R.W. Bro. Russell W. 
Treleaven, as Grand Master, was conducted by M.W. 
Bro. J. A. Hearn, assisted by M.W. Bros. W. L. 
Wright and H. L. Martyn. 

INSTALLATION OF THE 
DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 

The Deputy Grand Master-elect, R.W. Bro. John 
A. Irvine, was installed by M.W. Bro. W. L. Wright, 
assisted by M.W. Bros. J. A. Hearn and H. L. Martyn, 



258 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS 

The Assistant to the Grand Secretary read the 
names of the brethren who had been selected in the 
various Districts to sei^e as District Deputy Grand 
Masters. The Grand Master confirmed the selections 
and directed that they be installed and invested. 

District D.D.G.M. Address 

Algoma Kenneth M. MacKay .... Fort William 

Brant A. Laird Miller '.. Jarvis 

Bruce Gordon S. Matthias Walkerton 

Chatham Harold L. Martin Dresden 

Eastern Roderick A. Stewart Max\dlle 

Frontenac Roy R. Sweetman Westport 

Georgian Thomas J. Purvis Orillia 

Grey Robert E. Davies Mount Forest 

Hamilton "A" John H. Jackson , Hamilton 

Hamilton "B" Jlobert G. Truscott Hamilton 

London Jlossiter C. Fuller London 

Mus. P. Sound Frank W. Toswell Powassan 

Niagara "A" Alpheus V. Hammond ... St. Catharines 

Niagara "B" Sydney J. Gill Welland 

Nipissing East Maitland G. Go.uld North Bay 

Nipissing West Herbert A. Death Sudbury 

North Huron John L. MacElinnon , Kincardine 

Ontario Charles B. Rycroft Whitby 

Ottawa John O'Donovan Ottawa 

Peterborough William Anderson Peterborough 

Prince Edward Harry G. Bates Belleville 

Samia „ (Jeorge C. Searson Watford 

South Huron JR. Earle Tapp Monkton 

St. Lawrence Lyndsy Brown Lyn 

St. Thomas Douglas Orchard Shedden 

Temiskaming ...., James W. Bradley Kirkland Lake 

Toronto "1" Robert F. Brown Toronto 

Toronto "2" George H. Weston Toronto 

Toronto "3" Thomas F. Dodson Toronto 

Toronto "4" William A. Hagan Toronto 

Toronto "5" Francis P. Lowry Downsview 

Toronto "7" Harold G. Russell Schomberg 

Victoria Sherman J. Moore Lindsay 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 2B9 

Wellington Arthur B. Barton Elora 

Western John A, Cox Dryden 

Wilson Weldon F. Burrill Burgessville 

Windsor Harry Taylor Windsor 

INSTALLATION OF DISTRICT DEPUTY 
GRAND MASTERS 

The District Deputy Grand Masters were in- 
stalled and invested by M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn, 
assisted by other Past Grand Masters. 

INSTALLATION OF OTHER OFFICERS 

The other Grand Lodge officers were then in- 
stalled and invested by M.W. Bro. J. A. Hearn, 
assisted by Past Grand Masters. 

APPOINTED MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

The Grand Master appointed the following 
brethren as members of the Board of General 
Purposes: 

V.W. Bro. A. C. Ashforth Toronto 

R.W. Bro. T. J. Donnelly Kingston 

R.W. Bro. Willard M. Gordon Toronto 

V.W. Bro. H. I. Sparling St. Marys 

R.W. Bro. George E. Turner Windsor 

and for one year: 
R.W. Bro. H. B. Coxon London 

APPOINTMENTS TO OFFICE 

Grand Senior Deacon, V.W. Bro. Irvin Ferguson, Toronto. 
Grand Junior Deacon, V.W. Bro. Fraser Raney, Dunnville. 
Grand Supt. of Works, V.W. Bro. John H. Lee, Stoney Creek. 
Grand Dir. of Ceremonies, V.W. Bro. William R. Binney, 

Hamilton. 
Ass't. Grand Chaplain, V.W. Bro. Rev. J. W. Stewart, Cooks- 

ville. 
Ass't. Grand Secretary, V.W. Bro. Chester Shier, Sunderland. 
Ass't. Grand Dir. of Ceremonies, V.W. Bro. Eric John Read, 

Scarborough. 
Grand Sword Bearer, V.W. Bro. Charles Derry, Ottawa. 
Grand Organist. V.W. Bro. Harry M. Rotenberg, Toronto. 
Ass't. Grand Organist, V.W. Bro. L. Noble Armstrong, 

Kingston. 
Grand Pursuivant, V.W. Bro. Percy C. Bolton, Toronto. 



260 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

GRAND STEWARDS 

V.W. Bro. Robert Aiken Toronto 

" W. G. Agar lona Station 

" E. S. Allan Cayuga 

" J. R. Atkins London 

" W. T. Bacon Hamilton 

" " M. E. Baseman Hamilton 

" Carl Billings Orono 

" " W. S. Blizzard Mount Albert 

" " G. E. Boydell Mimico 

" " G. K. Brooks Hastings 

" P. A. Camp Toronto 

" " E. G. Carmichael Kingston 

" " R. J. Carswell, Sr Nilestown 

" G. K. Chapman Fort Erie 

" Preston Chase Frankford 

" " W. E. Collyer Lucknow 

" " Robert Cruickshank Hepworth 

" " Robert Cruise Weston 

" " J. N. Cunningham Toronto 

" " R. C. Cunningham Milton 

" H. C. Coull Haileybury 

" " W. E. Denning Napier 

" T. J. A. Gamey Toronto 

" " Graham Garlough Williamsburg 

" S. W. Goulding Arthur 

" " B. R. Grant Granton 

" W. T. R. Hay Hawkesbury 

" " Delbert Henry Fort Frances 

" B. E. Hulford Hamilton Beach 

" S. H. Knight Windsor 

» G. R. Lane Coldwater 

" " G. W. Lennox Toronto 

" " E. R. Lewis St. Catharines 

" W. G. Little Cochrane 

" L. W. Lovell Acton 

" C. C. Mabley Richmond Hill 

" T. B. W. MacNaughton Hamilton 

" " Percy Massey Ancaster 

" J. T. Minaker Toronto 

" " W. A. Munro Glencoe 

" " R. M. Murphy Cayuga 

" J. G. Nickalls Huntsville 

" R. J. Parlee Ottawa 

" R. L. Patterson Merrickville 

" R. F. Petch Waterloo 

" H. R. Quantrill Cobourg 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 261 

G. E. Readhead Campbellville 

Chauncev Renshaw York 

P M. Sanvidge Long Branch 

Ross Scott Seaforth 

H. R. Scruton Port Dover 

A. F. Shaw Tilbury 

W. E. Shaw Port Arthur 

G. H. Smith Hagersville 

George Somerton Amherstburg 

William Stanzell Smiths Falls 

R. E. Strain Sarnia 

W. L. Strieker Agincourt 

H. R. Svkes London 

O. J. Timber Espanola 

H. V. Watson Uxbridge 

A E. WooUard Bobcaygeon 

H. G. Ziegler Guelph 



GRAND STANDARD BEARERS 

V.W. Bro. E. C. Trapp Deep River 

" W. A. Hughes Toronto 



TESTIMONIAL FOR RETIRING GRAND MASTER 

It was moved by M.W. Bro. W. L. Wrig-ht, 
seconded by M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn, and unanimous- 
ly carried, that the Grand Master appoint a com- 
mittee to procure a suitable testimonial, at the 
expense of Grand Lodge, for the retiring- Grand 
Master, M.W. Bro. C. M. Pitts. 



VOTE OF THANKS 

On motion of M.W. Bro. J. A. Hearn, seconded 
by the Deputy Grand Master, it was unanimously 
resolved : That this Grand Lodge extends its sincere 
thanks to the Mayor and citizens of Toronto, to the 
Board of Education, to tlie Police Department, to 
the lodges of the six Toronto Districts, to the local 
Committee on Arrangements and to all other offi- 
cials for the kindness shown to the officers and 
delegates ; and that a copy of this resolution be sent 
to the several committees and officials. 



262 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

GRAND LODGE CLOSED 

The Grand Master, having announced that the 
labors of Grand Lodge were concluded, called on 
the Grand Chaplain to invoke the blessing of the 
Most High upon the Craft. 

Grand Lodge was declared closed in Ample 
Fonn at 1 p.m., of Thursday, July 20th, 1961. 




Grand Secretary 




GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, Page 286 to 294 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festival 

The names of the W. M. and Secretary 



Lodge 



Where Held 



W. Master 



Secretary 



2iaNiagara 
3 



Ni agar a-on-Lake_ 



6 

7 
9 

10 
11 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
20 
11a 
221 
23| 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
SI 
82 
83 
34 
35 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48' 
50 
52 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
68 
<9 



aThe Anc. St. John's,— Kingston.. 

aSusse:; Brockville_ 

aThe Barton Hamilton- 
Union Grimsby- 



aUnion — 
aNorfolk. 
aMoira... 



aTrue Britons' 

St. George's 
aSt. Andrew' 

St. John's. 
aPrince Edward- 
aSt. John's 
aSt. John's- 
aKing Solomon's 

Richmond- 
aSt. Francis 
alonic 



Napanee- 

. Simcoe 

Belleville 
Perth 



.. G. E. Irvine _ 
. W. D. Stevens . 
. L. H. Bracken 
-J. T. Peters _ 

. W. G. May 

. G. A. Reid . 

J. O. King 




A. W. Marner 

W. H. Keays 

St. Catharines — _ H. W. Thompson 

C. E. Waldron 

Jack Kemaghan — 

Neil Love _._ 

A. J. Graham 

Kenneth McLennan 

Gordon Pitcher 

G. A. Gardner 

E. C. Dowdall _-. 

A. B. Ward 



-A. G. Hall 

. T. J. Donnelly - 
. H. F. Blanchard 
. J. E. Piercy — 
. Vernon Tuck _ 
- Harry Ohlman — 
. J. D. Rouse Jr. 
-H. C. McElrath . 
. Ernest Cross 



W. H. Rowden 

Ronald Barty 

S. A. Price 

J. M. Brown 

H. F. Town 



aSt. George's 
aSt. George's 

King Solomon's 
aSt. Thomas 
aBrant 
aWellii .. 
aGreat Western 
aMadoc 
aConsecon 

Dalhousie. 
aVaufchan 
aMerrickville- 

aVictoria 

aHarmony 

Doric 

aAcacia- 



R. H. Graham 

G. L. Pyle ..___„._ 

- M. W. Cox 

Kenneth Gordon — 

Clifford Bell 

C. W. Wilson 

G. B. Hemstreet — 

Kenneth Greer 

J. W. Spillett 

M. L. Wigle 

A. M. Maxwell Jr. 

W. D. Richards 

J. A. Walton — — 

J. C. Creamer 

R. C. Gumming 

N. F. Harris 

William Derry 

E. V. Young 

Aubrey Fraser 

— . Coulson Malloy — 

Merrickville l. H. Yeomans 



aSt. Andrew's- 

St. John's 

aKilwinning — 

aRehoboam. 

aDurh am 

aSt. John's — _ 
StirlinK 



Sarnia.. 

' Binbrook-. 
Ottawa 

. Hamilton- 
Caledonia... 



Carleton Place- 
, London 

Toronto 

. Newcastle 

. Ingersoll 

Stirling 



A. J. Facer 

D. C. Young __ 

A. C. Stinson 

W. F. Benedict _ 
R. F. Thompson - 
G. C. Crampton ._ 

G. R. Dean 

V. B. Gale 

A. G. Perrin 

C. N. Mea'-herall 
Maurice Clancy _ 



W. E. Thompson „ 

T. H. W. Salmon 

- H. R. Quantrill _ 

. Robert Jeffery _ 

W. H. Kipp — 

. R. L. Ren wick _ 

■ H. F. Sutton 

• H. W. R. Sayers _ 

■ G. P. Marshall — 

• J. A. Deacon 

• E J. McKeever — 
D. G. Welby 

■ H. D. Hyndman _ 

■ I. H. Morrow 

■ W. G. Augustus _ 
•J S. Emmerson — 

• R. W. Stretton — 

■ C. J. Worsell 

Geo. Somerton — 

• R. M. Murphy — 

H. R. Nagle 

H. F. Burke 

W. G. Manning — 

• C. E. Heal 

• -T. C. Heath 

■ D. A. McDonald — 

■ A. W. Massie 

■ N. F. Rolling 

• TT. H. Clark 

H. D. Paulucci — - 

■ \. R. Bourne 

■ 'P. T. Navler 

F. R. Tavlor 

• .T W. Tuck 

W. O. Hallawell - 
M. G. Corbett — 

G. D. Watson 

■ G. R. Bell 



R. y. Tubman — 

D. R. Shaw 

T. J. Hicks 

F. A. McTavish . 

v.. C. Smith 

F. R. Workman 

r. .T. Allin 

•T. W. Dean 



Volney Richardson 



J 



TORONTO. ONTAKIO, 1961 



26& 



AT DECEMBER 31st, 1960. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge U held. 

ef St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31st, 1961. 



Nisrht of Meeting 



"S 



"S 






2|lst Wednesday 
3 list Thursday . 
6|3rd Monday 



612nd Wednesday 

7|Thu.-. on or before F.M.. 

9|2nd Wednesday 

10|2nd Tuesday 

lljlst Wednesday 

14{lst Monday 

15 2nd Tuesday 

16 1 2nd Tuesday 

17 1 2nd Tuesday 

181 l8t Thursday , 

20 1 2nd Tuesday 

21a|Tucs. on or before F.M_ 

22 1 2nd Thursday . 

23 1 3rd Wednesday 

24|lst Thursday 



1st Wednesday 
3rd Thursday . 

3rd Friday 

3rd Thursday . 
1st Tuesday — 
Last Monday 



25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 2nd Wednesday 

32 1 2nd Wednesday 

33 1 2nd Tuesday __ 

3411st Tuesday 

35|3rd Thursday _ 

3711st Friday 

S8'2nd Tuesday — 

391 1st Tuesday 

4013rd Thursday .... 
4111st Thursday — 
4211st Thursday ._ 
43 list Tuesday 
44 list Thursday 

4.')! 2nd Tuesday 

46; 1st Monday 

47 1 1st Thursday _ 
4813rd Monday — 

oOllst Friday 

52! 1st Tuesday 

54! 2nd Tuesday 

55 '3rd Friday 

66 list Tuesday 

57 1 2nd Wednesday 
581 3rd Thursday __. 

61 2nd Friday 

62 '3rd Thursday _.. 
63 2nd AVednesday 

64! 3rd Friday 

65! 1st Thursday ._ 

66! 1st Tuesday 

6813rd Tuesday 

69i3rd Thursday _ 



3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


11 


11 


8 


4 


1 


6 


7 


8 


1 


— 


7 


7 


6 


— 


— 


5 


8 


13 


5 


— 





3 


— 


2 


— 


8 


9 


14 


1 


1 


21 


19 


15 


— 


— 


8 


10 


11 


— 


— 


10 


16 


12 


3 


— 


4 


6 


8 


1 


— 


10 


8 


9 


1 


— 








4 


1 


— 


12 


13 


14 


3 


— 


4 


3 


2 


— 


— 


7 


5 


5 


1 


— 


9 


11 


15 


3 


— 


8 


8 


8 


3 


1 


9 


5 


4 


— 


— 


4 


3 


4 


1 


— 


10 


8 


9 


— 


1 


3 


4 


5 


— 


— 


1 


2 


4 


1 


2 


11 


7 


9 


4 


— 


10 


10 


12 


9 


1 


8 


7 


5 


5 


— 


4 


4 


4 


2 


— 


4 


4 


4 


— 


— 


4 


5 


3 


1 


— 


4 


5 


4 


3 


— 


20 


18 


18 


— 


1 


3 


4 


9 


— 


1 


10 


9 


6 


1 


1 


1 





3 


1 


— 


9 


6 


7 


— 


— 


in 


6 


6 


1 


— 


8 


9 


8 


— 


— 


15 


10 


9 


1 


1 


6 


4 


4 


1 


4 


1 - 


IS 


16 


2 


4 





1 


4 


1 


9 


4 


( 





1 








6 


8 


4 


1 


7 


4 


4 


— 





1 


4 


4 


— 





6 


6 


8 


4 





1 


1 


3 


— 





3 


3 


9 


— 





10 


9 


9 


4 


3 


3 


2 


5 


— 


— 


fi 


4 


3 


3 


— 


1 5 


13 


13 


4 


— 


7 


9 


7 


— 


1 


4 


3 


1 


— 


— 


o 


9 


o 


. — - 


— 


1 


2 


3 


1 


1 



2 6—257 254 

2 13 4 398 395 
4 13 2 491 479 

3 10 1 357 350 

1 2—254 261 

4 4—262 261 
4 9 7 308 299 

2 8 9 470 472 

1 5—254 25< 

2 12 — 373 372 

2 7 3 396 389 
1 11 2 353 350 
4 4—345 343 

— 10 6 572 571 

1 3—100 100 
4 7 12 340 325 
9 5—219 217 
4 6 4 398 39« 

3 8 1 217 207 

2 13 5 258 24a 

3 8 2 498 496 

2 3 4 137 131 

— 2—207 209 
1 2—213 225 

3 6 5 246 245 
1 7—283 288 
1 3 3 205 204 
6 5 2 164 155 

— 2 1 165 167 

3 3 1 206 206 
6 13 4 345 343 

— 2 3 156 155 
1 26 4 536 517 

1 3 2 255 251 

2 9—343 341 

1 8—386 388 

2 17 1 387 376 
2 10 8 384 381 

2 13 2 316 310 

4 16 13 735 725 

— 3—182 184 

1 2—126 128 

3 12 1 459 457 

2 2—110 113 
2 3—115 112 

— 7 2 386 387 
2 4—126 121 
6 11 1 365 350 
6 18 5 673 661 
2 1—173 173 

4 7 1 240 237 
6 6 2 665 670 
4 14 9 440 421 

— 3 1 121 121 

2 1—183 182 

3 11 1 213 200 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, Page 286 to 294 
I«deea marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Fe«tiT«l 

The names of the W. M. and Secretuy 



Lodse 



Where Held 



W, Master 



Secretary 



72 1 a Alma. 

73 aSt. 

74 aSt. Jamea 

75 aSt. John's. 

76 aOxford 

77 aFaithful Brethre 

78 aKing Hiram. 

79 aSimcoe 

81 aSt. John's. 

82 aSt. John's. 
8'3|aBeaver 
84 Clinton 
SSJaRising Sun 
86|aWilson 
87 aMarkham Union. 

881 St. George's 

9DiaManito_ 



Gait- 




9l!aColborne 

92JaCataraqui- 



93|aNorthern Light- 
94!aSt. Mark's- 



aCorinthian— 

aSharon 

True Blue— 

aTuscan 

aValley 

aCorinthian. 



96 

97 

98 

99 
iOO 
101 

103 aMaple Leaf- 
1041 St. John's- 
105 aSt. Mark's. 
lOelaBurford _ 

107|aSt. Paul 'a 
1081 Blenheim 
109|aAIbion... 
llOlaCentral 
llSlaWilson. 
114laHope. 
115|alvy. 
116|aCassia 



L. T. Oldfield 

J 

H 

C 

J, 

J, 

J, E. Stephenson 

N. H. Barron 

J. A. McLean 

R. C. Walker 



G. Bradley 

M. i!.arle 

A. Boddy 

D. Pattinson 

M. Roy 



A, G. Malcolm _ 
H. R. Alberta _ 
F. L. Bissell — 
J. D. Spears — 
C. E. NetJtleton 

C. H. Heels 

A. A. Coyle 

• W. K. Orr 



W. Tufford — 



— L. M. Brown 
C. A. Veigel 



Markhana 

Owen Sound— 
CoUingwood — 

Colborne 

Kingston 

Kincardine 

Port Stanley- 

Barrie 

Queensville 

. Bolton — 

, Newmarket 

Dundas- 



J. A. McLaren 

D. R. Layng 

D. C. Thompson 

Joseph Cham.pion _- 

N. E. Arnott 

A. G. Dempster 

D. D. M. Peebles — 

W. A. Sheppard 

D. O. Edmiston 

R. H. Walker 

W. T. Kirkpatrick — 

C. R. Houston 

Murray Irwin 



B. D. Marwick — 

■ D. E. Symons 

• A. E. Watt 

C. J. E. Lawer 

Harvey Rose 

E. C. Rosskopf 

F. H. Bellamy 

• H. F. Cowie i:—. 

T. N. Clarke 

• H. J. Norman i- 

■ J. A. Quinn 

■ Geo. Scott 

■ R. G. Strasler . 

W. H. McBride , 

■ T. A. Mitchell 

Walter Law . ■ 



Peterborough — 
St. Catharines- 
Norwich 

Niagara Falls— 
Burford- 



118 
119 
120 
121 
122 



Union. 




Samuel Jefferson . ». 

R. F. Carmichael — _ 

W. O. Thirnbeck r, F^ Downey 

F. E. Sampson James Thomson 

V. L. Moore r. o. Fewster _ 

A. C. Pratt H. Higgins — 

H. L. Davidson William Reed . 

Allan Chantler 



aMaple Leaf. 
Warren 
aDoric.._ 
I Renfrew. 



Charles Bonney ... 

L. H. Babcock 

J. B. Michell 

G. E. Saul 

G. H. Corbett 

L. G. Rouse 

Wesley Hilbom _. 

Gordon Cook 

Everett Gait 

Morley Adams 

F. A. Hunt 



Robert McDougall 

— H. D. Wight 

G. A. Goslin 

— A. P. Gaudin 

— R. K. Robinson 

R. A. GuBtar 

G. H. Dickson 

Herman Briers 



123|aBelleville 
125|aCornwalI 
126laGolden Rule 
127laFranck 
128! Pembroke. 

129|aThe Rising Sun Aurora-. 

131|aSt. Lawrence Southampton 

ISSlaLebanon Forest Exeter 

135 1 aSt. Clair Milton 



W. F. Aitchison 

Herbertt Weese 

Douglas Orchard 

E. E. Mclntyre 

L. B. Smith 

H. G. Bates 



Pembroke- 



1 36 1 aRi chardson— 
1 37 1 aPythagoraa- 
\ t9 1 alaebanon 



John Slingerland 
K. A. Thompson .. 
N. G. M. Tuck -, 

Murray Locke 

E. G. Gilmour __ 

H. T. Hale 

G. H. Bunt 

G. R. Chapman . 

G. W. Lawson Chester Mawhinney 

C. H. Fay E. B. Clements — 



G. E. McCutcheon _ 

— W. A. Kingston 

— Preston Chase ■ 

— . M. H. Doering 

— J. H. Knowles 

W. C. Scott 



Stouffville- 

Meaford 

Oahawa 



Robert Snowball 

D. A. Dcbie 

M. D. Jaoobi 



A. E. Weldon 

Ernest Ingleby 

Charles Templar , 



J 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



2*7 



AT DECEMBER 31st, 1960. 



If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lod?e ia held. 

of St. John the Evang:elist, all others on or near that of St. John th« BaptUu 

are corrected np to July 31st, 1961. 



«-l u 



Nlsht of Meetius 



"S 



J 5 if 



01 ^ 01-" "^ 



IO» 



72 i Last Tuesday _ 

73 1 3rd Monday 

74 1 4th Monday 

751 1st Monday 

76 1 2nd Monday 

77 1 2nd Tuesday _ 
78 1 2nd Wednesday 
79 1 2nd Monday _ 
81 [2nd Tuesday _ 
82 1 2nd Tuesday _ 
83 1 3rd Monday _ 
841 1st Friday 



85|Thurs. on or before F.M. 

86|8rd Tuesday 

87 1 2nd Wednesday 

88 1 2nd Wednesday 



90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 
103 
104 



2nd Tuesday 

3rd Friday 

2nd Friday 

1st Wednesday 
2nd Tuesday _ 
1st Thursday _ 
2nd Tuesday _ 

1st Friday 

2nd Thursday . 
2nd Monday _ 
3rd Friday 



Last Thursday 

,3rd Monday 

105i2nd Tuesday 

106|8rd Wednesday 
107 1 2nd Wednesday 
10S|2nd Friday — 



109|Friday on or before F.M. 

1101 1st Tuesday 

11312nd Wednesday 

11413rd Tuesday 

115 1 1st Tuesday 

llGj2nd Monday 

lis! 2nd Monday 

11912nd Monday 

1201 1st Tuftsday . 

121! 3rd Friday . . 

12211st Monday 



123! 1st Thursday 

1251 1st Wednesday 

126 '2nd Monday 

127 '3rd Monday 

12Silst Thursday 

12912nd Wednesday 

131|'Jnd Tuesday 

133 '2nd Monday 

13511st Thursday 

13614th Wednesday 

13711st Tuesday , 

139! 2nd Tue-sday 



8 


13 


13 


1 


— 


14 


12 


11 


— 


1 


2 


2 


3 


1 


— 


7 


8 


9 


— 


— 


18 


16 


18 


1 


— 


7 


6 


8 


2 


— 


6 


3 


3 


1 


— 


4 


3 


4 


1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


o 


3 


5 


— 


— 


4 


4 


4 


— 


— 


11 


6 


4 


1 


2 


4 


4 


3 


— 


— 


5 


5 


o 





— 


8 


9 


6 


7 


1 


4 


6 


5 


— 


— 


4 


3 


3 


— 


1 


10 


9 


5 


1 


1 


15 


15 


14 





2 


3 


5 


13 


1 


— 





S 


7 


— 


— 


10 


10 


12 


3 


— 


3 


3 


6 


2 


— . 


3 


1 


1 


1 


— 


9 


8 


5 


3 


1 


9 





5 


3 


— 


13 


9 


14 


3 


— 


8 


8 


7 


— 





3 


3 


4 








6 


4 


4 





1 


2 


2 


1 


— 


— 


11 


9 


9 





— 


3 


3 


3 








9 


6 


5 








6 


5 


5 


1 


— 


5 





5 


— 


— 


4 


4 


D 





1 


4 


6 


9 


9 


— 


9 


12 


9 


1 


— 


P. 


4 


3 


1 


. — 


3 


3 


3 





2 


4 


4 


4 





— 


4 


5 


7 








5 


5 


7 


1 


1 


7 


/ 


3 


1 


3 


19 


13 


10 


1 


1 


10 


6 


2 


1 


1 


4 


2 


2 


2 





10 


5 


6 


7 





4 


. 8 


7 


9 





9 


9 


2 


2 


— 


9 


6 


8 


— 


— 


1 


.7 


9 


9 


— 


■7 


.5 . 


5 


9 


— 


2 


4 


4 


2 


1 


19 


12 


9 


3 


2 



1 6 1 279 280 

— 4—237 248 

— 1—120 122 

2 10 1 241 235 

2 7 5 893 S98 
1 10 1 392 389 

— 10 — 365 362 

— 4—148 149 

1 1 — 94 93 
9 6 2 229 215 

— 1 1 177 179 

3 2 7 193 196 

— — 2 104 10« 

3 12 5 270 256 

2 — 1 171 184 
1 7—206 202 

4 7 S 295 286 
1 3—155 163 

3 10 5 410 409 
1 8—234 234 

— 2—156 158 
3 8 4 448 446 
3 2 3 148 145 
1 S — 129 129 

— 5 1 216 223 

1 10 — 369 870 
3 6 2 452 457 

2 7 3 490 486 

— S — 225 225 
1 8 1 331 328 

— 4—147 145 

1 4 1 206 211 

3 — — 106 106 

— 2—192 199 

5 4 2 155 151 

— 4—192 193 

2 5 — 224 224 
1 3—233 235 

— 3—108 116 

— 1 2 113 117 

— 2 5 140 137 

1 1 — 96 98 

2 15 — 495 482 

1 3 1 208 210 

2 6 3 360 360 

2 13 — 420 419 

3 6 3 286 286 

— 2 3 220 221 
5 4—287 295 
1 — 1 192 203 

— 2 — 93 95 

— 4—192 197 

— 8—228 223 

— 1 2 168 174 

1 3 4 147 144 

2 6—431 448 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, Page 286 to 294 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the FestiTal 

The names of the W. M. and Secretary 



^■3 



Lodge 



Where Held 



W. Master 



Secretary 



40 aMalahide_ 
41|aTudor.. 



Aylmer— 
Mitchell. 



42|aExcelsior Morrisburg. 

43|aFriendIy Brothers' Iroquois 

44|aTecumseh Stratford.. 



Roy Sinden 

Wesley Mahaffy 

M.W. Rielly 

J. A. Brown — 
. L. H. Scoigie 



45laJ. B. Hall Millbrook H. R. Campbell . 

46|aPrince of Wales Newburgh R. W. Shortts — 

47 1 Missis.sippi Almonte W. Y. Wood — 

48laCivii Service Ottawa N. F. H. Bright 

49|aErie Port Dover F. G. A. Morris . 

51|aGrand River Kitchener G. R. Jaggs 

53|aBums' Wyoming G. L. White 

54|alrving Lucan C. E. Robb 



55 1 aPeterborough- 

56 ! a York 

.57|aSimpson 

58|aAIexandra 

591 Goodwood 

.611 Percy.. 



621 Forest 

641 aStar-i n-the-East. 

65|aBurlington 

66 1 aWentworth 

68laMerritt 



Peterborough- 
Toronto 

Newboro 

Oil Springs — 

Richmond 

Warkworth 

Wroxeter 



69 1 aMacnab 

TOlaBritannia. 

TllaPrince of Wales- 

72(aAyr.. 



74laWalsinp'hpm 

771 The Builders.. 
78! Plattsville... 
SOIaSpeeu.. 

SllaOriental 

84|a01d Light._ 
85!aEnniskilIen_ 
861 Plantagenet. 

90|aBelmont 

92!aOrillia 

93|aScotland 

94iaPetrolia. 

95|aThe Tuscan. 
96 1 Madawaska- 

- 97 1 aSaugeen 

2001 St. AlbanV 

iOliaLeeds 

2031 Irvine.. 



' Wellington 

Burlington 

Stoney Creek— 

; Wei land. 

Port Colbome- 

Seaforth 

lona Station- 
Ayr.. 



' Port Rowan- 
Ottawa 

, Plattsville 

, Guelph.. 



Port Burwell. 

Lucknow 

; York 

, Riceville 

Belmont 

■ Orillia. 

Scotland. 

. Petrolia 

. London 

Amprior 

Walkerton 

Mt. Forest 

Gananoque 

■ Elora... 



— George Stevens 

— A. H. Gray 

J. D. Bulloch 

— Wesley McKay 

— B. C. Wilson 

— Roy McNally 

— Walter Renwick 

— W. H. Sainsbury .... 

— L. W. G. Crawford 

— H. H. Johnson 

— C. E. Griffin 

— L. J. Kennedy 

— Elmer Larone 

— J. A. Beecroft 

— M. E. Smith 

Warren Gee 

— W. J. Paterson 

— Arthur Riesberry ..- 

— K. A. Young 



Norman Bates — 

Bert Irwin _ 

Gordon Hewitt . 
O. E. Wilkea — 
Donald Black — 

G. E. Smith 

Keith Fobs - - 

Roy Cox ...- 

A. W. Harris — 
James Geddes __ 

H. W. Dobson 

Cecil Fairbaim ... 



205|aNew Dominion- 

207! Lan caster 

209' Evergreen 

209a !aSt. John's 

2151 Lake 

2161 aHarris 

217 1 aFrederick 

218|aStevenson 

2191 aCredit 

■220 1 aZeredatha 



\ New Hamburg- 

Lan caster 

Lanark 

. London 

Ameliasburg 

Orangeville 

. Delhi 



. Toronto 

. Georgetown- 
. Uxbridge 



— Gordon Emmerson . 

— F. G. Harrison -...- 

— H. F. Weicker -...- 

— L. M. Fourney - 

— Lloyd Closa 

— W. A. Smith „ 

— A. C. McFaul 

— E. C. Gray 

— J. E. Lichtenberge.- 

— E. A. Graham _ 

— Jack Addy 

— G. E. Hockley 



J. B. Wright 

Edward Brunk 

T. R. Parker 

C. E. VsnCamp 

S. W. Rust 

J. S. McGill 

• Delbert Sexsmith — 
S. H. Morton 

E. D. Berry . 

B. M. Varey 

H. W. Rothaermel _ 

J. G. Rice 

J. C. Murdy 

. A. J. Cummings — 

W. S. Collins . 

W. A. Barker 

G. W. Watson 

J. C. Foster 

El don Ewing 

J. H. Wylie 

B. C. Tice 

R. J. M. Allen 

W. A. McNeil 

J. B. Barclay 

C. M. McNeil 

C. A. Reith 

W. G. Agar 

.T. D. Patterson 

Harry Unger 

D. G. Hewer 

J. L. Gofton 

A. J. Hawker __ 

A. J. Bods worth 

T. J. Salkeld 

. A. W. McConachie . 

• Bert Fa-^cett 

• Brock Harkness 

J. W. Davies 

C. R. McEwan 

J. A. McCahe 

R. T. Dunlop . 

H. E. Hobbs 

T. E. Brant 

H. J. Corley 

J. F. Sjrmons 

■ J. C. Drimmie __ 

■ R. E. Memer 

W. R. Steele 

"W. M. Lee 

F. B. Robinaon 

O. G. Redner 

N. C. Harkness 

W. J. Hall 

J. H. Johnston 

J. F. Evans 

V. L. Bailey 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 

AT DECEMBER 31st, 1960. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31st, 1961. 



269 



Night of Meeting 



140|3rd Wednesday 
141 1 2nd Tuesday -.._ 
142|lst Wednesday 
143|2nd Wednesday 

144 1 3rd Friday 

1451 2nd Tuesday _.. 
14611st Wednesday 



147 
148 
149 
151 
153 
154 
155 
156 



1st Friday _.. 

2nd Tuesday 

Men. on or before F.M 

2nd Tuesday 

2nd Thursday 

2nd Thursday 

1st Friday 

3rd Friday 



1571 1st Tuesday 

168 1 2nd Thursday 



159 
161 
162 

164 



Tues. on or before F.M. 

1st Wednesday 

2'nd Monday 

1st Tuesday 



165!lst Wrdnesday 
166 1 3rd Tuesday __ 
16812nd Monday 
16912nd Tuesday 
1701 1st Monday 



17112nd Thursday 

17212nd Monday 

174|3rd Thursday 

17712nd Friday 

178|Fridny on or before F.M. 

18011st Tuesday 

181|2nd Tuesday 

1841 1st Tlnirsday 

IS.'^IIst Monday 

186 1 2nd Monday _ 

190 1 4th Thursday 

192|lst Thiu-sday 

193 1 2nd Monday 

194|2nd Wf-dnesday 

19o!lst Monday 

19612nd Monday 

19712nd Tuesday ._. 

200 1 Friday on or before F.M. 

20112nd Tuesday 

203' 3rd Friday 

2051 2nd Monday 

207 1 Tues. on or before F.M. 

209|2nd Thiu-sday 

209a 1 1st Friday 

2151 1st Monday . 

21612nd Tuesday 

21713rd Monday 

21812nd Monday 

J19|2nd Wednesday _ 
KOISrd Monday 



4 


4 


2 


2 


4 


5 


5 


9 


10 


7 


5 


2 


o 


4 


5 


1 


14 


12 


13 


9 


9 


9 


9 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


6 


6 


2 


1 


4 


7 


8 


2 


5 


4 


2 


1 


6 


6 


7 


4 





9 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


1 


10 


9 


7 





8 


8 


8 


1 


9 


3 


2 


— 


5 


4 


4 


— 


."> 


4 


4 


1 


1 


4 


4 


. — 


1 


1 


4 


— . 


8 


7 


5 


1 


9 


8 


11 


5 


9 


13 


19 


7 


3 


2 


6 


1 


S 


8 


8 


— 


5 


6 


4 


1 


3 


5 


4 


1 


9 


1 


1 


1 


10 


9 


6 


2 


4 


7 


8 


— 


— 


1 


2 





18 


18 


16 


1 










6 


6 


4 

1 

9 


— 




9 


_ 


5 


6 


4 


— 


in 


10 


10 


4 


4 


4 


6 





a 


5 


7 


1 


1 


6 


5 





S 


12 


9 


9 


4 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


9 


4 


3 


3 





3 

1 
4 


2 


2 


1 
9 


3 


2 


1 


4 


4 


1 


13 


11 


11 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


8 


( 


8 


1 


3 


9 


9 


1 


14 


14 


13 


1 


5 


5 


7 


2 


6 


8 


7 


2 



1 — 

— 5 

— 1 
1 1 

— 1 



— 4 
4 5 
2 2 

— 3 
1 2 

— 2 
4 9 
1 — 
7 7 



— 4 
5 12 

— 1 



6 
1 
1 
7 
3 
1 
1 
1 

13 
1 
7 
1 

10 



1 — 

3 2 

1 1 

12 4 

1 1 

5 — 

13 — 

7 — 

8 10 

2 — 

3 — 
8 — 

10 — 



10 



5-2 



209 
169 
162 
109 
396 
101 

69 
198 
312 
224 
438 
140 
124 
474 
371 

89 

97 
104 
146 
127 
139 
471 
434 
259 
300 
173 

76 

74 
145 
355 

73 
491 

96 
193 

84 

68 
135 
482 
166 
151 
279 
227 
150 

96 
223 
105 

68 
119 
105 
664 
120 
288 
175 
320 
224 
173 



= 2 



208 
173 
170 
114 
398 
111 

71 
199 
305 
223 
424 
143 
125 
474 
363 

87 
101 
105 
146 
126 
147 
473 
435 
259 
299 
175 

76 

74 
151 
343 

72 
488 

98 
195 

83 

66 
136 
478 
168 
155 
273 
223 
153 
100 
217 
104 

67 
125 
101 
655 
119 
239 
173 
317 
229 
169 



270 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, Page 286 to 294 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festirai 

The names of the W. H. and Secrctarr 



i^ 



Lodge 



Where Held 



W. Master 



Secretary 



221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
242 
243 
245 
247 
249 
250 
253 
254 
255 
256 
257 
258 
259 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
2^7 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 
274 
276 
277 
279 
282 
283 
284 
285 
286 
287 
289 
290 
?91 



aMountain. 

aMarmora— 

aNorwood— 

Huron-.. 



. Thorold..- 
. Marmora. 



aBernard 

aPrince Arthur 

alon i c 

Kerr 



. Norwood- 
. Hensall 

■ Listowel__ 

■ Odessa 

Brampton. 
Barrie- 



Lodge of Fidelity — Ottawa 

aCameron Dutton. 

Doric ParkhilL 

Beaver 



aAldworth- 
aManitoba_ 

Vienna _ 

Havelock... 

Tweed. 

aMacoy. 



aSt. Georga.— 

aTecumseh 

aAshlar 



Thornbury 

. Paisley 

- Cookstown 

Vienna 

• Watford. 

■ Tweed 

- Mallorytown- 
St. George — 



Thamesvilk 

Toronto.. 

Midland... 

Embro.. 




M. J. Gillespie 

Kenneth Tremble _ 
Cecil Cuthbertson _ 

D. R. D. Cooper 

N. C. Stirling 

Graham Irwin 

Horace Tomlinson _ 

R. A. Stewart 

L. G. Moar 

Stuart McWilliam _ 

Clare Sadler 

M. G. McKechnie _ 

L. B. Evans 

J. R. Pearson __ — 

J. W. Wimpory 

Fred Watson 

W. R. Marsh 

I. E. Turner -. 

R. E. Stubel 

C. D. Krieger 

Robert Muir 

J. M. Dahymple 

J. A. Zinn 

Frank Ormondroyd 

R. E. Miller 

William Irwin 

Elbum Crites 

K. W. Manning 

F. H. Theakston 

Leonard Simpson — 

A. R. Pegg 

W. G. Wells 

T. R. Pi'-hard'^on ... 

A. M. Metcalfe 

W. J. Avres Jr. — 

H. C. Hinchley 

P. M. Slotesbury . 

Ray Nerden 

R. B. Kennedy — 

Edgar Ward 

W. J. Burch 

Delisle Everson — 

D. W. Ewen 

VeBrter Russell _. 

Gerald Roane 

.1. S. Brooks 

F. R. PRddock 

A. H. Moore 

A. B. Gerow _ 

James McTaggart .. 

J. P. Sheridan 

Alex. Corrigan 

A. H. Mayes 

Murray Marsh 

E. P. Stephens 

C. A. Scott 



C. R. Buss 

R. E. Neal 

Charles MacMillan _ 
W. O. Goodwin 

B. L. H. Bamford — 
Percy Wright . 

C. A. Firman ■ 

Archibald Coates 

J. A. Pell — 

C. J. Beill _ — 

C. J. Fox . — 

R. N. MacDairmid — 

S. F. Ballachey 

L. A. Arnold — 

Lyle Walsh .._ 

G. C. Searson . 

F. Bowers . . . 

A. M. Purvis — . 

J. B. Raymer - 

W. E. Hopper — 

R. J. McCleary 

J. J. Robins 

D. J. McLeod 

G. H. Veale — — 

Fred<?rick Want 

W. B. Holmes 

F. T. Shaver . 

G. J. Johnson 

T. Jackson — 

F. E. Harris — . 

E. G. Kerby 

S. J. Hislop 

F. Fi Homuth 

W. F. Braun 

M. H. Chapman — 

G. A. Russell . 

G. A. Clemence _ — . 

J. B. Ryan . 

J. F. Mclsaac 

Alvin Wilson 

E. F. Farrow 

Stewart Scott 

E. McMullen 

E. L. Jacklin 

W. A. MoKenzie 

B. E. Schaab '. 

G. H. Henderson — 

J. A. Gould . 

W. Oliver 

A. E. Martin _ — 

R. N. Walker 

H. L. Sherbondy 

J. E. Hamilton 

Wilfrid Keays ._ 

Reginald McLean — 
T). W. Dunkin -i 



II 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 

AT DECEMBER 31st, 1960. 

■ If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge is held. 
of St. John the Evangelist, all othtrs on or near that of St. John th« BapUsu 
•re corrected up to July 31st, 1961. 



Niirht of Meeti&K 



221|Srd Thursday . 
•222 1 3rd Monday _ 
223|2nd Monday _ 

224|4Lh Monday _ 
•225 1 3rd Tuesday _ 

•2281 3rd Monday 

429 1 3rd Tuesday _ 
230 1 3rd Thursday . 
231 1 3rd Tuesday ... 
2821 Ist Wednesday 
233 1 2nd Tuesday _ 
234 1 3rd Tuesday _ 
235|lst Friday 

•23612nd Tuesday _ 

237 1 3rd Friday 

238 1 3rd Tuesday _„ 

13912nd Friday 

242 1 4th Monday _ 

2481 Ist Tuesday 

245|2nd Monday 

-247 4th Tuesday 

249|lst Monday 

2S0|4th Thursday ... 

2531 1st Tuesday 

254 1 1st Wednesday 

.2551 2nd Tuesday _ 

256! 2nd Wednesday 

2571 Ist Tuesday 

258|2nd Tuesday _ 
Monday 



271 



269|2nd 
2601 1st 
261|2nd 
26212nd 
263|2nd 
264 Uth 



Wednesday 
Thursday . 

Monday 

Wednesday 
Tuesday 
265|3rd Thursday .._ 

2661 1st Tuesday 

2671 Ist Wednesday . 

268 1 3rd Friday 

269! 1st Wednesday _ 

270 1 4th Tuesday 

271 1 let Thursday 

272 1 2nd Tuesday 

27412nd Monday _. 

2761 2nd Thursday _ 
27712nd Wednesday . 

279 1 2nd Monday 

28212nd Tuesday 

283 '2nd Wednesday 

284! 2nd Tuesday 

285!2nd Monday 

28611st Tuesday 

28711st Tuesday 

28913rd Wednesday _ 

2901 3rd Tuesday 

29113rd Thursday 



1 


■o 

V 


1 


■o 


•a 


•c 
c 


X 


■6 


2v 


s> '"So 


■B 


s 


a 


_c 





tj 


a 




l^ 




'c 


CU 


OJ 


o 




K 


C 


3 

w 


01,1 

a- 




.5 


10 


9 


1 





_ 


9 


2 


316 


311 


2 


5 


6 


1 


— 


— 


5 


— 


131 


129 


1 


2 


2 


— 


— 


2 


4 


— 


86 


81 


3 


3 


3 


1 


— 


— 


2 


_ 


106 


108 


2 


2 


5 


2 


— 


1 


3 


— 


237 


237 


3 


5 


4 


2 


— 


2 


2 


1 


139 


139 


•5 


5 


6 


2 


1 


2 


7 


4 


355 


350 


12 


10 


11 


6 


1 


3 


5 


5 


369 


375 


11 


10 


12 


1 


— 


5 


11 


3 


371 


363 


6 


7 


7 


— 


— 


— 


4 


6 


147 


143 


3 


5 


5 


— 


— 


2 


1 





170 


170 


6 


5 


5 


2 





z 


3 

1 


— 


107 
107 


112 
106 


2 


4 


3 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


150 


150 


3 


5 


5 


— 


— 


2 


4 


1 


112 


108 


4 


4 


5 


— 


— 


— 


2 





100 


102 


3 


2 


2 


— 


— 


— 


2 


1 


147 


147 


— 


1 


2 


— 


— 


1 


1 


— 


94 


92 


4 


5 


4 


2 


— 


— 


3 


2 


183 


184 


4 


4 


4 


1 


— 


. — 


4 


— 


142 


143 


3 


3 


5 


— 


1 


1 


5 


1 


237 


234 


4 


6 


12 


1 


— 


— 


8 





326 


323 


3 


2 


2 


— 


1 


— 


5 


— 


146 


145 


6 


7 


9 


1 


— 


2 


10 


— 


435 


430 


10 


9 


7 


2 


1 


— 


15 


— 


398 


396 


3 


3 


3 


— 


— 


1 


5 





171 


168 


6 


6 


5 


1 


— 


1 


3 


— 


108 


111 


7 


9 


9 


2 


— ■ 


— 


8 


4 


343 


340 


6 


8 


9 


1 


1 





7 


4 


295 


292 


10 


10 


8 


3 


1 


1 


5 





180 


188 


2 


4 


3 


2 


— ■ 


— 


5 


1 


201 


199 


3 


5 


4 


— 


— 


1 


1 


— 


103 


104 


3 


4 


3 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


140 


142 


3 


3 


3 


1 


— 


— 


— . 


— 


132 


136 


3 


5 


7 


3 


— 


1 


11 





363 


357 


8 


8 


7 


2 


— 


4 


6 


1 


309 


308 


7 


6 


3 


1 


2 


— 


4 





178 


184 


19 


16 


10 


4 


1 


2 


7 


4 


336 


347 


4 


6 


6 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


138 


143 


2 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


93 


94 


in 


12 


10 


— 


— 


3 


8 


— 


433 


432 


2 


2 


1 


2 


— 


— 


4 





169 


169 


13 


11 


12 


2 


— 


3 


7 


3 


284 


286 


4 


2 


4 


2 


— 


2 


5 


1 


246 


244 


2 


2 


2 


i 


— 


4 


1 


— 


92 


90 


6 


10 


12 


— 


1 


1 


2 


3 


250 


251 


7 


4 


5 


— 


— 


— 


4 


— 


117 


120 


4 


4 


4 


1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


142 


146 


26 


20 


20 


1 


2 


— 


14 


3 


486 


498 


2 


2 


2 


• — 


— 


1 


5 


— 


92 


88 


13 


12 


14 


5 


1 


4 


7 


2 


268 


274 


3 


1 


1 


1 


— 


3 


8 





205 


198 


9 


11 


9 


i 


— 


6 


16 


6 


491 


474 


1 


2 


3 


1 


— 


— 


3 


1 


124 


122 


3 


3 


4 


I 


— 


— 


10 


1 


332 


325 


3 


. 4 


4 


1 


— 


— 


2 


— 


149 


151 



272 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, Page 286 to 294 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the FestiTaJ 

The names of the W. M. and SecretaiT 



Lodge 



Where Held 



W. Master 



Secretary 



2921aRobertson_ 

294 ; aMoore 

295 HConestogO- 
296IaTeDiple_ 



297 1 aPreston 

2991 Victoria 

SOOiaMount Olivet. 

3021 St. David's 

SOS^aBIyth 

304'aMinerva 



305 '. aHumber 

306! Durham 

307 1 aArkona 

309'aMornin!T Star- 
Si 1 'aBlackwood 

3121 aPnyx 

3]3laCTementi 

SHIaBlair 

3151 Clifford 

316laDoric 



318laWiImot 

319'aHiram___ 

S20!aChe.«terville_ 

3211aWalker 

322!aNorth Star_ 

323'aAlvinston 

324laTemple 

325|aOrono 

32G'aZetIand 

327'aHanimond 

3281 Ionic 



329!aKinsr Solomon_ 

SSOiaCorinthian 

331 1 Fordwich 

332' Stratford 

333! Prince ArthtiP- 
334'aPrince Arthur— 

336'aHig;h.eate 

337 ! aMyrtle 

338' Dufferin 

339 ' p.Orient 

3411 Bruce 

343 ' aGeorgina 

344'aMerrilL 



345laNilestown 

346 1 aOccidert 

347 ' aMercer 

348'aGeorgian 

352'aGranite 

3541 Broclc 

356iaRiver Park__ 
S57|a'Waterdown.. 



358IaDelaware Valley- 

359iaVittoria 

360:aMuskoka 

861 aWcverley 



King 

Courtright- 
Drayton- 



St. Catharines- 
Preston 

Centreville 

Thorndale 

St. Thomas 

Blyth 

Stroud 

Weston 

Durham 

A r kon a 



Carlow — _ — 
Woodbridge — 
Wallaceburg- 

Lakefield 

Palmerston 

Clifford 

Toronto 

Baden 

Hagersville — 
Chesterville — 
Acton- 



Owen Sound- 

Alvinston 

Hamilton 

O rono 

Toronto 

Wardsville 

Napier 

Jarvis 

London 

Fordwich 

Stratford 

. Flesherton 

Arthur 

Highgate- 



Port Robinson- 

Wellandport 

Toronto 

Tiverton 

. Toronto 

. Dorchester 

Nilestown 

Toronto 

Fergus 



. Penetanguishene_ 

, Parry Sound 

Cannington 

Streetsville 

M LI 1 grove 

Del aware 

. Vittoria 

, Bracebridge 

. Guelph 



- Charles Henshaw 

- G. D. Jennings ..- 

- Keith Dickson -^ 

- W. H. Rudge — 

- R. H. Hoffman _ 

- John Wagar 

- J. C. Bere 

- aifford West 

- Carman Haines — 

- C. H. Robertson — 

- S. H. Johnson 

- Kenneth Leith 

- Clifford Rowland _ 

- John Wilson 

- S. D. Kaiser 

- J. S. Craven _ — 

- R. H. Campbell _- 

- Royden Clark 

- Vincent Stewart 

- D. R. Clark _- 

- A. E. J. Weiler _ 

- F. A. Smith 

- Maurice Beckstead 

- S. K. Joe 

- R. H. Cowan 

- K. B. Winnett 

- J. W. Sharpe 

- J. A. Rickaby — 

- G. E. Hill 

- Gordon Purdy — 

- Calvin Dodge 

- Ivan Smelser _- 
~ Jam^s Wood _ _ 

- S. K. Graham 

- W. G. Gray _ 

- B. A. Mcintosh _. 

- H. J. Prentice _ 
~ Allan Dickson — 

- Donald Camp 

- Donald Cass _ 

- L. C. McManus _... 

- George Downey — 

- E. R. Davies 

- C. F. Chamb*>rs .... 



F. E. Boys — 

B. C. Kitchen 
E. S. Morgan 
James Thorne 
W. Graystone 
Allan Burgess 

C. V. Fox 



_ K. S. Woodward 

_ H T. Vodden . 

— Gordon Emrick 

Douglas Williams __ 

— Clarence MnGiiT 

— G. S. Lampman 

._ W, G. Treble 

— G. L. McGillivray — 

— J. H. Burnett 

— D. A. Nichols 

— W. T. Brown 

— Edgar Ekenswiller _ 

— A. J. Collins . 

— C. L. Ritchie 

— R. H. Shoup 

— A. E. Jarvis 

— H. L. Ritchie 

— J. J. Te<=chke . 

— W. H. Clark 

— Jack Turner 

— - H. E. Duvall 

— P. E. Wootton . 

_ W. J. Taylor — 

— Fvan Donning . 

__ W. L. K^n . 

Fred Aldous 

J. H. Pollock . 



— A. A. Shaw 

Everett Blackburn 

Elgin Workman _ 

G. E. Ramsey 

\. C. -Avery 

— Frank Hiles 

— . K. M. Watt 



TjoveTl MacKenzie — 

P. W. Davies 

f*. V. .T. Hal A 

R. T. Carswell Sr. _ 

J. T. Bprry 

M. C. Watson 

v. F. W>iitp 

Elwood Robinson — 
C. Smith _ _ W. J. Beard _.. 



R. J. Carswell Jr. 
W. H. B. Avery _. 

T. L. Carter 

C. S. Wice 

W. H. Gerhart 
A 



L. M. McGillivary ^. V. M^a Vines 

C. O. Lester C. P. Robinson 

W. J. A. Cobban - G. P. McKay 

P. H. Sheppard Omar Thompson _.. 

■^. P. Lee R. F. Heath 

O. T. Flint R. G. Stephens -.. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 
AT DEJCEMBER 31st, 1960. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodtre is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the BaptisU 

are corrected up to July 3Lst, 1961. 

«H a, 

5' § Nigrht of Meeting 



292 1 3rd Monday 

29412nd Thursday . 

295 3rd Tuesday 

296 1 3rd Wednesday 

29713rd Thursday . 

899 list Thursday — 

300 i 3rd Thursday _ 

802|3rd Thursday _ 

803 1 3rd Monday 

304 1 3rd Tuesday 



8051 3rd Thursday _ 

306! 2nd Tuesday 

807 1 1st Thursday 

309 1 2nd Wednesday 

311 1 1st Tuesday 

312|3rd Monday 

3131 1st Tuesday 

31412nd Friday 

31513rd Monday 

316|3rd Thursday _ 
31812nd Thursday . 
31912nd Thursday . 
320!2nd Monday _ 

32112nd Monday 

322' 1st Wednesday 

323'4th Monday 

324 1 2nd Tuesday 

325|2nd Thursday - 

326!4th Friday 

32713rd Monday 

32813rd Thursday _ 

329 2nd Friday 

33011st Tuesday _ 
S31|2nd Thursday _ 

332 1 2nd Monday 

33312nd Friday 

33413rd Monday 

33612nd Friday 

S37l4th Tuesday 

33812nd Tuesday .... 
339 1 4th Wednesday 
34 111 St Tuesday _ 

34314th Friday 

3-14' 1st Thursday _ 
345 1 2nd Tuesday 



34613rd Wednesday 

34712nd Tuesday 

348! 1st Thursday 

35213rd Wednesday 
3r>4!2nd Wednesday 

336!lst Tuesday 

35713rd Tuesday 

358 '2nd Thursday _ 

35912nd Friday 

360ll.st Tuesday 

36112nd Monday _ 





S 




c 
*S 


<u 
u 

s 

to 


T3 
O 

C 

1 


"a 
Q 


c 
a 

03 






4 


2 


2 










9 


141 


136 


1 






1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


117 


117 




1 


2 












1 


105 


104 


5 


4 


3 





1 


3 


5 


7 


355 


346 


6 


8 


9 


2 








2 


2 


248 


253 


7 


3 


1 










3 


— 


74 


78 


11 


7 


6 


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1 





117 


129 


1'' 


11 


8 







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11 


— 


510 


510 




1 


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90 


90 





2 


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1 


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196 


188 


5 


7 


6 








4 


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318 


309 


9 


2 


2 


1 








5 


— 


151 


149 


4 


4 


9 




1 


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1 


— 


70 


73 


1 


1 


1 


1 








6 





113 


109 


8 


7 


6 


1 





1 


4 


3 


170 


171 


3 


5 


5 







4 


4 


1 


268 


262 


6 


5 


9 








1 


6 


— 


165 


164 


9 


2 


1 





1 





5 


— 


194 


192 


3 


1 













2 





82 


83 




9 


9 











5 


4 


279 


277 




3 


3 











1 


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43 


44 


fi 


6 


7 


1 





4 


3 


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172 


169 


3 


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2 








3 


4 


— 


127 


123 




4 


7 


2 


— 


3 


6 


— 


221 


216 


10 


10 


10 


2 


— 


3 


3 


1 


252 


255 


5 


5 


5 











3 


— 


93 


95 


3 


4 


5 





1 


3 


16 


3 


402 


384 




4 


5 





1 


4 


3 


1 


148 


146 


4 


3 


6 


3 


1 


1 


8 


— 


302 


298 


5 

1 


3 
1 


4 

9 




— 


— 


3 


— 


84 
60 


86 
61 


9 


1 


1 








2 


3 


1 


106 


102 


1? 


9 


11 


3 





2 


8 


5 


325 


325 


8 


6 


5 





1 





9 


— 


71 


78 


10 


9 


11 


1 





2 


9 


9 


389 


287 


4 


3 


1 





1 


1 


3 


9 


151 


149 


9 


1 


4 








— 


1 





111 


112 


3 


3 


9 











7 





124 


120 


4 


4 


4 











9 





104 


106 


1 


1 


1 





1 


2 


4 


1 


93 


89 


11 


15 


11 








1 


11 


7 


359 


351 


1 


1 





1 





— 


9 


— 


62 


62 


4 


8 


7 








6 


8 


— 


380 


370 


9 


9 


1 


— 


— 


6 


9 


1 


146 


139 


19 


21 


19 





— 


— 


9 


— 


268 


284 


10 


7 


6 





1 


3 


18 


2 


464 


452 


7 


7 


6 


2 





— 


3 


2 


170 


174 


— 


1 


9 


— 


— 


— 


1 


5 


92 


86 


7 


9 


8 


— 


1 


— 


s 


4 


395 


391 


9 


1 


2 


— 


1 


a 


3 


— 


98 


93 


3 


4 


6 


9 


— 


3 


4 


— 


188 


186 


8 


9 


7 


9 


— 


o 


10 


2 


296 


292 





1 


1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— . 


125 


129 


1 


1 


2 


— 


— 


1 


4 


— 


110 


106 


9 


9 


3 


2 


. — . 


2 


9 


1 


195 


194 


4 


6 


3 


3 


— 


5 


9 


1 


396 


388 



274 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

l-or Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, Page 286 to 294 
Ledges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officer* on or near the Fe«tlT*l 

The names of the W. M. and SccrvtaxT 



01 V 

1-2 



Lodse 



Where Held 



W, Master 



Secretary 



362!aMaple Leaf, 

364|aDufferia 

367|aSt. George 

368|aSalem 

369|aMimico. 

370 1 Harmony 

3711 Prince of Walea 

372|aPalmer- 

8731 aOope-Stone 

374|aKeene 

375|aLorne 

376 ( Unity 

3771 Lome 

378!aKinE Solomon's 

379iaMiddlesex 

380|aUnion 

382|aDoric.. 

3831 Henderson 

384|aAlpha 

385|aSpry 

386laMcCoU 

387 1 aLansdowne 

388iaHenderson 



Tara 




389|aCrystal Fountain 

390laFlorence 

391IaHoward- 

392!RHuron 

393|aForest 

394laKin)r Solomon 

395laParvaim 

396|aCedar 

397 ! aLeopoId. 

39Si Victoria- 

399iaMoffat..... 

400]aOakville 

401 laCraie . 

4n2'aCentra! 

403laWindso: 

404iaLorne _ 

4051 Mattawa... 
406laThe Spry 
408' Murray, 
409laGolden Rule 
410!aZeta 
411'aRodney 

4121 aKey^'tone 

413|aNaphtalL 

4141 Pequonua 

415laFort William. 

4161 Lyn 

417|aKeewatin 

418iaMaxviile.^ 

4191 aLiherty 

4201 Ni pissing 

421laScott 

422' Star of the 



Harold Wolfe 

Edward Brock 

J. E. Pearce 

E. A. Dickenson 
J. H. M. Smart _ 
Ronald Guthrie _ 

R. H. Sloan 

John Jones 



J. H. Williams 

I. W. Drimmie 

C. R. Vaughan 

N. A. Goodwin 

Heber Irwin 

A. W. H. Raine „ 
Graydon McRoberts 

J. W. Carson 

J. D. Lumley 

T. A. Sheldrick 

Lloyd Taylor 

T. F. Dale 

DoueIa<: Todd 



G. A. N. Funston 
J. C. McLean — _ 

W. F. Damp 

; E. C. Shaffer 

John Kendall 

■ Don Elliott 

H. J. Sykes 

" R. E. Gardiner — 

■ W. B. Martin 

' D. R. Comrie 

" T. C. Best 

■ S. G. Avery 

" Wilfred Newell _ 

L. M. Clark 



Cocil Chisamore 

H. L. Oneil 

Kldon Davis 

Gerald Parkin? - 

.T. A. R. Macdonald 
J. F. Armstrong _... 

A. N. Reid 

R. A. Hoesr 

Nevillp Wrieht 

Donald TT'^lohan 

Donald WTiite 

G. N. Stewart 



Herbert Hudson — 

R. E. Tillson 

W. J. Macintosh 

W. A. Sherwood — 

Joseph Gibson 

W. L. Watson 

B. E. Newman 

R. A. Running — 

B. R. Clemance 

F. M. McGregor 

Lome Ellliott 

David Mclntyre — 
Martin Burnley __ 

C. F. Rae 

T. R. Nancekivell 
Leslie Dietrich . 

■ G. G. Sinclair 

Orest Hawryluk 

G. V. Grant 



Sault Ste. Marie — 

Tilbury 

Kenora. — _ 

Fort William 

, Lyn 

, Keewatin — 

Maxville 

. Sarnia- 



Eaat 



North Bay — 
Grand Valley- 
Bothwell 



Tjaurpnfo Jamieson HT^n* Cor'^s _ 

G. K. Morden William Gault . 

Herbert Thompson 5"*U ^^^tafson 

M. F. Sadler 9; G. Johnston 

H. B. CorfBtine _.. Alex Shaw 

Don Norris 

.Tames D<»sntilnfers 

Archie Oillis _ _ 

H. G. Campbell _ 

Oscar Pinnson 

A. M. Smith _ 

G. A. Bocker 

T. Tj. Jnnnletm 

WilHam Hoseell 

W. O. Oalder 

.T. IS. Davles 

Robert Stick _ 

.T. T.. WpM) 

\. C. MtinTo 

• Geo-rere Cnniyh 

0. R. Kelly 

• T^omo T>pvls - 

Charles TVjrreBt ..., 



H. J. Hinchey 

Herman Maxwell 

A. W. Robson 

G. A. Smith 

W. E. McDonald ... 

TT. L. Bennett 

H. W. Mylrea 

L. G. Shier 

Georee Wallace .. 

H. S. Cade 

C. V. Bates 

Frank Cornell 

C. C. Galloway _ 

J. N. Fltzsrerald . 
A. W. Jordan _. 

A. B. Ro^ 

Wilfred West 

R. W. Tyrrell 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 



275 



AT DECEMBER 31st, 1960. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodsre is held- 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July Slst, 196L 



Night of Meeting 



362 1 2nd Monday — 
864 1 3rd Tuesday — 

867 list Friday 

868|2nd Monday — 
369 1 2nd Tuesday _ 
370 j 2nd Wednesday 

371 1 4th Friday 

372] let Tuesday 



373) l8t Thursday _ 
374 1 3rd Thursday _ 
375|2nd Wednesday 
37612nd Wednesday 

377 list Friday 

378|2nd Thursday _ 
379|4th Tuesday — 
380 1 2nd Monday — 

38213rd Monday 

383 1 2nd Friday 

384 1st Thursday _ 

385 1 3rd Monday 

386|2nd Monday 

387 1 1st Wednesday 

38813rd Monday 

3891 1st Wednesday . 

390 1 1st Friday 

3911 1st Monday 

392 1 3rd Monday 

39313rd Monday 

39412nd Wednesday 

39513rd Friday 

396' 1st Tuesday 

3971 2nd W-dn^sday 
39811st Wednesday . 
3991 1st Wednesday . 

400! 1st Tuesday 

401 1 1st Tuesday 

4021 1st Tuesday 

40311st Friday ___. 

40413rd Friday _ _. 

405 1 1st Tuesday 
40614th Wednesday . 

4081 1st Tuesday 

40912nd Monday 

41011st Friday 

41111st Friday 

412! 1st Tuesday 

41312nd Tuesday 

41411st Wednesday . 
41512nd Wednesday 

4161 1st Tuesday 

41711st Fridrty . 

418i2nd Friday -__.. 

419'2nd Monday 

42012nd Monday 

4211 Ist Monday -^ 

422 1 Last Wednesdi-y 



•o 

01 


T, 


-s 


•c 




c 


.c 


•a 

c 




2^- 

o to 


"S 


b 


*3 


>-> 


01 


u 
"3 

K 


OS 
0) 






0) _ - 


1 


9 


2 








1 


3 


_ 


57 


54 


9 





2 


2 


— 


— 


2 


2 


80 


80 


6 


7 


9 








4 


11 


2 


421 


410 


11 


8 


6 


2 


— 


2 


7 


4 


470 


470 


7 


6 


6 


1 


— 


2 


8 


— 


308 


306 





1 


1 


1 


— 


3 


1 


. — 


96 


93 


8 


6 


7 


1 


2 


2 


15 


8 


430 


416 


8 


11 


10 


— 


— 


1 


8 


1 


270 


268 


11 


5 


5 


1 


— 


3 


9 


— 


315 


315 


5 


9 


4 


1 





— 


2 


— 


81 


85 


6 


4 


1 








1 


5 


4 


138 


134 


3 


5 


8 


— 


1 


1 


6 


— 


213 


210 


2 


1 


9 





— 


— 


4 


. — 


152 


150 


13 


8 


7 


2 


2 


3 


14 
1 


— 


477 
84 


477 
83 





4 


3 










7 


8 


7 


3 


3 


2 


17 


4 


595 


585 


12 


14 


15 


1 


2 


2 


9 


1 


455 


458 


4 


4 


5 


3 





9 


6 


4 


146 


141 


6 


8 


6 


1 





6 


13 


5 


441 


424 


9 


2 


2 


— 


1 


— 


3 


2 


115 


113 


1 


1 


1 





— 


— 


4 


3 


147 


141 


1 


1 


1 











9 


— 


88 


87 


3 


2 


3 


— 


— 


— 


9 


2 


121 


120 


9 


2 


2 


— 


— 


1 


4 


1 


102 


99 


3 


3 


2 





— 


— 


1 


— 


97 


99 


5 


5 


4 


2 


— 


5 


6 


11 


236 


222 


9 


4 


2 


1 


9 


9 


3 


. — 


110 


111 


3 


— 


— 


— 


2 


3 


3 


3 


104 


101 


3 

1 


3 


3 


— 


— 


1 


3 
1 


— 


130 
72 


129 

72 


12 


15 


16 


2 


9 


1 


5 


— 


198 


208 


1 


3 


6 


— 





— 


1 


2 


167 


165 


3 


1 


1 


1 





— 


2 


— 


112 


114 


1 


2 


3 


1 





1 


— 


— 


82 


83 


10- 


13 


12 


4 





4 


4 


9 


297 


301 


T 


6 


6 





1 


1 


1 





144 


150 


8 


5 


o 


1 


9 


3 


4 





270 


274 


12 


16 


19 





1 





8 


3 


541 


541 


5 


3 


4 





__ 


— 


1 


_ 


91 


95 


1 


— 








__ 





9 


4 


122 


115 


.-) 


5 


5 





2 





7 


9 


162 


160 


3 


9 


2 


3 





. 


1 


. — 


137 


142 


4 


■ 4 


9 


1 


— 


1 


5 


3 


211 


207 


12 


11 


7 


2 





1 


13 


9 


350 


343 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


115 


115 


7 


10 


10 


3 


- 


9 


10 


— 


458 


456 


9 


9 


2 


- 





1 


4 


1 


112 


108 


i 


4 


4 


2 


— 


3 


3 


— 


282 


282 


s 


7 


6 


1 


— 


9 


13 


3 


474 


465 


8 


7 


6 


1 


— 





2 


— 


78 


85 


4 


4 


8 


— 


1 


7 


11 


2 


104 


90 


1 


1 


1 


— 


— 


— 


4 


— 


105 


102 


1 5 


17 


11 


4 


— 


5 


3 


4 


551. 


558 


15 


5 


6 


7 


1 


9 


9 


2 


342 


352 


3 


3 


3 


1 


— 





1 


9 


125 


126 


1 


5 


5 


1 


— - 


-^ 


1 





123 


124 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, Page 286 to 294 
Lodges marked (a) hold their lustallation of Officers on or near the Festival 

The names of the W. M. and Secretary 



Lodge 



Where Held 



W. Master 



Secretary 



231 Strong 

24|aDoric 

25|aSt. Clair 

26|aStanley 

27|aNicke] 

28|aFidelity 

29|aPort Elgin. 

30 1 a Acacia 

31 1 Moravian 

l32laHanover 

33 1 Bonnechere- 

34| Algonquin 

35 1 aHave]ock___ 

361 Burns 

;37laTuscan 

38 1 aHarmony 

391 Alexandria— 
40| Arcadia.. 



41[aWestport. 

421 Dyment 

43 1 Powassan. 
44|aNitetis 



Sundridge. 
Pickering. 
Sombra- 



Toronto 

Sudbury 

Port Perry. 
3" Port Elgin- 
Toronto 

~ Cargill 

Hanover 

Eganville 

_ Emsdale 

Havelock 

Hepworth 

Sarnia 

Toronto 

Alexandria 

Minden 

Westport 

Thessalon 

Powassan 

Creemore 



slaLake of the "Woodb_ ^^"^''Ji 



46 1 aOranite 

47!aSturgeon Falls. 

48|aXenoi)hon 

49| Dundalk 

50 1 Hawkesbury 

oil SomerviUe 

52|aAvonmore 

53 Royal 

54 Corona— 

55 1 Doric 

,56 
57 
58 
59 
60 



Fort Frances — 
Sturgeon Falls. 

\ Wheatley 

' Dundalk 

Hawkesbury 

Kinmount 

Avonmore- 



James Sim 

; A. W. Wright — 
.J. A. Templeton . 

. A. A. Gordon 

. J. J. Gilpin 

. Howard McMillan 

. Ross Williams 

. V. H. Perry 

■ Lloyd Hutton 

. J. W. Love 

- W, J. Kilby 

- J. E. Hodgson — 

- L. H. Geron 

• Robert Johnston 

■ S. S. Hango 

■ J. R. Scott 

• Alex. McNeil _ 

• W. A. Rogers 

E. A. McGregor 



• E. M. Moore 

. H. S. Anderson — 

. W. C. Laing 

.J. L. Johnson 

. P. A. Coates 

• Wentworth Watson 

■ Thomas Campbell - 

• H. A. Sinclair 

. J. M. Reid 

.J. A. Magee 

. H. G. Green 



Fort William — 

Burks Falls 

Little Current — 

Monkton 

Merlin 




aRideaa 

alonic 

Temiskaming 

North Entrance Haliburton_ 

King Edward. Sunderland. 

Carleton Carp 

aCoronation. 
Tottenham- 

aPeel.. 



aAlgoma— 
aVictoria... 
aKing Edward VII. 

a Gore Bay 

aThe Beaches... 

aVictoria 

aDundum 



. Elmvale 

. Tottenham 

Caledon East. 



Sault Ste. Marie. 
, Victoria Harbour 

, Chippawa 

, Gore Bay 

. Toronto 

Toronto 



J. O. McLeod 

E. C. Langford 

Herbert Newell (Act'g) 

J. L. Powers 

- C. F. Schubring — 

U. T. Brodkorb 

Howard Walker ~ 

J. W. Seeley — 

P. E. Wall 

- Alan Brown 

- Bruce MacRae - 

G. F. Hole 

- J. B. Fell 

L. G. Lowrie 

Ken McNaught 

Harold Atkinson 

W. D. McNaughton — 
Raymond Childerhose _. 

Don Moorhead 

A. D. Carson 

F. C. Nelson 

Dougall Kenning 

Carl St. John _ 

R. W. Moore 

Ewart Thurlow 

C. J. Flear 

Wilbert Kee 

K. J. McCracken 



Corinthian. 

. aHarding 

78laMilverton 




Clarence Pearsall 

J. W. Critror 

Lauchi" McCannell 

Wilfred Morton 

L. S. Weir 

.T. F. Milne 

H. L. Greer _..._ 

Htieh Imrie — 

•Joseph Petrie 



E. H. Thome 

W. J. Nobes 

R. A. Carson 

F. J. Sanders . 

D. S. Cody 

D. N. McRae 

A. V. Loucks 

Fred Butiterill 

A. Crealock 

E. J. Liddle 

Charles Foster 

H. C. Smiley 

W. T. Russell 

G. R. Bartlett 

W. M. Chute 

D. E. Aitdhison — 

W. T. R. Hay 

Bruce Dettman 

M. F. MacRae 

J. A. Macdonald 

H. L. Brandt 

L. H. Peck 

Charles Harrison — 

G. C. Wellwood 

Eric Rice _ 

T'lssell Childerhose 
Wm. McConnell Jr. 

A. Warnuk 

J. O. Evans 

Elwin P-'--vton _ 

C. E. Shier 

N. E. Irvine 

F. J. Griff is 

Allan MciLean 

G. A. Evans 

D. Willock ....- 

Arthur Rollinson 

E. G. McKenzie .-^ 
.T. R. Brown 

F. F. Mills 

Norman Henry 

C. W. Manning 

W. A. Arcnie 

M. P. Austin _ 

Roy Stover 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



277 



AT DECEMBER 31st, 1960. 



If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodgre is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31st, 1961. 



Nisrht of Meeting 



423|3rd Monday _ 
424 1 3rd Thursday . 
4251 3rd Tuesday . 
4261 1st Tuesday _ 
427 1 1st Wednesday 
42812nd Tuestlay .... 
429 1 3rd Thursday . 
430|3id Monday _. 
431 1 3rd Monday _. 
4321 Last Monday - 
433|2nd Monday __ 
434I3!(1 Tuesday _. 

435Uth Monday 

436 1 2nd Tue.sday 



437 1 3rd Wednesday 

438Uth Monday 

439iTues. on or after F.M. 

440 [2nd Friday 

441 1 1st Friday 

442 1 2nd Thursday 

44312nd Friday 

444 3rd Monday 

445 1 2nd Wednesday — 

4461 1st Tuesday 

44712nd Thursday 

448|3rd Thursday 

449|3id Monday 

45n|3rd Thursday 

451 1 1st Thursday 

452ITues. on or before F.M._ 

453 list Wednesday 

45412nd Monday 

455! 2nd Tuesday 

45611st Thursday 

457|3i-d Tunsdny — 

458'Mon. on or before F.M.- 

45912nd Tuesday 

46011 St Thursday 

461 1st Thursday 

46213rd Thursday 

46313rd Wednesday 

46412nd Fiidav 

4651 4th Thursday 

466|3rd Thursday 

46711st Monday 

468|2nd Friday 

469ll.«rt Monday 

470 1 3rd Tuesday 

471 1 1st Wednesday 

4721 1st Wednesday 

47312nd Friday ___. 

47413rd Tuesday 

47513rd Saturday 

476 list Friday 

47712nd Monday . 
47812nd Monday 



"c 


1 


1 

OS 


V 

a 


2 
S 


s 

B 

To 
«> 




"T3 
S 

1 
3 

m 




0) W o 


1 


1 


1 


1 


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3 


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114 


111 


10 


U 


8 


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223 


233 


2 


1 


2 


1 


— 


1 


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— 


95 


93 


10 


9 


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348 


342 


is 


22 


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7 


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469 


479 


9 





9 


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127 


127 


9 


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319 

48 


313 

47 


1 


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— 


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109 


103 


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154 


152 


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— . 


— 


— 


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92 


96 


14 


10 


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11 


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436 


442 


2 


3 


5 


2 


— 


2 


8 


10 


221 


205 


3 


3 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


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106 


109 


3 


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135 

86 


131 

85 


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9 


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— 


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138 


4 




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201 


193 


6 




8 


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9 


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248 


256 


1 




9 


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— 


2 


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89 


88 


9 




6 


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— 


3 


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185 


183 


3 




5 


— 


1 


1 


1 


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138 


137 


1 


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1 


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2 


1 
1 


2 
2 


138 
67 


134 
65 


1 




1 


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1 


— 


3 


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104 


103 


9 




6 


1 








7 


1 


291 


293 


3 





1 


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2 


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98 


100 


6 




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9 


— . 


112 


118 


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1 





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2 





82 


81 


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1 


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1 


153 


152 


9 




9 


3 


9 


9 


4 


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133 


132 


9 




3 


3 








4 


— 


149 


150 


3 




3 


1 








1 


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132 


135 


6 




4 


1 








5 


1 


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147 


S 




4 


9 





4 


3 


. — . 


152 


155 


3 




3 





1 


— 


3 


2 


146 


147 







1 





1 


1 


1 


— 


124 


125 


1 




3 


9 





2 


2 


— 


101 


102 


4 




9 


a 








1 


1 


134 


142 


3 




4 


. 








9 


— 


80 


81 


3 




4 


2 


1 


3 


9 


— 


169 


170 


IS 




19 


1 





1 


4 


— 


408 


422 


,T 




9 


— 





1 


5 


3 


81 


77 


4 




3 


— 





— 


— 


— 


130 


134 


4 




2 


— 





1 


3 


— 


148 


148 







5 


1 





5 


5 


7 


232 


221 


12 




12 


3 


1 


5 


5 


3 


309 


312 


14 




12 


9 





7 


16 


18 


524 


500 


9 


9 


1 








— 


6 


— 


105 


101 


3 


9 


1 








1 


9 


— 


110 


110 


2 


2 


2 








1 


2 


— 


122 


121 



278 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, Page 286 to 294 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festival 

The names of the W. M. and SecreUry 



Lodge 



Where Held 



W. Master 



Secretary 



4791 Russell 

480|aWilliamsburg 

481|aCorinthian 

482|aBancroft 

483 1 aGranton 

4841 Golden Star 

485|aHaileybury 

486 1 aSil ver 

487 1 aPenewobikong 

488iaKing Edward 

4891 Osiris 

4901 Hiram 

49i:aCardinal 

492laKarnak 

494|aRiverdale 

495|aThe Electric 

496 i aUniversity 

497laSt. Andrew's 

498|aKing George V. 

499!aPort Arthur 

500 1 aRose_ 

SOllaConnaught 

5021 Coronation 

503 lain wood 

5041 Otter 

505|aLynden 

506! Porcupine 

507|aElk Lake 

508laOzias.. 



509laTwin City-. 

SlOlaParkdale 

511 1 aConnaught- 

5121 Malone 

513|aCorinthian. 
514iaSt.Alban's_ 
5151aReba.. 



516| Enterprise 

5171 Hazeldean 

5181 Sioux Lookout- 

519 1 aOnondaga 

520 1 aCoronati 

521 i aOntario 

522!aMount Sinai— 
523laRoyal Arthur — 

524 ! aMississauga 

525'aTemple 

526|aIonic __. 

527 1 Espanola 

528laGolden Beaver. 

529 ' aMy ra . 

5301 Cochrane 

oSHaHigh Park 

532!aCanada 

5331aShamrock 

5341 Englehart 

535 ' aPhoenix 



Russell K. J. Campbell 

Williamsburg Doug. Hough 

Toronto -w. F. Robinson 

. Bancroft \v. H. Davy 

. Granton Lome Marshall 

. Dryden p a. Fulford 

. Haileybury ^ l. Throop 

Cobalt f^ J. Mathews 

. Blind River ^ r_ Bell 

Harrow q l Graham 

. Smiths Falls ^^■^_ Gamoura'^ 

Markdale Norman Burritt 

Cardinal jj O. Weldon 

. Coldwater yi g Millard 

. Toronto j^^^ c. Holl 

. Hamilton . j q Hamilton 

. Toronto jj ^ Blanchard" ..- 

_ Arden— j j Savieny — - - 

_ Coboconlc^ ^ J McKague 

Port Arthur j -^ Rowthorn 

Windsor J ^_ Pp^ _ 

. Mimico ^ T rr^y,^ ._ 

_ SmithviUe p ^ Moorecroft 

. Inwood.^ Bruce Chapman 

_ Lombardy p c, Oovell 

_ Lynden — ._ Gordon Robertson - 

_ S. Porcupine ^ p Millar 

_ Elk Lake j ^ Waterhouse 

Brantford j <-.. Cok*>r 

_ Kitchener j jj fi "v^Toodside 

. Toronta..^.^- Bruce Craine 

_Fort William j, g (5^^ 

_ Sutton West Charles Chirnside 

_ Hamilton y -p geager 

_ Toronto Kerhert Patterson 

_ Rrantford -p y Smith 

_ Beachburg Manrice Bulmer 

_ Hazeldean f, ^ g^^ 

_ Sioux Lookout Wilmer .Tonsson 

_ Onondaga- ^^ f/f WesthrooTc 

_ Toronto 'Ronnld T?. Cheeseman . 

_ Windsor j_ ^ I^wis 

_ Toronto —. Meyr TTarris 

_ P<^terborougn ^ ^ Abraham 

_ Port Credit ^ ^ McNpv 

- I?r°"^° H. W. CTarlc 

_. Ottawa ^ tj> fv>le - 

_ Espanola ^- j TTip^lns 'I._ 

_ Timmins y^ ^ p^^le 

_ Komoka ^^^ -p^^^ 

_ Cochrane _ ^^ „_ .TohTi<=OTi .._ 

- Toronto j „ .T»n1cinB 

_ Toronto j, ^ •Dapwtt - 

_ Englehart-——- ,^; ^^^y^ _ 

_Fonthill j; Y^ liVanTcs 



W. M. Stanley 

Graham Garlough — 

A. W. Hood 

R. W. Blatherwick _ 

Robert Rainey 

Donald Gammon 

G. R. Herbert 

i'. J. Chapman __— 

T. W. Christilaw 

R. L. Mf-Lachlan — 

J. S. Allan 

SUnley York 

H. E. Keeler . 

G. R. Lane 

J. B. Stokes 

D. M. Ritchie — 

E. J. Walkom 

Harry Davis ■ 

E. B. White 

S. H. Green 

G. K. Pinney 

S. J. Smith . 

W. A. White 

j. R. Graham . 

P. J. Jones 

H. B. Dayman 

L. H. Nctherton 

H. A. Somerville 

J. M. Buchanan 

, H. J. Orpen . 

E. H. Wilson 

. E. T. Hughes 

. James Weir 

. A. G. "FTlford 

A. T>. Thompson 

T. E. Greenaway 

'. A. R. Singleton 

. G. A. Gracey 

. R. F. Lewis 

William Kemp 

■ D. C. Little 

T>. V. Wakeley 

. H. R. Fox 

J. H. Cooper — — 

"E. R. Thompson 

G. C. OuHon 

' W. J. WatUng 

'_ J. F. Boucher 

Gordon Miller 

J. B. Frqnk 

" C. E. Bailey 

" C. N. Bell 

J. M. Stephen , 

" G. H. Lepner — 

' E. A. Smith 

' J. M. B. McClellan _ 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 



279 



AT DECEMBER 31st, 1960. 



If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodgre is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John Um Baptist. 

are corrected up to Jtily 31st, 1961. 



VI <v 



Nig-ht of Meeting 



479:3rd Monday 

480;Thurs. oil or before F.M. 

48114th Thursday 

482|2nd Monday 
483|lst Monday 
484 2nd Tuesday 
4851 1st Thursday 
486il8t Monday - 
48712nd Monday 
488! 2nd Tuesday . 
489i2nd Thursday 
49Ui2nd Thuisday 
Tuesday . 
Thur.sdiiy 
Friday 



49113rd 
492|lsl 
494 1 2nd 
495;3rd 
496.2nd 
497 I 3rd 
498; l3t 
499i2nd 



Wednesday 
Wednesday 

Friday 

Monday 

Monday 



500|2nd Tuesday . 
50 11 2nd Thursday 
o02;2nd Monday — 

503! Ist Monday 

504' 2nd Tuesday — 
5u5|2nd Wednesday 
506; 1st Thursday _ 
507 1 2nd Tuesday — 
508 3rd Tuesday — 

509,2nd Friday 

510 1 2nd Wednesday 

511 1 3rd Monday 

512 list Wednesday . 
513 4th Thursday _ 
514:4th Monday — 

515 2nd Friday 

5161 1st Monday 

517 3rd Wednesday 

5181 1st Monday 

ol9|4th Tuesday — 
52012nd Tuesday — 

521 list Monday 

522 2nd Tuesday _ 

523 1st Monday 

524 2nd Thursday . 

525 4th Tuesday 



526 '2nd 
527:1st 
528' 2nd 

529 2nd 

530 2nd 



\V ednesday 

Wednesday . 

Wednesday 

Monday 

Friday 



531 3rd Thursday 

532 1st Friday — 

533 3rd Tuesday - 

534 2nd Monday 
!>35 3rd Monday 



i! 


•V 


"?, 


'?, 


01 


c 




•9 
S 


o oS 




•- 


m 


X 


c .. 


s 


M 


« 


?! 


~Qo> 


•°C w 




s 




o 


?, 




u 










a, 


6S 


« 


« 


Q 


3 

m 




S" 


6 


10 


9 
3 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


126 

77 


130 

77 


9 


9 


9 


6 





1 


17 


6 


336 


327 


16 


10 


11 


2 


2 


3 


6 


5 


233 


288 


1 





2 


1 


1 


— 


1 


2 


90 


90 


8 


6 


6 





— 


— 





— 


241 


244 


4 


o 







3 


3 


4 


1 


106 


107 


3 


3 











2 


9 


3 


180 


171 


q 


6 


7 


4 


1 


5 





— 


152 


136 


.•? 


2 


4 








3 


3 





183 


180 


5 


1 


1 


9 





1 


1 


2 


193 


196 




3 


4 


1 


__ 


1 


2 


— 


94 


94 


4 


4 


5 











6 


— 


92 


90 


5 


4 


9 


1 


. 


9 


1 


— 


120 


123 


fi 


8 


7 


3 





1 


8 


— 


241 


241 


19 


19 


17 


1 


— . 


3 


14 


3 


452 


452 


1 


9 


9 


4 


— . 


6 


12 





284 


266 


5 


3 


4 


— 


— 


— 


2 
3 


1 


135 
90 


137 
87 


10 


14 


14 





1 


— 


12 


9 


462 


452 


S 


8 


9 


2 


— 





a 


— 


210 


213 


1? 


14 


9 


1 





9 


4 


— 


372 


379 


3 


1 


3 


1 








1 





130 


133 


1 


9 


3 








1 


5 





125 


120 


1 


1 


1 


1 








5 





51 


48 


5 


5 


6 


2 





9 


3 


— 


152 


154 


7 


5 


4 


9 








5 


— 


134 


138 


6 


3 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


78 


79 


S 


6 


4 


1 


9 


3 


8 


11 


306 


295 


5 


4 


6 







4 


8 


2 


357 


348 


6 


3 


3 








a 


S 


4 


223 


212 


i 


5 


S 


9 


. 


2 


9 


4 


263 


261 


3 


5 


8 


1 





— 


8 


— 


179 


175 


S 


9 


10 





1 


1 


9 


5 


466 


460 


6 


6 


9 


9 





1 


7 


— 


303 


303 


10 


9 


9 


3 


9 


3 


5 


7 


425 


4»3 


1 


9 


3 











— 


2 


106 


105 


7 


7 


3 








1 


1 


— 


82 


87 


fi 


4 


4 


9 





1 


3 


— 


196 


198 


fi 


5 


4 


. . 








3 


— 


111 


114 


12 


9 


12 


2 





1 


7 


— 


329 


335 


14 


12 


11 


1 


9 


9 


13 


9 


456 


449 


17 


15 


17 


3 


9 





8 





629 


638 


9 


8 


6 


— 





9 


7 


— 


324 


324 


10 


10 


10 


4 





1 


1 


4 


324 


332 


•■) 


6 


6 





_ 


1 


5 


— 


261 


260 


11 


7 


4 


3 


1 


1 


10 


1 


483 


486 


3 


9 


2 


1 





9 


1 


5 


187 


183 


S 


10 


11 


5 





4 


9 


— 


250 


257 


3 


9 


9 


— 


1 





9 


— 


64 


66 


6 


.1 


4 


1 








1 


— 


167 


178 


fi 


6 


4 


— 





3 


9 


1 


359 


352 


1 


7 


s 


1 


1 


3 


15 


6 


450 


445 


10 


S 


6 


3 





2 


4 


4 


199 


202 


2 


9 


6 


— 





— 


4 


— 


151 


149 


9 


8 


8 


4 





2 


— 


— 


194 


205 



280 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, Page 286 to 294 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the FestivaJ 

The names of the W. M. and SecretaiT 



Lodge 



Where Held 



W. Master 



Secretary 



Kafi|aA1frnnqiiiTi 


. Copper Cliff 


KS7|aTTlst*>r 


. Toronto 


fWSlaEarl KitrhpTiPf . 


. Port. MrNiroll 


fiSQ|aWatprlrv. 


. Waterloo 


540!aAhitihi 


. Troqno)<^ Falls 


RillaTiispan 


Tnrnntn 


542!aMptropolitaTi 


Tnrnntn 


54ai!>Tmpprinl 


Toronto 


S44|aI.inrolii 


Ahing-Hon 


545|aJohn Ross Robertson 


Torn Tito 


K4fil«Tnlhot 


St. Thomaa 


fU7|aTli» Vi^«ry 


Toronto 


R^SIaGpriprnl Mpropr _. 


. Toronto 


R4C>|nTonip 


Hamilton 


K-;n|nRii/<hHnan 


Hamilton 






SMInQiiPPn rity 


Toronto 


KfialnOnWwfwl 


Toronto 


KK4lflRr.rHpr Hitimi 


WinHsor 


B5!i|aW!irf1rnpA 


. Hamilton 


RRfil Natinn 


Sponrorvplo 


SK7I Finph 


FinpVi 


5581 Sidney Albert Luke _ 

SSQIaPalpstinP 


Ottjiwa 


Toronto 


Mfll St AnHrPw'a 


Ottawa „, _..„ 




Otrtjiw?! 


5fi2laHamiItnn 


Hamilton 


5fi3laVir-tnrv 


fThatham 


5641 Ashlar 


. Ottawa 


RfiSlaKilwinniTipr 


Toronto 


SfifilaKin? Hiram 




SfiTlaSt.Aidan's 


Toronto 


RfiSlaTTnllptt 


T.ondpsboro . 


RfifllanonV 


T.akpsidp 


RTOlaDiiffpHn 


Toronto 


571 laAntiqnity 


Toronto 



572iaMizpah 

573'aAdoniram. 

574 ' aCraig 

575'aFidelity 

576'aMimosa 

577|aSt. Clair.. 

578!aQue€n's 

579'aHarmony_ 

580! a Acacia 

SSllaHarcourt. 



Toronto 

, Niaprara Falls- 

Ail.sa Craig 

, Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 



582 ! aSunnyside 

583 ! aTran?r>ortation_ 

584laKaministiquia 

5S5|aRoyal Edward- 

586 1 aRemembrance 

587 ! aPatricia 

588 ! aNational 

589|aGrey. 



_ Kinjrston- 
_ Windsor— 

_ London 

_ Toronto — 

— Toronto — 

— Toronto. .- 



Fort William- 

Kingston 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Capreol. 



B90[ Defenders 

SSraNoTth Gate- 
592;aFairbank 



— Toronto.- 

- Ottawa 

_ Toronto- 
_ Toronto- 



J. G. McLennan _. 

Harold McKee 

C. A. Ward 

Pryor 

Jack 

Crane 



J. 
C. 
B. 

J. A. Simmons 

G. Hartwick 

W. Davey 

E. Hartley 



James Pickston — 

F. H. Westbrook 

R. A. Sim 

W. G. Warden 

W. R. Magwood _..... 
C. G. Battey 

B. K. Bell ...— 

C. G. Pearce 

F. J. Barlow 

Ivan Dtherington . 

E. T. Kelso 

H. A. Shaver 

W. A. GrPKory 

Albert Allison 

W. T. Stewart 

G. N. Fpp 

D. O. Willson 

J. I. D'-VnrP 

.Tames McKie 

Robert Collett 

J. T. Rosp 

W. R. Wilson 

Weldon Tyndall 

Hugh Munro 

James Struthers — 

A. P. Evans 

A. D. Chambers 

W. H. Cartwright _ 

Fred Steward 

G. Mitchell 

n. E. Ryan 

. J. C. Honan 

H. C. Babcock 

A. J. Elliott - 

Ronald Sewell 

C. R. Burton 

V. R. Aveline 

J. P. Shunk 

James Shanahan 

W. J. Aleate 

W. A. Kine 

George Rankin _ 

D. G. Simmons 

J. H. Brereton 

J. J. Balchin 

T. T. Push 

James Paul 



A. A. Watson 

.._ C. M. Flatten 

__ A. M. Lumsden 

N. A. MacEachem _ 

_ C. G. Critchley 

-_ F. C. Craig 

_ W. R. Daniels 

_ E. E. Reid 

_ J. H. Clark 

J. H. Jackson 

„ W. A. McPherson _ 

._ J. H. Hartley 

._ W. H. Quinn 

_ A. W. Marshall 

Alex. Kerr 

_ R. A. Carter 

Walter Carey 

B. N. Ashbourne — 

John Lock 

__ M. E. Smith 

G. R. Drummond _ 

D. K. MacLean 

_ Z. M. Niblock 

Herman Ginsberg _ 

_.. J. N. Salter 

...„ C. W. Carson 

_ H. A. Snell 

_ J. A. M. Hay 

_ S. G. Davis 



__ G. E. Langley 

_ H. Hanwell 

__ H. J. Jeffery 

Wm. Leiper Jr. _ 

_ F. W. Seaton 

_ G. N. Walker 

R. M. Brown 

_ F. M. Shepherd _ 

_. F. E. Wilson 

W. L. Burgis . 

_._ G. W. Phillips 

_- W. G. McCulloch 
-_ G. R. Stephens _ 

J. A. MacLeod 

— Donald Vannan _ 

_ H. C. Steele 

__ A. H. Wait 

Cyril Bnckingham 

._ F. W. Charles . 

_... H. M. Barth 

~. E. L. Earl 

._. S. Ya+es 

Wm. Vose 



F. B. Greaves 

Tom Chard 

H. R. Haywood 

R. H. S«>ndor=;on 

F. P. Tonkin _ 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 



AT DECEiMBER 31st, 1960. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge is held. 

ef St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John th« Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31st, 1961. 



Night of Meeting 



536! 3rd 
537 1 1st 
538|2nd 
5391 1st 
540l3id 
54113rd 
542|2nd 
543|2nd 
544! 3rd 
545|3rd 
546i4th 
547 1 3rd 
548|2nd 
54911st 
550 1 1st 
551 1st 
552tlst 
55312nd 
554 list 
555|4th 
556 1 1st 
557 list 
558 1 2nd 
559 1 4th 
5601 Ist 
56113rd 
562 1 2nd 
56312nd 
564|lst 

565 3rd 

566 Ist 

567 (4th 
568 1 2nd 
569 list 
5701 Ist 
57 It 4th 
572|2nd 
57312nd 
574 i 1st 
5751 3rd 
576 1 1st 
577 list 
578|2nd 
579|lst 
580|lst 
581!2nd 
582! 4th 
58313rd 
584! 3rd 
585 4th 
586' Ist 
58712nd 
588 1 1st 
58911st 
590! 1st 
59112nd 
6!>2l3rd 



Tuesday — 

Monday 

Tuesday — 
Wednesday . 

Friday 

Friday 

Wednesday 

Monday 

Friday 

Tuesday — 
Thursday _ 
Tuesday _ 

Friday 

Wednesday 
Thursday — 
Thursday _ 
Wednesday . 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Monday 

Friday 



Thursday _ 
Wednesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday _ 

Tuesday 

Monday — 
Tuesday — 

Friday 

Friday 

Friday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday — 
Thursday _ 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Monday 

Wednesday . 
Wednesday 

Thursday 

Wednesday 
Thursday - 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Tue^*day 

Friday 

Friday 



W'rdnesday 

Tu'esday 

M-jnday 

V/ednesday 
Thursday 

Monday 



•s 

"a 


b 




■8 

s 


1 


1 


■ 


1 

flD 

3 

m 


09 > 

V vat 




10 


6 


9 


1 






6 




295 


300 


7 


9 


13 


2 





4 


14 


3 


490 


478 


3 


3 


2 

















51 


54 


n 


s 


9 


4 


— 


1 


8 


— 


306 


312 


1 


^ 





9 


— 


1 


— 


— 


172 


174 


5 


4 


5 








2 


7 


1 


269 


264 


fi 


8 


6 


3 


1 


9 


7 


— 


240 


241 


12 


10 


15 








3 


6 


8 


339 


334 


1 


1 


1 











9 


— 


70 


69 


S 


5 


9 


2 


1 


4 


16 


3 


378 


366 


12 


10 


11 


. 


— 


6 


6 


1 


419 


418 


9 


8 


5 


1 





1 


1 


8 


233 


233 


7 


7 


6 








9 


6 


— 


356 


355 


14 


12 


13 


9 


1 


6 


4 


1 


442 


448 


7 


8 


10 


3 


1 


2 


5 





389 


393 


21 


19 


19 


— 


— 


2 


13 


7 


613 


612 


14 


14 


19 


4 


2 


6 


12 


4 


532 


530 


12 


11 


9 


5 


1 


— 


4 


2 


339 


351 


3 


3 


6 





1 


2 


4 


6 


235 


227 


U) 


8 


9 


3 


1 


5 


7 


6 


411 


407 


1 


9 


9 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


96 


97 


3 


4 


4 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


141 


144 


9 


7 


6 


3 





3 


3 


— 


202 


208 


19 


16 


21 


3 





3 


14 


5 


569 


564 


14 


17 


18 





1 


1 


6 


7 


533 


534 


8 


10 


7 


5 


1 


9 


5 





302 


309 


6 


8 


7 


— 


— 


2 


6 


9 


326 


322 


3 


3 


3 


3 


1 


3 


5 


4 


341 


334 





6 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


1 


236 


240 


9 


9 


9 


3 


3 


5 


19 


10 


408 


394 


6 


6 


5 


— 


— 




8 


1 


277 


273 


6 


9 


6 


9 


1 




— 


4 


157 


161 


1 


1 














1 


— 


63 


63 


5 


5 


4 















101 


104 


6 


3 


3 




— 




1 


— 


281 


284 


9 


9 


9 









7 


1 


269 


271 


fi 


7 


8 










6 


— 


268 


268 


1 


1 


3 









4 


1 


260 


252 


o 





1 











1 


— 


101 


102 


8 


5 


6 




— 




4 


3 


266 


267 


9 


10 


9 





— 




6 


4 


299 


304 


4 


5 


5 







5 


8 


— 


255 


247 


4 


2 


3 








2 


6 


2 


218 


212 


in 


6 


7 


3 


1 





5 


5 


278 


282 


13 


19 


15 


9 


— 


— 


6 


1 


363 


371 


9 


9 


2 





— 


— 


1 


— 


95 


96 


11 


13 


12 


9 


— 


— 


4 


3 


322 


326 


7 


9 


11 


8 


— 


— 


11 


3 


359 


360 


5 


4 


4 


3 





— 


1 


— 


218 


225 


in 


6 


7 











1 





252 


261 


4 


6 


7 








3 


6 


9 


351 


344 


11 


9 


1(1 


— 


_ 


1 


8 


9 


305 


305 


.- 


5 


n 


3 


— 


— 


9 





139 


145 


6 


5 


7 


— 


— 


3 


4 


3 


220 


216 


«; 


fi 


r> 


— 


— 


6 





5 


244 


234 


o 


3 


4 


1 


9 





9 


5 


329 


319 


6 


9 


8 


— 





5 


2 


1 


267 


216 



282 



GRAN DLODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



RETURNS OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, Page 286 to 294 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the FestiTai 

The names of the W. M. and Secretary 



I'S 



Lodge 



Where Held 



W. Master 



Secretary 



593iaSt.Andrew'8- 

594 aHillcrest 

595! Rideau 

596 1 Martintown— 
597|aTemple... 



598 ' aDominion 

599iaMount Dennis, 

SOOlaMaple Leaf 

SOllaSt Paul 



602!aHuKh Murray. 

603!aCampbell 

604laPalace 

605 ' aMelita 

6061 aUnity— 

607laGoIden Fleece- 

608'aGothic 

609! Tavistock 

eiOlaAshlar 



6111 aHuron-Bruce- 
612 aBirch Cliff— 

613!aFort Erie 

614|aAdanac 

61 5 'aDominion.. 



616' aPerf ection 

617.aNorth Bay 

618iaThunder Bay 

619' aRunnymede 

620|aBay of Quinte 

621laFroTitenac _^_ 

622'aLome , 

623' Doric 

624 i aDereham 

625'aHatherly..J^ 

6261 aStamford- 

627'aPelee 

628 ' aGlenrose 

629 i aGrenville 

630'aPrince of Wales- 

6311 Manilou _ 

632'aLonp Branch 

633 ■ aHastin jrs 

634 aDelta 

633iaWellinp'ton 

636 ' aHornepayne 

637 ' aCi I'Hionia 

638 ' aBedf ord 



Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Ottawa 



Martintown 

Lon don 

Windsor 

Weston 

Toronto 

Sarnia 

Hamilton 

Campbellville— 

Win dsor 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Lindsay 

Tavistock 

Byron 

Toronto 

To r o nto 

Fort Erie 

Merritton 

Ridgeway- 



N. J. Campbell . 
George Cruden _ 
W. G. Dalzell _ 

E. W. Sansom _ 

K. R. Stott 

R. B. Clark _ 

G. A. Conti 

Stanley Brown . 
Burton Newman 
R. E. Passmore . 

Ralph Gorter 

V. C. Wright _ 

John Button 

G. T. Hackett _ 

J. K. Reid — 

R. P. Reeds 

Lloyd Jones _^ 

R. R. Preston _ 

F. D. Douglas __ 
R. A. Wilson 



Robert Strachan 
G. A. SweatmaJa 
W. A. Hamm __ 
D. S. Mcintosh 
W. G. Stewart _ 

D. C. Taylor 

Fred Thain 

R. A. Duff 

E. A. Soden 



J. Eaglesham 

G. R. Carbert 

Harry Taylor _^.^_ 

A. C. Gerrard 

H. Browning 

W. D. Grierson 

W. R. Allely 

S. A. Goring _____ 

S.- 'H. Bryant 

C. S. Farmer _: 

H. y. French 

J. 0.' Sinclair 



— St. Catharines- 
__ North Bay 

— Port Arthur 

— Toronto 

— • Toronto 



H. W. Stouffer 

W. R. Binning W. G. Crandon 

H. T. ^r^r..r-,.r Geo. A. Lewis _ 

F. J. Brown W. C: filli 



Sharbot Lake 
Chapleaii 



C. W. McCuliey .. 

— J. H. McMullin _ 

— R. E. Page 

— H. S. Wardman _. 



C. Dennis _ 



A. A. Small _..- 

Kirkland Lake— Ronald Loach 

Mount Elgin x. T. Hanson _ .... 

Sault Ste. Mane — n. N. McCormack 
Stamford Centre — Alex Duncan 



R. A. Mea<lowcroft 

W. J. Armstrong 

Harold Babbit 

G. A. Meldrum W. Meldrum 

G. N. McKnight 



— Scudder 

— Elmira- 

— Toronto 

— Toronto 

— Emo 

— Mimico 



639'aBeach 

640!aAnthonv Sayer_ 
641laGarden. 



Ha-stings 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Hornepayne- 

Toronto 

Toronto 



642 1 aSt. Andrew's 

643 ' aCathedral 

644'aSimcoo 

S45'aLake Shore 

6461 Rowland 



Hamilton Beach. 

Mi mi CO 

Windsor 



James Winer 

William Shipley 

P. R. Weston 

D. J. H. Thompson 

C. V. Strachan 

Wm. Gibbons . 

T. F. Parker 

■RoHort Harrison 

R. N. Butcher 

P. G. Leonard 

C. W. Nes« 

L. H. Taylor 



— Frank Washington 

— W. J., M. Hart 

— G. H. Lee 

— R. F. Cooper 

— W. F. Wiper 

— D. E. Wade 

— J. A. Eyre 

— H. J. Campbell 

— E. L. Bote! 

~ Wpj. Preacott 

— W. A. Thomas 

— Alex. Lawrence 

— N. J. Nixon 

R. H, Bauer 



George McBain 
Thomas Adams 



<47!nTodmorHpn 

648laSpru(e Falls 

649laTemple 



Perce Andrews B. E. Hulford 

Don McCloy A. W. Bryan 

J. A. Jsmes _ John Brlggs 

H. W. T>nwe C. W, Plett 

J. P. Hinki.-'S M. R. MarKay _. 

R. T. Nelson Murdoch Mclver 

' T. J. Lnras K. E. Newton 

■ H. J. MoT+on K. O. Lees 

.... ■ .T. a. TTnllnm R. Moss 

- Kapuskasmg ^^ ^ TTennMv R. Holmes 

T. J. Grosart O. D. Friend .-_ 



— Windsor 

- Toronto 

— Toronto 

— Mimico 

— Mount Albert 
Tndmorden _.. 



Oshawa— 



1 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



288 



AT DECEMBER 31st, 1960. 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodge is held- 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John th« Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31st, 1961. 



59314th 


594 


2nd 


595 


2nd 


596 


2nd 


597 


2nd 


598 


1st 


599 


1st 


600 


3 id 


601 


2nd 


602 


3rd 


603 


1st 


604 


2nd 


605 


2nd 


606 


2nd 


607 


3rd 


608 


3rd 


609 


2nd 


610 


4th 


611 


2nd 


«12 


Ist 


613 


3rd 


614 


1st 


615 


1st 


616 


2nd 


617 


2nd 


618 


1st 


619 


2nd 


620 


1st 


621 


2nd 


622 


1st 


623 


2nd 


624 


1st 


625 


Srd 


626 


1st 


627 


l8t 


628 


3rd 


629 


2nH 


630 


4th 


631 


3rd 


632 


3rd 


633 


4th 


634 


2nd 


635 


1st 


636 


2nd 


637 


3rd 


638 


3 id 


639 


2nd 


640 


3rd 


641 


1st 


642 


2nd 


643 


Ist 


644 


2nd 


645 


Ist 


646 


1st 


<iil 


1st 


64S 


2nd 


649 


3rd 



Nigrht of Meeting 



Wednesday 
Monday 

Thursday . 
Thursday 



Wednesday . 

Wednesday . 
Wednesday . 
Wednesday . 
Wednesday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Thursday 

Tuesday — 

Monday 

Thursday 

Monday 

Tuesday — : 

Monday 

Thursday _ 

Friday 

Tuesday 

Thursday 

Thursday 

Monday 

Friday 

Thursday 

Wednesday 

Tuesday 

Friday 

Thursday — 
Thursday — 

Tuesday 

Friday 

Wednesday . 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Friday 

Friday 

Thursday 

Tuesday _. 

Wednesday 
Tuesday — 
Friday 



Wednesday -.. 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Friday 

Friday 

Friday 

Thursday 

Thursday 

Monday 
Tuesday 
Monday . 

Monday ■ 
Tuesday 



"c 


T3 

o 

c 
Ok 


1 
"5 
a 


V 

a 
'o 

"-s 


o 


c 


"a 

a 


R 

s 

m 

3 

w 


Si <ue) 
2" 


J3QtO 


33 


33 


27 


10 


_ 


2 


9 


2 


685 


715 


10 


9 


11 


1 


— 


3 


8 





319 


319 


11 


10 


11 


1 


— 


1 


6 


— 


306 


311 


2 


2 


3 


— 


— 


— 


1 





71 


72 


6 


7 


10 


— 


1 


3 


6 


1 


278 


276 


8 


12 


10 


— 


3 


6 


4 





300 


301 


11 


8 


10 


2 


— 


7 


11 


3 


438 


430 


4 


5 


6 


— 


— 


— 


4 


1 


307 


306 


14 


8 


8 


9 


— 




3 





242 


254 


21 


20 


20 





2 




10 


3 


469 


475 


1 


2 


4 


1 


— 


— 


1 


— 


127 


128 


22 


18 


18 





1 




9 


— 


356 


321 


8 


7 








1 




4 





231 


235 


7 


7 


7 


3 


3 




3 


4 


241 


246 


6 


5 


6 


2 


2 


2 


5 


4 


231 


229 


4 


4 


4 


3 


— . 


1 


4 





164 


166 


4 


2 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


127 


131 


10 


7 


9 


3 


— 


2 


4 


— 


164 


171 


4 


4 


4 


— 


1 


— 


6 


1 


256 


254 


16 


18 


18 


4 


— 


5 


6 


— 


362 


371 


3 


4 


6 


— 


— 


— 


2 


4 


203 


200 


4 


1 


1 


2 


— 


2 


5 


1 


219 


217 


3 


1 


2 


— 


— 





3 


6 


117 


111 


5 


5 


5 


— 


1 


3 


3 


7 


234 


227 


7 


11 


11 


2 


1 


2 


9 


— 


280 


286 


4 


4 


4 


4 


— 


1 - 


1 


2 


231 


235 


7 


3 


5 


— 


1 


4 


2 


1 


200 


201 


10 


10 


9 


2 


•1 


1 


6 


1 


213 


219 


2 


4 


•> 


1 


— 


— 


2 


— 


129 


130 


7 


in 


10 


— 


1 


2 


6 


2 


145 


143 


5 


2 


2 


1 


2 


3 


5 


4 


295 


291 


2 


1 


4 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


104 


105 


4 


6 


6 


— 


— 


1 


4 


1 


130 


128 


7 


12 


7 


1 


1 


1 


4 


4 


300 


800 


2 


1 


2 


— 


— 


1 


S 





56 


54 


5 


2 


4 


— 


— 


— 


. — . 





91 


96 


9 


10 


• 6 


1 





3 


3 


2 


307 


809 


2 


4 


3 


— 


1 


3 


6 


— 


180 


174 


3 


3 


3 


1 


— 


— 


1 


— 


111 


114 


7 


8 


8 


1 


1 


9 


3 


2 


181 


188 


1 


1 


1 


— 


1 


1 


1 





85 


85 


6 


8 


6 


1 


1 


2 


6 


1 


833 


332 


7 


10 


8 


2 


— 





9 


— 


281 


276 


2 


3 


5 


— - 


— 


9 


3 


— 


136 


133 


21 


26 


20 


9 


1 


4 


U 


1 


538 


553 


4 


5 


3 


— 


— 





3 


2 


227 


221 


9 


7 


i 


— 


— 


8 


o 


5 


269 


268 


3 


3 


3 


3 


— 


1 


i 





120 


124 


11 


r 


8 


— ■ 


1 


3 


4 


6 


219 


219 


9 


y 


U . 


— 


1 


1 


4 


3 


212 


214 


5 


4 


4 


1 


— 


4 


2 


— 


207 


207 


7 


I 


7 


— 


— 


4 


1 


1 


260 


261 


Q 


12 


. 9 


1 


— 


7 


2 


1 


239 


289 


4 


3 


4 


— 


— 


— 


9 


— . 


78 


80 


7 


.■> 


7 


1 


1 


1 


4 


6 


272 


270 


8 


4 


4 


— 


— 


3 


2 


— 


220 


228 


11 


7 


9 


— 


— 


2 


2 


— 


320 


827 



284 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RETURN'S OF LODGES AS 

For Secretary's Address look first at list of Special Addresses, Page 286 to 294 
Lodges marked (a) hold their Installation of Officers on or near the Festival 

The names of the W. M. and SecretAry 



Lodge 



aFidelity 

aDentonia... 
aMemotial- 



d o 
Z,^ 

650 
651 
652 

653 aScarboro 

654 a Ancient Landmarks- 

655 aKingsway 

656 Kenoframisis 

657 1 Corinthian 

658iaSudbury 

659 aEquity 

660'aChukuni 

661iaSt. Andrew's 

662 Terrace Bay 

663 aBrant-— 

664iaSunnyl 
665|aTemple_ 
666 aTemi-le.. 



Where Held 



Toledo — 

Toronto- 
Toronto- 
A gin court- 



Hamilton 

Lambton Mills 
Geraldton- 



Kirkland Lake- 
Sudbury 

Orillia 

Red Lake- 



St. Catharines 

Terrace Bay 

BurlinjTton 

Lambton Mills 

Ottawa- 



W. Master 

. Charles Davidson 

. J. J. Gilmour 

. F. G. Cooke 

N. L. Churcher 

S. B. Lancaster 

G. E. Roelofson 

• H. G. Sutherland 

• T. J. Clark 

. S. S. Speigel 

. D. J. Messenger 

J. L. lutji^swaii 

D. K. Diggins 



Secretary 



Ernest Barber 

Wm. Tennent 

W. J. Finch 

J. H. Neville 

J. D. Taylor 

H. C. Startup 

D. H. Bovyron 

W. D. Stroud 

G€0. H. Barnett — 
F. M. Lamb 




Port Credit- 



667 aComposite. 

668 Atikokan- 
i69!aCorinthian 
670|aWest Hill 
671|aWestnx)unt 
67 2 i Superior 
6T3 aKempenfeldt 

674 aSoutli Gate.... 

675 aWilliam James Dunlop. Peterborough- 
676,aKroy ThornhilL 

677;aCoronation Weston- 

678 aMercer Wilson 
679|aCentennial 
6801 a Woodland 
681'aCIaud3 M. Ken 
682;a.\stra 

683'aWexford 

6841aCentennial 

685|aJoseph A. Hearn 
686! Atomic 

687laMeridian 

688!aWyndham 

689lariower City 
690|aTempl 

691iaFriendship Copper Cliff— 

692iaThomaF Hamilton 

Simpson Stoney Creek- 

693!aEa.=:t Gate Asrincourt — 

694|aBaldoon Wallaceburg— 

695laPark\vood -_-_ Oshawa 

696]aHarry L. Martyn 

697iaGrantham 

698!aElliot Lake 

699'aBethel 

TOOiaCorinthian 

TOla'Ashlar .__. - 



A. W. R. SinkinB _ 
R. W. McPhail 

D. W. Lambie — 

G. W. Wilson 

A. J. Clare 

H. W. Priest 

E. I. Swanbergson 
R. H. Hamilton — 

L. J. Ellis 

S. J. Griffin 

H. W. Hill 

D. E. Magee 

J. S. Hazard 

J. M. Turner 

R. F. Eatock 

A. L. Crocker 

E. E. Nadalin . 

Stamford Centre R. D. Morningstar . 



L. O. Browne 

E. R. Lewis 

R. H. Scowen 

W. J. B. Kay 

A. Braidwood 

Maxwell Hopper 

M. R. Davidson 

W. T. Bacon 

Maurice Waranuk 

F. E. Eaton 

■ A. J. Grigsby . 

A. G. Adams . 

J. C. Scott 




D. H. Harten 
C. G. Franklin 
R. C. Frise 



James Poppleton — 
I. E. Sisler 

D. E. Bell 

H. G. Jackson 

Fred Thain 

C. H. Dearden 

John Withey _._ 

B. G. Turner 

W. S. McKay . 

E. J. Carruthers 

L. S. Beak 

C. J. Hill 

J. R. Flynn 



J. R. Alexander 

C. F. M. Ross 

Sherman Piper 

J. M. Putnam E. C. Trapp 

N. E. Byrne A. D. Hahnau 

R. W. Maltby J. F. Heap 

J. W. Elley .T. A. McCleave . 

T. C. Boon Hugh Taylor 

N. E. Silverson C. E. Wilton . 



Toronto 

Port Dalhousie 
Elliot Lake 

■ Sudbury 

■ Kintore 

Tillsonburg 



H. J. Weir 

R. A. Dunlop 

E. W. Allen 

C. M. Elliott 

L. G. Towner 

A. J. Harley 

C. Maynard — 



Leighton McDermid 

G. T. Gambling 

A. E. Brunt 

W. F. Graper 

R. J. Woods 

F. G. White 

R. C. Russell 

A. R. McPhee 



702'aThe Lodge of Fellow- 
ship 

703laThe Lodge of the 

Pillars __.. Weston 

704'aAurum _____ — Timmins 



L. S. J. Atkinson 

Bruce Henderson Wm. Mac Henderson 

J. P. Williams 



Richmond Hill P. G. Savage 



I-eo. Morse 

A. K. Graham 



S. E. L. Woodman 

D. W. Higgins 

Milton Naiberg 

J. M. Hamilton 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 

AT DECEMBER 31st, 1960, 

If not there, then Secretary's Address is where lodgre is held. 

of St. John the Evangelist, all others on or near that of St. John the Baptist. 

are corrected up to July 31st, 1961. 



^ 



Night of Meeting 



6501 Ist Monday . 
€51 1 1st Thursday 
65212nd Monday . 
653i4th Monday 
65414th Tuesday — 

655|3i'd Monday 

656! 1st Wednesday 
€57 1 3rd Tuesday — 

€5813rd Monday 

€59 1 2nd Tuesday — 
660 1 2nd Wednesday 

661|4th Friday 

662!2iid Thursday 
663 3rd Monday _ 

664 2nd Friday _ 

)»66|3rd Friday 

6661 1st Monday 

667l3rd Wednesday . 
668|lst Wedne>^day 
66912nd Thursday _ 
67011st Wednesday .. 

671 4th Tuesday 

672 2nd Wednesday 

673ilst Tuesday 

674! Ist Tuesday 

675 3rd Wednesday 

6761 1st Friday 

677 1 2nd Monday 

6781 3rd Wednesday 
679 1 3rd Tuesday — 
68012nd Thursday _ 

681 '2nd Wednesday 
682 2nd Thursday .... 

683 '1st Friday 

684 1st Tuesday 

685! 1st Friday - 

686 '2nd Tuesday _. 

687! 2nd Wednesday 
68813rd Wednesday 
689! 2nd Thursday _... 
69013rd Wednesday 
69112nd Wednesday 

692 '3rd Thursday _... 
693 '2nd Wednesday 



694' 1st Wednesday 

695' 2nd Thursday 

696' 1st weekday after 28th 

697 ' Last Monday 

698 '2nd Wednesday 

699' 2nd Fridiy 

700 '2nd Tuesday 

70111st Thursday 

70212nd Tuesday 

70312nd Wednesday 

7 04 1 1 ftt Wednesday 



2 


5 


4 


— 


10 


11 


15 


— 


12 


8 


9 





19 


11 


13 


6 


9 


8 


o 


9 


9 


4 


4 


1 


21 


15 


14 


1 


8 


7 


10 


1 


16 


15 


12 


3 


9 


10 


10 


3 





6 


7 


— 


8 


6 


o 


— 


7 


4 


6 


1 


6 


7 


9 


3 


6 


6 


1 


1 


4 


5 


5 


1 





4 


4 


9 


18 


18 


14 


1 


7 


6 


5 





4 


4 


8 


. 


16 


19 


13 


3 


9 








1 





5 


5 


1 


7 


5 


9 


3 


7 


6 


7 


4 


9 


S 


8 


9 


14 


11 


12 


2 


8 


8 


8 


1 


in 


10 


14 


3 


14 


11 


8 


3 


8 


9 


6 


1 


12 


12 


11 


3 


12 


11 


7 


5 


n 


10 


10 





s 


5 


5 


4 


8 


7 


7 


9 


( 


10 


8 


1 


n 


4 


4 





6 


8 


6 


3 


11 


13 


11 


10 


4 


7 


7 


1 


7 


7 


7 


1 





& 


a 

B 


1" 




_ 


2 





64 


64 


4 


6 


4 


321 


317 


7 


6 





276 


275 


3 


1 


1 


261 


281 


1 


3 


2 


199 


205 


2 


5 


— 


192 


188 


— 


9 


3 


201 


218 


3 





1 


135 


140 


4 


2 


2 


232 


243 


— 


— 


— 


170 


182 


— 


1 


— 


132 


136 


6 


1 


7 


161 


155 


1 


1 


— 


132 


138 


3 


. — 


__ 


184 


190 


8 


3 


2 


165 


160 


9 


— 


1 


136 


138 


5 


— 


— 


144 


146 


9 


— 


4 


135 


148 


9 


— 


— 


105 


100 


i 


1 


— 


119 


121 


— 


— 


2 


172 


189 


1 


1 


— 


132 


140 


4 


— 


— 


106 


108 


1 


1 


2 


124 


130 


— 


— 


2 


107 


116 


9 


9 


— 


135 


142 


4 


1 


— 


144 


155 


4 





— 


148 


153 


3 





— 


100 


110 


1 


1 


2 


69 


82 


_ 





— 


69 


78 


1 


1 


1 


86 


98 


2 


1 


— 


112 


126 


4 


1 


1 


119 


126 


— 


2 


— 


164 


174 


3 


1 


1 


124 


129 


1 


2 


— 


101 


106 


— 


1 


2 


57 


64 


— 


— 


1 


66 


74 


3 


1 


_ 


75 


92 


1 


— 


— 


57 


61 


- 


— 


— 


44 


52 



7 7 8 5— 2— — 72 82 
7795— 21— 73 82 

— 1 2 — — — — — 42 42 
88 2 9— 1— — 7288 
5 6 3 3— — 1 — 66 73 

12 12 12 4 — 4 — — 66 78 

28 27 28 2 1 4 — — 75 102 

14 14 14 5 — — — — 55 74 

3 3 15 — — — — — 33 36 

9 9 8 4— — — — 52 65 

8 4 1 31 — — — — _ 38 

2 1 1 34 — — — — _ 36 

— — — 45— — — — _ 45 
3.842 3.718 3.742 904 207 1.029 2,783 981 136.266 136,413 



286 GRAVID IXJDGE OF CANADA Al«aJAL COMMUNICATION 

P. O. ADDRESSES OF SECRETARIES 

Special addresses of Secretaries of Lodgea in the Cities and in other places 
where the Secretary's address is not the same as that of the Lodae. 



No. Lodge 

5 Sussex— 

6_The Barton- 

lQ__Norfolk 

11 Moira.. 

14 — True Britons'^ 
1.5 —St. George s — 
16 — St. Andrew's- 



17_St. John's- 
20-.-St. John's- 
21a^.St. Johns- 



Location 

-Brock ville 

.Hamilton 

_Simcoe 

.belleville 

-Perth 



Secretary and P.O. Address 

_H. F. Blanchard, 24 Jessie St. 
-J. E. Piercy, 197 Prospect St. S. 
_J. D. Rouse, R. R. No. 2 
. H. C. McElrath. 49 Dunbar St. 
JErnest Cross, 72 Beckwith St. 



22 King Solomon's. 

23 Richmond-. 



24_-St. Francis- 
25 Ionic 



- rfi. Catharines W. E. Thompson, 31 Dacotah St. 

-Toronto T. H. W. Salmon, 21 Barberry 

PI. Willowdale. 

. Cobourg H. R. Quantrill, 177 Albert St. 

. London... W. H. Kipp, 124 Base Line Ed. E. 

-Vankleek Hill R. L. Renwick, R. R. No. 1 

. Toronto H. E. Sutton, 52 Sotithwood Dr. 

(13). 

^Richmond Hill H. W. R. Sayers, 63 Starligbt Cr. 

-Smiths Falls G. P. Marshall, 25 McEwen Ave. 



-Toronto... 



27 Strict Ob.servance Hamilton^ 

30 -„CompoBiteu_____Whitby 

32 Amity Dunnville- 



33 JMaitland 

35 St. John's- 

S8_-Trent 



-Goderich 

-Cayuga 

.Trenton 

, Hamilton 

, Kingsville — 



40 St. John's _ 

41— St. George'8. 

42 — St. George's London 

43 King Solomon's Woodstock — 

44. -St. Thomas St. Thomas. 

45-_.Brant 

46 Well in (Tton 

47._.Great Westerr 



62 Dalhousie- 

54 Vaughan— 

56 Victoria — 



.Ottawa. 



. Maple— 
.Sarnia- 




—IngersolL 
-Stirling — 
..Gait 



_ St. Marys..- 
S. Augusta- 



Toionto- 



68 St. John's- 

69 Stirling 

72. .-Alma 

73 St. James. 

74._St. James. 

75 St. John'B- 

76._...Oxford Woodstock 

77— Paithful Brethren.! indspy 

78 King Hiram Tillsonburg 

79— Simcoe Bradford 

81— St. John's . -Mt. Hrydtres.. 

86._Wilson Toronto 



87 Markham Union — Markhgm 

88.._St. George's .Owen Sound.. 

90 Manito -GoUinKwood— 

92 C^taraqui Kingston ._ 

98— -True Blue Bolton 

99 Tuscan .Newmarket — 



_J. A. Deacon, 176 Cortleigh Blvd., 

(12). 
-D. G. Welby, 43 Nancy St. 
-W. G. AugosttB, 230 Euclid St. 
-R. W. Stretton, 121 Lock St. 
-C. J. Worsen, 182 Victoria St. 
-R. M. Murphy. R.R. No. 1 
-H. F. Burke, 105 Byron St. 
. C. E. Heal, 136 Brantdale St. 
.J. C. Heath, 32 Mill St. E., Box 

389 
. D. A. McDonald, 478 Central Ave. 
-A. W. Massie, 717 Rathbourne Ave.. 
-N. E. Rolling. 215 Sunset Dr. 

H. H. Clark, 59 Kin.e George Rd. 
. H. D. Paulucci. 47 Wilson Ave. 
A. Ross Bourne, 1014 Marentette 

Ave.. Apt. 4. 
J. Walter Tuck, 39 Roseberry Ave. 

(1). 
W. O. HallRwell. Concord 
G. D. Watson, 165% South Mitton 

St. 
R. F. Tubman, 55 Glen Ave., (1). 
D. R. Shaw, 69 Herkimer St. 
F. C. Smith, 105 Langarth St. B. 
F. R. Workman. 11 Brendan Rd. 
(17) 

.T. W. D°an, 308 Thames St. S. 

Volney Richardson, R.R. No. 2 

_-. A. O. Malcolm. 38 S^muel.son St. 

H. R. .Alberts. 97 W.iter St. 

F. L. Bissell, Alp-onquin 

J. D. Spears, 993 Carlaw Ave. (6> 

C. E. Nettleton. 512 Princess St. 

C. H. Heels, 76 Glenelg St. W. 

A. A. (3oyle, 258 Tillson Ave. 

W. K. Orr, Bond Head. 

L. M. Brown, R.R. No. 2 

C. J. E. Lawer, 158 Colin Ave. 

(7) 

W. B. H. Rose. S28 Peter St. 

^E. C. Rosskopf, 997-2nd Ave. E. 

F. H. Bellamy, 198 Pine St. 

..- T. N. Clarke. 173 Macdonnell St. 

W. H. McBride, 146 Haines Dr. 

r. A. Mitchell, 227 Eagle St. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



287 



No. 



IxwJ«e 



Location 



Secretary and P.O. Address 



100— Valley Dundas Walter Law, €0 Hatt St. 

lUl Corinthian Peterborough R. F. Downey, 298 Boswell Ave. 

Iii3 Maple Leaf St Catharines James Thomson, 68 Merritt St. 

105._St. Mark's Niagara falls,- H. Higgins, 2078 Valley Way 

lo7..-.St. Paul's Lambeth— R. A. McDougall, K.U. No. J. 

Glanworth 

109 — Albion : — Harrowsmith G. A. Goslin, Hartington, 

114 — Hope Port Hope R. A. Gustar. 56 Pine St. 

116._Cassia Thedford Herman Briers, R.R. No. 4 

lly-....Mai>le Leaf .....Bath Herbert Weese. R.R. No. 2. 

120 Warren Fingal D. Orchard, Shedden 

J21-_Doric __ Brantford E. E. Mclntyre. R. R. No. 1. 

122 Renfrew Renfrew L. B. Smith, 5 Flaunt St. S. 

123 Belleville Belleville H. G. Bates, 53 Everett St. 

125_.Cornwall Cornwall G. E. McCutcheon, 515 Guy St. 

128-. Pembroke Pembroke..... M. H. Doering, 558 Mary St. 

129 The Rising Sun .Aurora J. H. Knowles, 76 Catherine Ave. 

133— Lebanon Forest Exeter Chester Mawhinney, 310 Carling 

St. 

139 — Lebanon Oshawa Chas. Templar, 67 "Whiting Ave 

144 Tecumseh Stratford S. W. Rust, 203 Douglas St. 

145_ .J. B. Hall Millbrcok : J. S. McGill, R. R. No, 1 

146- Prince of Wales....-Newburgh.^ ;_:.-.: Delbert Sexsmith, Box 1075, Nap- 

anee. 

Ottawa E. D. Berry, 56 Glen Ave. (1) 

151 — Grand River Kitchener H. W. Rcthaermel, 65 Ellis Cresc, 

S. Waterloo . 

155 Peterborough Peterborough _A. J, Cummings, 1025 Braund f\. 

l.=»«..„yprk_ : . Toronto.-^.^ W. S. Collins, 1078 Dupont St. <4) 

159 Goodwood Richmond . — J. C. Poster. 284 Ferndale Aye., 

Ottawa 3 

161_.Percy._ Warkworth Fldon Fwing. Dartford 

:64_aiar-in-tne-EaBt -Wellington B. C. Tice, R.R. No. I 

. ;55 jbutiir.s^.on _^ — Burlington R. J. M. Allen. 51" Martha St. 

166 Wentworth — _.3toney Creek W. A. McNeil. 26 King St. W. 

168 -Merritt Welland J. B. Barclay, 115 Norway Ave. 

169— Macnab : Port Colborne C. M. McNeil. R." R! Nb 2 

171— P'rince of Wales lona Station-.-..-. W. G. Agar, R. R No. 4 

174— Walsingham- _ Pbrt Rowan H. C. Unger, R.R. No. 2, St. 

Williams ' • 

177„..The Builders Ottawa D. G. Hewer, 1302 Amesbrooke 

Dr.. (3). 

178 Plattsville— Plattsville....- — J. L. Gofton, Bright. 

Isn^Speed , Guelph — ....A. J. Hawker, 47 Edgehi'1 Dr. 

185— Enniskillen York — _A. W. "McGonachie, R.R. No. 3. 

Haeersville. 

192 Orillia Orillia J. W. Davies. 96 Borland East. 

193 Scotland Scotland C. R. McEwan. Oakland 

194— Petrolia_ Petrolia J. A. McCabe, 507 Grove St. ' 

195 The Tuscan London R. T. Dunlop. 550 St. Gprtrge St. 

209a St. John's l^indon F. B. Robinson. 21 Franklin Ave. 

215_...Lake , . .\meliashurg Gerald Redner. R.R. No. 1 

216 JIarris . OrangevTlle ^N. C. Harkness, 232 Elizabeth St. 

21 8. .-.Stevenson Toronto J. H. Jnbnston, 445 Castlefield 

Ave. (12) 

219— Credit Georgetown J. F. Evans, 2 Guelph St. 

221 Mountain... Thorold C. R. Buss. 26 Welland St. S 

223 Norwood Norwood Charles MacMillan, R.R. No. 1, 

Warsaw 

228. ..Prince Arthur Odessa Percy Wright, Westbrook. 

229 Ionic Brampton C. .■\. Firman. 106 Fiiroboth St. S 

230 Kerr... Barrie Archibald Coartes. 78 Nelson St. 

231 _Lodge of Fidelity—Ottawa J. .\. Pell, 202 Billings Ave.,(l) 

233-...Doric Parkhill C. J. Fox. R.R. No. 7 

234.....Beaver Thombury R. N. McDairmid. R.R. No. 1 

237— Vienna Vienna Lyle Walsh. Strafff>rdville 

242....Macoy Mallorytown A. M. Purvis, R.R. No. S 



288 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



No. 



Lodge 



245 Tecumseh- 

247 Ashlar... 



249.._..Caledonian- 
250-_Thistle 



Location 



. Thamesville- 
-Toronto 



253 Minden- 

254..._CTifton_ 



...Midland- 

-Embro 

Kingston- 



.Niagara Falls- 



257...-GaIt_ 



-Galt. 



258_nuelDh 

2.j» — Sprinjrfield.. 
264.._-OKaudiere__ 



-Guelph 

..Springfield- 
- Ottawa 



J 6 5 —Patterson- 



-ThomhilL 



-Chatham- 



?67 — Parthenon 

268 Verulam Bobcaygeon 

269 Brougham Union....Claremont -.. 

27 0.__Cedar Oshawa 

271__WeIIJngton Erin 



272 — Seymour- 
274.._Kent- 



-Ancaster. 



-Blenheim- 



276 Teeswater 

277 — Seymour 

•?-79.._..New Hope— 

t!82-„..Lome 

283 Eureka 

285_Seven Star- 

289 Doric 

290 Leamington. 

291__Dufferin 



-Teeswater 

-Port Dalhousie 



.Hespeler- 
-Glencoe 



-Belleville.. 
. AUiston 



.Lobo- 



-Leaminjrton. 



292 Robertson- 

294 Moore 



W. Flambonj- 

—King 



296.._Temple 

297_Preston - 



800__Mount Olivet-. 



-Courtright 

-St. Catharine 

_ Preston 

-Thorndale 



802_..St. David's 

804 Minerva , 

305 number _. 

307 — Arlcona 

309 Morning Star 

311 Blackwood 

312 -. ..Pnyx 

81 3__Clementi 

.<« 1 fi_ Doric 



Secretary and P.O. Address 

_W. E. Hopper, R. R. No. 1 

...R. J. McCleary, 100 Cortleigh 

Blvd., (12). 
-J. J. Robins, 316 Second St. 
-D. J. McLeod. R. R. No, 6 
-G. H. Veale, 21 Alfred St. Apt. 1 
-Frederick Want, 647 McDougal 
Crescent 

. G. J. Johnson, 55 Lansdowne Rd. 

S. 
_T. Jackson, 17 Kensington St. 
_F. E. Harris, Brownsville 
.M. H. Chapman, 86 Blackburn 

Ave. (2) 
.G. A. Russell, 188 Snowdea Ave., 

Toronto (12) 
.John B. Ryan, 114 West St. 
J. F. McLsaac, R.R. No. 2. 
Alvin Wilson, Brougham P.O. 
E. F. Farrow, 94 Ritson Rd. S. 
. Stewart Scott, Belfountain 
.E. McMullen, 1169 Wilson Ave., 
Hamilton 

L. Jacklin, 28 Elizabeth St. 
Box 74. 

W. A. McKenzie, R.R. No. 2. 

_ B. E. Schpab, 31 Tecumseh St. 
St. Cf'-harines 

G. H. Henderson, 125 Ckxrper St. 

__J A. Gould. R. R. No. 1 
.._..W. Oliver, R.R. No. 3. 
_R. N. Walker, Box 4, Camp 

Borden 
—Wilfrid Keays, R.R. No. 1, Hyde 

Park 
— R. D. McLean. 29 Oak St. B. 
_ D. W. Dunkin, 6 Tweedsmuir 

Ave., Dundas 
_.F. E. Boys, R.R. No. 3, Oak 

Ridges P.O. 
_B- C. Kitchen, 931 Highway 40, 

Moorertown. 
_James Thome, 86 Welland Ave. 
_.W. Graysrtone. 4)26 Margaret St. 
_C. V. Fox, 953 Colborne St., 

London 
_K. S. Woodward. 45 Redan St. 



E, 



—St. Thomas- 

Stroud Gordon Bmrick, R.R. No. 4, Barrie 

.-..Weston Douglas Williams, 95 Portage Ave. 

Arkona G. S. Lampman, R.R. No. 2, 

Thedford. 
_Carlow -.W. G. Treble, R.R. No. 5, 

Goderich. 



-Woodbridgte..- 

_Wallaceburg-. 

-Lakefield. 

-Toronto 



322.._.North Star- 



-Owen Sound.. 



324-_.Temple —Hamilton. 

326 Zetland Toronto._- 

S28 Ionic Napier 

SSn Corinthian __I,ondon 

832 Stratford Stratford 



.._G. L. McGillivray, R.R. No. 3, 

Woodbridge 
_.T. H. Biimptt. 647 Wall St. 
-J). A. Nichols, Caroline St. 
_A. J. Collins, 67 MacDonald Ave., 

Weston (15) 
-J. J. Teschke, 715-3rd Ave. E., 

Box 342. 

— J. Turner, 18 Bevan Court 
-P. E. Wootton, 252 Hanna Rd. (17) 

— Evan Denning. R.R. No. 8. 

Strathroy 
—Fred Aldous, Box 194, Lambeth. 

— A. A. Shaw, 108 Douro St. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 



289 



No. Lodge Location Secretary and P.O. Address 

333 Prince Arthur Flesherton Everett Blackburn, R.R. No. 1. 

339— Orient Toronto A. M. Watt, 30 Taylor Dr., (6), 

341 Bruce Tiverton Lovell MacKenzie, R.R. No. 3, 

Kincardine. 
343 Georgina — o^uoaoxP. W. Davies, 229 Symington Av. 

(9) 
345 Nilestown Nilestown R. j. Carswell, 516 Hamilton Rd. 

London 

346— Occident Toronto J. T. Berry, 201 Melrose Ave. (12) 

356 River Park Streetsville S. V. Meakings, 2 Ellesboro Dr. 

358— Delaware Valley Delaware G. F. McKay, R. R. No. 1 

359 — Vittoria Vittoria _ Omar Thompson, R. R. No. 3, 

Simcoe 

361 Waverley Guelph R. G. Stephens, City Hall 

364_Dufrerin Melbourne J. C. McLean, R.R. No. 1, 

Walkers 
867_St. George Toronto W. F. Damp, 63 Southvale Dr. 

Leaside. 
369 Mimico Lambton Mills J. Kendall, 120 Lloyd Manor Rd. 

Islington 

870— Harmony Delta Don Elliott. Chantry 

871 — Prince of Wales... Ottawa. H. J. Sykes, 634 Churchill Ave. 

(3) 

372— Palmer Fort Erie R. E. Gardiner, 188 Henrietta St. 

373_Cope-Stone Welland W. B. Martin. 234 Willson Rd. 

374— Keene Keene D. R. Comrie, R.R. 3. Keene 

376— Unity Huntsville S. G. Avery, 125 Main St. W. 

878-.-.King Solomon's London L. M. Clark, 444 Dorinda St. 

379 Middlesex Bryanston Herbert Hudson, R.R. No. 1, 

Thorndale 

880.-Union London R.E. Tillson, 194 Belgrave Ave. 

382 Doric Hamilton W. J. Macintosh, 72 Kenilworth 

Ave. S. 
384-...-Alpha Toronto Joseph Gibson, 132 Fairlawn Ave., 

(12). 

386 McColl West Lome B. E. Newman. R.R. No. 2, 

387 — Lansdowne I^ansdowne R. A, Running, R.R. No. 1 

388 Henderson.——. — Ilderton __ . — _ B. R. Clemance. R.R. 1. Derfield 

392— JIuron Camlachie Martin Burnley, R.R. No. 2 

397 Leopold Brigden Orest Hawryluk, R.R. No. 1 

399— Moffat Harrietsville Granit Corless, R.R. No. 1, Spring- 
field 

400 Oakville Oakville Wm. Gault, 1049 Linbrook Rd. 

403 Windsor Windsor Alex. Shaw, 610 Wyandotte St. E., 

Riverside. 

405. Mattawa Mattawa , H. Maxwell, Eau Claire 

409— Golden Rule Graveuhurst W. E. McDonald. 491 Phillip St. E. 

410— Zeta Toron.o H. L. Bennett. 83 Allanbpook Dr., 

Islington. 

41 2. ...Keystone Sault Ste. Marie L. G. Shier, 581 Placid Ave. 

414-.. Pequonga Kenora H. S. Cade, 313 First St. N. 

416 Lyn Lyn Frank Cornell, R.R. No. 1. 

119.. I.ihorty ....- .>^arnia _ A. W. Jordan. 264 Campbell St. 

421 Scott Grand Valley Wilfred West. R.R. No. 2. 

426 Stanley Toronto J. L. Johnson, 202 Drewry Ave. 

Willowdale 

427....-Nirkel Sudbury P. A. CoR^es. 107 Pino St. 

430 — Acacia Toronto— H. A. Sinclair, 52 Balsam Ave., 

(13). 

431 Moravian Cargill .T. M. Roid. Pinkertnn 

436— Burns Hepworth R. A. Carson, R.R. No. 1, CTlaver- 

ing 

437 Tuscan Sarnia F. J. Sanders. 316 Ross Ave 

438 . Hwrmony Toronto D. S. Cody, 32 Kimbark Blvd. (12) 

441 ..Wrstport Westport FVed Butterill, R.R. No. 2, God- 
frey 

'45 Lakeof the Woods. Kenora. H. C. Smiley, c/o Canadian Legion 

446 ..-Granite Fort Frances W. T. Russell. 428 Second St. B. 



290 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



No. 



Lodge 



Location 



Secretary and P.O. Addreaa 



447_Sturgeon Falls Sturgeon Fall8.-_G. R. Bartlett, Box 1, Warren 

450__Hawkesbury Hawkesbury W. T. R. Hay. 11 Thorne St. 

453 lioyal _ __.Fo]t Wimam J. A. Macdonald, 350 N. Archibald 

St. 

456.-.Elma Monkton C. S. Harrison, R.R. No. 1 

458-_Wales Longue Sault Eric Rice, Box 130, Ingleside 

459 Cobden. Cobden Russell Childerhose, R.R. No. 3. 

467 — Tottenham Tottenham A. McLean, Palgrave 

468 Peei Calcdon Eai^t Geo. A. Evan.s. ii.R. Nc. I 

469....Algoma Sault Ste. Marie_D. Willock Jr., 183 Woodward 

Ave. 

470.....Victoria Vicrtoria Harbour_Art Rollinson, Waubaushene 

471 King Edward VII.. Chippawa. E. G. McKenzie, 736 Water St. 

473 The Beaches Toronto F. F. Mills, 114 Fallingbrook Rd. 

Scarborough 

474 Victoria Toronto Norman Henry, 1835 Bayview 

Ave., Apt. 416, (17). 

47.T Diindurn Hamilton C. W. Manning, 123 Florence St. 

476 Corinthian North Gower W. A. Argue, R.R. No. 3, Manotick 

481 Corinthian Toronto _ A. W. Hood, 313 Fairlawn Ave., 

(12). 

489-...Osiris Smiths Falls J. S. Allan, 4 Florence St. 

494 JRiverdale Toronto _. J. B. Stokes, 80 Barrington Ave.. 

(13). 

495 -The Electric Hamilton D. M. Ritchie, 267 East 11th St, 

496 University Toronto E. J. Wallcom. 384 Strathmor* 

Blvd. (6) 

497 -St. Andrew's Arden Harry Davis, Northbrook. 

498._.King George V_(^boconk E. B. White, R.R. No. 1 

499_.. Port Arthur Port Arthur S. H. Green, 669 Tied River Rd 

500—Rose Windsor Geo. K. Pinney, 1765 Chilver Rd 

Walkerville 

601-....Connaught Mimico S. J. Smith, 27-30th St. (14). 

503 In wood Inwood _ — J. R. Graham, R.R. No. 3, Oil City 

504__Otter Lombardy P. J. Jones, Box 9, Smiths Falls 

505 Lyriflen Lynden H. B. Dayman. Trov 

507 Elk Lake Elk Lake H. A. Somerville. O'Brien. 

608-..Ozias. — Brantford _ — J. M. Buchanan, 31 Morrell St. 

509 Twin City Kitchener H. J. Orpen, 96 Braeside Street, 

Waterloo. 

510.....Parkdale Toronto E. H. Wilson, 11 Vickson Court 

Islinciton 

511_...Ck)nnaught Fort William E. T. Hughes, 183 E. Francis St. 

512 Malone Sutton West James Weir, Pefferlaw 

513 Corinthian Hamilton A. G. Elford. 40 Lirwdorl \vo 

514 — St. Alban's Toronto A. D. Thompson, 121 Ashbourne 

Islington 

51.5 — Reba Brantford — T. E. Grepnaway, 15 Fivot Ave. 

B17 Hazeldean Hazeldean G. A. Gracey, Box 26, Stittsville. 

519 Onondaga Onondaga Wm. Kemp, 414 Nelson Street. 

Brantford 

520 Coronati Toronto D. C. Little, 126 Parkview Hill 

Cresc. (16) 

521-...Ontario Windsor R. V. Wakeley, 229 Buckingham 

Dr. Riverside 

522 Mt. Sinai Toronto H. R. Fox, 42 Tarlton Rd. (7) 

523 Royal Arthur Peterborough J. H. Cooper, 445 Arndon Ave 

524 Mississauga. Port Credit E. R. Thompson, 1440 Lochlin 

Trail. 

525._Temple Toronto G. G. Oulton, 23 McGillvray Ave. 

(12) 

526 Ionic Ottawa W. J. Watling, 7 Seguin St., (2). 

529 Myra- Komoka J. B. Frank. R.R. Nn. 3 

681 High Park Toronto C. Norman Bell, 224 Harvie Ave., 

MO). 

332 Canada Toronto J. M. Stephen, 37 Queensdale 

Ave., (6). 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



291 



No. 



Lodge 



Location 



Secretary and P.O. Address 



533 Shamrock Toronto 

535 Plioenix Fonthill — 

536 Alijonquin Copper Cliff 

537 — Ulster Toronto 

539 Waterloo Waterloo . 

540. Abitibi Iroquois Falls 

541 Tu.^can Toronio 

642 Metropolitan Toronto 

543 Im ! urial To ro n to 

544 Lincoln Abingdon 

545 John Ross 

Robertson Toronto _ 

546._..Talbot St. Thomas 

547— The Victory Toronto 



548. ..-General Mercer Toronto. — 

549.-Jonic Hamilton. 



550-....Buchanan Hamilton... 

651 Tuscan Hamilton.. 

552 Queen City Toronto 

5.'56...._Oakwood Toronto 

554 Border Cities Windsor 

K55 Wardrope Hamilton. 

558_.Sidney Albert 

Luke Ottawa 

559 Palestine Toronto 



560-.-St. Andrew's- 
561 — Acacia 



Ottawa- 
. Ottawa. 



.S62 Hamilton- 



. Hamilton. 



563 Victory- 

564 Ashlar. 



565 Kilwinning Toronto.- 



566 King Hiram. 

567_..St. Aidan's. 



568__Hullett 

57" Uufferin 




571 Antiquity.. 



Toronto... 

572-...Mizpah Toronto.. 



573 .Adoniram- 

57r;_.J!^deIity 



N'iaprara Falls 

Toronto 



576 Mimosa- 



o77-_St. Clair. 
S78 — Queen's. 



. Toronto 

. Toronto 

.King-ston 



579 Harmony Windsor 

580 Acjiria T.nndon 

581 Harcourt Toronta 

582 Sunnyside Toronto 



—Gordon Lepper, 76 Amelia St. 
-J. M. B. McClellan. Ridgeville. 

— A. A. Watson, 11 Power St. 

■ C. M. Platten, 52 Donegal! Dr., 

(17) 
-.-N. A. MacEachern, 187 Albert St. 
— G. G. Critchley, Monteith 
_F. C. Craig. 154 Nairn Ave. (10) 
-.W. R. Daniels, 303 Warden Ave., 

Scarborough. 
_E. E. Reid, 380 Manor Rd. E. (7) 
-.J. H. Clark. R.R. No. 1, Smith- 

ville. 
... J. H. Jack.son, 80 Sun Row Dr., 

Weston. 
... VV. A. McPherson, 38 Metcalf St. 
_.J. H. Hartley, 769 Windermere 

Avenue (9) 
..._W. H. Quinn, 301 Pacific Ave. (9) 
_A. W. Marshall, 279 BalmoraJ 

Ave. N. 
..-Alex. Kerr, 163 Longwood Rd. N. 
.... R. A. C.Trter, 33 Rosodale Ave. 
—Walter Carey, 2052 Gerrard St., 

East (13) 
...B. N. Ashbourne, 323 Sheldrake 

Blvd.. (12). 
...John Lock, 647 Cameron Ava- 
_M. E. Smith. 250 Main St. W. 

_Z. M. Niblock. 105 Faraday St. 
. Herman Ginsberg, 451 Wilson 

.^ve., Downsview. 
_J. N. Salter, 8 Wesitmount Ave., 

(3). 

- C. W. Carson, 530 Brierwood Ave. 

(3) 
-H. A. Snell, 196 Mountain Park 

.^ve, .\pt. 12 
■ J. A. M. Hay. 27 Ellwood Ave. 
S. G. Davis, 1967 Alta Vista Dr., 

fl) 
G. E. Langley, 15 Koos Rd., 

Etobicoke. 
-H. Hanwell, 84 Belgravla Ave. (10) 
H. J. Jeffery, 50 Glenvale Blvd. 

07). 
W. Lei per. R.R. No. 1 
-G. N. Walker. 2106 Russet Road, 

Port Credit 
_R. M. Brown, 240 Oanbrooke 

Ave. (12) 
-F. M. Shepherd. 228 Willard Ave., 

Swansea. 
_F. E. Wilson. 469 Hiram St. 
..G. W. Phillips, 281 Queensdale 

Ave.. (6) 
-W, G. McCulloch, 2 Filbert Gate, 

Don Mills. 
-G. R. Stephens. 35 Larkin Ave., 

(3) 
J. A. MacLeod. 215 Stuart St. 
..D. Vannan. 1376 Pillette Rd. 
-H. C. Steele, 989 Glenbannpr Pd. 
-A. H. Wait. 15 Wellington St. W. 
Cyril Buckingham, 57 Leroy Ave. 



292 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATTON 



No Lodge Location Secretary and P.O. Address 

583_Transportation Toronto F. W. Charles, 34 Randolph Rd., 

(17). 

584_Kaministiquia Fort William H. M. Barth, 352 Kingsway 

585 ...Royal Ekiward Kingston E. L. Earl, 252 CoUingwood SU 

586-_Remembrance Toronto -.-S. Yates, 75 Flora Dr., Scarbor- 
ough. 

587 Patricia Toronto. Wm. Vose, 9 Agar Cres., Islington 

589 Grey Toronto Tom Chard, 57 Mallory Cres,, AjJt. 

6, (17) 
590 Defenders Ottawa H. R. Haywood, 2429 Clemenitine 

Blvd., (1). 
691 North Gate Toronto R. H. Sanderson, 39 Lesmar Dr., 

Islington. 
592_J"airbank Toronto F. P. Tonkin, 584 Oakwood Ave., 

(10). 

593 St. Andrew's Hamilton Robert Strachan, 90 Tom St. 

594 Hillcrest Hamilton G. A. Sweatman, 40 Alpine Ave. 

595_Rideau Ottawa W. A. Hanun, 1285 Woodside Dr., 

(3). 

697_Temple London W. G. Stewart, 596 Adelaide St. 

598__Dominion Windsor D. C. Taylor, 1138 Lincoln Rd. 

599— Mt. Dennis Weston Fred Thain, 12 Craydon Ave. 

Toronto 15 
600 Maple Leaf Toronto R. A. Duff, 111 Newmarket Ave. 

(13) 

601_....St. Paul Sarnia E. A. Soden, 984 Beverley Rd. 

602 Hugh Murray Hamilton John Eaglesham, 185 Kensington 

Ave. S. 

603_..Campbell Campbellvillfe__ G. R. Carbert. R.R. No. 2 

604__Palace Windsor Harry Taylor, 977 Bridge Ave. 

605— Melita Toronto A. C. Gerrard, 21 Shrewsbury 

Square, Agincourt 
606__Unity Toronto H. Browning, 565 St. Clarens Ave 

(4) 
607 Golden Fleece Toronto W. A. Grierson, 312 Lawrence 

Ave. W., (12) 

608. _ Gothic Lindsay W. R. Allely. Town Hall 

609 .Tavistock Tavistock S. A. Goring, 31 Milton St. 

610..-. Ashlar. Ryron S. H. Bryant, R.R. No. 4, London. 

611 Huron-Bruce ^Toronto C. S. Farmer, 151 Roehampton 

Ave., (12). 
612....-Birrh Cliff— Toronto H. V. French. 141 Dunnington 

Dr.. Scarborough. 

613 Fort Erie ___Fort Erie J. O. Sinclair, 217 Bowen Rd. 

614__Adanac Merritton W. G. Crandon, 21 Ollege St. 

615 Dominion Ridgeway G. A. Lewis, Box 193. Crystal 

Beach 

616 Perfection St. Catharines W. C. Ellis, 12 Cliff Rd. 

617.--North Bay North Bay C. Dennis, 790 Durril St. 

618.. Thurder Bay Port Arthur- R. A. Meadowcroft, 29 Elizabeth 

St. 
619 Runnymede Toronto W. J. Armstrong, 16 Graywood 

Dr., Islington. 
620 Bay of Quinte Toronto H. Babbit, 96 Broadlands Blvd., 

Don Mills 

623 Doric Kirkland Lake Frank Wa.shingtoai, 6 Comfort St. 

624— Dereham Mount Elgin. W. J. M. Hart, 37 Third St., 

Tillsonburg. 

625 Hatherly Snnlt Ste. Marie..- G. R. Lee. 184 Pirn St. 

626 Stamford— Stamford Centre_R. F. Cooper. 64 Longhurst Ave.. 

Niagara Falls 

627— Pelee Scudder W. J. Wiper, Pelee Island 

628 Glenrose Elmira D. E. Wade, 9 - 2nd St. 

62^-..Grenville Toronto T. A. Eyre, 460 Gladstone Ave. (4) 

630.-.Prince of Wales-Toronto H. J. Campbell, 147 Eastbourne 

Ave. f7) 
632 Long Branch Mimico Wm. Preseott, 54 Lake Promen- 
ade, (14). 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



293 



No. 
634__Delta.- 



Lodge 



635 Wellington Toronto- 



637 Caledonia. 



Location Secretary and P.O. Address 

.Toronto \. Lawrence, 424 Roehatnpton 

Ave. (12) 

N. J. Nixon, 148 Sheldrake Blvd., 

(12). 

.Toronto Geo. McBain, 370 Broadway Ave. 

(12). 

-Toronto Thomas Adams, 3 Oakburn Cresc, 

Apt. 9 

639— Beach Hamilton Beach — B. E. Hulford, 46 Cope St. N., 

Hamilton. 

640.._..Anthony Sayer Mimico A. W. Bryan, 24 Stanley Ave. (14) 

641 Garden Windsor John Briggs, 264 Reedmere Kd.. 

Riverside. 



638_Bedford_ 



642_.-St. Andrew's. 
643— .Cathedal 



644 Simcoe- 



-Windsor. 
.Toronto 



-Toronto. 



645_Lake Shore- 
647 Todmorden — 



648— Spruce Falls. 



649._Temple- 
650_Fidelity- 



. Mimi'^o 

. Todmorden 

.Kapuskasin?- 



651 Dentonia. 



. Oshawa. 
-Toledo— 
.Toronto. 



652-. Memorial. 
653 Scarboro.... 



.Toronto 

-Agincoupt— 



_C. W. Flett, 442 Askin Blvd. 
.M. R. MacKay, 50 Northridge 

Ave., (6). 
-Murdoch Mclver, 110 Broadway 

Ave., (12). 
_H. E. Newton, 42 Lake Cresc. 
-Roy Moss, 4 Stanhope Ave. 

Toronto. (6). 
-R. Holmes, 11 Poplar Cresc, 

Box 1236. 
-0. D. Friend, 124 Ritson Rd. S. 
-Ernest Barber, Eastons Corners 
.Wm. Tennent, 33 Panmure Cresc, 

Scarborough. 
-W. J. Finch. 86 Grandville Ave. 
-J. H. Neville, 126 Brenda Cresc, 

Scarborough. 



J. D. Taylor, 101 Dromore Ores. 



654_Ancient 

Landmarks Hamilton — 

65.=) Kinesway Lambton Mills H. C. Startup, 14 Robin Hood Rd. 

Islington. 
658— Sudbury Sudbury G. H. Barnett, 111 Bloor St. 

Apt. 5 

659_.Equity Orillia F. M. Lamb, 67 Penetang St. 

661 St. Andrew's St. (Catharines E. R. Lewis, 10 Cameron Drive 

662 Terrace Bay Terrace Bay R. H. Scowen, 78 Hudson Dr. 

668_Brant —Burlington W. J. B. Kay, 2058 Emerald Ores. 

664_Sunnylea Lambton Mills A. Braidwood, 2655 Bloor St. W., 

(18) 

665 Temple Ottawa Maxw^ell Hopper, 440 Athlone Ave. 

666_.Temple .__ Belleville M. R. Davidson. R.R. No. 7 

667 Composite Hamilton W. T. Bacon. 172 Arkell St. 

669— Corinthian Cornwall F. E. Eaton, 128 Fourth St., W. 

670._West Hill Agincourt A. J. Grigsby, Box 63, West Hil) 

671 Westmount Hamilton_____A. G. .Adams. 47 Douglas St 



672 - -Superior 

67.3 _ Kempenfeldt 

674— South Gate 

675 William James 

Dunlop 

S76 Kroy 



-Red Rock James C. Scott, Cameron Falls. 

_Hnrrip Jas. Poppleton. 25 Holpratp St. 

-Port Credit I. E. Sisler, 2081 Snow Cresc. 



-Peterbororugh D. E. Bell, 505 King St. 

.Thornhill H. G. Jackson. 140 Park Horn* 

Ave. Willowdale 

677 Coronation Weston Fred Thain, 12 Craydon .A.ve. (15) 

678 Mercer Wilson Woodstock C. H. Dearden, 147 Delatre St. 

679_Cemennial Stamford Centre- J. N. Withey, 2142 Burdett Dr., 

Niagara Falls. 

681— Claude M. Kent. Oakville W. S. McKay. 17 Spruce St. 

682 Astra Weston E. J. Carruthers. 86 Lexfield \ve., 

t)ownsview 

683— Wexford Agincourt L. S. Beak, 2630 Kennedy Rd. 

684__ Centennial London— C«cil J. Hill, 170 Bruce St. 

685 Joseph A. Hearn Port Credit _ J. R. Flynn, 1459 Glenwatson Dr. 

686— Atomic Deep River E. C. Trapp, 23 Wolfe Ave.. Box 

833. 



294 GRA2«) LOIXJE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



687 Meridian. 



»Dundas_ 



688 Wyndham 

esg-Jlower City 

690-_Temple 

6P1 Friendship 

692 Thomas Hamilton 

Simpson 



693-_.East Gate 



-Guelph 

Brampton 

. Kitchener 

Copper Cliff 

.Stoney Creek — 

-Avincourt 



694.....Baldoon "Wallaceburg-— 

695 Parkwood Oshawa. ._ 

696 JIarry L. Martyn_Toronto 

697 Grantham Port Dalhousle.. 

698 Elliot Lake Klliot Lake 

700 — Corinthian Kintore 



701 Ashlar- 



-TillsonburK... 



702— The Lodge of 
Fellowship 

703_The Lodge of 
the Pillars _ 



-Richmond Hill 
_ Weston 



704 Atrnnn , 



-Timmins- 



_A. D. Hahnau, 389 York St.. 
Hamilton. 

J. F. Heap, 24 Simcoe St. 

J. A. McCleave, 252 Queen St. W. 

Hugh Taylor, 709 Rockway Dr. 

__C. E. Wilton, Box 100, Lively. 

„Xeighton McDermid, 106 King St. 

E. 
G. T. Gambling, 30 Grangemill 

Cresc, Don Mills. 
_ A. E. Brunt, 20S Hiram St. 
_W. F. Graper, 848 Law St. 
R. J. "Woods, 28 Shaunavon Hhta., 

Don Mills. 
...F. G. White, 156 Lakeshore Rd., 

St. Catharines. 
__R. C. RuBsell, 56 Spruce Ave. 
Wm. Mac Henderson, R.R. No.l, 

Thamesford. 
— S. E. L. Woodman, 40 Venison 

St. E. 



. W. Higgins, 84 Harding Blvd. 

-Milton Naiberg, 41 Lissom Cresc, 
Willowdale 

-J. M. Hamilton, Box 755, Schu- 
macher. 



TORONTO, O^TTARIO, 1961 296 



List of Lodges — By Districts 



ALGOMA DISTRICT (11 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Kenneth M. MacKay, Fort William 

No. 287— Shuniah Port Arthur No. 618— Thunder Bay_.Pt. Arthui 

No. 415 — Fort William Fort William Vo. 636 — Hornepayne _Horiiei>ayne 

No. 453 — Royal Fort William Ac. 656 — Kenogamisis Geraldton 

No. 499 — Port Arthur.Port Arthur No, 662 — Terrace Bay_Terrace Bay 

No. 511 — Connaught Fort William No. 672— Superior Red liock 

No. 584 — Kaministiquia Ft. William 

BRANT DISTRICT— (14 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. A. Laird Miller, Jarvis 

No. 85 — St. John's Cayuga No. 243— St. George St. George 

No. 45 — Brant Brantford No. 319 — Hiram Hagersville 

No. 82 — St. John's Paris No. 329 — King Solomon Jarvis 

No. 106 — Burford _. Burford No. 505 — Lynden Lynden 

No. 113— Wilson Waterford No. 508 — Ozias Braniford 

No. 121 — Doric Brantford No. 515 — Reba Brantfoid 

No. 193 — Scotland Scotland No. 519 — Onondaga Onondaga 

BRUCE DISTRICT— (12 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. C^ordon S. Matthias, Walkerton 

No. 131 — St. Lawrence Southampton No. 393— Forest Chesley 

No. 197 — Saugeen Walkerton No. 396— Cedar Wiarton 

No. 235— Aldworth Paisley No. 429— Port Elgin —Port Elgin 

No. 262 — Harriston Harriston No. 431 — Moravian Cargill 

No. 315 — Clifford Clifford No. 432 — Hanover Hanover 

Na. 362— Maple Leaf Tara No. 436— Burns Hepwortb 

CHATHAM DISTRICT— (15 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Harold L. Martdn, Dresden 

No. 46 — Wellington Chatham No. 327 — Hammond Wardsville 

No. 245 — Tecumseh Thamesville No. 336— Highgate Highgate 

No. 255 — Sydenham Dresden No. 390 — Florence Florence 

No. 267 — Parthenon Chatham No. 391 — Howard Ridpetown 

No. 274— Kent Blenheim No. 422— Star of the East- Bothwell 

No. 282 — Lome Glencoe No. 457 — Century Merlin 

No. 312 — Pnyx Wallaceburg No. 563 — Victory Chatham 

No. 694 — Baldoon Wallaceburg 

EASTERN DISTRICT— (19 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Roderick A. Stewart, Maiville 

No. 21a— St. John's—Vankleek Hill No. 418— Maxville Maxville 

No. 125 — Cornwall Cornwall No. 439 — Alexandria Alexandria 

No. 142 — Excelsior Morrisburg No. 450 — Hawkesbury _Hawkesbiiry 

No. 143 — FViendly Brothers' Iroquois No. 452 — Avonmore __ _ Avonmor<= 

No. 186 — Plantagenet Riceville No. 458 — Wales Longue Sault 

No. 207 — Lancaster -Lancaster No. 480 — Williamsburg Williamsburc 

No. 256 — Farran-Ault Ingleside No. 491— Cardinal Cardinal 

No. 320— Chesterville _..Chesterville No. 557 — Finch Finch 

No. 383 — Henderson Winchester No. 596 — Martintown ..Martintown 

No. 669 — (Corinthian Cornwall 

FRONTENAC DISTRICT— (18 Lodge.«=) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Roy R. Sweetman, Westport 

No 3 — Ancient St. John'sKingston No. 253— Minden Kingston 

No. 9 — Union Napanee No. 299 — Victoria Centreville 

No. 92 — Cataraqui Kingston No. 404 — Lome Tamworth 

No. 109 — Albion Harrowsmith No. 441 — Westport Westpon 

No. 119 — Maiile Leaf Bath No. 460 — Rideau - — Seeley's Bay 

No. 146 — Princeof Wales Newburgh No. 497 — St. .Andrew's Arden 

No. 157 — Simpson Newboro No. 578 — Queen's Kingston 

No. 201 — Leeds Gananoque No. 585 — Royal Ekiward Kingston 

No. 228 — Prince Arthur Odessa No. 621— Frontenac - Sharbot IjtVi 



296 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



90- 
96- 
192- 
230- 
234- 
236- 
249- 
266- 
28.-- 
304- 
348- 



GEORGIAN DISTRICT— (20 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Thomas J. Purvis, OriUia 

-Manito CoUingwood No. 385- 




-bpry 



Beeton 

-Creeraore 
-Elmvale 



-Manitoba 
-Caledonian 

-Northern Light Stayner 

-Seven Star Alliston 

-Minerva Stroud 

-Georgian Penetanguishene 



No. 444 — Nitetis _ 
No. 466 — Coronation 

No. 467— Tottenham Tottenham 

No. 470 — Victoria Victoria Harbour 

No. 492 — Karnak —Coldwater 

No. 538 — Earl Kitchener- 



-Pt. 



No. 659 — Equity 

No. 673 — Kempenfeldt 



McNicoll 

Orillia 

_ Barrie 



D.D.G.M. 



GREY DISTRICT— (12 Lodges) 
R.W. Bro. Robert E. Davics, Motint Forest 



88 — St. George's Owen Sound 

137 — Pythagoras Meaford 

200~St. Alban's...Mount Forest 

216 — Harris Orangeville 

306 — Durham _._Durham 

322— North Star._Owen Sound 



No. 333 — Prince Arthur ..Flesherton 

No. 334 — Prince Arthur Arthur 

No. 377 — Lome Shelburne 

No. 421— Scott Grand Valley 

No. 449— Dundalk Dundalk 

No. 490 — Hiram Markdale 



HAMILTON DISTRICT A— (19 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. John H. Jackson, Hamilton 



6— The Barton 
40— St. John's _ 

100— Valley 

135— St. Clair _ 
165 — Burlington 

272 — Seymour 

291— Dufferin 

324— Temple 

357 — Waterdown 
400— Oakville _ 



-W. 



_ Hamihon 

Hamilton 

_ Dundas 

. —Milton 

.Burlington 

Ancaster 

Flamboro 

Hamilton 

Millgrove 

Oakville 



No. 475 — Dundurn 



No. 513 — Corinthian 

No. 551 — Tuscan 

No. 562 — Hamilton 

No. 602 — Hugh Murray 

No. 603 — Campbell Campbellville 

No. 663 — Brant Burlington 

No. 681— Claude M. Kent, Oakville 
No. 6S7 — Meridian Dundas 



.Hamilton 
-Hamilton 
-Hamilton 
Hamilton 
..Hamilton 



HAMILTON DISTRICT B (20 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Robert G. Truscott, Hamilton 



7 — Union Grimsby 

27 — Strict Observance Hamilton 

57 — Harmony Binbrook 

61 — Acacia Hamilton 

62 — St. Andrew's Caledonia 

166 — Wentworth -Stoney Creek 

185— Enniskillen York 

382— Doric JHamilton 

495 — The Electric Hamilton 

544— Lincoln Abingdon 

549 — Ionic Hamilton 



No. 550 — Buchanan Hamilton 

No. 555 — Wardrope Hamilton 

No. 593 — St. Andrew's Hamilton 

No. 594 — Hillcrest Hamilton 

No. 639 — Beach Hamilton Beach 

No. 654 — Ancient Landmarks 

- Hamilton 

No. 667 — (Composite Hamilton 

No. 671 — Westmount Hamilton 

No. 692 — Thomas Hamilton 

Simpson Stoney Creek 



LONDON DISTRICT— (24 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Rossiter C. Fuller, London 



No, 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



No. 358— Delaware Valley Delaware 

No. 378 — King Solomon's London 

No. .^79 — Middlesex Bryanston 

No. 380 — Union London 

No. 388— Henderson Ilderton 

No. 394 — King Solomon Thamesford 

No. 399 — Moffat __JIarrietsville 

No. 529 — Myra Komoka 

No. 580 — Acacia London 

No. 597 — Temple London 

No. 610 — Ashlar Byrr>n 

345 — Nilestown Nilestown No. 684 — Centennial London 

MUSKOKA — PARRY SOUND DISTRICT— (8 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Frank W. Toswell, Powassan 

352 — Granite Parry Sound No. 423^Strong . Sundridge 

860 — Muskoka Bracebridge No. 434 — .Algonquin -Emsdale 

376 — Unity Huntsville No. 443 — Powassan Powassan 

409 — C^lden Rule Gravenhurst No. 454 — CoTona, Rnrlrg Fall* 



20— St. John's 

42— St. George's 

64 — Kilwinning 

107— St. Paul's - 

190 — Belmont 

195— The Tuscan 
209a— St. John's 

289— Doric 

300— Mount Olivet 
330— Ciirinthian 
344— Merrill _ 




TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 297 

NIAGARA A DISTRICT— (14 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Alpheus V. Hammond, St. Catharines 

No. 2— Niagara _Niagara-on-Lake No. 296 — Temple St. CatharineB 

No. 15 — St. George's St. Catharines No. 338— Dufferin Wellandport 

No 32 — Amity Dunnville No. 502 — Coronation Smithville 

No. 103 — Maple Leaf St. Catharines No. 614 — Adanac Merritton 

No. 115 — Ivy Beamsville No. 61S — Perfection St. Catharines 

No. 221 — Mountain Thorold No. 661 — St.Andrew's St.Catharinet 

No. 277 — Seymour _Port Dalhousie No. 697 — Grantham _Pt. Dalhotisie 

NIAGARA B DISTRICT— (14 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Sydney J, Gill, Welland 

No. 105 — St. Mark's -Niagara Falls No. 471 — KingEdwardVII Chippawa 

No. 168— Merritt >7elland No. 535— Phoenix Fonthill 

No. 169 — Macnab Port (Jolborne No. 573 — Adoniram Niagara Falli 

No. 254— Clifton Niagara Falls No. 613— Fort Erie Fort Erie 

No. 337 — Myrtle Port Robinson No. 615 — Dominion Ridgeway 

No. 372— Palmer Fort Erie No. 626— Stamford.Stamford Centn 

No. 3^3 — Cope-Stone Wella,nd No. 679 —Centennial Stamford 

(3entr« 
NIPISSING EAST DISTRICT— (8 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Maitland G. Gouli. North Bay 

No. 405 — Mattawa Mattewa No. 485 — Haileybury — Jlaileybury 

No. 420— Nipissing North Bay No. 486— Silver Cobalt 

No. 447— SturgeonFa. StMrgeonFalls No. 507— Elk Lake Elk Lake 

No. 462— Temiskaming NewLiskeard No. 617— North Bay North Bay 

NIPISSING WEST DISTRICT —(17 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Herbert A. Death, Sudbury 

No. 412— Keystone Sault Ste. Marie No. 536— Algonquin —Copper Clliff 

No. 427— Nickel Sudbury No. 588— National Capreol 

No. 442— Dyment Thessalon No. 622— Lome C!hapleau 

No. 455— Doric Little Current No. 625— Hatherly Sault Ste. Marie 

No. 469— Algoma— Sault Ste. Maria No. 658— Sudbury Sudbury 

No. 472— Gore Bay Gore Bay No. 680— Woodland Wawa 

No. 487— Penewobikong Blind River No. 691— Friendship. -Copper Cliff 

No. 527— Espanola Espanola No. 698— Elliot Lake _ Elliot Lake 

No. 699— Bethel Sudbury 

NORTH HURON DISTRICT— (12 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. John L. MacKinnon. Kincarddne 

No. 93 — Northern Light Kincardine No. 286 — Wingham Wingham 

No. 162— Forest Wroxeter No. 303— Blyth Blyth 

No. 184— Old Light Lucknow No. 314— Blair Palmerston 

No. 225 — Bernard Listowel No. 331 — Fordwich Fordwich 

No. 276 — Teeswater Teeswater No. 341— Bruce Tiverton 

No. 284 — St. John's Brussels No. 568 — Hullett Londesboro 

ONTARIO DISTRICT— (14 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Charles B. Rycroft, Whitby 

No. 17 — St. John's Cobourg No 114— Hope 

No. 26— Ontario Port Hope No. 139— Lebanon 

No. 30— (Composite Whitby No. 270— Cedar 

No. 31 — Jerusalem ...Bowmanville No. 325 — Orono 

No. 39— Mount Zion Brooklin No. 428— Fidelity 

No. 66 — Durham Newcastle No. 649 — Temple 

No. 91 — Colborne _.(3olbome No. 695 — Parkwood 

OTTAWA DISTRICT- (29 Lodges) 

D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. John O'Donovan. Ottawa 

No. 52— Dalhousie Ottawa No. 231— Lodge of Fidelity Ottawa 

No. 58 — Doric Ottawa No. 264 — Chaudiere Ottawa 

No. 63 — St. John's Carleton Place No. 371— Prince of Wales Ottawa 

No. 122 — Renfrew Renfrew No. 433 — Bonnechere - Eganville 

No. 128— Pembroke Pembroke No. 459 — Cobden Ck)bden 

No. 147 — Mississippi AJmonte No. 465 — Carleton Carp 

No. 148 — Civil Service Ottawa No. 476 — (Corinthian -North Gower 

No. 159 — Goodwood Jlichmond No. 479 — Russell Russell 

No. 177 — The Builders Ottawa No. 516 — Enterprise Boachbiire 

No. 196 — Madawaska Arnprior No. 517 — Hazeldean Hazeldean 




298 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



No. 526 — Ionic 



Ottawa 



No. 590 — Defenders 
No. 595 — Rideau _ 

No. 665— Temple 

No. 686— Atomic _ 



No. 558 — Sidney Albert Luke Ottawa 

No. 560 — St. .Andrew's Oltawa 

No. 561 — Acacia Ottawa 

No. 564 — Ashlar Ottawa 



PETERBOROUGH DISTRICT— (12 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro, WUliam Anderson, Peterborough 



Ottawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

-Deep River 



iiNO. 101 — Corinthian ..Peterborough 
No. 126— Golden Rule Campbellford 

No. 14.5— J. B. Hall Millbrook 

No. 155 — Peterborough Peterborough 

No. 161 — Percy Warkworth 

No. 223 — Norwood Norwood 

No. 313— Clementi ___Lakefield 



No. 374 — Keene 



Keent 



No. 435 — Havelock Havelock 

No. 523 — Royal Arthur Peterborough 

No. 633 — Hastings Hastingrs 

No 675 — William James 

Dunlop Peterborough 



No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT- 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Harry G. 

11— Moira Belleville No. 164 

18 — Prince Edward Picton 

29 — United Brighton 

38— Trent Trenton 

48 — Madoc Madoc 

50 — Consecon Consecon 



69— Stirling 
No. 123— Belleville 
No. 127— Franck _ 



— Stirling 

Belleville 

Frankford 



No. 215- 

No. 222 

No. 2.'?9 

No. 283 

No. 4'il. 

No. 482 

N'o. 666 



-(17 Lodges) 
Bates, Belleyille 

—Star in the East Wellington 

—Lake Ameliasburg 

— Marmora Marmora 

— Tweed Tweed 

-Eureka Belleville 

Craig Deseronto 

Bancroft Bancroft 

Temple Belleville 



SARNIA DISTRICT— (21 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. George C. Searson, Watford 



No. 56 — Victoria Sarnia 

No. 81 — St. John's Mount Brydges 

No. 83 — Beaver Stratnroy 

No. 116— Cassia Thedford 

No. 153 — Bums' Wyoming 

No. 158 — Alexandra Oil Springs 

No. 194 — Petrolia Petrolia 

No. 238— Havelock Watford 

No. 260 — Washington Petrolia 

No. 263— Forest Forest 

No. 294 — Moore Courtright 




Arkona 

Alvinston 

Napier 

Camlachie 
BrigdeD 
Sarnia 
..Sombra 
...Sarnia 
..In wood 
Sarnia 



SOUTH HURON DISTRICT— (17 Lodges) 



D.D.G.M. — R.W, Bro. 

No. 33 — Maitland — (Joderich 

No. 73 — St. James St. Marys 

No. 84— Clinton Clinton 

No. 133 — Lebanon Forest — Exeter 

No. 141— Tudor Mitchell 

No. 144— Tecumseh Skratford 

No. 154 — Irving Lucan 

No. 170 — Britannia Seaforth 

No. 224 — Huron Hensall 



R. Earle Tapp, Monkton 

No. 233— Doric —Parkhlll 

No. 309 — Morning Star _... Carlow 

No. 332— Stratford Stratford 

No. 4'fi- ^!ma -_ Monkton 

No. 478 — Milverton Milverton 

No. 483— -Granton Granton 

No. .'^74 — Craisr Ailsa Craiu 

No. 609— Tavistock Tavistock 



ST. LAWRENCE DISTRICT— 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Lyndsy 

No. 5 — .Sussex Brockville No. 368- 

No. 14— True Britons' Perth No. 370 

No. 24— St. Francis -Smiths Falls No. 3S7 
No. 28 — Mount Zion . Kemptville No. 389 
No. 55 — Merrickville ..Merrirkville No. 416 

No. 74— St. James South Augusta No. 489 

No. 85 — Rising Sun ___ Athens No. 504 

No. 110 — Centra! Preacott No. 556 

No. 209 — Evergreen Lanark No. 650 

No. 242 — Macoy .__. ^Mallorytow 



.Brockville 
Delta 



(19 Lodges) 
Brown, Lyn 

-Salem 

-Harmony _ 

-Lansdowne T<an8downe 

-CrystalFountain N.Augusta 

-Lyn Lyn 

— Osiris Smiths Falls 

— Otter Lombardy 

— Nation SpencerviHe 

Fidelity Toledo 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 299 

ST. THOMAS DISTRICT— (11 Ix)dBes) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Douglas Orchard, Sheilden 

No. 44— St. Thomas _ St. Thomas No. 302 — St. David's St. Thomaa 

No. 94— St. Mark's Port Stanley No. 364— Dufferin Melbourne 

No. 12U— Waiien tiiigal No. 386— McColl West Lome 

No. 140 — Malahide Aylmer No. 411— Rodney Rodney 

No. 171— Prince of Wales Zona Sta. No. 546— Talbot St. Thomaa 

No. 232— Cameron Dutton 

TEMISKAMING DISTRICT — (9 Lodges) 

D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. James W. Bradley, Kirkland Lake 

No. 506 — Porcupine S. Porcupine No. 540 — Abitibi Iroquois Falls 

No. 528— Golden Beaver Timmins No. 623— Doric Kirkland Lake 

No. 530— Cochrane Cochrane No. 648 — Spruce Falls -Kapuskaaing 

No. 534 — Englehart Englehart No. 657 — Corinthian, Kirkland Lake 

No. 704 — Aurum Timmins 

TORONTO DISTRICT 1 — (19 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Robert F. Brown, Toronto 

No. 229 — Ionic Brampton No. 619 — Runnymede Toronto 

No. 356 — River Park Streetsville No. 630 — Prince of Wales -Toronto 

No. 426— Stanley Toronto No. 632 — Long Branch Mimico 

No. 474 — Victoria Toronto No. 640 — Anthony Sayer Mimico 

No. 501 — Connaught Mimico No. 645 — Lake Shore Mimico 

No. 524 — Mississauga -...Port Credit No. 652 — Memorial Toronto 

No. 525— Temple Toronto No. 674— South Gate _ Port Credit 

No. 548— General Mercer Toronto No. 685— Jos. A. Heam Pt. Credit 

No. .'>fi5 — Kilwinning Toronto No. 689 — Flower City Brampton 

No. 566 — King Hiram Toronto 

TORONTO DISTRICT 2 — (18 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. George H. Weston, Toronto 

No. 305 — Humber Weston No. 5S7 — Patricia Toronto 

No. 346— Occident Toronto No. 599 — Mt. Dennis Weston 

No. 369 — Mimico Lambton Mills No. 600 — Maple Leaf Toronto 

No. 510— Parkdale Toronto No. 60o— Melita Toronto 

No. 522 — Mt. Sinai Toronto No. 655 — Kingsway ..Lambton Mills 

No. 531— High Park Toronto No. 664— Sunnylea -Lambton MUli 

No. 575 — Fidelity Toronto No. 677 — Coronation Weston 

No. 582 — Sunnyside Toron-o No. 682 — Astra Weston 

No. 583— Transportation __.Toronto No. 703— The Lodge of 

the Pillars Weston 

TORONTO DISTRICT 3 — (15 Lodges) 

D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Thomas F, Dodson, Toronto 

No. 16 — St. Andrew's Toronto No. 343-Oeorgina Toronto 

No. 25 — Ionic Toronto No. 4_'4 Doric Pickering 

No. 75— St. John's Toronto \i, 473— He;.chps Toronto 

No. 186— Richardson .StonlTviUe No. 567 — St. Aldan's Toronto 

No. 218— Stevenson Toronto No 612 — Birch Cliff Toronto 

No. 220 — Zeredatha U.xbridge No. 620— Bay of Quinte Toronto 

No. 316 — Doric - Toronto No. 637— Caledonia Toronto 

No. 339— Orient - Toronto 

TORONTO DISTRICT 4 (17 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. William A. Hagan, Toronto 

No. 87 — Markham Union Markham No. 552— Queen City Toronto 

No. 269 — BroughamUnionClaremont No. 576— Mimo.^a Toronto 

No. 430 — Acacia _ Toronto No. 647— Todmorden Todmorden 

No. 464 — King Edward Sunderland No. e.il — Dentonia Toronto 

No. 494 — Riverdale Toronto No. fi'.S — Scarboro Apincourt 

No. 520— Coronati Toronto No. 670 — West Hill Agincourt 

No. 532— Canada Toronto No. 683— Wexford Agincourt 

No. 643 — Imperial Toronto No. 693— East Gate Agincourt 

No. 545 — JohnRossRobertsonToronto 



300 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

TORONTO DISTRICT 5 — (30 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Francis P. Lowry. Downsview 



No. 22 — King Solomon's Toronto 

No. 23— Richmond ..Richmond Hill 

No. 65 — Rehoboam Toronto 

No. 79 — Simcoe Bradford 

No. 8€ — Wilson Toronto 

No. 97 — Sharon Queengville 

No. 99 — Tuscan Newmarket 

No. 129— The Rising Sun Aurora 

No. 156 — York .___ Toronto 

No. 247 — Ashlar Toronto 



No. 265 — Patterson 
No. 326— Zetland 



-Thornhill 
..Toronto 



No. 438 — -Harmony Toronto 

Mo. 481 — Corinthian Toronto 

No. 512 — Malone Sutton 



No. 542- 
No. 553- 
No. 577- 
No. 581- 
No. 591- 
No. 592- 
No. 606- 
No. 607- 
No. 629- 
No. 634- 
No. 638- 
No. 646- 
No. 676- 
No. 696- 
No. 702- 



-Metropolitan 

-Oakwood 

-St. CTair — 

-Harcourt 

-North Gate - 

-Fairbank 

-Unity 



-Toronto 
-Toronto 
-.Toronto 
-Toronto 
.-Toronto 
—Toronto 
—Toronto 
-Golden Fleece Toronto 



-Grenville 

-Delta 

-Bedford 

-Rowland 

-Kroy 



Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

_Mt Albert 
_ Thornhill 



-Harry L. Martyn ..Toronto 
-The Lodge of Fellowship 
Richmond Hill 



No. 


54- 


No. 


98- 


No. 


118 


No. 


292- 


No. 


311- 


No. 


367 


No. 


384- 


No. 


410- 


No. 


468 


No. 


496- 


No. 


514- 


No. 


53.3- 


No. 


.537- 



TORONTO DISTRICT 7 — (25 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Harold G. Rossell, Schomberg 

-Vaughan Maple No. 541 — Tuscan 

-True Blue Bolton No. 547— The Victory 

-Union Schomberg isu. 6oa — Palestine 

-Robertson King No. 570 — Dufferin 

-Blackwood Woodbridge No. 571 — Antiquity 

■^t. George Toronto No. 572 — Mizpah 

-Alpha Toronto No. 586 — Remembrance _ 

-Zeta _ Toronto No. 589— Grey 

-Peel — Caledon East No. 611 — Huron-Bruce 

-University Toronto No. 635 — Wellington 

-St. Alban's Toronto No. 643— Cathedral 

-Shamrock Toronto No. 644 — Simcoe 

-Ulster Toronto 



-Toronto 
-Toronto 
-Toronto 
-Toronto 
-Toronto 
-Toronto 
...Toronto 
..Toronto 
..Toronto 
..Toronto 
..Toronto 
...Toronto 



VICTORIA DISTRICT— (13 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Sherman J. Moore, Lindsay 

No. 77— Faithful Brethren ...Lindsay No. 440 — Arcadia Minden 

No. 268 — Verulam Bobcaygeon No. 451 — Somerville Kinmoimt 

No. 354 — Brock Canningrton No. 463 — NorthEntrance Haliburton 

No. 375 — Lorne Omemee No. 477 — Harding _ Woodville 

No. 398— Victoria Kirkfield No. 498 — King George V Coboronk 

No. 406— The Spry -.J'enelon Falls No. 608— Gothic Lindsay 

No. 408 — Murray Beaverton 



WELLINGTON DISTRICT— (22 Lodges) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Arthur B. Barton, Elora 



No. 72- 

No. 151- 

No. 172- 

No. 180- 

No. 203- 

No. 205- 

No. 219- 

No. 257- 

No. 258- 

No. 271- 

No. 295- 



No. 414- 

No. 417- 

No. 445- 

No. 446- 

No. 461- 





Halt 


-Grand River Kitchener 

-Ayr Avp 


-Speed 


..Guelph 


-Irvine 


_. . Elora 


■New Dom'n. 

Credit 

Gait 


New Hamburg 

— Georgetown 

Gait 


■Guelph - ..... 




-Wellington 
■Conestogo _ 


- Erin 

Drayton 




WESTERV DISTRICT— (10 Lodsos) 
D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. John A. Cox, Dryden 



-Pequont;a - Kenora 

-Keewatin _ Keewatin 

-Lake of the Woods .Kenora 

-Granite Fort France." 

-Ionic - Rainy River 



No. 484- Golden Star Dryden 

No. 518 — -Sioux Lookout Sioux L'out 

No. 631 — Manitou Emo 

No. 660— Chukuni Red Lak« 

So. 6fi8 — .Atikokan .\tikokan 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



301 



tio. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Mo. 



WILSON DISTRICT— (23 Lodges) 

F. Burrill, Burgessville 

217— Frederick Delhi 

237 — Vienna Vienna 

250 — Thistle Embro 



D.D.G.M. — R.W. Bro. Weldon 

-Norfolk Simcoe No, 

—King Hiram Ingersoll 



No. 104 
No. 108- 
No. 149 
No. 174- 
Ko. 178- 
No. 181- 



No. 

King Sol iinon's Woodstock No. 

—Si. John's ____lnKer8oll No. 

—Oxford Woodstock No. 

—King Hiram Till.sonburg No. 

—St. John's Norwich No. 

—Blenheim Princeton No. 

-Erie Port Dover No. 

— Walsineham _Port Rowan No. 

-Plattsville Plattaville No. 

—Oriental Port Burwell 



259— Siuingfield SpiinKfielc^ 

261 — Oak Branch Innerkip 

359— Vittoria Vittoria 

569 — Doric Lakeside 

624— Dereham Mt. Elgin 

678 — Mercer Wilson Wood.stock 

700 — Corinthian . Kintore 

701— Ashlar Tillsonburg 



WINDSOR DISTRICT— (19 Lodges) 



D.D.G.M. 



R.W. Bro. Harry Taylor, Windsor 



No. 34- 
No. 41- 
No. 47- 
No. 290- 
No. 395- 
No. 402- 
No. 403- 
No. 413- 
No. 448- 
No. 488- 



-Thistle Amherstburg 

St. George's Kingsville 

-Great Western Windsor 

-Leamington Leamington 

-Parvaim Comber 

-Central Essex 

-Windsor Windsor 

-Naphtali Tilbury 

-Xenophon Wheatley 

-King Edward Harrow 



No. 
No. 



500— Rose 
521— Ontario 



_... Windsoi 

Windsor 



No. 554 — Border Cities Wiiid.^or 

No. 579 — Harmony Windsor 

No. 598 — Dominion Windsor 

No. 604— Palace Windsor 

No. 627— Pelee Scudder 

No. 641 — Garden Windiior 

No. 642— St. Andrew's Windsor 



RECAPITULATION 

Algoma District 

Brant District 

Bruce District 

Chatham District 

Eastern District 

Frontenac District 

Georgian District 

Grey District 

Hamilton A District 

Hamilton B District 

London District 

Muskoka — • Parry Sound District 

Niagara A District - 

Niagara B District 

Nipissin.g East District 

Nipissing West District 

North Huron District -. 

Ontario District 

Ottawa District _ 

PeterborouKh District 

Prince Edward District 

Sarnia District _._ 

South Huron District _ 

St. Lawrence District — 

St. Thomas District 

Temiskaming District - 

Toronto 1 District 

Toronto 2 District 

Toronto 3 District _ 

Toronto 4 District 

Toronto 5 District _ - 

Toronto 7 District 

Victoria District 

Wellington District 

Western District 

Wilson District - 

Windsor District 



11 

.....14 

12 

15 

19 

18 

20 

_..12 

19 

20 

24 

8 

14 

14 

__17 
.... 12 

14 

_....29 
_...12 
.....17 

21 

.....17 

19 

11 



9 

19 

.....18 

15 

17 

30 

25 

13 

. 22 

_ 10 

23 

19 



Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodgee 
Lodges 
Lodges 
T>odges 
Lodges 
Loil'.'t^H 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodge* 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 
Lodges 



617 



302 GRAND LODC.E OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



LODGES, ALPHABETICALLY 



No. 
540 
61 
430 
561 
580 
614 
573 
109 
235 
158 
439 
469 
(34 
S36 
72 
i84 
S23 
32 
654 
640 
571 
140 
307 
247 
564 
SIO 

701 

682 

~ 668 

686 

704 
452 

172 
694 

482 

620 

639 
83 

234 

638 

123 

190 

225 

699 

612 

311 

314 

108 

303 

433 

554 
45 

663 

170 

854 

269 

341 

550 

106 

165 

153 

436 

637 

249 

232 

603 



and Name 

Abitibi 

Acacia 

Acacia 

Acacia 

Acacia 

Adanac 

Adoniram 

Albion 




Ancient Landmarks Hamilton 

Anthony Sayer Mimico 

Antiquity Toronto 



Arcadia 
Arkona _ 

Ashlar 

Ashlar 

Ashlar 

Ashlar 

Astra 

Atikokan 

Atomic 

Aurum 

Avon more 

Ayr 

Baldoon 
Bancroft 



_Minden 
-.Arkona 
-.Toronto 
-.Ottawa 
-Byron 



.._ Tillsonburg 

^Weston 

Atikokan 

Deep River 

Timmins 

Avonmore 

-Ayr 



Wallaceburg 

Bancroft 

Bay of Quinte Toronto 

Beach -Hamilton Beach 

Beaver Strathroy 

Beaver ^Thornbury 

Bedford Toronto 

Belleville _ 
Belmont 
Bernard 
Bethel 



No. 
532 
491 
465 
116 
92 
643 
110 
402 
270 
396 
684 
679 
457 
264 
320 
660 
148 
681 
313 
315 
254 
84 
459 
530 
91 
30 
667 
295 
501 
511 
50 

373 
96 

101 

330 

476 

481 

513 

657 

6(69 

700 

125 

454 

520 

466 

502 

677 

401 

574 

219 

389 
52 

590 



Claude M. Kent 

Clementi 

Clifford 

Clifton Niagara Falls 

Clinton Clinton 

Cobden : Cobden 




Cochrane . 

Colborne 

Composite 

CoraiK)site 

Conestogo 

Connaught 

Connaught 

Consecon .. 

Cope-Stone 

Corinthian 

Corinthian 

Corinthian 

Corinthian 

Corinthian 

Corinthian 

Corinthian 

Gorinthian 

Corinthian 

Cornwall 

Corona 

Coronati _ 
Coronation 
Coronation 
Coronation 

Craig 

Craig 

Credit 



-Cochrane 
.-Colborne 

Whitby 

-Hamilton 
Drayton 



-Mimico 
^ort William 

Consecon 

Wei land 

Barrie 



Peterboro 

London 

North Cower 

...Toronto 

..Hamilton 



-Kirkland Lake 



Cornwall 

Einto(re 

Cornwall 

Burks Falls 

Toronto 

Elmvale 

__„.Smithville 

Weston 

Deseronto 

Allsa Craig 

-Georgetown 



Crystal Fountain N. Augusta 

Dalhousie : Ottawa 

Defenders Ottawa 



Delaware Valley 

Delta 

Dentonia 

Dereham '. 

Dominion 

Dominion 

Doric 

Doric 

Doric 

Doric 

Doric _, 

Doric 

Doric 

Doric 



-Delaware 

Toronto 

-Toronto 



Mount Elgin 

Windaoi 

Ridgeway 

Ottawa 

Brantford 

Parkhill 

Lobo 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

-Pickering 



-Little Current 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 



303 



No. and Name Lof-ation 

569 Doric Lakeside 

623 Doric Kirkland Lake 

291 Dufferin W. Flamboro 

338 Dufferin Wellandport 

3S4 Dufferin Melbourne 

570 Dufferin Toronto 

449 DundaJk Dundalk 

475 Dunduri Hamilton 

66 Durham Newcastle 

306 Durham JJurham 

442 Dyment Thessalon 

588 Earl Kitchener Port McNicoll 

i^^i ?^** *^^*« Agincourt 

^^2 S,"' ^^^^ Elk Lake 

€98 Elhot Lake Elliot Lake 

ro? S'""? . Monkton 

534 Englehart Englehart 

ISo Enniskillen York 

516 Enterprise Beachburs 

6o9 Equity Orillia 

i^? Erie Port Dover 

o2, Espanola Espanola 

n.i Eureka Belleville 

209 Evergreen Lanark 

142 Excelsior Morrisburg 

592 Fairbank __ .Toronto 

77 Faithful Brethren Lindsay 

.oo F?"an-Ault Ingleside 

M ?^i^«' ?ty Port Perry 

l^n l-Avl^ Toronto 

«50 Fidelity Toledo 

o.->7 Finch Finch 

^o2 E',°''ence Florence 

689 Flower City Brampton 

331 Fordwich Fordwich 

162 Forest Wroxeter 

263 Forest Forest 

«?^ ^"""f t ■: -..Chesley 

613 Fort Erie Fort Erie 

H^ Fort William Fort William 

127 Franck Frankford 

217 Frederick „ Delhi 

143 Friendly Brothers* Iroquois 

691 Friendship Copper Cliff 

621 Frontenac Sharbot Lake 

641 Garden Windsor 

o48 General Mercer Toronto 

348 Georgian Penetanguishene 

2oo ^'f°''e'"a Toronto 

?„f l-'enrose Elmira 

028 Golden Beaver Timmins 

607 Golden Fleece Toronto 

126 Golden Rule Campbellford 

409 Golden Rule Gravenhurst 

484 Golden Star -Diyden 

Jf9 Goodwood Richmond 

472 Gore Buy Gore Bay 

608 Gothic Lindsay 

lol Grand River Kitchener 

3o2 Granite Parry Sound 

in, ^'"""'^^ ^"""t Frances 

697 Grantham Port Dalhousie 

483 Granton Granion 

47 Great Western Windsor 

629 Grenville Toronto 

589 Grey ._Toronto 

258 Guelph Guelph 

485 Haileybury Haileybury 



No. and Name I/ocation 

>»i2 Hamilton Hamilton 

327 Hammond Wardsville 

482 Hanover Hanover 

oSl Harcourt ToroiUO 

477 Harding Woodville 

57 Harmony Binbrook 

370 Harmony ; Delta 

488 Harmony Toronto 

■i79 Harmony Windsor 

216 Harris Orangeville 

•.:'^2 Harriston -_.Harriston 

696 Harry L. Martyn Toronto 

683 Hastings Hastings 

625 Hatherly Sauit Ste. Marie 

235 Havelock Watford 

435 Havelock H.iv Kv k 

450 Hawkesbury Hawkesbury 

517 Hazeldean Haz->l<iean 

383 Henderson Winchester 

388 Henderson Ilderton 

336 Highgate —Highgate 

531 High Park Toronto 

594 Hillcrest Hamilton 

319 Hiram Haeersville 

490 Hiram Markdale 

114 Hope Port Hope 

636 Hornepayne Jiornepayne 

391 Howard _._ Ridgetown 

602 Hugh Murray Hamilton 

56S Hullett Londesboro 

305 Humber Weston 

224 Huron Hensall 

392 Huron Camlachie 

611 Huron-Bruce Toronto 

543 Imperial Toronto 

503 Tnwood Inwood 

25 Ionic Toronto 

223 Ionic Brampton 

328 Ionic Napier 

461 Ionic : Rainy River 

526 Ionic Ottawa 

549 Ionic Hamilton 

203 Irvine Elora 

154 Irving Lucan 

115 Ivy _..__ Beamsville 

145 J. B. Hall Millbrook 

31 Jerusalem BowmTnvillc 

54-=^ John Rosa Robertsori Toronto 

685 Joseph A. Hearn _Pt. Credit 

584 Kaministiquia Fort William 

402 Karnak Coldwater 

374 Keene ... Keene 

417 Keewatin Keewatin 

673 Kf-mpenfeldt Barrie 

656 Kenogamisis „GeraIdton 

274 Kent Blrnheim 

230 Kerr ...Barri< 

412 Keystone Sault Ste. Marie 

64 Kilwinning T>ondon 

565 Kilwinning Toronto 

464 King Edward Sunderland 

488 King Edward .Harrow 

471 King Edward VIL.^Chippaws 

498 King George V Coboconk 

37 King Hiram Iiigersoll 

78 King Hiram Tillsonburg 

5fi<; King Hiram . Toronto 

22 King Solomon's Toronto 

43 King Solomon's Woodstock 



304 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



No. 
329 
378 
394 
655 
676 
215 
445 
645 
207 
387 
290 
139 
133 
201 
397 
419 
544 
231 
632 
282 
375 
377 
404 
622 
416 
505 
242 
169 
196 
48 
33 
140 
512 
90 

236 

631 
103 
119 

362 

600 
87 

222 

596 

405 

418 

386 

605 

652 

347 

678 

687 
55 

344 

168 

542 

379 

478 

369 

576 

253 

304 

524 

147 

572 

399 
11 

294 

599 

300 



and Name 
King Solomons 
King Solomon's 
King Solomor 
Kingsway 
Kroy 



Loration 
-Jarvis 



London 

Thamesford 

Lambton Mills 

Thornhill 



Lake _ Ameliasburg 

Lake of the Woods ._.Kenora 

Lake Shore Mimico 

Lancaster Lancaster 

Lansdowne Lansdowne 

Leamington Leamington 

Lebanon Oshawa 

Lebanon Forest Exeter 

Leeds Gananoque 

Leopold Brigden 

Liberty h^arnia 

Lincoln Abingdon 

Lodge of Fidelity Ottawa 

Long Branch Mimico 



Lorne 

Lome 

Lorne 

Lorne 

Lorne 

Lyn 

Lynden 

Ma coy 

Macnab 

Madawaska 

Madoc 

Maitland 

Malahide _ 

Malone 

Manito 

Manitoba _ 

Manitou 

Maple Leaf 
Maple Leaf 
Maple Leaf 
Maple Leaf 



Glencoe 

Omemee 

..-Shelburne 
-Tamworth 
— Chapleau 
-Lyn 



' Lynden 

Mallorytown 

-Port Colborne 

Arnprior 

-Madoc 



Godericb 

Aylmer 

—Sutton W. 
-Collingwood 
— Cookstown 
-Emo 



— St. Catharines 

Bath 

-Tara 



Markham Union 

Marmora 

Martin town 

Mattawa . 

Maxville 

McCoh 

Melita 

Memorial 

Mercer 



Mercer Wilson 

Meridian 

Merrickville 

Merrill 
Merritt 



Toronto 

Markham 

- -Marmora 

-Martintown 

Mattawa 

- -Maxville 
-West Lsrne 

Toronto 

Toronto 

__ Fergus 

—Woodatock 
-Dundas 



Merrickville 

Dorchester 

Welland 

Metropolitan Toronto 



Middlesex 
Milverton 
Mimico . 
Mimosa _ 
Minden 

Minerva 

Mississauga 
Mississippi 

Mizpah 

Moffat 

Moira 

Moore 

Mt. Dennis 
Mt. Olivet 



-Bryanston 

Milverton 

-Lambton Mills 

Toronto 

Kingston 

Stroud 

Port Credit 

Almonte 

- — Toronto 

-Harrietsville 

Belleville 

Courtright 

Weston 

Thorndale 



No. 
522 
28 
39 
431 
309 
221 
408 
360 
529 
337 
413 
556 
588 
2 
427 
345 
420 
205 
279 
444 
10 
617 
463 
591 
322 
93 
266 
223 
261 
400 
553 
346 
184 
519 
26 
521 
339 
181 

192 

325 

489 

504 
76 

508 

604 

559 

372 

510 

695 

267 

395 

587 

2fi5 

468 

627 

128 

487 

414 

161 

616 

155 

194 

535 

186 

178 

312 

506 

499 

429 



and Name 

Mt. Sinai 

Mt. Zion 

Mt. Zion 

Moravian 

Morning Star _ 

Mountain 

Murray 

Muskoka 

Myra 



Location 

Toronto 

-Kemptville 

Brooklin 

Cargill 

Carlow 



Thorold 

— Beaverton 
-.Bracebri,dge 
-Komoka 



. Port Robini^on 

Tilbury 

Spencerville 

-Capreol 




Myrtle 

Naphtali . 

Nation 

National „..,..^„. 

Niagara — Niagars-on-tfae-Lake 

Nickel Sudbury 

Nilestown Nilestown 

Nipissing North Bay 

New Dominion._New Hamburg 

New Hoiie Hespeler 

Nitetis Creemore 

Norfolk Simcoe 

North Bay 

North Entrance 

North Gate 

North Star 

Northern Li^ht 

Northern Light 

Norwood 

Oak Branch 

Oakville 

Oakwood 

Occident 

Old Light — _ 

Onondaga 

Ontario 

Ontario 

Orient 

Oriental 

Orillia 

Orono 

Osiris 

Otter 

Oxford 

Ozias 

Palace 

Palestine 

Palmer 

Parkdale 

Parkwood 

P irthenon 

Parvaim 

Patricia 

Patterson 

Peel 

Pelee 

Pembroke 

Penpwnbikong 

Pequonga 

Percy 



Oakville 

To ron to 

Toronto 

Luck now 

Onondaga 

Port Hope 

Windsor 

Toronto 

Port Burwell 

Orillia 

Orono 



.Smiths Falls 

Lombardy 

Woodstock 

Brantford 

Windsor 

Toronto 

Fort Erie 

Toronto 

Oshawa 

Chatham 

-Combpr 
...Toronto 



Thcrnhill 

Caledon East 

Scudder 

Pembroke 

-Blind River 

__ Konora 

Warkwortb 

Perfection St. Catharines 

Peterborough —Peterborough 

Pctrolia Petrolia 

Phoonix Fonthill 



Plantagenet . 
Plattsville _ 

Pny:: 

Porcupine 

Port Arthur 
Port Elgin _ 



Riceville 

Plattsville 

Wallaceburg 

_S. Porcupine 
-Port Arthur 
Port Elgin 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 



305 



No. 
443 
297 
228 
333 
334 

18 
146 
171 
371 
630 
137 
552 
578 
616 

65 
686 
122 
136 

23 
460 
595 

85 
494 
356 
292 
411 
500 
646 
453 
523 
585 
619 
479 
567 

too 

514 

16 

62 
497 
660 
593 
642 
661 
135 
425 
577 
302 

24 

15 

41 

42 

88 
243 
367 

73 

74 

17 

20 

21a 

85 

40 

63 

68 

75 

81 

82 
104 
209a 
284 



and Name 
Powassan _ 
Presiton 



Location 

Powahsan 

Preston 

Prince Arthur Odessa 

Prince Arthur Plesherton 

Prince Arthur Arthur 

Prince Edward Picton 

Prince of Wales — Newburgh 
Prince of Wales — lona Sta. 

Prince of Wales Ottawa 

Prince of Wales Toronto 

Pythasoras Meaford 

Queen City ToronU 

Queen's Kingston 

Reba Brantford 

Rehoboam Toronto 

Remembrance Toronto 

Renfrew Renfrew 

Richardson Stouffville 

Richmond . Richmond Hill 

Rideau Seeley's Bay 

Rideau Ottawa 

Rising Sun Athens 



Riverdale 
River Park 
Robertson . 
Rodney — 

Rose 

Rowland — 
Royal 



Toronto 

-Streetfiville 

King 

-Rodney 



Windsor 

-Mt. Albert 
_Fort William 



Royal Arthur Peterborough 

Royal Edward Kingston 

Runnymede Toronto 

Russell Russell 

St. Aidan's Toronto 

Alban's Mt. Forest 



St 

St. Alban's 

St. Andrew's 

St. 
!^t. 

St. 
St. 

St. 



Andrew's 
Andrew's 
Andrew's 
Andrew's 
Andrew's 
St. Andrew's 



St. 
St. 
St. 
St. 
St. 
St. 



Clair 

Clair 

Clair 

David's __ 
Francis 



Toronto 

Toronto 

Caledonia 

A rden 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Windsor 

.St. Catharines 

Milton 

Sombra 

Toronto 

St. Thomas 

—Smiths Falls 



George's __St. Catharines 



St. George's 
St. George's 
George's 
George 
George 
James 
James 
John's 
John's 
St. John's 
St. John's 
St. John's 
St. John's 
St. John's 
St. John's 
St. John's 
St. John's 
St. John's 
St. John's 
St. John's 




Ham i 1 ton 

Carleton Place 

. Ingersoll 

-...Toronto 

Mt. Brydges 

Paris 

Norwi ch 

London 

Brussels 



No. 

131 

94 

105 

107 

601 

44 

368 

197 

558 

653 

193 

421 

285 

272 

277 

633 

97 

287 

558 

486 

79 

644 

157 

518 

451 

674 

180 

259 

385 

648 

626 

426 

164 

422 

218 

69 

332 

27 

423 

447 

658 

664 

582 

672 

5 

255 

546 

609 

144 

246 

276 

462 

296 

324 

525 

597 

649 

665 

666 

690 

3 

6 

473 

177 

495 

702 

703 



and Name Location 

St. Lawrence Southamptoin 

St. Mark's Port Stonley 

St. Mark's Niagara Fall* 

St. Paul's Lambeth 

St. Paul Sarnia 

St. Thomas St. Thomas 

Salem . Brockvllle 



Saugeen 

S. A. Luke 
Scarboro — 
Scotland — 
Scott 



-Walkerton 

Ottawa 

-Agincourt 
—-.Scotland 



Grand Valley 

Alliston 

Ancaster 



Seven Star 

Seymour 

Seymour Port Dalhouaie 

Shamrock Toronto 

Sharon Queensville 

Shuniah Port Arthur 

Sidney Albert Luke — Ottawa 

Silver Cobalt 

Simcoe Bradford 

Simcoe Toronto 

Simpson _. Newboro 

Sioux Lookout _Sioux Lookout 

Somerville Kinmount 

Souths Gate Port Credit 

Speed Guelph 

Springfield Springfield 

Spry Beeton 

Spruce Falls Kapuskasing 

Stamford Stamford Centre 

Stanley Toronto 

Star in the East Wellington 

Star of the East Bothwell 

Stevenson Toronto 

Stirling Stirling 

Stratford Stratford 

Strict Observance Hamilton 

Strong Sundridge 

Sturgeon FaIls„Sturgeon Falls 

Sudbury Sudbury 

Sunnylea Lambton Mill* 

Sunnyside Toronto 

Superior Red Rock 

Sussex . Brockville 



. Dre.«den 

..St. Thomas 

Tavistock 

Stratford 



Sydenham 

Talbot 

Tavistock 

Tecumseh 

Tecumseh 

Teeswater 

Temiskaming- 

Temi)le 

Temple 

Temple 

Temple _ ^ 

Temple . 

Temple 

Temple 

Temple Kitchener 

The Anc't. St. John's Kingston 

The Barton Hamilton 

The Beaches Toronto 

The Builders Ottawa 

The Electric Hamilton 

The Lodge of 

Fellowship 

The Lodge of 
the Pillars 



Thamesville 

— -Teeswater 
.New Liskeard 
-St. Catharines 

Hamilton 

Toronto 

London 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

-Belleville 



Richmond Hill 
Weston 



306 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMTJNICATION 



No. and Name Location 

129 The Rising Sun Aurora 

406 The Spry Fenelon Falls 

195 The Tuscan London 

547 The Victory Toronto 

34 Thistle Amherstburg 

250 Thistle Embro 

692 Thomas Hamilton Simpson 

Stoney Creek 

618 Thunder Bay __.Port Arthur 

647 Todmorden Todmorden 

467 Tottenham Tottenham 

583 Transportation Toronto 

38 Trent ^Trenton 

98 True Blue Bolton 

True Britons' Perth 



14 

141 Tudor 

99 Tuscan _ 

437 Tuscan 

551 Tuscan 

Ml Tuscan 

239 Tweed 

509 Twin City 

637 Ulster 

7 Union 

9 Union 

118 Union 

880 Union 

29 United 

S7fi Unity 

60« Uni^ 

496 University 

100 Valley 

54 Vausrhan . 

268 Verulam _ 

56 Victoria _ 

299 Victoria _ 

898 Victoria 



-Mitchell 



Newmarket 

Sarnia 

Hamilton 

^Toronto 

^..-Tweed 

Kitchener 

Toronto 

Grimsby 

Napanee 

Schombere 

London 

Brighton 

Huntsville 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Dundas 

..Maple 



No. and Name 
470 Victoria . 
Victoria . 
Victory 
Vienna _ 
Vittoria . 

Wales 

Walker 



474 
563 
237 
359 
458 
321 
174 
•555 
120 
260 
357 
.=539 
361 
46 
271 
635 
166 
670 
671 
441 
683 
675 



Location 
.Victoria Harbour 

To ron to 

Chatham 

-Vienna 




Westmount 

Westport 

Wexford 

William James 
Dunlop 



— — Vittoria 
Longrue Sault 
Acton 



Millgrove 

Waterloo 

- Guelph 

Chatham 

Erin 

— Toronto 

Stoney Creek 

Agincoort 

Hamilton 



—Westport 
-A gin court 



Peterborough 



.Williamsburg 
Baden 



.Bobcaygeon 

Sarnia 

—Centreville 

-Kirkfield326 Zetland 




448 
156 
220 
410 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



307 



LODGE S BY LOC ATION 

Location Name and No. Location Name and No. 

Abincdon Lincoln 544 BurlinEton BurlinBton 165 

Acton Walker 321 Byron Ashlar 610 

^Kincourt East Gate 693 Caledon East Peel 468 

Aeincourt Scarboro 653 Caledonia St. Andrew's 62 

AKincourt West Hill 670 Campbellford Golden Rule 126 

AKincourt . _Wexford 683 Campbellville Campbell 603 

Ailsa Craig Craig 574 Camlachie Huron 392 

Alexandria Alexandria 439 Cannington "xT?'""'''^ ttt 

Alliston Seven Star 285 Capreol National 588 

Almonte Mississippi 147 Cardinal Cardinal 491 

Alvinston Alvinston 323 Cargill -_ Moravian 431 

Ameliasburg Lake 215 Carlow Morning Star 309 

Amherstburg Thistle 34 Carp ^,^^^},tT. U 

Ancaster Seymour 272 Carleton Place St. John s 63 

Arden St. Andrew's 497 Cayuga ^^^ ^^vSi^ 9^? 

Arkona Arkona 307 Centreville ~^'f°^'l III 

Arnprior Madawaska 196 Chapleau . Lome 622 

Arthur Prince Arthur 334 Chatham Parthenon 267 

^^.^=zif!:i^i^ 6g l^f s =^S 

Aylmer Malahide 140 Chippa.. "l^^^ ,f,r^^UnL^^ ^6^ 

Baden-IZZZZIIIZwilm^t 3^8 Clifford Cliff^d 315 

Bancroft Banc«,ft 482 ^^ ^ZZZZIIZZ^'^^ 486 

Barrie Trf^'^Tnl'Mt fi?^ Cobden ._..... Cobden 459 

Barr.e Kempenfeldt 673 Cobourg St. John's 17 

Barne -^-...^ Kerr 230 ^oboconk King George V 498 

Bath Maple Leaf 119 Cochrane Cochrane 530 

Beachburg Enterprise 5 6 ^n,orne Colborne 91 

BeamsviUe ^ Ivy 115 Coldwater Karnak 492 

Beaverton Murray 408 Collingwood Manito 90 

Beeton ^-^^l^ ^^ Comber - Parvaim 395 

Belleville- Eureka 283 Consecon Consecon 50 

Beilpville .Moira 11 Cookstown Manitoba 236 

Belleville . Belleville 123 Copper CHIT __...Algonqnin .'.36 

BellevilJe Temple 666 Copper Cliff Friendship 691 

Belmont Belmont 190 Cornwall Corinthian 669 

Binbrook Harmony .'^7 Cornwall Cornwall 125 

Blenheim _ Kent 274 Courtrit;ht Moore 294 

Blind River Penewobikong 487 Creemore Nitetis 444 

Blyth Blyth 303 p^ep River'"— l-I Atomic 686 

Bobcaygeon Verulam 268 Delaware Delaware Valley 358 

Bolton True Blue 98 Delhi Frederick 217 

Bothwell Star of the East 422 Delta Harmony 370 

Bowmanville Jerusalem 31 Deseronto CrsiK 401 

Bracebridge Muskoka 360 Dorchester Mprrill 344 

Bradford Simroe 79 Drayton , Conphtopro 295 

Brampton Flower City 689 Dresden Sydenham 255 

Brampton Ionic 229 Dryden Golden Stnr 484 

Brantford Brant 45 Dundalk ^.__.._ Dnndnlk 449 

Brantford Doric 121 Dundas Meridian 687 

Brantford Ozias 508 Dundas Valley 100 

Brantford _Reba 515 Dunnville Amity 32 

Bricrden Leopold 397 Durham Durham 306 

Brighton United 29 Dutton _._.. Ciimeron 232 

Brockville Salem 368 Eganville -I Eonnechere 433 

Brorkville -...Sussex 5 Elk Lake Klk Lake ."^O? 

Brooklin Mount Zion 39 Elliot Lake Elliot take 698 

Brussels St. John's 284 Elmira Glenrose 628 

Bryanston Middlesex 379 Elmvale Coronation 466 

Burford Burford lOfi Elora Irvine 203 

Burks Falls Corona 454 Embro Thistle 250 

Burlington Brant 668 Emo Manitou 631 



308 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



Location 

Emsdale 
Englehart 

Erin 

Espanola 

Essex 

ExPtpr 

Fen el on 
Fergus 
Finch . 
FinKal 



Name and No. Location 



Falls 



Flesherton 

Florence 

Fordwich 

Forest 

Fonthill 

Fort Erie 

Fort Erie 

Fort Frances 
Fort William 
Fort William 
Fort William 
Fort William 

Frankford 

Gait 

Gait 



Algonquin 434 

Englehart 534 

Wellington 271 

Espanola 527 

Central 402 

-Lebanon Forest 133 

The Spry 406 

Mercer 347 

Finch 557 

-Warren 120 



-Prince Arthur 333 

Florence 390 

Pordwich 331 

Forest 263 

Phoenix 535 

Fort Erie 613 

Palmer 372 

..Granite 446 



Gananoque 

Georgetown _ 

Geraldton 

Glencoe 

Goderich 

Gore Bay 

Grand Valley 
Granton 



Connaugrht 511 

-Port William 415 
-Kaministiquia 584 

Royal 453 

Franck 127 

Alma 72 

Gait 257 

Leeds 201 



Gravenhurst 

Grimsby 

Guelph 

Guelph 

Guelph 

Guelph 

Hagersville 

Haileybury 

Haliburton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton . 

Hamilton 

Hamilton . 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 



Credit 219 

— Kenogamiais 656 

Lome 282 

Maitland 33 

Gore Bay 472 

Scott 421 

Granton 483 

Golden Rule 409 

Union 7 

Guelph 258 

Speed 180 

Waverley 361 

Wyridham 688 

_Hiram 319 



Haileybury 485 

North Entrance 463 

Acacia 61 

Ancient Landmarks 654 

Buchanan 550 

Composite 667 

Corinthian 513 

Doric 382 

Dundurn 475 
..Hamilton 562 
. Hillcrest 594 



Hamilton Beach 

Hanover 

Harrietsville 



Hugh Murray 602 

— Ionic 549 

-_-_St. Andrew's 593 

St. John's 40 

. Strict Observance 27 

..-.Temple 324 

The Barton 6 

The Electric 495 

Tuscan 551 

Wardrope 555 

-Westmount 671 
—Beach 639 



-Hanover 432 

Moffat 399 



Harriston Harriston 262 

Harrow .._ King Edward 48.^ 

Harrowsmith Albion 1*^9 

Hastings -Hastings 633 



Havelock 

Hawkesbury 
Hazeldean _ 

Hensall 

Hepworth _ 

Hespeler 

tiighgate 

Hornepayne 
Huntsville _ 

Ilderton 

Ingersoll 

Ingersoll 

Ingleside 

innerkip 

in wood 



Name and No. 

Havelock 435 

—Hawkesbury 450 

Hazeldean 517 

Huron 224 

Burns 436 

New Hope 279 

Highgate 336 

—Hornepayne 636 
Unity 376 



Henderson 388 

-King Hiram 37 
-....St. John's 68 
-Farran-Atdt 25« 



-Oak Branch 261 

In wood 503 

lona Station -.Prince of Wales 171 

Iroquois Friendly Brothers' 143 

Iroquois Falls Abitibi 540 

Jarvis King Solomon 329 



Kapuskasing 
Keene 



-Spruce Falls 648 
-Keene 374 



Keewatin Keewatin 417 

Kemptville Mount Zion 28 

Kenora Lake oi the Woods 445 

Kenora Pequonga 414 

Kincardine Northern Light 93 

King Robertson 292 

Kingston-.The Anct. St. John's 3 



Kingston 
Kingston 
Kingston 
Kingston 
Kingsville 

Kinmount 

Kintore 

Kirkfield 

Kirkland Lake 
Kirkland Lake 



-Cataraqui 92 

Minden 253 

-Queen's 578 

Edward 585 

41 



Kitchener 

Kitchener 

Kitchener 

Komoka 

Lakefield 

Lakeside 

Lambeth 

Lambton 

Lambton 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Lancaster 

Lansdowne 

Leamington 

Lindsay Faithful 

Lindsay 
Listowel 



Royal 

St. George's 

Somerville 451 

Corinthian 700 

Victoria 398 

Corinthian 657 

Doric 623 

Grand River 151 

Temple 690 



Mills 
Mills 
Mills 



Twin City 509 

Myra 529 

—dementi 313 

Doric 569 

St. Paul's 107 
-Kingsway 655 

Mimico 369 

— Sunnylea 664 

-Evergreen 209 

Lancaster 207 




Lansdowne 387 

Leamington 290 

Brethren 77 

Gothic 608 

Bernard 225 

Doric 455 

Doric 289 

Otter 504 

Hullett 568 

Acacia 580 

Centennial 684 

Corinthian 330 

Kilwinning 64 

King Solomon's 378 

St. George's 42 

St. John's 20 

St. John's 209a 

.-.Temple 597 

The Tuscan 195 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 



309 



Location 
London 
Longue Sault 

Lucan 

Lucknow 

Lyn 



Lynden 

Madoc 

Mallorytown 

Maple 

Markdale 

Markham 

Marmora 

Martintown , 

Mattawa 

Maxville 

Meaford 

Melbourne _ 

Merlin ..._ 

Merrickville 

Merritton 

Midland 

Millbrook 

Millfrrove 

Milton 

Milverton 

Mimico 

Mimico 

Mimico 

Mimico 

Minden 

Mitchell 

Monkton 



Name and No. 

..Union 38n 

Wales 458 

..._Irving 154 

-Old Light 184 
..Lyn 416 



Lynden 505 

Madoc 48 

Macoy 242 

Vaughan 54 

Hiram 49C 

.Markham Union H"? 

Marmora 222 

Martintown 596 

Mattawa 405 

Maxville 418 

______Pythagora3 137 

Dufferin 364 

Century 457 

Merrickville 55 

Adanac 614 

Caledonian 249 

J. B. Hall 145 

Waterdown 357 

St. Clair 135 

Milverton 478 

—Anthony Sayer 640 

Connauprht 501 

Lake Shore 645 

Long Branch 632 

Arcadia 440 

Tudor 141 

Elma 456 



Morrisburg 

Mount .Albert 
Mount Brydges 
Mount Elgin _ 
Mount Forest _ 
Napanee 

Napier 

Newboro - 

Newburgh 

Newcastle 



Excelsior 142 

Rowland 646 

St. John's 81 

Dereham 624 

St. Alban's 200 

..Union 9 

Ionic 328 

Simpson 157 



-Prince of Wales 146 

Durham 66 

New Hamburg.New Dominion 205 

New Li.skeard Temiskaming 462 

Npwmarket ._ _. Tii^'can 99 

Niagara -.._NiaKara-an-the-Lake 2 

Niagara Falls Adoniram 573 

NiagJfra Falls Clifton 254 

Niagara Falls St. Mark's 105 

Nilestown Nilestown 345 

North .Augusta. Crystal Fount. 389 



Bay 
Bay -_ 
Cower 



North 
North 
North 

Norwich 

Norwood -._ 

Oakville 

Oakville 

Ode.ssa 

Oil Springs 

Omemee 

Onondaga _ 
Orsngeville 

Orillia 

Orillia 

Orono 

Oshawa 

Oshawa 

3shawa 



Nipissing 42" 

North Bay 617 

Corinthian 476 

St. John's 104 

_ Norwood 223 

.Claude M. Kent 681 

— _ Oakville 4nn 

— Prince Arthur 228 

Alexandra l.^S 

Lome 37.T 

Onondaga 519 

Hirris 21 « 

Equity 659 

— Orillia 192 

Orono 32." 

Cedar 270 

Lebanon l.?"^ 

Parkwood 695 



Location 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa . 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound 
Owen Sound 

Paisley 

P'limerston 

Paris 

Parkhill 



Name and No. 
-Temple 649 
—Acacia 561 



-Ashlar 564 

Chaudiere 264 

Civil Service 148 

Dalhousie 52 

Defenders 590 

—-..Doric 58 

Ionic 526 



Lodge of Fidelity 231 

Prince of Wales 371 

Rideau 595 

St Andrew's 560 

Sidney Albert Luke 558 
Temple 685 



Parry Sound 

Pembroke 

Penetanguishene 

Perth 

Peterborough 
Peterborough 
Peterborough 
Peterborough 



-The Builders 177 

North Star 3^2 

_St. George's 88 

Aldworth 235 

Blair 314 

St. John's 82 

Doric 233 

Granite 352 



Petrolia - 
Petrolia 
Pickering 
Picton _ 



Pembroke 128 

--Georgian 348 

True Britons' 14 

Corinthian 101 

Peterborough 155 

-Royal Arthur 523 

William James 

Dunlop 675 
Petrolia 194 



Plattsville _ 
Port Arthur 



Port 
Port 
Port 
Port 



Arthur 
Arthur . 
Burwell 
Credit _ 



Washington 260 

Doric 424 

-Prince Edward 18 

Platuville 178 

Port Arthur 499 

__...-— -Shuniah 287 

Thunder Bay 618 

Oriental 181 

Joseph A. 

Heam 685 

—.Mississauga 524 

South Gate 674 

Macnab 169 

-Grantiian €99 
—Seymour 277 
Erie 149 



Port Elgin 429 

Hope 114 

Ontario 26 



Port Credit 

Port Credit 

Port Colborne . 
Port Dalhousie 
Port Dalhousie 

Port Dover 

Port Elgin __. 

Port Hope 

Port Hope 

Port McNicoll —Earl Kitchener 538 

Port Perry Fidelity 428 

Port Robinson Myrtle 337 

Port Rowan Walsingham 174 

Port Stanley St. Mark's 94 

Powassan Pov. assan 443 

Prescott Central 110 

Preston Preston 297 

Princeton Blenheim 108 

Queensville Sharon 97 

Rainy River Ionic 461 

Red Lake Chukuni 660 

Red Rock Superior 672 

Renfrew -Renfrew 122 

Riceville Plantagenet 186 

Richmond Goodwood 159 

Richmond Hill ..Richmond 23 



Richmond Hill 



The Lodge 

of Fellowship 702 



310 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



Location 

Ridgeto-svn 

Ridgeway 

Rodney 

Russell 

St. Catharines Maple Leaf 

St. Catharines Perfection 

St. Catharines St. Andrew's 

St. Catharines SL George's 



Name and 

Howard 

Dominion 

Rodney 

Russell 



St. Catharines 

George 

Marys 



-Temple 



St. 
St. 

St. 



Thomas 
Thomas 
St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Sarnia 

Sarnia 

Sarnia 



Sault Ste. Marie 
Sault Ste. Marie 
Sault Ste. Marie 

Schomberg 

Scotland 

Seaforth _ 

Scudder 

Seeley's Bay 

Sharbot Lake 

Shelburne 

Simcoe 




Sioux Lookout- 
Smiths Falls 
Smiths Falls _ 

Smithville 

Sombra 



-Sioux Lookout 
Orisis 



Southampton 

South Augusta _ 
South Porcupine 
Stamford Centre 
Stamford Centre 

Spencerville 

Springfield 

Stayner 

Stirling 



St. Francis 

Coronation 

St. Clair 

-St. Lawrence 
St. James 



-Porcupine 
Centennial 
—Stamford 

Nation 

Springfield 
Northern Liirht 
Stirling 



Stoney Creek 

Thomas Hamilton Simpson 

Stoney Creek Wentworth 

Stouffville Richardson 

Stratford Stratford 

Stratford Tecumseh 

Strathroy Beaver 

Street<=vi!le River Park 

Stroud Minerva 

Sturgeon Falls Sturgeon Fal'." 

Sudbury Beithel 

Sudbury Nickel 

Sudbury Sudbury 

Sunderland King Edward 

Sundridep Strong 

Sutton West _Malono 

Tamworth Lome 

Tara Manle Lesf 

Tavistock Tavistock 

Teeswater Teeswater 

Terrace Bay Terrace Bay 

Thamesford King Solomon 

Thamesville Tecumseh 

Thedford Cassia 

Thessalon Dvment 

Thornbury Beaver 



No. 
391 
615 
411 
479 
103 
616 
661 

15 
2t)6 
243 

73 
31JZ 

44 
546 
419 
601 
437 

56 
469 
625 
412 
lib 
193 
170 
627 
460 
621 
377 

10 
51S 
489 

24 
502 
425 
131 

74 
506 
679 
626 
556 
259 
2'56 

69 

692 
166 
136 
332 
144 
83 
356 
304 
447 
699 
427 

e.'is 

464 
423 
512 
404 
362 
609 
276 
662 
394 
245 
116 
442 
234 



Location 
Thornhill _ 
Thornhill . 
Tilbury __ 
Tillsonburg 
Tillsonburg 

ThOiold 

Timmins 

Timmins 

Tiverton _ 
Todmorden 

Toledo 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 
Toronto 
loronio 
Toronto 
loronuj 
Toronto 
ioronto 
Toronto 
ioronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto John 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto 



Name and No. 
JCroy 876 



Patterson 265 

Naphtali 413 

Ashlar 701 

King Hiram 78 

Mountain 221 

Aunim 704 



-Golden Beaver 528 

Bruce 341 

Todmorden 647 

Fidelity 650 

Acacia 430 

-Alpha 384 



-Antiquity 571 
.Ashlar 247 
Bay of Quinte 620 

Bedfoid 638 

_ Birch Cliff 612 

Caledonia 637 

Canada 532 

—Cathedral 643 

Corinthian 481 

Coronati 520 

Delta 634 

Dentonia 651 

—Doric 316 

— Dufferin 570 



-Fairbank 592 
— Fidelity 575 



Georgina 343 

-General Mercer 548 

— Golden Fleece 607 

— Grenville 629 

.. —Grey 589 

Harcourt 581 

-Harmony 438 



SaxTj L. Martyn 696 

High Park 531 

Huron-Bruce 611 

Imperial 543 

Ionic 25 

— King Solomon's 22 

Kilwinning 565 

King Hiram 566 

Ross Robertson 545 

Maple Leaf 600 

. Melita 605 

-Memorial 652 



-Metropolitan 542 
-Mizpah 572 



Mimosa 576 

— Mt. Sinai 522 
-North Gate 591 

Oakwood 553 

Occident 346 

Orient 339 

Palestine 559 

Parkdale 510 

Patricia 587 



Prince of Wales 630 

Queen City 552 

Rehoboam 65 

Remembrance 586 

Riverdale 494 

Runnymcde 619 

St. Aldan's 567 

St. Alb»n'8 514 

St Andrew's 1 6 

St. George 367 

St. Clair 577 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 



311 



Thorndale 
bocation 
Toronto _ 
Toronto ... 
Toronto 
Toronto 
Toronto _ 
Toronto _ 
Toronto -_ 
Toronto _ 
Toronto 
Toronto _. 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Tottenham 

Trenton 

Tweed 

Uxbridge 

Vankleek Hill 

Victoria Harbour 

Vienna 

Vittoria -_ 

Walkerton 

Wallaceburg 

Wallaceburg 
Wardsville 
Warkworth 
Waterford - 

Waterloo 

Watford 

Wawa 

Welland 



-Mount Olivet 300 
Name and No. 

Shamrock 533 

Simcoe 644 



Stanley 426 

Stevenson 218 

Sunnyside 582 

_ Temple 525 

The Beaches 47.^ 

The Victory M7 

Transportation 5s3 

Tuscan 541 

Ulster 537 

Unity 606 

University 496 

Victoria 474 

Wellington 635 

Wilson 86 

York 156 

Zeta 410 

Zetland 326 

Tottenham 467 

Trent 38 

Tweed 239 



.- Zeredatha 220 
St. John's 21A 

Victoria 470 

Vienna 237 

Vittoria 359 

Saupeen 197 

Baldoon 694 

-Pnyx 312 

Hammond 327 

Percy 161 

Wilson 113 

Waterloo 539 

Havelock 238 

Woodland 680 

Cope-stone 373 



Toronto 

Location 

Welland 

VV'ellandport 

Wellington Star 

West Flamboro 

West Lome 

Weston 

Weston 

Weston 

Weston 



-St. John's 75 

Name and No. 

Merritt 168 

Dufferin 338 

n the East 164 

Dufferin 291 

McColl 386 

-Astra 682 



Coronation 677 

Humber 305 

-Mount Dennis 599 
Weston — The Lodge of 

the Pillars 703 

Westnort Westport 441 

Whcatley Xenophon 448 

Whitby Composite 30 

Wiarton Cedar 396 

Williamsburg 480 

Henderson 383 

Border Cities 554 

Dominion 598 

Garden 641 

Great Western 47 

Harmony 579 

Ontario 521 

Palace 604 

Rose 500 

Andrew's 642 

Windsor 403 

-Wingham 286 

Blackwood 311 

— Harding 477 

King Solomon's 43 

ercer Wilson 678 

Oxford 76 

Forest 1«2 

Bums' 163 

Enniskitlen iso 




312 «RAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

RESTORATIONS— 1960 

2— H. P. Bishop. 3— J. W. MacDonald. 10— D. L. Dennis. 24— W. 
H. Wilson. 27— E. C. Howell. 29— N. Marshall, C. L. Swartman. 
81— G. White. 38— T. D. Macauley. 39— F. Richardson. 40— B. 
Fowler. 45— G. Glanville. 46— H. Goodwin, W. L, Loxton, W. D. 
Sewell. F. W. Crookes. 47— J. A. A, Mennell, E. C. Churchill, R. J. 
Spencer, H. H. Catfield. 48— Z. Bristol, J. W. Munro. 52— A. Rockliff. 
61— W. W. Pearson, D. C. Glass, J. M. MacRae. 65— J. A. Newlands. 
69— B. C. Donnan. 73— W. N. Alberts. 81— J. H. Gibbs. 84— H. W. 
Gould, C. O. Cox. 87— R. W. C^ampbell. 90— A. J, Plant. 91— W. L. 
Chapman. 92-^. Mitchell, C. G. King. 99— J. W. Bartholomew, A. R. 
Porter. 105— J. W. McKay. 114— A. E. Winston. 119— G. B. Mac- 
Donald, H. C. Burleigh. 122— E. C. Wilson. 123— W. W. Smith Jr.. 
W. R. Windover, V. Eachus. 125— A. McGibbon. 126 — L. Henson. 
137— F. A. Brown. 139— G. W. Jackson. G. R. Foster. 142— E. C. 
Hess, K. W. Froats. 154 — W. O. Dixon. 165— R. L. Scott. 180— D. 
Wilson, G. E. Sheehy. 197— K. R. Bessey. 201— C. A. Walker. . 207— 
W. H. McCosham. 209A— W. M. Page. 218— R. S. Cameron. 229— 
H. L. Robson. 230— B. E. Neill. 247— E. C. Thompson. 250— H. 
Jackson. 254— D. H. Scott. 258— H. Bannister. 259— T. W. McGill. 
266— G. A. Watson. J. Douthwaite. 267— D. Lenfesty. 277— J. H. 
Driver. 283— R. L. Sprague, G. R. Purdy. 285 — R, Barnes. 294 — H. 
E. B. Brown. 296— H. P. Armsti-ong. 307— W. Lambie. 314— G. W. 
Brown. 324— K. D. McColl. 325— R. A. Winter. 326— H. R. Mount- 
tain 331— T. Wilson. 333 — G. R. Fenwick. 338— T. Freure. 346 — 
C. S. Anger. 352— D. S. Ritchie. 354— H. L. Lidstone. 371 — C. H. 
Eldridge, R. C. Moffatt. 376— W. L. Crompton. 378— P. Leslie, W. 
Hetheringtoni. 380— J. D. McCartney, R. L. Small, J. S. Smith. 382 — 
A. Anderson, G. T. Kent. 392— S. S. Steele, J. McFarlane. 393— J. 
R. B. Lamiman, J. A. Dolphin. 396 — E. LI. Hardman, H. Hopkins. 
401— A. R. Herrington. 402— T. S. Slote, E. T. Saunders. 403 — R. O. 
Widkens. 406— T. L. Northey, R. B. Beggs. 410— B. C. Wigmore, H. 
C. Mead. 411— C. Buth. 417— W. T. Moore. 420— A. J. Hatcher. 
433— R. McTiernan. 437— C. E. Richmond. 442— S. B. Bromley, G. 
Reid. 446^H. G. M. Ayre, C. H Borgeson. 449^F. A. McLeanL 
452— G. A. Helmer. 455— N. P ^a^. 458— D. L. Wylie, W. E. 

Armstrong. 463— ^C. Hussey. 4B4 — r<. G. McDonald. 468 — S. Wllsoo. 
474— T. B. Sanders. 482— J. C. Lumb, W. F. Smith. 483— H. Alp. 
485— J. M. Robb, G. A. Piche, J. A. Thomson. 487— W. J. Innes. 
499— T. B. Atchie. 507— G. Pic-he. 508— S. A. Cordrey, H. B. Storer. 
513— J. H. Garbett. 515— D. Snyder. A. Strather. 521— W. J. Hutchin- 
son, F. C. Mansell. 522— S. C. Bond, J. M. Gordon. 626— W. G. 
Van Slyck. 529— J. M. Gordon. 532— D. W. Gark. 542— C. C. 
Holman. 545— J. A. Miller. 549— E. W. Bird. 550— H. Ripley. 
552 — E. Remes. R. Kent. 553— G. W. Lovegrovp. 554 — R. H. Scrivens. 
555— E. E. Cotter. 560— D. M. Gaitens. 561— W. Karam. 563— F. S. 
Rawlings. .=;64— J. M. Grant. 565— G. W. Co<>, E. M. Kennedy, W. J. 
Russell. 567— L. R. Graham. 579— C. G. MacDonald. 591— L. 

McAteer, J. A. Wells. 597— K. L. Swartz. 598— D. MacMillan, R. 
Johnston. A. Pirak. 602— G. S. Skene, S. Lyons. 604— R. F. Fyffe. 
605 — .T. M. Clendinning. 606 — E. J. Galway, J. Lindsay, S. Rainey. 
607— F. Jewell. A. T. Pearse. 611^J. W. Robinson. 616— S. R. Taube. 
617— T. W. Williamson. 619— R. Holbrook. 620— W. D. Calder, 622— 
J. H. Hastings. 623— J. G. Angus. C. H. Olsen. 626— J. W. Gardiner. 
630— ,G. A. Johnson. 632— A. McMillan. ^33 — A. G. Armstrong. 

634- B. R. Ord. 637— H. Q. Boyd. 641— R. V. Carter. 642— A. H. 
Gladstone Jr. 647— W. J. Bogle. 654— J. T. Kemp. 664— H. A, 
Carberry. 698 — W. J. Innes. 

RESTORATION — U>TMASONIC CONDUCT 

644 — Ivan B. Grose. 

SUSPENSIONS — 1960 

» — S. J. Edgley, H. B. J. Jamieson, D. C. Clement. 5 — A. Frieday, 
J A. Roth. 6 — D. G. Browne. 10 — H. D. Blayney, C. M. Browne, D. 
Kennedy. F. V. Sanders, M. Blayney, F. E. Blayney, A. Robb. 11 — C. 
A. Haight, G. S. Dumphy, D. C. Alexander. E. G. Shorey, D. A. Hill, G. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 818 

H. Carveth, M. J. Hunter, L. B. Chinningham, W. A. Lowen. 16 — G. H. 
Dickinson, R. A. Gilliland, M. E. T)&gg. 17— H. L. Watson, C. M. 
Niles. 20— J. Milliken. J. A. Moffatt, T. R. YounKcr, H. H. Luscombe, 
D. W. Milne, W. H. Gluff. 22 — E. R. Brown, H. G. Laine, T. M. 
Maxwell, J. W. Spear, J. Craip, A. A. Cracknell, G. W. Muir, J. R. 
Townley. H. E. Townley, N. G. Treadwell, J. Watson, J. Watkins. 24 — 
G. R. Gillespie, C. J. Cavana^h, A. S. Richardson, C. D. Wiltsie. 25 — 
N. Kinersmill. 26 — W. M. Roche, W. G. D. MacMillan, J. W. Trueman, 
F. G. Tufford, A. R. Lewis. 27— G. D. L. Lee, E. C. Howell. 28— R. 
H. Dewar. W. E. Tilley, S. W. McKeen, H. E. Hunter. 31— A. R. 
McDonald. L. E. Hastings, J. D. Wright, H. S. Brooking, G. White. 
33— D. Mclvor, L. F. Hartwidt, S. C. Anderson. 34— G. Mickle, W. 
Staddon. 35— T. C. Rhodes. 37— H. H. Gray. 38— W. G. FleTi^relling, 
J. G. McLean, D. S. MacLean, T. D. Macauley. 39 — S. Lockyer, T. M. 
Lakey, N. Swanson. 40 — W. Clarke, E. H. Wilson, E. Mearns, E. 
de Patoul. 41— D.T. Heaton, D. J. Heckman. 45— G. M. Glanville, J. 
Smith, T. A. Nuttycombe. R. E. Harrison, J. E. Donkin, R. N. Sharen, 

D. A. MacCauley, E. Newman. 46 — ^G. B. Lafferty, H. Lawrence. 47 — F. 

A. Appleyard, E. Tutton, W. S. Park, O. MoCuaig, H. C. Johnson, 
W. N. VanNest, G. C. Clark, W. H. Vincent, A. K. Rankin, D. D. James, 
R. H. Moir, R. J. Warnock. D. R. Phillips. 52— C. S. McPartlin. 56— J. 
Dick A. Crawford. 57— W. J. Ellliott, A. Stinson. J. H. Glover. 58— B. 
Lake. 61— R. H. Evans, C. M. Lifeso. U. E. Smith, C. E. Olmstead, H. 

E. Owen. €3— J. Bracewell. 64— K. L. Wilkins, L. V. Travers. 65— T. 
H. Atkinson, W. R. Barnes, D. G. Berryman, F. W. E. Hamer, R. R. 

B. Hara. G. E. Hunter, J. D. McMillan, H. M. Nash, A. E. Patchell. 
66 — F. J. Thomas. 69— R. P. Parker. 72— L. Taylor. 75 — L. 
P. Gurney. 76— W. J. Cameron, C. D. McPherson, W. W. McHouIl, 
R. J. Renwick, J. J. Taplay. 77— A.McIsaac. 82— T. G. English, 
A. W. J. Kensit. 84— C. D. Cox, R. M. McVean, F. A. Thompson, 
L. I. McGovern, L. J. McKnight, J. T. Wood, J. A. Austin. 85 — 
W. B. Robertson, H. N. Burgess. 86 — W. G. Bennett, J. A. Bromley, 
E. N. Loftus. A. B. Va-sey, H. J. Winfield. 87— J. H. Little. 90— 
E. W. Baran, O. H. Sipe, D. Young. 92— C. G. King, V. L. 
MacLeod. C. G. Gibbs, J. Mitchell, H. Mauger. 96— G. S. Mc- 
Kenzie, H. O. Moore, W. H. Brown, A. R. Perkins. 97 — D. Ouder- 
kirk, A. Young, W. C. Timuik. 99— J. C. Hamilton. 101 — ^F. L. 
Huffman. C. P. Dorrinprton. 103 — J. Phillips, T. O. Hey, G. Morgan. 
105— F. Bullas. 107— J. D. H. Campbell. 110— D. E. Hilborn, M. W. 
Long. 118— J. C. Furton, C. C. Sutton. 119— ffl. 0. Burleigh, G. O. 
Sloan, J. C. Head, W. C. McEwen. K. C. Sharp. 122— G. R. Ledingham. 
123— R. A. Wardle. J. N. Brintnell, J. W. MoAteer. 126— L. Henson, W. 

A. Hogle. H. A. Potts. 127— B. A. Dafoe, H. W. Smith, C. CTarke. 
129— W. H. Hutchinson. 136— R. Q. Bone, T. H. Forgie. 137— W. W. 
Hamly, C. D. Grant. R. J. McMillen, T. J. Simms. 140 — H. G. Pratt. 
142— M, Reader. E. C. Hess. 143— W. R. Strader. 144— W. H. Snyders. 
W. H. Graham, J. F. Gilbert, J. R. Ward. 145— G. A. McGahey. 
151— M. A. Van Oordt, R. J. Nesbitt, M. J. Hart, S. S. Gill, A. D. Rose, 

B. B. Coombs, W. G. Speake, G. T. Jones, D. J. Demerling, G. R. Ross. 
157— R. R. Stevens. H. G. Smith. 165— R. L. Scott. J. McKechnie, J. 
D. Bennett. 166— R. A. Wilson, W. H. Roberts, E. S. J. Brewer, E. E. 
Bertrand. 171— R. A. Cooper. 177— E. C. Gardham, W. J. St. George, 
M. L. Bradley. 180— A. V. Green, R. H. Laidlaw. A. Morris, G. R. 
Barber, C. Ferneghough, N. Scarrow, W. L. Hill. H. Chappel, R. N. 
Atkinson. H. G. Stokes. 184 — ^H. D. Purdon. E. McPherson. 186— M. 
Bickerstaff, J. K. Proudfoot. 192— W. E. Glass. 193— L. N. Nagy. 
196 — C. G. Mathews, H. L. .Tones. .A.. L, Stevenson, R. E. Wfx>d, P. 
Maclntyre, E. O. Coe. 197— W. F. Ahern. K. R. Betsey. W. M. Wvlie, S. 
W. Pattison. 201— W. Stafford. J. H. Gray. 209— R. L. H:iy. 209A— A. 
B. James. R. I. Archer. M. E. Foster, R. D. Grassick. E. T. Harding, R. 
H. Hamill, F. A. L. Smythe, R. W. Skinner. W. M. Pace. 215- W. F. 
Dawes, S. B. Jenkins. 217 — A. G. Slaght, H. M. Fair. 218 — S. C. 
Bourne, J. B. Ferguson. D. Aikenhead, .T. L. Leslie, F. H. Carter, R. S. 
Cameron. C. J. Reynolds. 220— A. Gqrv'io. .T. E. Macmillan, H. W. 
Welch, W. Borrowman. 221 — J^. F. Ragna'l. E. Neilsen. 22S — J. Cos- 
grove. 229— H. P. Prop.ser, H. L. Millnr, W. G. Dawson. A. W. Knight. 
230— W. R. Lytton, W. E. BIceg. J. E. Brewer, D. B. Duncan, R. H. 
Johnson. 231 — J. L. MacArthur, C. B. Head. C. C. D. Cheshire. 232 — 
O. S. CTappe, W. MoCullagh. R. Webster, P. G. McPherson, L. H. J. 



314 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Smith, J. J. Eberle. 237— C. R. Pears. 239— H. R. Geen. 243— E. J. 
Milligan, J. D. Patterson. 247 — W. T. Smith. 257— J. Thordale, W. 
O. Houser, H. A. Cooper, R. Shettler. 258— A. Cavanaugh, W. P. 
Foster, C. L. Stevenson, W. R. Buffin. 260— G. C. Brand. 265 — A. 
Sinclair. 267— P. Peters, T. Pallas, M. Freeman, R. Heath. 272 — R. 
B. McPherson, J. E. G. Rorke, V. A. Pound. 274— H. O. Goff. 277— 
G. A. Rushton, J. H. Driver, K. M. Chirgwin. 282— J. Burchett. 283— 
G. W. Gee, J. E. Samain, C. R. Pryke. 285— A. Hems, R. Barnes. 
287— E. W. Robison, E. K. Andrews, W. R. Skinner, L. A. Widdifield, H. 
Hopper, D. M. Scott. 289— G. L. Hull. 290— D. C. MacLean. 292— J. 
FergiLjon, T. Walker, M. H. McQuarrie, J. Norris, H. Wellesley, J. 
White, C. Canning. W. D. Glass, G. E. Scott. 294— J. Stothers. 295— 
R. S. Campbell. 296— W. J. Oille, A. M. Purdie, T. H. Elliotson, N. 
Day, N. B. Thomas. T. Millar, R. Semple. 297^. Ross, C. Rittenhoiise. 
304— L. A. Sawyer, J. A. Manning, R. V. Campbell. 305— A. A. Steele, 
G. B. Lewis. J. Jolly, L. Shakesby. 311— J. A. Austin, H. E. Horsley, 
J. G. Davies. 312 — S. J. McCaughey. 316— T. A. Post, V. J. Giddins, 
J. Wall, J. Wikon. 319— C. E. Ramey. J. J. M. Wighton, L. W. 
Balfour. 322— E. C. McNab. 324— T. E. Opie, K. D. McColl, H. F. 
Gibbs. 325— C. R. Knox. 329— R. D. Ordinal. 330— J. Brash, W. C. 
Boyce, J. R. Graham, R. S. Stevens, E. R. Rowe. 332 — L. W. Sanders, 
A. B. Saunders. 333 — G. R. Fenwick, E. J. Beaton. 338 — A. J. Smith. 
339— J. C. Finlay. L. A. Rodbard. C. K. Moore. J. T. McMullan. L. W. 
Burton, C. D. MacKay, E. Nethercott. 341— M. McNeil, W. J. Grunder. 
344— C. B. Preston. 346— D. A. G. Rankilor, K. J. Pekin. 347— C. T. 
Dix. W. J. Fleet. 348— C. W. Weegar, C. A. Day, F. E. Soott, W. B. 
Armstrong, J. E. Stewart. 352— R. R. Forder. G. A. Smith. J. D. 
Byrne. G. A. Moore. 357 — L. V. Doyle. R. W. Neal. 360— J. A. 
Rinrtoul. 361 — U A. Campbell. 3«4— W. G. Lawrencet A. E. 

Stephenson. 367— A. Nepean. R. S. Wedekamm. 368 — S. B. Mills, 

D. B. Livingston, B. C. Guilboard, J. E. Fox. 371— L. E. Jackson, W. 
F. Holt, D. W. Sullivan, N. C. Martin, D. R. Lindsay, J. Saunders, M. 

A. T. Burke. D. E. Samuda. 372— H. L. Hall. 375— T. W. Rehill. L. 

B. Middleton. E. R. Roos, A. J. Chessar. 380— J. Noble, J. Knowles Jr.. 
N. B. Borne, E. J Brown. 382— S. A. McCracken. 383— G. Foxton, 
H. R. Partridge, J. B. Dawson, G. W. Fleming. 384— C. A. Breckles, H. 
ClaphRm, J. Walker. R. B. Edmonds, J. L. Malloney. 385— W. Brennand. 
986— H. Staddon, D. Campbell, F. J. Hay. 388— F. W. McAndless, A. 
Paisley. 389— T. H. G. Luther. 391— L. McLarty, D. E. Kearney, D. 
Henry. A. E. Galbraith. L. O. Conway, G. F. Butler, W. Markham, A. 
Everitt, D. Fair. R. I. Delmege. A. M. Proctor. 393— J. W. B. Thomson, 
J. H. Martin, W. J. Hamilton. 397— A. LeMesurier, W. J. T. Irwin. 
400— J. Becker. W. E. Slater. 403 — ^T. Ashton. C. M. Jennings, A. 
Finestone. 405— D. A. McKechnie. H. Hall. G. R. McKinnon. J. E. O. 
Coe. 406— S. Consky, J. E. Barrett. 409— W. L. Russell, R. J. LaRose. 
W. J. Chittick. 410— J. S. Fyfe, J. W. Mason, J. Wells, E. C. Wigmore, 
H. C. Mead, K. D. E. Ptolfe. G. R. Montgomery. F. Williams, I. E. Boone. 
413— S. V. Mcffatt. 415— W. A. Horton. W. Wiebe, W. G. Cozens. 
417— F. S. Sweet. T. Sveinson. 419— B. E. Wyville. A. Fash, J. M. 
Grirve. L. H. Gloin. 420— M. S. Matheson. W. J. Davidson. 421— R. 
C'vokm-n, W. C. McKay. 423— C. C. Robertson. J. E. Osborne. 426 — 
W. A. Latter, P. Canivet, B. A. Kirkpatrick, R. R. Grant, C. E. Gallagher, 
J. W. Turner, R. J. Teasdale. 427— W. E. Wilson, M. Greene, S. J. 
Smythe, E. M. White. A. D. Russell. 428— J. V. Hannant. 480 — J. 
Davey, L. Jarvis, M. Elliot. K. Lee, J. Digby, M. Seward. 433 — J. 
Martin, G. A. Adamson, R. McTieman. A. M. Pierce. H. A. Benson. 
434— V. R. Andersen. 435— F. J. Hill. 438— H. J. Hunt, M. W. 
Bradsha-wT, F. V. Lee, W. D. Liberty, E. H. McKinney. W. B. Wilson, 
V/. R. Wplsh. A. J. T, Audy, A. C. Boriand. K. G. Warren. 440— F. E. 
Ff^witt. H. M. Ashman, W. Hounsell, M. Sears, R. W. Welch. 443 — G. 
Cotter, G. H. Perkins. 445— A. R. Snyder, A. W. Reeves, L, D. Munger, 
H. Cusson. C. F. Thorpe. 448— G. Adams. 449— R. Mitchell, J. A. 
McLean, J. F. Goheen. 450— G. A. Bullis. T. T. Higginson. 451— A. J. Ford, 

E. C. Moore. 453— O. Sigurdson. 457— G. M. Leach. 461— W. G. Mitchell. 
463— D. F. Darit, C. V. Hussey. 470— K. Mundy, J. A. Ehinlop, K. E. Mc- 
Dowell. 473— R. R. J. Kerr, A. E. Norris, G, B. Barnes, A. F. Leith, H. A. 
McCallum. C. H. John, A. Wylie. 474— G. Turner, H. Slinfirer, S. A, 
Smyth. 475 — F. N. Chapman. H. R. Jackson, A. Marr, J. Clegg, R. 
Sinclair, I. E. Hurst, W. Foeard, D. G. Bums. D. Agnew, W. Newoombe, 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 81B 

A. N. Crisp, A. Hunter, R. M. Muir, J. S. Smith, R. Robertson, G. W. 
Dandie, D. Sloan, J. Hood. 481— W. R. Dailey, J. G. Reuter, H. D. 
Summers, L. M. Soper, K. Entwistle, F. E. Alexander. 482— W. T. 
Hopper, T. G. Hawley, J. Potts, J. A. Ayers, F. W. Soble. 483— W. 
Jones, A. Hailton. 485— J. A. Thompson. 486 — C. W. Train, J. Lloyd, 
C. J. F. Humphry, R. McCourt. 489— H. A. Muir, M. L. Billings. 

495— H. J. Cawsey, P. D. Scarrow, R. H. Fi.sher. 496— L. L. Baker, 
G. W. Beecroft, A. R. Nicol, H. E. Smith, E. J. Van Nest. 497— O. 
Scott. 499 — F. Shipp, G. A. Adams, R. A. Wolframe, J. Kapanitchuk, 
G. J. H. Fussell, W. B. Cryer, B. A. Pederson, K. V. Almond, T. E. 
Atchie. 507— H. C. Authers, W. H. Scott, F. W. Tregarthen. 508— R. 
Deane, F. C. Kennedy, W. J. Burke, R. Magill, N. J. Phillips, A. J. 
Waller, G. B. Sharpe, L. W. Edwards, J. C. Dale, R. E. Sherred, J. 
Pans. 509 — M. H. Daub, A. H. Cameron. 510 — W. McVeigh, A. H. 
McCiillouch. W. Marquis-. H. J. Gross. 511 — J. Graveson, R. I. Garrity, 
E. H. Whittaker, H. Green. 513— W. G. Reynolds, A. Hunt, G. A. 
Norminton, J. M. Nicholson, I. W. G. Mann. 515 — A. Eraser, A. 
Rarret, L. J. Finch, N. H. Bowdcn. V. J. Fulmines, J. P. Edwards, H. C. 
Noalce^. 616— R. S. Cassidy, A. G. Weedmark. 521— F. E. Elford, 
W. A. Black, G. Bump, T. E. Morgan, W. G. Clapper, H. N. Fulford, 
A. Whyte, J. Bogl, W. Meek. 522— H. Stein, H. Berg, L. Nadler, A. 
Miller. N. Simpson. 524— S. Smith, F. M. Thomas, J. Stanway, V. E. 
Boyd. 526-^. H. Gillmor. 527— L. W. Smith, W. G. Collins, W. W. 
Heath, E. Shamess, F. Hunter. 531— J. C. Fuller. 532— M. A. Beck- 
with. J. Thompson, W. S. Pitchford. D. H. Goldsby, E. E. McDonald, W. 
E. Smart. 533— A. Asker, S. McKelvey. W. H. Hutchings, D. R. 

Anderson. 537 — M. McKinnon. A. Mason, J. R. Perrett. 541 — T. A. 
Francis. 543— C. Hodpe, K. H. Hitchings, K. C. Gregory. R. E. Oliver, 
A. S. Bedford, A. L. Strobbe, T. V. Haney, R. J. Whittington. 545 — F. 
A. C. Baker, R. N. Hatt, P. Sherridan. 546— A. Hanson. 547— W. 
Yerex. C. E. Murray, W. M. Stonehousn, R. H. Matson, R. D. Dickson, 
W. Ross. W. P. Black. \V. J. Smith. 549— D. Walker. 551— H. 
Pollard, H. J, Banks, J. O. Anderson, J. Adams, T. Donaldson, A. 
Campbell, C. T. Shav/. 552— M. Hatch, N. Mill-ward, J. Gibson, M. 
Knapp. 553 — G. W. Lovegrove, J. H. Steward. 554 — H. B. Towers, R. 
C. Cook. R. M. Clark, M. D. Hutchinson, F. F. English, G. M. Duncan. 
555 — R. G. Crocker, R. Iy?pgate Jr., H. A. Vaughan, L. H. Upright, 
W. H. MacCarl, M. G. Squires. 559— H. Kochen. H. Kirsh, D. Klags- 
brun. J. Klagsbrun, L. Feldman. 560 — L. O. Davies, A. E. Green, G. K. 
Jeffery, C. R. Switzer, D. .A.. Swit7«r. A. C. Giles, F. W. Waterman, 
562— W. G. Harris, T. S. Parker. 563—1. E. Scott, G. D. Lambert, G. 
R. Toothill, V. G. Gibbons. 564— J. B. Prince. 565— A. G. Myles. R. 
Kerr, .T. H. Adams, B, Campbell. D. Bain, J. McFarlane. W. E. Cunning- 
ham, W. H. Hulse, R. A. Warner, G. E. Horsborough. 566— H. R. 
Clyde. 567— J. F. Imrie, G. R. Gregory, J. Black, E. D. McQuigge. 
571-^. Reilly. 573— A. Maclvor. 575— L. W. Swain, S. G. Mockford, 
J. R. McKee. 576— E. R. Covell. A. E. Armstrong. M. P. Smith, J. H. 
Moore. 578— A. G. Roach, H. G. Kelly. 579— H. Vexler. R. H. 

Kenry. C. H. Myles. R. McKe-. J. Verk. 580— H. E. Sadler. 582— D. G. 

Willan, G. E. Sturgess, W. L. Hoskinson. 583— H. R. Dancy. J. M, 

Thomson. F. A. Smith. 586— J. C. Steadman. G. F. Faris. 587— H. T. Tate, 

J. E. Tilley. 589— D. R. Bruton. E. Vaughan. H. G. Riley. 590— O. K. 

I.RWson. E. G. Baldwinson. T. G. K. MacMurray, H. J. Trunks. R. S. 

Wedekamm. 591— S. C. B. Moore, J. A. Wells. O. K. Owens, D. J. 

Ryerson, R. H. Billings. 592— L. March. 593— H. O. Porter. T. Ander- 
son. 597 — G. F, Pavif-s. 599— F. Armstrong. A. N. Matthews. D. W. 

MacKay. 600 — G. J. Hodgins. 602 — A. S. Dawson, J. B. T. Ri+son, A. 

P. Joh-nstone. 606- C. Tbbot^on. H. Lindlcv. J. Sheppard. W. Gillespie. 

607— R. Dunn, W. A. Hill, A. R. Boyd, F. Jewell. 611— K. G. Rumble. 

613 — C. G. Irish, V. G. Jenkinson, P. R. Pvk° D. H. Scott. 614- W. 

K. Walls. 615— W. P. Davidce, K. R. Cronfelt. S. P. MacDonald, E. 

A. Thompson, M. G. Reed. H. L. Herbrrt. fil6— T. A. Burton. J. 

Bennett, R. B. Bradley. S. 'R. Taube, J. R. Knight. A. Kamckcy. D. A. 

Willis. 618^. D. Martell. T. A. Connor. 619— R. G. Holbrook. 

620— R. Tanner. 622— H. Vnllis, S. A. Young. 623— C. H. Olsen, A. 

Clark, H. A. Holmes, W. Hastie. 625 — P. Parker. 626—1. L. Dickson, 

J. W. Gardiner. W. E. Pickford. J. G. Embleton. 629— R. M. Swance. R. 

R. Baynes. 632 — G. H. Halsey, R. A. Davidson. 634 — H. J. Rymes. 

637 — J. F. Imrie. 638 — A. V. Foster, G. A. Barrowman. 639 — C. R. 



316 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Mitchell, J. C. Hagerman, A. Dickinson, L. D. Hickling, B. H. Cathcart. 
641 — ^F. Courtney, A. R. McRobbie, R. Cade, J. A. Bryce, R. V. Carter. 
642— G. F. Wilson, R. W. MacDonald, G. Grundy. 644— R. Hunt. 645— 
G. R. Thistle. 647— H, McNeill, S. Evans, I. J. Williams, C. Northern, 
R. L. Ott, G. E. T. Trudgian. 651— W. J. Palmer, G. Bird. V. G. 
CameTon, W. J. Brown. 653 — C. E. Carter. 654 — D. H. Hymers, J. 
Lees. 656 — ^H. E. Blair, T. Ainsworth, W. V. Loiwnen. 657 — G. G. 
Towers. 658— F. W. Pensitone, L. G. Armitage. 661 — J. A. Tudhope, 
T. Willson, J. D. Colquhoun, W. S. Rowand. J. T. Neil, J. W. White. 
A. Hardee. 644— H. A. Carberry, J. E. Littler. 665 — G. Humble. 
667— C. L. Johnson, N. J. Weaver, E. T. Maine, D. A. Brown. 670 — C. 
Siviter, C. Vowlos. 673 — M. Fodcn, R. Mcintosh. 674 — R. Birrell, 
J. Byrne. 679 — C. B. Schrader, H. G. Barnett. 681— G. S. Chambers. 
683 — T. A. Post. 685 — R. H. Johnson. 687 — A. Forrester, W. G. 
Milligan. 688— J. Stewart. 

SUSPENSIONS — FOR UNMASONIC CONDUCT 

327 — Alvin V. Esseltine. 382 — Sydney A. MeCracken. 541 — William 
H. Harris. 

EXPULSIONS 

644 — Robert Hunt. 669 — Walter Earl Lashway. 

DEATHS— 1960 

2— C. C. Lyall, W. C. White, F. W. Epp, J. Stewart, W. R. Toovey, L. 
Hall. 3— C. H. Hall, J. A. McRae, J. G. Brown, H. Edgar, F. A. 
Smythe, I. M. Martin, J. H. Spring, J. F. Twiss, J. A. Fowler, S. M. 
Poison, J. P. Fleming, P. G. C. Campbell, R. M. Seymour. 5 — G. E. 
Snider, W. H. Row, C. G. Wickware, E. J. Claxton, A. J. Miirray, R. B. 
Kerfoot, H. R. Ferris, S. G. Rose, F. S. Miller, C. L. Willis, W. J. 
Weeks, F. S. Reynolds, K. N. Paupst. 6 — W. H. Bates, J. J. Parsons, 
F. E. Wodehcuse, F. A. Copus, H. C. Hatch, J. Taylor, W. H. McCurdy. 
J. G. Murphy, J. Hawkins, G. K. Eraser. 7— S. B. Bradley, S. Harris. 
9 — J. A. McRae, J. Diament, R. D. Martin, D. W. Workman. 10 — C. 
H. Donnelly, J. R. Brookfield, A. G. Neidrauer, C. O. Hurst, W. C. 
Everett, A. R. Rae, G. E. Hickman, L. E. Wedd, J. G. Martin. U— J. 
W. GriKwold. F. S. Lazier, W. H. F. Ketcheson, H. Varley, E. W. Boulton. 
S. H. Sanderson, G. W. French, E. C. Roberts. 14— W. Y. Cannon, J. Win- 
ton, R. J. Smith, N. Miller, C. S. Greer. 15 — E. McMurray, T. A. Pearson. 
W. H. Cameron, W. A. Betteridge, G. E. Tees, P. E. Leith, H. V. 
Rel'^on, J. K. Sinclair. A. E. Bowen, J. R. Miller, C. W. Glass, F. G. 
Brookson. 16— J. R. Bulmer, S. V. L. Willmot, C. W. Orr, F. A. Copus, 
R. M. Speirs. F. McFarquhar, A. C. Slater. 17— A. Nicholl, A. K. 
Mcintosh, J. C. Clitheroe, A. E. Storms, P. G. Thompson, E. Feakea, G. 
E. Page, W. H. Carlton, G. E. Baldwin, T. E. Wier, A. C. Luffman. 
18— A. S. Dozer, P. Collier. A. E. Storms, M. B. Parks. 20— J. J. L. 
Ardiel, F. J. Timbrell, F. H. Muir, E. A. G. Dalton, W, L. Magee, W. 
Footitt, C. K. Edward, W. S. Clarke, H. Hare, H. C. Prior. 21A— F. M. 
Goddard, J. O. DuFresne. G. Chalmers. 22 — W. J. Nelson, J. Westaway, 
R. Haslett, B. Wilson, J. Meen, J. F. H. Byam, H. E. Stronach. 28— F. 
Dolan, C. S. Hamilton, C. Mylks, W. J. Roberts, I. D. Ramer. 24— H. 
W. Aunger, M. L. Perry, E. H. Bennett, T. W. B. Irwin, D. R. McDonald, 
W. H. Thompson. 25— H. J. Parsons, H. D. Bums, R. W. Angus, H. 
J. Welch, G. D. Kirkpatrick, W. J. Scott, A. E. Allen, W. D. Neil. 
26— R. B. Scott. H. G. Jex. R. W. Smart, A. Wilson, J. A. Hume, M. M. 
Hewscin, E. J. Pratt, E. B. Lingard, C. E. Langdon, R. Croft, H. W. 
Mitchell. C. E. Waters, F. King. 27— C. E. Wilson, A. J. Taylor. 
P. H. Douglas, F. Clemo, J. A. Bauer, R. A. E. Bright, H. R. Macfarlane, 
J. Kennedy. 28— S. S. Halpenny, A. R. Griffiths, L. Reddiek. 29— H. 
D. McColl, R. A. M. Tougas. 30 — A. G. Channen, V. M. Smith. 31— E. 
J. Osborne, S. W. Mason, G. Black, A. Norton, F. R. Kerslake, C. W. 
Slemon. 32— J. W. Hicks, J. W. Brown, C. W. Webster, J. Clark, C. 
M. Kauth, W. E. Svrartz, J. W. Happell. 33^J. W. Eraser, J. A. 
McDonald. W. E. Bushell. 34 — L. J. Pettypiece, R. P. Jones, J. A. 
Cook, F. Pigeon, A. Flowers. S5— R. F. Miller, L. P. Hoffman. X7— 
J. G. Chambers, N. R. Baynton, E. C. Wa.shington. 38 — F. J. Hendricks, 
H. E. Powell, W. H. Bradshaw, L. Pack, R. G. Weddell, M. Lovett, R. J. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 317 

Beatty, N. E. Bellyou, S. E. Teasel, C. Chi-istinsen, G. J. Aziz, G. C. 
Harper, J. G. Fitzgibbon. 39— D. Smith, O. Downey. 40 — R. F. Lomas, 

B. A. Carey, T. Todd, O. R. Blandy, G. Murray, H. F. Hancock, J. A. 
Spittle, W. T. Cook. J. McQueen, G, Tracey, S. G. Pook, W. O. Mills, 
A. J. Wall, J. A. MacLennan. F. J. Lyne. J. M. Firth, G. Hutcheson, 
A. S. King, J. Bibby, V. H. Wilson, C. H. Zeller, V. C. Hill, J. P. Crosby. 
A. B. Bigg-ar, C. Mace, A. J. Jehan. 41— W. M. Fulmer, M. F. Hutch- 
jngs, J. Plancke. 42 — F. Swain, E. F. Underwood, F. Stajilon, G. L. 
Oliver, G. W. Moore, G. Say, D. J. Davies, S. Snider, H. M. Kirk. 
43— F. Biddlecomb, S. L. Krompart, T. E. McMonagle, B. H. Travers, H. 
L. Reece, M. E. Milton, J. E. Thompson, S. Lipovitch. 44 — A. Taylor, 
A. W. Whalls, A. Wight, A. E. Maxwell, A. Pletsch, A. E. Eberts, R. J. 
Knight, J. E. Ellsworth, W. W. Taylor, C. M. Knight, M. J. Williamson, 
G. W. Wallace, T. R. Erwin, H. G. Edgeworth, A. Wight, W. H. Cripps, 

C. L. Painter. 45— W. H. Walsh, E. L. McNames. W. H. Maynard, J. C. 
Coles, R. W. E. Hall. D. MacDonald, F. Calbeck. H. Code, J. Vivian, 
T. W. Weller. 46— W. N. McCorvie, J. C. Way, C. Piggort. J. H. 
Walsh. W. D. Colby Sr., W. M. Abraham, A. C. Tanner, R. T. Babcock, 
H. Nichoh, J. W. Charlton, G. A. Chamberlain, G. H. Chappell, C. J. 
Hock. 47— A. E. Paddon, W. R. Jenkins, W. E. H. Murray, W. G. 
Harvard. R. T. Brown, S. E. Chandler. G. C. Rowcliffe, K. F. Alexander, 
J. Budzynski, W. F. Danby, A. W. Warren, F. S. Bertram, L. J. Fox, 
G. R. Williamson. W. G. E. Harris. J. Kearn. 48— H. Nickle, A. McBain. 
R. Blue. 50 — W. Thompson, R. McCurdy. 52— P. C. McGillivray, J. A. 
Gibson, C. G. Keyes, J. W. Balharrie, J. K. C. Young, J. R. Rudd, J. A. 
Murphy, E. A. Fluker, H. S. Robinson, B. H. Q'Part, G. D. Ro6s, G. E. 
Cape. 54— P. White. W. Maclachan. 55— A. A. Holmes, N. R. Walsh, 
C. R. Moffatt. 56— A. R. Allen. W. Carruthers, D. McJntyre. A. J. 
Chester. H. V. Potter, G. W. Thompson, W. A. Mann. 57— J. A. Daw. 
58— F. H. Hird, W. J. Hall, C. J. Mills, R. M. Graham, J. F. Argue, L. 
P. Armstrong. J. D. Coleman, R. M. Armstrong, G. H. C. Ussher, D. A. 
Beggs, r. W. Hamilton. 61— H. F. Harvey. D. J. Parry, A. W. Nix, A. 
Wiieon. J. W. Thompson, A. Smith, A. Sims. W. A. Hagan, W. H. 
Daniell, F. A. Copus, J. A. McRae, C. S. Hamilton. E. A. Bottrill, A. E. 
Darker, W. E. Hawkes, G. W. Arnold. F. R. W. Reepe, C. Cramond. 
62 — A. M. Rice. 63 — A. Hunter, G. Robertson. H. M. Morris. G. R. 
France. A. E. Dunlop, T. J. Steele, S. M. Fournier. 64— J. W. Streeter. 
J. H. T. Dennis, G. F. I>owe, K. S. Smylie. W. Bird. H. G. Higgins. 
65 — J. A. Roberts, D. S. Moncrieff, E. Y. Hutchison. H. Streeter. E. E. 
Hunt. J. N. Johnston, F. D. Lee, E. A. Adams. C. E. MacDonald, F. W. 
Field, A. C. F. Wes*. J. N. Manace, G. F. Drewry. W. E. Magee. 66— J. 
T. Brown. H. J. Toms, J. A. Butler. 68^. I. Patterson. 69 — W. 
L. Anderson, J. A. Wood, J. W. Cummings, T. Montgomery, E. Brown, 
T. E. B. Yeats. A. Donald, J. C. Sills, J. Wright, W. R. Archer, B. 
Oonley. 72 — G. A. McCurdy, H. R. Eaton, E. M. Holtzman, W. Chalmers, 
E. C. Daniels, C. R. Mudjie. 73— N. V. Johnston. E. M. Crostwaite. J. 
N. Robinson, G. D. Thompson. 74 — D. M. Ross. 75 — H. M. Steiner, 
E. P. Smith, A. G. Ayres, C. S. Hamilton, A. Hall, W. C. Gurney, J. 
G. Atcheson, J. A. McRae, D. Johnston, S. H. Davidson. 76 — A. J. 
McKinney. R. C. Hartley. J. H. Hill. H. C. Karn. B. Millar, W. Roddick, 
S. McLean. 77— J. W. Deyell, F. W. Thompson, A. G. Roberts. W. A. 
E. White. J. W. Anderson. N. R. Mark. R. C. Willis. A. H. Everson. 
W. T. Qayton, R. M. B. McGill. 78— L. G. Jacobson, W. F. Sutch. J. 
Bennett, K. H. Anderson, F. L. MacDonald, T. L. Armstrong. J. E. 
Teckae, B. W. Ronson, F. A. Cousins. R. R. Corner. 79— P. R. Wor- 
folk. O. K. Lukes, R. J. Phillips, W. H. Barron. 81— M. McGugan. 
82— W. J. Innes, G. E. Taylor, H. C. R. Craigie, T. Grigg. W. M. 
England. 83 — A. G. McAlpine. 84 — J. M. Elliott. C. F. Lockwood. 
86 — G. Puddy. F. Joselin. J. Barron, J. Dunlop. H. Home. F. T. Gerow. 
C. S. Hamilton, H. W. Thompson, R. K. Williams. S. Warburton. F. 
Fox, F. R. Francis. 88- A. L. Danard, R. E. Hair, F. A. Copus. R. R. 
Mundle. C. Ru.ssell, R. A. Ross. J. E. Taylor. 90— F. H. Beynon, J. 
W. Smith, A. M. Hustin'=. C. R. Brooks. W. A. Chatterson, D. A. Brown. 
C. C. Cook. 91— J. Blackball. H. J. Mayhew. W. Spencer. 92— H. J. 
Simmons. A. C. Revington. W*. H. Borland. A. S^inson. G. R. Wc-odruff. 
A. E. Hunt. D. L. Jackson. C. E. Walker E. B. Harris. G. W. Saunders. 
93 — W. J. Riggin. I. Doupe. R. J. Kincaid. 94— H. F. Lanning. C. W. 
Varv. 94— J. W. Munro. J. H. .\rm«tronp. R. N. Black. J. E. Mac- 
Neilly. A. H. Miles. A. R. McKinnon. H. J. Petersen. J. Pulford. 97— 
J. Gable. C. S. Cridland. 98— C. R. Boughen. C. L. Gctt. F. A. Mc 



31» GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Cuteheon. 99— J. H. Gadsby, J. S. Law, J. S. Booth, F. Hopper, G. 

B. Ough. 100— C. M. McMurrich, F. W. Arnold, W. F. Patterson. H. 
J. Lumsden, J. B. Hunt, E. H. Smith, J. H. Carmichael, V. Wicks, R. 
Gibson, R. W. Weaver. 101— A. C. V. Darling, J. G. Jopling. G. R. 
Page, A. L. Killaly, G. M. Oke, B. Austin. 103— J. H. Campbell, J. 
F. Crow, M. Margetts, H. C. Wallace, R. E. Hoi-ton, T. E. Halsall, C. 

C. Robinson. 104— H. Vonder Heyden, H. S. Jull, E. Palmer. 105— P. 
P. M. Gatze, T. F. Dorrington, W. O. McLeod, W. K. Hardwick, S. 
Harding, G. Rossall, G. Young, W. A. Calvert. 106 — C. L. Stephenson, 
W. T. Hearne, M. E. Newstead, R. Grieve. 107— L. J. Nichols, M, E, 
Hooper, C. Wickerson, J. A. Halls. 109— C. W. Ellerbeck, D. Barr. 
110— D. N. C^burn, A. Tapsell, E. Huff, A. Johnston. 113— F. H. 
Bechtel, G. A. Allan, T. F. Stone, H. E. Honey. 114— J. Gettys, A. 
Mark, M. S. Hawkins, S. Zealand, W. T. Henry. 115— G. R. Fry, A. 
Humphries, C. E. Honsberger. 116 — C. Moloy, R. J. Ross, J. Mao> 
Donald. 118 — S. Leonard. 119— W. McKeever, E. E. Sharp. 120— F. 
E. Hall. 121— E. B. Terryberry, J. W. Ness, R. G. Scott, C. Jackson, 
S. D. Mcintosh, H. I. Palmer, R. R. Deagle, C. G. Main, T. W. Welter. 
J. W. Dickie. W. Willson, J. C. Jaques, J. W. Finch, F. S. Boltz, C. 
R. White. 122—1. C. Hawthorne, J. W. Young, W. P. Allum. 123— 
W. J. Johnson, L. S. Ash, R. S. Hart, E. A. Cherry, C. D. Crosby, H. 
U. Jones. 125 — S. M. Gray, W. H. Gardner, E. Daye, A. C. Golenum. 
A. W. Campbell, C. S. McKinnon, R. F. Taylor, W. H. Uagwood. P. 
C. McDonald, W. Riley, J. A. Fowler, J. B. Hackney. F. Winterbum. 
126 — J. S. Whitehead, P. C. Denyes, A. E. Southworth, G. Hawthorne, 
W. D. Bullock, A. C. Ferguson. 127— J. A. Lott, E. J. Wilmink. 128— 
P. A. Switzer, A. G. Acheson, J. Wolfe, W. F. Wagner. 131— A. C. 
Hubar, J. W. Burns. 133— G. Dow, R. Creech, G. Stonehouse, W. J. 
Smith. 13-5 — G. H. Dixon, J. M. Denyes, G. Johnston, J. R. Tate. C. 
A. Wood, L. G. Needham. J. McClure, B. B. Marsh. 136— F. J. 
Ratcliff. 137— H. D. Helstrop, G. E. Moon, F. L. Eberhardt. 189— S. 
"V. Irwin. R. W. Graham, W. Scilley, R. F. Lick, F. E. Hallett. 140 — 
E. H. Porte, H. B. Westover, C. A. Brooks, W. Bowins, E. W. Young. 
141— F. Porterfield. 142— A. A. Martin, W. L. Leroy, E. Deeks. 143— 
W. N. Wert. 144— F. A. Copus, L. A. Taylor, W. H. Wensley, R. G. 
"VanEvery, L. A. Morgan, G. D. Davis, R. C. Keane, F. Mee, C. T. 
Vivian, G. Elgear, H. E. Watt, J. H. Mills. 145— W. H. Ooombe. 
147— J. J. Gorton, R. H. McMullan. W. H. Morton. A. H. Whitten, R. 
L. Smithscn. 148— F. S. S. Dunlevie, N. F. R. Dixon, E. Chadwick, 
R. D. Davidson, D. J. Ford, W. A. Burns. C. P. Edwards, A. E. Knight, 
R. B. Halpenny. F. H. Rowe, W. Douglas, E. G. Wallace, R. McGill. 
149— A. E. Williamson. S. Goodwin. W. S. McCall. W. A. Smith, J. H. 
Jackson, J. A. Innes, J. Davison. 151 — W. M. O. Lockead, J. W. Bailey, 
H. W. Appel, M. Seymour, I-. A. Galloway, H. M. Katzenmeier, H. P. 
Hamilton, T. C. Stanley. 153 — I. Maw, J. M. Parker. 154 — R. Elaon. 
H. W. Lewis. H. G. Tilburv. 155— E. J. McClelland, A. E. Watkins. 
I. D. Moore, H. Carter, J. H. Brown, R. Dale, A. D. Buck, D. Hillier. 
156 — E. Briggs, B. Boden, E. B. Simpson, A. P. Harrison. C. S. Hamil- 
ton, W. A. Barrington, R. C. Hatton, N. Rowland, R. J. Elliott. C. A. 
Houghtoi. 157— H. G. Sheldon. J. F. Singleton. 159— R. I. Birtch. 
R. B. Mackey, H. E. Cassidy, W. Hemphill, G. Tennant. 161— D. A. 
Woof. 162— C. R. Gathers. 164— G. S. Taylor. 165— H. A. 
Lorimer. R. E. Strong, M. H. Macfis, W. R. Shaver. W. A. Walker, 
A. Gropp, J. E. Troughton, W. J. Bennett. 166 — E. J. Upper. 
J. H. Murray, C. W. Lockard, A. A. Button, A. G. English, F. 
E. Madden, D. J. McLean, G. H. Hughes. 168— H. L. Cudney, B. 

E. Robins, H. Mathers Sr., D. A. Haist. 169 — W. J. Robinson, I. 
Ferguson. R. J. Williams, L. Sloat, J. G. Irwin. 170- R. C. Ovens, 
H. M. Mason. 171— R. W. Lumley, B. McCallum, M. A. Mclntyre. 
172— H. B. Pickott, J. A. Scott. 174— A. Duncan. C. Duncan. 177— 
J. Fitzsimmons, H. M. Herbst. C. W. Hill, H. P. Woodburn, W. J. McKee, 

F. R. Sparks, J. Rankin, E. N. Richardson, R. R. B. Day. 180 — E. Fray. 
J. P. Gould, W. A. Strain. J. W. Manning, G. A. Jones, J. Coutts, W. 

G. Ccpp. 184— W. S. McLeod, A. C. Agnew. 185— R. F. Martindale, 
190 — ^J. P. McLarty, M. Chivers. R. J. Ferguson, O. F. Sexsmith. 192 — 
T. B. Harvey, J. A. Csldwell, B. S. Marshall, F. J. Harvie, H. W. Gill, 
C. J. Martyn, J. E. Ti'd>>ope, P. Kelly. W. Russell, A. C. Mclntyre, M. 
E. Taylor, T. H. Campbell. 193— F. P. Baker. 194— F. J. Russel, D. 
E. Bygrove. 195 — E. G. Shannon, T. B. McCormick, P. P. Banninga, 
C. R. Rowntree. G. H. Wilson. O. D. Newton, H. L. Windrim, R. H. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1961 819 

KeHh. 196— C. L. Arnold, W. Shaw, S. L. Slater. T. N. Trudeau, E. C. 
Lindsay. T. A. O'Brien. 197— K. L. Hamilton. 200 — G. A. Broughton. 
201 — W. V. Taylor, W. R. Cunningham, C. A. Thomson, J. H. Dillon, 
E. G. Bishop, J. A. McRae, J. R. Arbuckle. 208— J. M. Wilson, J. D. 
Brown, H. M. Mitchell. 205 — A. Haussamen. 207 — C. M. Edgar. 
209— W. Spo-oule, J. A. L. Barr, H. Bulloch, J. C. McDonald. 209A-^. 
G. Steele, G. H. Upshall, B. Downes, G. T. Mitchell, J. B. Orr. F. M. 
Brickenden, J. C. Clarke, C. S. Martin, R. E. Taylor. E. W. McClennan, 
A. Cushman. W. A. Dean. C. B. Smith. 215— W. O. Locklin. 216— T. 
H. Greenis, J. W. Nesbitt, A. Bryan, B. Hunter, W. Danaugh, N. H. 
Reid, J. T. Thomas. 217— W. E. Sutherland. 218— H. C. Alexander, 
A. W. Brown. R. Forster, W. Ferris, W. Spearman, W. W. Forsyth. J. 
W. G. Wilson, R. AUman, J. H. McMinn, W. H. Robinson. 220— J. H, 
Olmstead. D. Turner, W. L. Feasby, H. W. Knight, W. T. Lyons, L. 
Hutchinson. W. R. Pollock. 221— W. Monro. H. Grisdale. G. Pollock. W. 
Cassady, A. Boyle. J. W. Lee, R. Roberts, W. T. Anderson, T. Graham. 
222— J. W. Bonter, R. E. Bonter, E. C. Prentice. G. Baldwin. C. J. 
Beckley. 223— L. Q. Duffield. P. B. Scott, R. Wilson. R. M. Gardner. 
224— R. J. Cooper, F. J. Wickwize. 225— J. C. Hymers, J. R. Ovens, 
G. W. Brown. 228— E. Clark. E. L. Percy. 229— W. G. McClure. C. 
H. May, A. P. Cheyne, T. A. Robinson, E. W. Jones, R. D. Little, J. 
Dalzell. 230— T. E. Phillips, E. Ayers, J. D. Wisdom, J. R. Wheeler, 
T. G. John.ston. 231— W. P. Harrell. L. Hayes, J. G. Wilson. C. E. 
Siteeves. J. H. Hayes. M. T. Ashe, G. R. Adamson. F. A. Sim, H. E. 
Beaton. S. Blyth. A. W. Fleck. 232— J. W. Bobier. E. Mann, D. P. 
McKellar, W. L. Nichol. 233— J. A. Geromette. 234— E. N. Hartry. S. 
G. Lougheed. E. R. Offord. 235— €. A. Fraser. 236— W. M. Maley. 

C. P. L. Banting. 237— G. E. Reavely. M. R. Hotchkiss, E. T. Truman, 

D. R. Bartlett. 238— P. S. Kingston. W. L. Millar. 239— W. VanAllan. 
W. A. Cransiton. 242— A. Votier. 243— H. D. Mitten. C. M. Burt. B. 
D. Martin. 245 — ^T. G. Atkinson. E. N. Watts, D. MacLeod, A. Graham. 
247— C. S. Hamilton, L. Duncan, J. C. Williams. E. H. Booth, W. G. 
Edward. 249— R. G. Nesbitt. G. S. Dudley. M. N. J. Dedman. J. H. 
Olmsted, C. J. Smith, A. E. Ovell, M. Howard, J. Mackie. 250— R. L. 
Glendenning, W. Mcintosh. C. Matheson, J. W. Hhtchinson. H. R. 
Smith. 253— W. Fitzgerald. J. Finlay, A. Rhodes. W. J. Clark. H. J. 
Milne. F. A. Gumner, C. F. Jackson, R. Ringling, A. W. Mock, R. L. 
Health. 254— W. Wright. A. A. Thompson. N. Gillies, T. Tunney. A. F. 
Payne, C. Macintosh, J. W. Lyon, J. Henderson, W. D. Stpnlake. W. G. 
Thompson. E. A. Lowe. H. H. Scott, W. R. Green, W. F. Mepham, T. J. 
Dunstan. 255— H. Thomp.son. H. C. Burrows, R. C. Turner. G. A. 
Forshee. P. Shaw. 256 — L. J. Marcellus. L. O. Piper. C. F. Dafoe. 
257— J. G. Wilson, W. R. Shaw. E. C. Codling. F. Palmer, J. Weepers, 
B. Gadd, T. C. Lawrence, E. H. Anderson. 258 — J. G. Grieve. E. Denver. 
W. B. Whyte. G. J. Freeland, G. M. Binks, S. Milton, C. H. Barber. 
259 — ^J. F. Belmore. B. McKenney, W. J. Fewster, C. M. Anger. H. R. 
Moff.itt. 260— G. B. Gilroy, P. A. Smith. A. J. Elder, G. W. Merrill, W. 
J. Hussey. 261 — D. Isbister. 262 — J. E. Sothem, D. McConachie. 
2G4— W. J. BycTS, M. D. Short. L. O. Button. N. Rivers, W. F. Fumerton, 
T. Saunders, R. Lawson, T. H. Little, D. McDiarmid. N. A. Arnold, G. 
Blyth. 265— J. E. Francis, W. Riddell, H. S. Sparks, W. W. Maynes. 
W. Brotherton. R. Lang. 266 — R. J. H. Carscadden. J. C. Henderson. J. 
Risebrough. E. M. Wilson. 267 — O. Legue. D. A. Bennie, T. Jones, 
W. Want, C. N. Chrysler. S. P. Wills. G. Cook. 269— C. S. Truman. 
270 — C. J. Pirie. A. E. Barton, J. L. Broadbent. J. M. Little. W. Stevens, 
H. A. Shellev, H. W. Knight. D. E. Daniels. 271— N. A. Deering, R. 
R. McKay. C. E. Hilton, J. H. Gillospie. 272— T. G. Anderson. F. M. 
Horning, R. Johnston, H. K. Begg, W. F. Patterson, J. H. Porter. 274— 
W. Snow. D. Foulis. W. F. Smith. W. C. Faust. A. V. Homick. 276 — A. 
Watson. 277— R. V. Jarvis. C. Longhurst. 279— R. F. Slater, H. F. 
Russ. L. E. Weaver, A. T. Dalcrleish. 283— W. G. Black. D. E. 
Fisher, J. O. Huffman. A. Gray, F. T. Symons, A. Francis, R. D. Black. 
W J FostPr, S. F. MoGuire, J. W. Davison. J. H. Clark, P. R. Boulton. 
{5 H. MacDonald, P. T. Seibert. 284— R. W. Whitfield, J. Gibson. J. 
Clark, J. A. Campbell, E. L. Desjardine. 285— F. N. Hurst, W. K. 
Bean, J. E. Christian. O. W. Chapman. P. G. Thomson. H. G. Solomon. 
B F Anderson 286 — R. A. Currie, J. J. McGee, L. D. Cunningham, D. 
.t' Hntoh'^'^on, G. L. Bisbee. W. A. Galbraith. W. H. Phair, R. B. Aitken. 
287- J. H. Johnston. N. MacFadyen, E. B. MacKay, J. W. Palmer. D, 



320 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Strachan, G. C. Mulligan. A. E. Holland, B. F, Daniels, A. W. Widenoja, 
G. M. Stewart, R. W. Meadows, W. R. Norton, A. Hodgins, A. O. Lake, 
J. G. Hepburn, A. D. MacDonald. 289— R. Mclntyre, D. H. Sills, F. 
F. Tuckey. 290— L. A. Ewald, L. J. Nichols, W. R. Dewar, J. E. 
Stewart, R. A. Smith, N. C. James, E. Mills, R. R. Duff. W. Carder. G. 
Lockwood. 291 — B. R. Marsales, E. Hamilton. 294 — R. G. Alexander. 
296—0. D. Leaak, C. F. Herr, C. H. Price. J. A. Archer, J. D. Wiley. 
297— W. J. Bartlett. W. Conaway. 299— D. B. Wagar, E. W. McNeil. 

E. M. Horton. 300— C. Barter. S02— C. Johns, H. Mclntyre. P. Dawdy, 
W. J. Stidwell. H. L. Lawton, R. J. Emslie, C. A. Ashbury, H. Mathews, 
N. Richardson. W. Bodkin. C. E. Clelford. 304— R. H. McKonkey, J. 
C. Neelands. W. J. A. Emridc, H. E. Hughes. 305— A. B. Drane, H. 
W. Scott, C. M. Richardson, K. M. Hermeston, S. Totten. P. Knight. 
806- M. Allan, R. V. Daniels. G. Jucksch. R. J. McGowan. A. A. 
McArthur. 307— H. J. Hall. 309— A. T. Allen, N. Hill. W. H. Walter, 
C. E. Asquith, E. Lawson, R. Finnigan. 311— S. McClelland, E. W. 
Brown. A. Elliott, W. J. Frankum. 312— G. E. Norman, J. Ritchie, D. 
Ritchie, N. G. Henning. 313— E. J. Millage. H. M. Wannamaker. G. K. 
Fraser, F. J. Leonard, W. Dunford. L. G. Webster. 314— R. Gooley, A. 
R. Smith, D. W. Kay, H. B. Coleman, W. H. Fair. 815— W. W. Ma^on, 

F. H. Raven. 316— R. H. Dee, W. Moore, A. Goodall. E. C. Vance, W. 
S. McClymont. 318— A. M. Everts. 319— C. H. Campbell. J. H. 
Delahaye. R. E. Risdill. 320— W. T. Faulkner. H. S. McMurray, T. 
Klingvall, S. W. Cook. 321— F. McCutcheon, G. W. Beevers, F. Mcintosh, 
A. Mason, J. Wood, C. W. H. Harrison. 322— F. A. Copus, W. J. J. 
Arthur, S. Jenkins. 323 — A. D. Munro, J. H. Johnston. D. J. McKinlay. 
324— 'C. L. Mills. J. Fi-eebom. W. N. Donnelly. W. R. Burgin. J. B. 
Porter. J. E. Hulls, W. Pendlebury, H. G. Patterson. E. C. Mitchell, V. 
Morrow, N. C. Hart, W. E. Weston. A. E. Keen, J. P. Gorman. S. A. 
Potter, A. J. Smith. 325— B. Richardson. S. E. Allin. N. J. Woodley. 
326 — ^J. W. Lees. W. H. Lytle, G. R. Bailey, J. H. Godfrey. H. A. 
Tipple. R. G. Roberts. E. D. Lennie. T. H. Crocker. 327— M. G. 
McMaster, H. Harvey. L. Hillman. 329— J. J. Parsons. P. S. Ba.nka, 
W. Simpson. 330 — H. Maule. A. A. Arthur. S. H. Rowed, A. Bowling. 
T. J. Wilson, E. B. Slyford, J. Dunkerley, I. Carey. 331— A. E. Fries, 
K. F. Hill. 332 — H. G. Downes. A. J. Moorhouse, A. E. Parkinson, 
F. M. Hider. N. H. Robb. F. A. Copus. A. G. Pettie, A. Plummer. W. 

C. Jones. 333— W. B. Williamson, A. W. Hawken. S. Campbell. 334— 
S. L. Small. 336— M. S. Scott. J. H. McKillop. N. McAskile. W. L 
Gosnell, P. A. Bieber. D. R. McLaren, C. A. Wootton. 337— E. H. 
Bouk. J. Dandy. 338— T. Freure. J. N. Smith. C. D. Houck, G. H. 
Smith. 339— C. M. Stouffer, F. D. Hunt, C. Bolton. J. Wharrana, R. 
Fick Sr., C. M. Allinson, F. W. Death. V. Moody, V. Swann, R. J. 
Mawson. G. R. Wilkins. 343— F. B. Edwards. C. H. Scales, W. H. 
White. N. Heron. A. L. McTear, W. G. Lines. N. R. Dean. R. I. 
Johnston. 344— H. Marr, J. E. Rogers. 345 — J. Ayres. G. C. Robb. 
846- R. McLean. C. S. Anger, W. G. Piatt. W. D. Thomas. W. E. 
Smith, A. C. Knox. R. C. Taylor. H. Hirst. J. Buchanan, W. R. Coker, 
W. J. Slemmon, W. J. A. Lake. W. J. Beer. C. W. North, H. I. 
Miller, W. Church. A. L. Skinner. J. McCullough. 347— T. A. Short, 

D. L. Burwell. C. E. Pilkey. 348— G. A. Beck. 352— T. H. Pickering, 
H. J. Fisher, J. C. Muffatt, R. A. Robinson. R. J. Mills. H. E. Lemieux, 
T. C. Speers. H. F. Lee. 354— R. Will. D. A. Gall. S. J. Kennedy. 
35fi— W. F. Switzer, F. P. Hansen. W. J. Hiller, J. H. Newman. 357— 
J. I. Flatt, G. E. Nicholson. G. H. Greene. W. J. Eastman, R. Smith, 
W. S. Henderson, A. E. Richards. G. V. Hamilton. H. Stetler. R. E. 
Gaptley. 358— J. A. McKay. 359— H. W. Jones, G. Snook, S. R. 
Hancock. E. W. Hayes. 360— A. W. Fife. J. T. Johnston. 361— F. 
R. John.ston. A. Leitch. J. Curzon. C. B. Fairley, T. R. Pickard, G. 
H. Webor. D. McKeller. D. P. Smith. H. L. Bohn. 326— W. S. Tindale, 
A. D. Gran^den. J. R. Burt. 364— E. Cobban, C. Graham. 367— H. F. 
Cannon. J. F. Wood. W. Fisher. J. Winnett. W. R. Edwards. J. Corbett. 
.T. E. King. C. Nelson, E. Ogilvie, M. Ross. A. G. A. Nelson. 368 — E. 
Bolton, J. Cairns. R. J. B. Drew. D. M. Ross, H. E. Gardiner. W. A. 
Reid. R. S. Shields. 369- R. W. Ellins. J. T. Glendenning. H. S. White. 
T. T. Phi'lips. N. V. Howard. W. J. H. Hawkins, J. M. McRae, R. H. 
Reid. 370— H. M. Dennison. 371 — G W. Northwood. M. G. Webster, 
.T. P. Reynolds, T. A. Parker. E. Meade, W. N. Stevens. H. Rosenthal, 
C P. T,°febvTe, J. E. Mullican. H. T. S. Brown. A. G. Bounsall, W. A. 
Neighom. N. M. Currey. R. C. Moffatt, A. C. Collins. 372— W. G. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 321 

Stamp, C. C. Butler, H, C. Farrin^ton, E. W. Johns, R. R. Bown, E. 
G. Shaubel. I. T. Atwood, C. C. Cooke. 373— N. Sace, W. Stephens, 
G. Riley, V. Davidson. J. Bigrigg, S. Wilford, P. Bitner, F. Crenshaw, 
N. Lewis. 374— D. C. Hops. P. C. Gillespie. 375— T. E. MasPherson, 
L. W. McKenzie, W. J. Reeds, A. Jones, L. M. Hart. 376— W. J. A. 
Lalor, P. H. Gerhart, E. H. Flaxman. W. J. Smith, A. Kellock, F. N. 
Yearington. 377— R. Hudd, G. M. Watts, S. Rands, J. E. A. White. 
378— C. Ardy, H. Lee. L. H. Hunt, E. Thomson, E. T. Rhame, J. A. 
Anderson, H. R. Corbett, G. H. Rutledge, G. Hexter, E. H. Davey, S. 
McCoy, J. McKinnie. J. Hill, W. J. Sharpe. 379— A. Hodgins. 380 — 
R. Rider, W. J. Moorehead, A. M. Legg, F. H. Taylor, L. J. Willis. 
J. R. House. F. V. Dear. P. D. Hill, G. L. Castle, C. L. Palmer, R. 
Sinclair, E. Buck. B. G. Haskins. J. M. Pocock, H. H. Pingel, J. Brooks, 
W. Parker. 382— A. C. Martin, D. T. Wilson. T. Calladine, H. F. 
Etherington. W. W. Yeager, A. L. Haight, W. H. Duncan, W. Coates, 
W. M. Sutcliffe. 383— C. V. Shaver, C. B. Timmins, W. V. Faith. 
J. L. Dixon, A. Christie, J. A. McDonnell. 384— W. Downey, E. 
Clendening, R. Bailie, A. Turnbull, W. F. Eccles, S. J. Bayly, T. H. 
Chaponan. J. Davidson, F. M, Cunningham. C. H. Cook, N. M. Mackie, 
J. A. Rassell, C. A. Read. 385— J. Stewart, R. A. Robins. D. W. 
Watson. 386- H. Miller, G. F. Neil. A. W. Smith, N. McEachren. 
337- H. W. Johnston, E. Slack. 388— T. G. Hudson, M. Oliver. 389— 
W. W. Dool, J. J. Jack, H. Ferguson, W. H. Wilson. 390— W. Sager. 
391— H. Holmes, C. Scafe, G. W. Barwell, C. J. Field, P. C. Gosnell. 
E. W. Johnson. 392-^. J. Mclntyre, F. D. Shea, R. S. Brock. 393— J. 
A. Dolphin. W. M. Shouldice, J. S. Marshall. 394— W. H. Dunlop. 
J. H. Clark, W. J. Jamieson. 395 — C. W. Yorke. 396 — W. M. Newman. 
H. Wedmeyer. D. C. Dargavel, W. J. Holler, J. McCartney. 397— D. L. 
McLean. 398— J. Clarke. J. D. Revell. 400 — W. R. Edwards, H. J. 
Woods, A. Patterson. D. R. Smith. 401— E. Lazier. 402— H. Dewhirst, 
S. Francottie, E. Beattie, C. A. Simpson. 403— T. G. Humphiers, W. 
Reid. A. B. Moffat, F. A. Millard, W. H. Cantelon, A. Hatchard, W. 
R. Smith. A. W. V. Hasler. 404— T. J. Carroll. 405— E. J. Brien, 
E. J. Rodebaugh. 406 — B. J. Burgess. J. J. Thurston. S. F. Brien, 
M. H. McCallum. S. F. Gullon. M. C. Mills. F. M. Graham. 408— G. S. 
Nunns. 409 — A. J. Dass, E. Manson, L. Kenrick, D. Doig, W. J. 
Dermott. 410 — E. Irvine, N. R. Turner, W. A. Lawrence. J. A. MacLean. 
A. S. Duff. R. E. Van Buskirk. E. B. Fielding, C. F. K. Smyth, W. L. 
Diek.son, C. A. Mills, E. Mathison, A. W. Cooksley, D. J. Sheppard. 
411— J. N. McDonald. 412— D. A. Williams, G. E. Hall, A. R. Kerr. 
C. L. Belyea. W. M. Wray, A. H. CTark. J. R. Morris, C. M. Bone, J. 
L. Taylor, O. H. Hugill. 413— T. F. Vanaman. A. E. Underwood, T. 
Dobson, J. K. Smith. 414— J. S. H. Colbert. A. Hargrove. J. H. R. 
Baker. 415 — J. Walker, J. H. Basford. G. Erickson, T. A. Cook, S. 
Yeomans, N. A. Osh. J. R. Munro. M. S. Pittman. A. A. Slater, R. E. 
Thornes. J. A. I. Bowie. R. C. Arthur. J. M. Paton. 416 — J. H. Purvis, 
J. Johnston. 417— L. J. Smith, G. Drew, W. H. Moore. F. Markham, 
J. E. Wickham, W. R. Challes, W. R. Home, W. J. McPherson. D. M. 
Gordon, D. Crombie. H. C. Benabo. 418— A. D. Kippen, J. D. Grant, 
J. H. Munro.. W. R. McEwen. 419— F. T. Haggis. L. M. Wagnnr. G. 
Beairsto. 420— G. M. Parks. D. F. Connell, J. E. Grimes. G. R. Smith, 
W. E. McGill, R. L. Mcintosh, N. R. McArthur, G. B. McDonald. J. K. 
Garratt. 421 — J. A. McLeod. 422— L. J. Burgess. 423— D. T. .Johnston, 
J. P. G. Johnstone. V. R. Whitehead. 424— D. M. Birrell, J. W. Eastwood. 
425— G. L. Johnston. D. R. Cleland, W. P. Leyland. A. J. McDonald. 426— 
E. Coombs, A. T. Gardner, H. M. Code. A. N. Brown. J. C. Ix)ckhart, 
S. H. Binns. J. C. Hutton. J. A. Irvine, J. H. Wynn, E. J. Lessel. 
427— G. H. B. Roefs. R. S. Manwell, A. A. Jackson. W. R. McLean, 
G. E. McVittie, P. R. Beattie. M. M. Craddork. 428— G. P. Bell. E. 
King, W. Howsam. 429— E. W. Roppell. 430— R. T. Prestsell, J. T. 
Veen. W. R. Edwards. W. Jarrett. E. Pickering. M. E. Steele, G. 
Westfall. W. H. Carlton, W. Cook. 432— R. Brown. 432— .^. R. 
Zummach. J. Diamant. 433 — H. Shaw. R. O. Hunt, J. I. Richards. 
434— H. R. Havward. T. B. Clark. G. W. McGeown. D. T. Deans, T. A. 
Pcrcival. 43 V— H. Gerow. 437— K. H. Hnjnes. J. Boss. F. G. 
Chambers. F. Pelling. J. Morris. W. J. Mills. O. D. Shaffer, R. C. R. 
Bell, T. Mattingley, C. C. Sandercock. R. Rodda. 438 — A. S. Cromarty, 
E. A. G. Lowndes, F. Rose, J. E. Dandy, A. Miller. R. T. Musson, E. 
Post. G. M. Channing. 440— T. R. Hotrg. J. M. Fleming. 441— G. 
E. MrCulloch. 442— M. Beaton. A. A. Nolin, A. D. McLeod, G. R«id. 



322 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

443— A. R. Millar, C. D. Garland. 444 — G. K. Bates. 445 — C. Quintan, 
R. Halliday, J. W. Pearson. 446— C. Russell, R. A. Taylor. 447— W. 
C. Austin, M. Mandell. 448— H. B. Quick, O. C. Dales, G. M. Reynolds, 
449— W. Carson. 450— C. P. Carmody. 451— P. J. Wilson. 452— W. 
O. Wert, C. L. Helmer, G. A. Helmer. 453— S. G. Cole, S. F. Yeomans, 
C. O. Goodsell, R. D. Johnston, M. Cochrane, J. D. Craigie, H. F. 
Dougall. 454— S. H. Troyer. G. R. Purdie. 455— J. A. Lillie, R. L. 
Graham. 456— N. Ross, A. Terry. 457— G. W. Fraser, C. A. Smith. 
J. MacHardy, W. O. Tudhope. 458— R. E. Canough, B. J. W. Blakeley. 
P. F. Johnston, C. C. Ault, W. A. Grant, G. A. Shaver, H. J. Fleming. 
459— J. C. Ritchie, B. M. Hayes, H. J. Millar, E. H. Gueat. 460— H. 
Stanton. 461— R. J. Corrigan, J. McDonald, W. H. Patterson, F. 
Duckworth, J. Langstaff. 462 — J. A. Hough, A. M. Turner, P. H. 
Miller. 463— J. H. Soady, J. E. Barnes, A. Henderson. 464— W. J. 
Campbell. 465— H. Downey, J. P. Grierson. 466— W. Cotton. 467— 
R. H. McCabe, T. E. Wilson. 468— J. E. Francis, W. J. S. Gott. 
4^9— L. S. Kelfth, C. E. Harbottle, G. S. Harbottle, J. R. P. Molony. 
470— R. C. Belcher, C. H. Russell, F. Gendron, G. W. Hodgkins, J. A. 
Allan. 472— N. A. McDougall, J. M. Allan, A. J. Wagg. 473— T. 
Pugh, W. H. Ford, A. P. Holden, C. B. Wright, F. Shuker 474— H. L. 
Scythes, W. Babey, R. F. Wilson, R. J. Hallawell, R. R. Spencer. 
475— J. Crawford, A. D. Baillie, J. E. Mundell, W. Inglis, J. Marshall, 
G. C. Donn, A. Agnew. B. J. Fradenburgh, R. S. Douglas, T. Mason, A. 
Armistead, R. Templeton, W. R. Watson, D. C. Ferguson, T. Graham, 
S. T. Jones. 476 — R. R. Thompson, S. H. Collins, J. McConnell. H. A. 
Jones, F. L. Brownlee, E. S. Fennell. 477— W. J. Stoddart, C. J. 
Beckley. 478 — W. J. Zoager, E. H. Doepel. 479 — J. E. Johnston. 
481— W. Kyle, J. R. Sturton, R. A. Taylor, J. H. Sanders, N. H. Croucher, 

A. A. Moore, A. C. Aulder-Heide, E. J. Winn, A. G. Kennell, D. McLean, 
J. D. Wiggins, J. Hay, C. E. C. Dyson, G. M. Britton, G. F. Allen, R. 
Greenwood. S. Cull. 482— W. A. Davy, F. Thompson. C. E. Muffett, 

B. W. Weller. E. Schickler. A. J. Tivey. 483— F. Hud.<9on. 484— J. C. 
Foulis, A. D. Mclntyre, A. Taylor. R. A. Budd, J. P. Skene. 485 — A. W. 
Sanderson. J. C. A. Crawford, T. A. Hibbert. W. A. Merkley; 486 — ^F. 

C. Dafoe, G. Gill, A. R. Herbert, M. B. McCallum, E. J. Bishop. A. 
Hops, E. A. Zakibe, G. A. Cavin, S. G. Prescott. 487— D. J. Nesbitt, 
J. A. Lidstone, G. E. Lang, O. Pousette, W. B. Plaunt. 488— L. L. 
Morin, E. S. Her, O. C. Tingen. 489— A. Armstrong. 490— F. D, 
Sawyer, A. Acheson. 491 — A. Turner, R. D. Murphy, F. Jackson, W. 
Hunter, H. J. Swift, G. C. MacKenzie. 492— R. A. Brown. 494 — ^H. 

B. Wells. J. Moorcroft, F. Tripp, W. Wells, P. Sugden, K. E. Bush, 

C. Probert, G. T. Domelle. 495— R. Livingstone, E. Hall, H. E. Dodson, 
W. Turner, R. Jarrett, E. Wainwright, L. Moore, W. H. Robinson, M. 
J. Clark, W. Spiby, R. Stead, G. Porter, F. W. McClurkin, M. L. Crane. 
496— A. C. Ross, G. A. Cline, W. C. White, W. M. Trezdgold, W. S. M. 
Enouy. H. A. Dixon, J. A. Tilston, F. A. Copus, W. J. M. Lloyd, V. 
Voaden, J. L. Laughton, G. R. Workman. 497— T. J. Alexander, D. 
H. Co-:. 498— W. Puterbaugh, A. M. Reid, H. J. Hall. 499— G. Stoitt, 
P. Sturmey, J. Wallace, V/. Tilson, W. H. Bagnall. C. E. Cummings, H. 
Mitchell. J. Galloway. J. T. Hodges. W. F. Haskell, J. Adamson, D. M. 
Black. 500 — E. C. Wackley, E. G. Rlood, C. Henderson, E. G. Coombs, 
W. J. McKee. 501— T. Scott, P. C. Tawton, W. Turner, P. J. R. Ailles. 
502— F. F. Hays. 503— D. Johnston, J. E. Watson, H. Atkin, O. M. 
Gibson. S. A. Graham. 504— H. E. Polk, H. C. Imerson, M. G. Phillips. 
L. A. Cardiff, H. Houze. 505— J. B. Robertson, O. J. Anderson, W. B. 
Mulholland. 506— R. S. Crawford. J. K. Aitken. V. H. Evans, G. H. 
Cross. C. R. Starling. 507— C. W. Twamley. 508— E. W. Noble, D, 
J. Orr. J. W. Edwards, F. J. Walker. T. H. Summerhayos. W. G. Jones. 
F. J. Calbeck. F. Lacy. 509— F. W. Smith. J. A. McCutcheon. H. W. 
Knerhtel, C. V. Smith. A. Snider. C. F. Thurlow, R. J. Mclllroy, G. A. 
Huehnergard. 510 — ^W. J. Wake, A. A. Mason, E. J. Judd. H. Drury. 
M. H. McArthur, J. W. G. Wilson. J. Bell, L. V. Ostrander. 511— D. 
H. Mathews. W. H. Thornburrow. 512 — G. S. Chapman. F. L. Kaiser. 
W. A. Thayer, F. M. Wilmot, W. H. Pugsley, J. D. Sibbald, H. R. 
Torrens, C. A. MacAlpine. 513— T. E. Hilton, R. C. Ekins, L. Sismey, 
J. T. Burns, J. Robb, J. W. DeBow, A. H. Kelter. F. A. Eddenden. T. 
F. Edwards. 514— A. C. Whiteley. D. Elliott, G. K. Hurd, J. A. McRae, 
L. J. Turtle, M. J. Rogers, H. E. Griffiths. 515— H. Dunkp, G. Carter, 
C. M. Osborne, S. W. Seago, W. Bladcer. 517— R. R. Strachan. 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 328 

618— P. Allert, A. E. Hainsworth. E. R. Mcintosh. 519— J. L. Richard- 
son, A. D. Barton, L. J. Stuart. 520— \V. G. Coggins, W. Purser. L. 
H. Hardy. J. Fraser, R. Dodds, R. N. Tansley, T. Gillespie. 521— E. R. 
Musselman, C. A. Bray, W. R. Bray. R. S. Baird, J. A. Young, J. C. 
Reid, D. Laing, J. K. Brown, W. J. Craig, S. Aiken. C. R. Wadge. B. 
O. Bulley, H. Fyall. 522— E. P. Bernstein, H. Alexander, A. King, E. 
L. Bochner, P. Glouth, M. Cchen. H. Mannis. S. S. Wintraub. 523— W. 
Miller, W. L. Hardwicke, L. H. Ingram, G. T. Cheatle, J. K. Hughes. D. 
Eteuglas. G. W. King. 524— H. L. Gaetz. 525— J. R. Jackson. 

W. J. Coulter, G. Swarbrick, H. Young, W. A. Micks. 526— H. A. Grain. 
J. M. Gillmor, A. Peacock, J. H. Greenway, G. C. Ritchie, T. Gibson, G. B. 
Snider, T. Saunders, F, Hothersall, J. D. Johnson. 527— H. A. 
Christopher. 528— A. C. McDonald. D. B. McKinnon. 529— B. Smith, 
R. M. Gray. ."iSO— J. L. Penney. 531— G. M. Jones, W. C. Kerr, A. 
McCauslan, F. Power, S. Manuel, G. St. Leger. C. L. Young, A. J. 
Haycock, J. A. Andrews. 532 — F. C. Frankland. A. M. Runcie. E. 
A. Skeats, E. McLean. W. Tilling. J. Parker, W. J. McKee, W. Wolfen- 
den, J. E. Strange, J. Gibson, C. Bannerman, G. C. Wonders, F. Marshall, 
A. Henry. O. A. Bennett. 533— G. H. Sheppard, J. W. Andrew, B. L. 
Moore, T. N. Bates. 534— W. R. Clark, D. B. Bowen, E. D. Connelly, 
C. W. Cobb. 536— M. C. Workman, W. W. Henderson. J. B. Stone, A. 
F. Ling, J. W. Garrow. T. H. Rowe. 537— A. Ingle, T. A. Taylor. W. 
S. Stauffhton. F. Copus, W. Hanley, C. S. Hamilton, D. G. Bowie, R. 
A. Spence, F. A. Ellis, J. J. McKennell, C. Grieve. G. H. Bush. H. A. 
Stewart, E. B. Cole. 539— H. G. Mistele, W. R. Grassick, J. E. Johnson, 
R. A. Breith.-iupt, G. G. Armstronpr. L. H. Hauck, H. A. Glei-ser, O. 
C. Ea-'ton. 541— D. M. Christie, W. S. Stokes, A. F. Turrall, J. E. 
Ackroyd. F. F. Saunders. T. Lowe, F. W. Roberts. 542— T. E. C. Butler. 
H. J. Coon. C. C. Douglas, A. H. Gray, T. G. Brick, C. S. Hamilton, A. 

A. Richardson. 543— R. H. Dee. J. J. Kiernan, W. B. McCuaig. A. 
M. Orr, R. R. Houston. H. G. M. MacLennan. 544— S. A. Miller. J. 
W. Youncr. 54.5— E. H. Boddy, W. H. Ford, K. G. Nettleton, H. C. 
Smith, A. C. Wood, A. W. Mongour, J. J. Ittas, H. E. Henderson, W. 
H. Simkin, R. G. Dibble, S. Warburton, J. E. Brailsford, H. N. Deas, R. 
H. Emery. G. Hesk. R. E. Creagen. 546— A. J. Hockham. L. J. Gilbert, 
T. J. P. Jones, W. E. Walters, A. H. HeiT, O. E. Berdan. 547— C. 
Dickinson. 548 — J. K. Mcintosh, G. Davenport. E. Johnson. G. B. 
Dempster. W. M. White, A. G. A. Nelson. 549 — A. Murray. A. R. 
Smith. R. Gracie. F. Sisman. 550 — R. Johnston. J. G. Chappel. G. 
Morden, W. F. Guenther, G. Levesque. 551 — W. Turner, L. Lawton, 
J. Neal, J. A. McRae, J. Hartley, E. Wilson, F. D. Jones, J. M. Horning. 
R. Graham, G. Stewart, B. S. Baikie, W. J. Blackmore, R. J. Lyne. 
552— E. Adair, J. J. Bradley. C. Dorsit, F. Paul. H. Dyett. W. Rice, P. J. 
Ryan. A. Barker. E. Urquhart. J. Nesbitt, F. Horton. 553— H. R. 
Pollock, E. M. Peace, E. A. Alves, S. E. Servant. 554— A. E. Welsford, 
W. W. Thatcher, E. R. Musselman, J. M. Wyllie. 555 — J. Taylor, A. 
Love, B. Shrubsall. A. S. Bishton, T. J. Taylor, A. D. Stephenson. C. 
W. Berquist. 558— E. F. G. White, W. Lamb, A. H. Fitzsimmons. 559— 

B. Krauss, L. Perlman, H. Rumm. A. Zacks, J. Tekerman, M. A. 
Starkman, A. Spector, A. Cohen. B. J. Okun. M. Soren, D. Steinbersr. G. 
Bookman, I. Levins, A. Rovner, F. Goldman. 560— G. M. Reid. J. 
McBridge, W. Fleming, H. V. Gough, R. B. Hewitt, T. M. Mulligan. 
561— W. G. Simpson, H. Willson, E. J. Ci-eighton. W. V. Merritt, J. M. 
Wood. 562— R. Livingstone, A. Wood, H. P. Middleton, J. Barratt. T. 
W. Clemence, F. G. Fraser. 563 — F. Brown, S. Chamberlain. D. S. 
Aiken, G. Foster, J. Wignall, A. Toon. 564 — R. S. Montgomery. W. 
M. Wilson, G. H. Gibson. 565 — R. M. Penrose, J. P. Ferguson. H. A. 
Stevenson, E. J. Stephens, F. A. Copus, J. A. McRae, W. A. Ross, H. 
Jamieson, D. Lockhart, J. B. Calder. J. W. McKee, R. Coward. B. J. 
Fradenbureh, E. Bull, P. M. Grant, E. G. Payne, J. C. Mann, A. H. 
Forster, W. Isbester. 566— H. S. Ii-ons. A. P. Ellis. F. Tcugh. C. K. 
Butler. J. E. Simpson, R. G. Hawkins, H. S. Shepherd, H. A. Winder. 
568— J. H. Johnston. 569— W. H. Dunlop, A. J. Baker. 570— W. H. 
Bunting. 571 — A. E. Stockey, C. G. Goadcrham, M. J. Cochrane. R. 
Fritzgerald, T. P. Fry, C. G. Holloway, W. Brown. 572— E. J. West. 
R. E. Cain, N. Knight. W. House, A. M. Reid. J. McLeod. 573— D. O. 
Smith, D. J. McCuaig, H. G. WilloX H. H. McMillan. 574— J. C. 
Norris. 575 — W. Edwards. R. A. Fleming, C. Crammond. H. J. Best. 
576— W. J. Duncan, O. Baird Jr.. J. C. Armstrong, E. H. Pickering. M. 
Roberts, A. J. Boase. 577 — J. H. Dawe. M. L. Martyn. A. J. Hefford. 



324 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

E. H. Olver, H. A. Ness, C. S. Hamilton, G. E. Blevins, T. B. Puddi- 
eombe. 578— J. A. McRae, R. K. Kilborn, W. M. Mark, P. G. C. 
Campbell, G. R. MacLachlan, A. J. Terry. 579 — H. Richardson, S. 
Meretzkey. A. F. Hardie, G. E. Thurlow, W. Mechanic. 580 — W. C. 
Agnew, F. J. Sperring, J. A. Glennie, C. A. Prangley, C. A. Boxall, 
W. J. F. Fcrtner. 581— H. J. Coon. 582— R. H. Dee, R. G. V. Tress, 
A. H. Williams, F. Power. 583— N. R. Willoughby, S. H. Pudney, J. 

E. McNeil, W. J. L. Bowers, W. Henderson. J. M. Campbell, F. C. 
Hatcher, F. Crease, W. T. Woodhouse, J. E. Robinson, H. Dutton. 
584— C. W. McPhail. 584— P. W. Timmerman. 586— A. E. Verral, C. 
H. Stock, F. W. Garrison, R. W. Smart, R. E. Cain, H. B. Breden. 
587— T. J. McGregor, S. Donnan, H. Kabel. M. Abraham, J. E. Kemp, 

F. T. Fox, J. A. Gumming, G. Edgar. 588— W. J. Buchanan, J. W. 
Clark. 589— C. A. Jolly, R. D. Lane, W. W. Taylor. J. P. C. Mac- 
Latchy. 590— E. Pye, F. W. Stremes, T. N. Stokoe, A. W. Chambers, 
J. A. Humphreys. 591 — P. M. Lamb, D. Alexander, A. G. Roberts, W. 
McLagan, T. J. Johnston, F. B. Denison, W. H. Miller, W. W. Scott, W. 
T. Qayton. 592— R. Blair, J. Buchanan. 593— J. K. Gilmour, S. 
Leslie, S. F. Gent, A. H. Archer, A. Skinner, G. W. West, G. R. 
Stewart, W. J. R. Dunsmcre, D. G. W. Brunton. 594— P. T. Bound, 
W. Hadfield, N. Ashley. N. R. Bell, R. Geddes, A. D. Davidson, A. E. 
Darker, C. Harvey. 59.5 — B. J. Cunliffe. H. Dover, A. R. Pettapiece, 
S. D. Hill, J. L. C. Cote, J. E. Laughlin. 596— D. H. McDougal. 
597— W. M. Mes.ser, W. N. Floyd, F. M. McLeod, C. C. Mclntyre, A. A. 
Jackson. 598 — A. Nolin, G. Fraser, H. Bromley, H. Russell. 599 — F. 
Gowlan. S. J. Totten, C. H. Wiles, N. O. Majury, W. J. Dollimore. 

F. Whitnell, W. F. Underdown, A. G. Toftley, A. E. Baker, W. M. 
Robin.son, A. W. Jarrett. 600— W. H. Cowie. G. H. Blyth, W. Wade. 
A. Wilkinson. 601— N. Saylor, J. F. Brown, G. M. Miller. 602— J. 
Nash. N. R. Madill. L. T. Williamson, C. J. Allcock, K. R. Armour, 
A. Brown. W. G. Arnold, M. L. Varlow, F. G. Hunter, R. W. Lees. 
603— J. Gilmour. 604 — R. J. Stevenson, R. S. Shaw. 605— C. W. R. 
Adams, E. Stansbury, G. H. Bent, C. H. Harvey. 606— F. Bowen, W. J. 
Kelcher. R. J. Sinclair. 607— A. Lee, J. R. Forth, C. S. Hamilton, J. 
W. Coombs. E. J. O'Keefe. 608— W. V. Peel, R. J. Miller, F. S. 
Crichton, C. V. Mulligan. 610— R. M. Miller, L. O. McGugan, F. A. 
Meriam, D. E. Coates. 611 — W. J. Edmonds. O. J. Steinmiller, E. A. 
Batholomew, A. E. Canham, E. L. Fick, W. T. Graham. 612— W. Magee. 
W. P. Smith. G. Reeves. E. A. Wilmot. R. N. Shaw, W. Hilton. 613— 
J. A. Spencer, G. Sider. 614— C. M. C. Munro, A. M. Duff, D. A. 
Cameron, J. S. Patterson, D. D. Gammon. 615 — E. J. Horney, J. E. 
Jewson, J. J. Whittins-ham. 616 — R. C. Rodgers, L. G. Masson, M. A. 
Soper. 617— B. L. Parr, G. C. Gordon. 618— J. Wallace. 619— C. 
Findlay. E. Cavell. 620 — J. A. Briston, D. G. Houston, T. M. Pine, 
E. T. Thompson, M. P. Garrison. 621— B. Hawley, N. J. McPherson. 
622— W. J. McLean, W. Muske. F. Hands, P. J. Collins, M. C. New- 
combe, O. J. Maki. 623 — J. M. Hamilton. S. J. Trim, W. P. Lane, 

E. E. O'Halloran, F. A. Greer. 624— A. F. Robinson. 625 — W. H. 
Birks. S. Worth, G. E. Aitkin, J. A. MacGregor 626— R. W. Dickson. 

G. H. Mather. J. A. Cottom, F. D. Fremlin. 627— C. L. Mulls. E. 
Glutton, I. H. McCormick. 629— G. Taylor, A. Good. W. Service. 
630— J. R. Bulmer, H. G. Rumble, A. Smith, W. A. Ross, E. P. Garbutt, 
W. J. Webb. fi.SI— M. J. Movers. 632— G. Bruce. G. Sharpe, K. Cullen. 
633— H. E. Horwill. 634— H. J. Boggis, B. C. Salter. C. S. Hamilton, 
G. F. Drewry, .T. G. N. Crawford. P. T. Seibert. 635— P. J. Wardle, 
G. A. Britton, H. R. Pollock, E. B. Johnson. T. G. Blake, W. R. Maas, 
A. D. Allan, G. S. Bray, A. S. Wilkes. 636— G.' Erickson, S. G. Ladd, C. 
W. Worth. 637— G. E. McAHs^er. G. McKillop, A. McNeill J. R. 
Fawcett. W. K»pn, C. Bowman. T. L. Barrett. J. Craw. J. E. Tulloch, 
A. Hall. H. St'>en. 638— W. T. Amos, W. G. Haylock, C. S. Hamilton. 
639— A. King, F. A. May. 640— W. C. Kerr. J. Franceschini. 641 — J. 
H. Taylor. G. J. Dick, A. G. Stevens. P. Kisch. 642 — O. Ebbinghaus, 

F. Munroe. T. L. Wylie, P. Hall. 643— W. A. E. White. M. Roberts. 
644— W. J. M. Lloyd. 645— T. L. Miller, F. M. Laxby. 646— P. 
Appelberg. T. A. Smith. 647 — F. G. Bater, E. H. Shipton. J. T. Buch- 
anan, I. F. Fleming. 648— J. P. S. Ballantyne, T. H. Scott. 649 — W. 
W. Morine, W D. Bulmer. 650 — I. E. Lockwood, W. G. Quinton. 
651— A. B. V. Flett, G. A. Thirlway. W. W. Peers, J. G. Marler. W. A. 
DeLorme. J. Fraser. 652— H. R. Copp. W. J. Frost. H. V. Saunders. 
W. Forbes, E. J. Sandland, A. Harper. 653— J. Douglas. 654 — A. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 325 

Rudy, V. C. Hill, E. A. Bottrill. 655— R. B. McCauley, H. LePagre. 
M. E. Cunningrton, H. J. Shock, F. G. Willmot. 656 — J. Lang, J. H. 
Sullivan. 658 — G. W. Qeland. A. J. Haycock. 660— T. Gorley. 

661— T. Stinson. 662— A. D. MacDonald. 664— C. Rolston, G. M. 
Carlaw, J. T. Phillips. 669— E. Daye. 671— R. Woolrich. 673— W. 
J. A. Harvey. 675 — L. H. Ingram, K. W. Strayton. 676— D. Low. 
679— A. F. Payne. 681— F. Power. 682— E. Cullen. 683— F. Reepe. 
684— T. M. Willoughby. W. A. Brown. 685— H. D. Helstrop. 686— T. 
C. Mursion, J. L. Gilmore. 687 — A. D. Baillie. 689— J. Monaghan. 
693— H. A. Winder. 696— C. B. Weese. 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



LIST OF GRAND LODGE OFFICERS— 1961-1962 



M.W. Bro. R. W. 



The Grand Master 

Tieleaven 



R.W. Bro. J. A. 



The Deputy Grand Master 

Irvine — 



Hamilton 



Lambeth 



Algoma . 
Brant — 
Bruce — 
Chatham 
Eastern 

Frontenac 

Georgian 

Grey 

Hamilton "A" 
Hamilton "B" 
London 



The District Deputy Grand Masters 

Kenneth M. MacKay 

A.. Laird Miller 

Gordon S. Matthias 

Harold L. Marrtin 

-Roderick A. Stewart 

Roj' R. Sweetman ._ 

Thomas J. Purvis 

Robert E. Davies 

John H. Jackson 

Robert G. Trusccrtt — 

Rossiter C. Fuller 



Muskoka-Parry SoundFrank W. Toswell 

Niagara "A" . .Alpheus V. Hammond 

Niagara "B" Sydney J. Gill 

Nipissing East Maitland G. Gould 

Nipissing West Herbert A. Death 

North Huron John L. MacKinnon — 

Ontario Charles B. Rycroft — 

Ottawa John O'Donovan ... 



Peterborough 



-Willian; Anderson 
-Harry G. Bates 



Prince Edward ^ - 

Sarnia Georcre C. Searson 

South Huron R. Earle Tapp .._. 

St. Lawrence Lyndsy Brown _... 

St. Thomas Douglas Orchard 

TemiBkaming James W. Bradley 



Fort William 

Jarvis 

Walkerton 

Dresden 

Maxville 

Westport 

_ _ Oriliia 

. Mount Forest 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

London 

Powassan 

St. Catharines 

Welland 

North Bay 

Sudbury 

Kincardine 

Whitby 

Ottawa 
Peterborough 

Belleville 

Watford 

Monkton 

Lyn 



Toronto 1 
Torontc 2 
Toronito 3 
Toronto 4 
Toronto 5 
Toronto 7 
Victoria 
Wellington 
Western — 

Wilson 

Windsor _ 



_Robert F. Brown 

_Geor!Te H. Weston 

_Thomas F. Dodson — 

_William A. Hagan 

Francis P. Lowry 

_Harold G. Russell _ 

Sherman J. Moore — 

Arthur B. Barton 

John A. Cox - 

_Weldon F. Burrill 

_Harry Taylor 



Shedden 

Kirkland Lake 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Tororuto 

Toronto 

. Downsview 

Schomberg 

___ Lindsay 

Elora 

Dryden 

Burjressville 
Windsor 



The Grand Senior Warden 

R.W. Bro. G. C. Bennett 



The Grand Junior Warden 

R.W. Bro. W. M. Prentice 



The Grand Chaplain 
R.W. Bro. Rev. Canon A. J. Anderson 



The Grand Treasurer 

M.W. Bro. Joseph A. Hearn 



The Grand Secretary 



R.W. Bro. E. G. Dixon 



The Grand Registrar 



R.W. Bro. F. L. Barrett 



Custodian of the Work 



M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn 



_ Ottawa 
_ Toronto 
. Kingston 
_ Toronto 
Hamilton 
Kitchener 
_ Toronto 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 



Appointed Officers 



Grand 
Grand 
Grand 
Grand 

Ass't. 
Ass't. 
Ass't. 
Grand 
Grand 
Ass't. 
Grand 



Senior Deacon 

Junior Deacon 

Supt. of Works 

Dir. of Ceremonies 



Grand Chaplain . 
Grand Secretary _ 
Grand Dir. of Ceremonies -V.W. 
Sword Bearer V.W 

Organist V.W 

Grand Organist V.W 

Pursuivant V.W. 



V.V/. Bro. Irvin Ferguson, Toronto 
.V.W. Bro. Fraser Raney, Dunnville 
V.W. Bro. John H. Lee. Stoney Creek 
.V.W. Bro. William R. Binney, Hamilton 
.V.W. Bro. Rev. J. W. Stewart. Cooksville 
.V.W. Bro. Chester Shier, Sunderland 

Bro. Eric John Read. Scartxjrough 
Bro. Charles Derry, Ottawa 
Bro. Harry M. Rotenberg, Toronto 
Bro. L. Noble Armstrong, Kingston 
Bro. Percy C. Bolton, Toronto 



Gnmd Stewards 



V.W. Bro. Robert Aiken 

" W. G. Agar 

" E. S. Allan 

" J. R. Atkins 

" W. T. Bacon 

" " M. E. Baseman 

" Carl Billings 

" " W. S. Blizzard 

" G. E. Boydell 

" G. K. Brooks 

" " P. A. Camp 

" " E. G. Carmichael _ 

" R. J. Carswell, Sr. 

" " G. K. Chapman 

" " Preston Chase 

" W. E. Collyer 

" " Robert Cruickshank 

" " Robert Cruise 

" " J., N. Cunningham 

" " R. C. Cunningham 

" H. C. Coull 

" " W. E Denning 

" " T. J. A. Gamey 

" " Graham Garlough . 

" S. W. Goulding 

" B. R. Grant 

" W. T. R. Hay 

" " Delbert Henry 

" B. E. Hulford 

" S. H. Knight 

" G. R. Lane 

" " G. W. Lennox 

" E. R. Lewis 

" W. G. Little 

" L. W. Lovell 

" C. C. Mabley 



Toronto 

lona Staition 

Cayuga 

London 

Hamilton 

Hamilton 

Orono 



Mount Albert 

Mimico 

I Hastings 

Toronto 

Kingston 

Nilestewn 

Fort Erie 

Frankford 

Lucknow 

Hepworth 

Weston 

Toronto 

Milton 

Haileybury 

Napier 

— Toronto 

_ Williamsburg 

Arthur 

Granton 

Hawkesbury 

_ Fort Frances 

Hamilton Beach 

Windsor 

Cold water 

Toronto 



T. B. W. MacNaughiton 

Percy Massey 

J. T. Minaker 

W. A. Munro 

R. M. Murphy 

J. G. Nickalls .__ 

R. J. Parlee 

R. L. Patterson 

R. F. Fetch 

H. R. Quantrill 

G. E. Readhaad 

Chauncey Renshaw 

P. M. Sanvidge 

Ross Scott 

H. R. Scruton 

A. F. .''haw 

W. E. Shaw 

G. H. Smith 

George Somerton 



St. Catharines 

Cochrane 

Acton 

Richmond Hill 

Hamilton 

An caster 

Toronto 

Glencoe 

C-ayuga 

HuntBville 

Ottawa 

Merrickville 

Waterloo 

Cobourg 

_ Campbellville 

_ York 

_ Long Branch 
Seaforth 

— Port Dover 
.. Tilbury 

— Port Arthur 

Hagersville 

_ Amherstburg 



328 GRAND LOIKJE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

William Stanzell Smiths FallB 

R. E. Strain Sarnia 

W. L. Strieker Agincourt 

H. R. Sykes London 

O. J. Timber Espanola 

H. V. Watson Uxbridge 

A. E. Woollard Bobcaygeon 

H. G. Zeigler Guelph 

Grand Standard Bearers 

V.W. Bro. E. C. Trapp Deep River 

" W. A. Hughes Toronto 



TORONTO. ONTARIO, 1961 329 

BOARD OF GENERAL PURPOSES 

President 
R.W. Bro. J. A. Irvine, 34 Campbell St., (Box 236) Lambeth 



Vice-President 



R.W. 

M.W. 



Bro. 
Bro. 



J. N. Allan 



Dunnville 



By Virtue of Office 

R. W. Treleaven, 702 Main St. East Hamilton 

T. H. Simpson, Past Gr. Master, Royal Bank Bldg., Hamilton 
J. A. Hearn, Past Gr. Master, 460 Oriole Parkway, Toronto 7 
W. L. Wright, Past Gr. Master, Bishophurst, Sault Ste. Marie 
" " H. L. Martyn, Past Gr. Master, 32 Langford Ave., Toronto 

C. M. Pitts, Past Gr. Maater, Box 374 _ Ottawa 

R.W. Bro. G. C. Bennett, Gr. Sr. Warden, 31 Euclid Ave. Ottawa 

" W. M. Prentice, Gr. Jr. Warden, 41 Chaplin Cresc, Toronto 7 
•• " Rev. Canon A. J. Anderson, Gr. Chaplain, Apt. 2, 175 Union 
St., Kingston 
M.W. Bro. J. A. Hearn, Gr. Treasurer, 460 Oriole Parkway, Toronto 7 

R.W. Bro. E. G. Dixon, Grand Secretary. Drawer 217 _ Hamilton 

" F. L. Barrett, Gr. Registrar, 34 Sheldon Ave. N., Kitchener 
V.W. Bro. Wm. R. Binney. Gr. Dir. of Ceremonies, 118 Haddon Ave. S., 
Hamilton. 



DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS 

District Name Address 

Algoma Kenneth M. MacKay, 733 Catharine St. Fort William 

Brant A. Laird Miller Jarvi* 

^<=? Gordon S. Matthias, Box 308 Walkerton 

Chatham Harold L. Martin, R.R. No. 5 Dresden 

v^r^^Z Roderick A. Stewart, Box 445 Maxville 

^"^^° Roy R. Sweetman _ Westport 

Georgian Thomas J. Purvis, 59 O'Brien St. Orillia 

H«Lm!lt/>n <'A" Robert E. Davies Mount Forest 

H^ ton "B" "John H. Jackson, 121 Blake St Ham. ton 

iWjnuton a -Robert G. Truscott. 127 Fairleigh Ave. S, Hamilton 

Mn^k^ka. Rossiter C. Fuller. 810 Riverside Dr. London 

pTr^ Sound Frank W. Toswell Powassan 

NiagI?a-r_Alpheus V. Hammond, 17 Hazel St St. Cathanne* 

Niarara "B" Sydney J. Gill, R.R. No. 1 ;:,—-- r, Ilu d 

N dS™k Eas~Maitland G. Gould, 714 Mclntyre St. W. -. North Bay 

NiDiS inl W^t "Herbert A. Death, P.O. Box 352 --. Sudbury 

Norih Huron -IJohn L. MacKinnon, Box 631 .. ^'"?i^[^ii:^ 

Antnri- Charles B. Rycroft. 700 Byron St. S ^^y*"***? 

0?bfwa John O'Donovan, 359 Hinton Ave. Ottawa S 

Pettrfwr^^h William Anderson, 395 Edison Ave. Peterborough 

Pr nS°S?w2rdTHarry G. Bates. 53 Everett St Bel W^le 

«;„„,:„ George C. Searson, Box 134 Wattora 

SL li^n _R. Earle Tapp Monk^on 

St. Ljawrence — ^^sy Brown _.... ZTZZZZZZTThedden 

lem^k'a^g ^^el^W^'^B^a'c^ey. 109 FrrsT St Kirkland Lake 

Toront^T ""Robert F. Brown. 83 Besslyrough Dr Toronto 7 

Toronto 2 George H. Weson. 12 Ivy Lea Cres To''^"*'' ^ 

Toronto 3 ^Thomas F. Dodson. 470 Atlas Ave. Toronto 10 

?o^to 4 "IZZwilliam A. Hagan, 78 Kingspark Blvd Toronto 6 

Srto Z F^nc^,P-^^J-. 2« Southgate A_ve ~- Downsv^ew 

^[S^a^ ZZZrS^^^J^^LrElTN^-^ Ll^say 

Wellington Arthur B. Barton. PO. Box 84 ^Elora 

Western John A. Cox^ Box 610^ iur^gesT^fle 

Wilson ^Weldon F. Burnll. R.R. No 1 w^Sor 

Wind.or Harry Taylor. 977 Bridge Ave. Windsor 



330 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Honorary Members of the Board 

R.W. Bid. E. T. Howe _ "Windsor 

R.W. Bro. G. F. Clark, 530 Maple Ave Hamilton 

R.W. Bro. H. S. Johnston, 46 Bond St. _._ Lindsay 

R.W. Bro. J. R. Rumball, 100 Alexandra Blvd. Toronto 

R.W. Bro. R. C. Berkinshaw, 250 University Ave., Sviite 701 — Toronto 

Elected Members of the Board 

R.W. Bro. J. N. Allan Dunnville 

R.W. Bro. B. B. Foster _ Ridgetown 

R.W. Bro. Wellington Smith, 166 Third St. W. Fort Frances 

R.W. Bro. W. K. Bailey, 177 Lawrence Ave. E. Toronto 12 

R.W. Bro. George T. Evans, 76 Melrose Ave. S. Hamilton 

R.W. Bro. D. J. Gunn, 65 Grenview Blvd. N. Toronto 

R.W. Bro. F. D. Shannon, 109 Bayfield Ave. Bajrrie 

R.W. Bro. M. C. Hooper, 430 Lytton Blvd. Toronto 

R.W. Bro. J. B. Sainsbury, c/o Can. Imperial Bank of Commerce, Gore 

and Queen Sts., Sault Ste. Marie 

Appointed by the Grand Master 

V.W. Bro. A. C. Ashforth, 18 Glenallen Rd Toronto 12 

R.W. Bi-o. T. J. Donnelly, P.O. Box No. 1 — Kingston 

R.W. Bro. Willard M. Gordon, 346 River View Drive Toronto 

V.W. Bro. H. I. Sparling St. Marys 

H.W. Bro. George E. Turner, 2281 Victoria Ave. Windsor 

and for one year : ' 

H.W. Bro. H. B. Coxon. 831 Wellington St. London 

H.W. Bro. W. H. Gibson . Tillsonburg 

Tl.W. Bro. H. H. Dymond Renfrew 

H.W. Bro. A. V. Chapman, Box 273 Port Arthur 

R.W. Bro. G. J. Patterson. 77 Marion Ave. N. Hamilton 

R.W. Bro. P. Stuart MacKenzie -.:...._ Walkerton 

COMMITTEES 
Audit and Finance 

R.W. Bro. R. C. Berkinshaw (Chairman) ; M.W. Bro. J. A. Hearn ; 
R.W. Bros. A. V. Chapman, D. J. Gunn. J. A. Irvine, J. B. Sainsbury, 
H. H. Dymond, G. H. Weston, J. H. Jackson, H, I. Sparling; V.W. Bro. 
A. C. Ashforth. 

Benevolencp 
R.W. Bro. J. N. Allan (Chairman): M.W. Bro. J. A. Hearn ; R.W. 
Bros. J. A. Irvine, B. B. Foster, W. H. Gibson, F. D. Shannon, E. T. 
Howe. G. F Clark, J. R. Rumball, H. S. Johnston, G. E. Turner. F. L. 
Barrett, R. E. Davies, R. G. Truscott, H. G. Russell, R. E. Tapp, H. B. 
Coxon. 

Condition of Masonry 

R.W. Bro. B. B. Foster fChairman) : R.W. Bros. T. J. Donnelly, H. 
L. Martin, R. R. Sweetman. F. W. Toswell, A. V. Hammond, S. J. Gill, 
G. C. Searson, W. F. Burrill, Douglas Orchard. 

Constitntion and Laws 

M.W Bro. T. H. Simpson (Chairman) ; M.W. Bros. J. A. Hearn, W. 
L. Wright, H. L. Martyn, C. M. Pitts ; R.W. Bro. J. A. Irvine. 

Fraternal Correspondence 

M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn (Chairman); M.W. Bro. W. L. Wright; 
R.W. Bros. J. A. Irvine, E. G. Dixon. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 881 

Frftternal Dead 

R.W. Bro. D. J. Gunn (Chairman) ; R.W. Bros. K. M. MacKay, 
William Anderson, A. V. Hammond, S. J. Moore. 

Fraternal Relations 

M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn (Chaii-man) ; M.W. Bros. T. H. Simpson, 
J. A. Heam, W. L. Wright, C. M. Pitts ; R.W. Bros. J. A. Irvine, E. 
G. Dixon. 

Grievance* and Appeals 

R.W. Bro. M. C. Hooper (Chairman) : M.W. Bros. T. H. Simpson, J. 
A. Hearn, W. L. Wriffht, H. L. Martyn, C. M. Pitts; R.W. Bros. J. A. 
Irvine, E. G. Dixon, J. R. Rumball, P. S. MacKenzie, G. T. Evans, W. 
M. Gordon. J. A. Cox', M. G. Gould, C. B. Rycroft, G. C. Bennett; V.W. 
Bro. W. R. Binney. 

Library 

R.W. Bro. W. M. Gordon (Chairman) ; M.W. Bros. J. A. Heam, H. 
L. Martyn; R.W. Bros., R. F. Brown, G. H. Weston, T. F. Dodson, W. 
A. Hagan, F. P. Lowi-y, H. G. Russell. 

Masonic Education 

R.W. Bro. W. K. Bailey (Chairman) ; M.W. Bros. W.L. Wright, H. 
L. Martyn; R.W. Bros. E. G. Dixon, B. B. Foster, Wellington Smith, W. 
M. Prentice, A. J. Anderson, R. F. Brown, G. H. Weston, F. P. Lowry, 
G. J. Patterson, H. G. Bates, T. J. Pui-vis, G. S. Matthias, R. A. Stewart, 
C. B. Rycroft. . 

Printing and Suppliei 

R.W. Bro. J. B. Sainsbui-y (Chairman) ; R.W. Bros. H. S. Johnsitom. 
J. O'Donovan, Lyndsy Brown, A. B. Barton, J. L. MacKinnon, Harry 
Taylor. 

WARRANTS 

R.W. Bro. W. H. Gibson (Chairman) ; R.W. Bros. J. A. Irvine, E. 
G. Dixon, Laird Miller, R. C. Fuller, H. A. Death, J. W. Bradley, R. 
R. Sweetoian. 



SPECIAL COMJMITTEES OF GRAND LODGE 

Award Committee — Meritorious Service Medal 
M.W. Bros. J. A. Hearn, H. L. Martyn. 

Regralia Committee 
R.W. Bros. G. F. Clark, E. G. Dixon. 

Policy Oommittee on Bulletin 
M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON LODGE BUILDINGS 
R.W. Bro. George T. Evans (Chairman). 

BLOOD DONORS' COMMITTEE 
R.W. Bro. F. D. Shannon (Chairman). 



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•Henry T. Backus- 
♦Philip C. Tucker— 
•Michael Furnell 



•W. C. Stephens 

•Robert Morris 

•T. D. Harington 

•Thos. G Ridout 

•Aldis Bernard 

•Thomas Drummond _ 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 1961 

HONORARY OFFICERS 

Michigan 1857_ 

Ireland 1S57 . 

Hamilton 1857_ 

Kentucky 1858- 

Vermont 1858_ 

Montreal 1858_ 

Toronto 1859 . 

Montreal 1860.. 



335 



•John H. Orp.ham 

•Jas. V. MaoKey 

•Brackstone Baker 

•Sir John A. Macdonald 

•John V. Ellis 

•Rev. C. P. Bliss 

•Wm. H. Fraser 

•H. A. MacKay 

•Thos. White, jr 

•J. A. T.^ockwood 

•Otto Klntz 

•Geo. C .Patterson.. 

•T. R. Barton 

*J. J. Ramsay 

•KivaB Tully.. 



•W. A. Sutherland 

•.T. J. Mason 

•Chief Justice Gerald Fitz- 

Gibbon 

•R. L. Shriner 

•Alex. Patterson 



_ 1862 

Richmond 1 S64 .. 

Ireland 1867. 

England 1868 

Kingston 1868.. 

New Brunswick 1869. 

New Brunswick 1871_. 

Wisconsin 1873 

Hamilton 1873... 

Montreal 1874.. 

New York 1882 

Preston 1 885 .. 

Toronto 1 897.. 

. To ron to 1897... 

Toronto 1897.. 

Toronto 1 897 

New York 1900 

Hamilton 1900 



-Ireland-. 

-Toronto- 

— Toronto- 



•H.R.H. Duke of Connaught... England. 

•Lord Ampthill Entrland.. 

Gerald Fitzpribbon. K.C Ireland..- 

Rt. Hon. Lord Desborough, 

K.C.V.O Fnpland....- 

Stanley Machin, J.P England 

Jas. H. Stirling Ireland 

A. Cecil Powell England. 

.Tnhn Dickens _ England 

•R. F. Richardson Strathroy..- 

•Sir George McLaren Brown-England 

Sir John Ferguson _.__Fngland_ 



H. HimiUon-Wpdderburn ... England.. 

♦Arthur E. Carlyle England 

•D'ldley H Ferrell Massachusetts— 

•Chas. H. Ramsay Massachusetts— 

•Frank H. Hilton Massachusetts.... 

A. Beitler Pennsylvania 

•S. W. Goodyear Pennsylvania 

•George Ross Toronto 

•Chas. B. Murray Toronto 

•Sir Alfred Robbins Enelnnd 

Earl of Stair Scotland 

•Lord Donoughmore__.^__Irpland 

•Viscount Galway England 

Canon F. J. C. Gillmor England 

J. Bridges, Eustace England 

Robt. J. Soddy England 

•Gen. Sir Francis Davies England 



Canon Thomas T. Blockley England... 

Rt. Hon. Viscount de Vesci_. England 

Major R. L. Loyd England 

Raymond F. Brooke Ireland 

Rt. Hon. Lord Farnham Ireland 

Dr. W. E. Thrift Ireland—. 

Gen. Sir Norman A. 

Orr-Ewing Scotland 

•T. G. Winning Scotland 

Joseph E. Perry Massachusetts- 
Reginald Harris Nova Scotia 

Norman T. Avard Nova Scotia 

Wr E. H. Coonor _„ . . . England^ 



1900- 
1900- 
1901.. 
1902- 
1919- 
-_ 1920_ 

1920.. 

1920... 

_ 1920- 
-.. 1920- 
_.. 1920. 
_.. 1920„ 
_. 1921- 
_ 1923- 
__ 1923 

1923 

1923_ 

1923- 

1923 

— 1923 

— 1923... 
._..192.V. 

1925... 

1927-. 

19.?1-. 

1981- 

1931- 

__ 1931.. 
_ 1«81_ 

1933 

— 1988- 

1938 . 

1938- 

1938.. 

19.38- 

1 938. 

-..-1938- 



•Erneat B. Thompson— 
James W. Hamilton— 
• Deceased 



-Hamilton.. 
-Harnilton- 



1938- 

1938 

1938 

1938. 

1938- 

.1040 

.1959- 

.1959- 



336 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



LIST OF GRAND LODGES 
With Name and Address of the Grand Secretaries 

The United Kingdom 



England- 

Ireland.- 

Scotland.... 



.J. W. Stubbs 

.J. 0. Harte 

A.. F. Buchan 



London 
ublin 
-Edinburgh 



Dominion of Canada 



Alberta. 

British Columbia.™. 

Manitoba 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Isl, 

Quebec 

Saskatchewan 



E. H. Rivers Calgary 

..J. H. N. Morgan Vancouver 

...Thos. C. Jackson Winnipeg 

...A.. C. Lemmon St. John 

...H. F. Sipprell Halifax 

„Floyd Drake Charlottetown 

-J. M. Marshall Montreal 

^Richmond Mayson. Regina 



Other British Countries 



Newfoundland 

(Eng. Con.) 

Newfoundland 

(Scot. Con.) 

New South Wales™. 

New Zealand 

Queensland 

South Australia 

Tasmania „ 

Victoria 

Western Australia... 



.A. G. Miles.. 



"B. R. Taylor 

.J. S. Miller. 

.F. G. Northern. 

.V. I. Carter 

•F. J. Ellen 

.H. A. Wilkinson... 

.C. W. Davis 

.N. J. Munro 



.St. John's 

,St. John's 

-Sydney 

.Wellington 

.Brisbane 

.Adelaide 

..Hobart 

.Melbourne 

-Perth 



United States of America 

Alabama _„ R. R. Berryman. Montgomery 

Arizona Joseph A. E. Ivey Tucson 

Arkansas _.- L. L. McDaniel Little Rock 

California. E. H. Siems San Francisco 

Colorado Harry W. Bundy _ Denver 2 

Connecticut Earle K. Haling. Hartford 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 



337 



Delaware.. 

Dist. of Columbia- 

Florida-.. 

Georgia. 

Idaho 

Illinois— 

Indiana — 

Iowa.... 

Kansas. 



Kentucky. 
Louisiana. 
Maine.. 
Marylanc 
Massachusetts- 
Michigan — 
Minnesota.. 
Mississippi. 
Missouri. 
Montana... 
Nebraska. 



Nevada 

New Hampshire... 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 



North Carolina — 

North Dakota 

Ohio 



Oklahoma.. 
Oregon. 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina^. 
South Dakota — 

Tennessee- 

Texas. 
Utah- 
Vermont 
Virginia- 



Washington 

West Virginia. 
Wisconsin.. 
Wyoming 



C. R. Jones Wilmington 

R. N. Babcock Washington 

Wm. A. Whitcomb Jacksonville 

.-Daniel W. Locklin Macon 

H. H. Eberle Boise 

E. L. Lawrence Harrisburg 

Dwight L. Smith Indianapolis 

R. E. Whipple Cedar Rapids 

C. S. McGinness Topeka 

A. E. Orton Louisville 

•D. P. Laguens New Orleans 

Earle D. Webster. Portland 

.Gerald M. Pine -Baltimore 

Earl W. Taylor Boston 

•Chais. T. Sherman Grand Rapids 

David E. Palmer St. Paul 

Sid. F. Curtis Meridian 

E, E. Wagner. _..St. Louis 

B. F. Gaither Helena 

C. R. Greisen Omaha 

E. C. Peterson Carson City 

Harold 0. Cady Concord 

Harvey C. Whildey Trenton 

Chandler C Thomas Albuquerque 

Edward R. Carman New York 

C. A. Harris Raleigh 

C. E. Miller Fargo 

.Andrew J. White. Jr.... Worthington 

J. F. Latham Guthrie 

Harry D. Proudfoot Portland 

.Ashby B. Paul Philadelphia 

Arthur R. Cole Providence 

Jlenry F. Collins Columbia 

JJlvin F. Strain Sioux Falls 

.T. E. Doss Nashville 

Harvey C. Byrd. Waco 

_ Clarence M. Groshell -Salt Lake City 

.-A. H. Grout Burlington 

_A. B. Gay Richmond 

„Daniel T. Simmons .. — Tacoma 

_J. B. HolHngsworth Charleston 

P. W. Grossenbach Milwaukee 

M. R. Nichols Casper 



338 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

Other Countries 

Argentina. Carlos Wilson Buenos Aires 

Bahia (Brazil) Diogo Menezes do 

Nascimento Bahia 

Chile Oscar Pereira H Santiago 

Colombia 

BHrranquilla JMiguel M. Zapata E. ..Barranquilia 

Colombia Bogota Pedro A. Ba()ueio C. Bogota 

Colombia Cartagena Ernesto A. Florez Cartagena 

Costa Rica Enrique Chaves B San Jose 

Cuba Eduardo R. Lopez 

Bobadilla La Habana 

Denmark Alfred Nyvang ^.Copenhagen 

Ecuador Ricardo Chavez Coca Guayaquil 

Finl and — Lau ri S arkia. _ Helsinki 

France, Nationale — Jean P. Muet Neuilly-Sur-Seine 

Germany, United Frankfurt am 

Grand Lodges Richard Muller-Bomer„ Main 

Greece ...._ _ Panayotis Hadj ipetros.. Athens 

Guatemala Jorge J. Escandon 

Enriquez - Guatemala 

Iceland Olaf ur Gislason. Reykjavik 

Israel Shlomo Zarankin Tel- Aviv 

Japan G. H. Booth Tokyo 

Netherlands P. J. Van Loo .The Hague 

Norway Odd Lie-Davidsen Cslo 

Panama Julio A. Ramos Panama 

Para (Brazil) Otto L. Hiltner Para 

Paraiba (Brazil) Napoleao Crispim Paraiba 

Peru Baldomero Carreno 

Galicio Lima 

Philippines Esteban Munarriz Manila 

Puerto Rico Juan L. Matos 

Cintron Santurce 

Sweden Sven Svedin Stockholm 

Switzerland Ernst Hagmann _ Zurich 

^T'enezuela Francisco Escobar 

Rojas Caracas 

York, Mexico Cantwell C. Brown Mexico City 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, 1961 389 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES OF THE GRAND 

LODGE OF CANADA, NEAR OTHER 

GRAND LODGES 



The United Kingdom 

England Sir Ernest Cooper London 

Ireland Thomas Jackson Dublin 

Scotland 



.Viscount Trap rain. Edinburgh 



Dominion of Canada 



Alberta F. P. Galbraith Eed Deer 

British Columbia Geo. C. Derby Vancouver 

Manitoba S. H. FahmL Portage LaPlraarie 

New Brunswick A. C. Lemmon St. John 

Nova Scotia W. E. Ryder Dartmouth 

Prince Edward Isl—F. A. Van Iderstine Charlottetrwn 

QiioV>p<» n L. Witter Knowlton 

Saskatchewan F. C. Wilson Regina 



Other British Countries 



New South Wales>. 
New Z'^alfind 


_F. 


N. 

R. 
F. 

A. 

H. 


Boddington 

Taylor 


Clovely 


Queensland 


F 


Brisbane 


South Australia— 


_.N. 
H. 


Hopkins 


,, Djilwirh 


Tasmf^n^a 


Wilkinson — 
Tucker 


Hobart 


Victoria . 


~.W 


Melbourne 



Western Australia C. P. Smith- 



.Perth 



United States of America 

Alabama Harry P. Suggs E. Tallassee 

Arizona ^_ E. Hogel .Globe 

Arkansas Leslie M. Greene Siloam Springs 

California Ellsworth Meyer Los .\ngeles 



340 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Dist. of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa„ 
Kansas.... 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts- 
Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

M n tana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire- 
New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York. 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon — _., 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina. 

South Dakota _ 

Tennessee 

Tex as 

Utah 

Vermont 

Vi rgi n i a 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 



..E. J. Wittelshofer Denver 

...Clarence 0. Lister Bridgeport 

„Wm. E. Matthews, Jr Smyraa 

._Wm. T. Ballard Washington 

..Walter R. Gall Zephyrhill? 

_0. B. Turner Griffin 

.. Robert Berg Moscow 

.Wm. R. Peters Chicago 

_0rvis A. Dellinger Fort Waynt 

_W, A. Westfall Mason City 

J. H. Stewart, Jr Wichita 

.W. R. Harris„...„. Union City 

.Adam Mehn New Orleans 

,.J. Abemethy -.West Pembroke 

-J. D. Hospelhorn Baltimore 

.H. C. Pollard. Lowell 

-M. J. Smead Rochester 

„D. E. Palmer _ Minneapolis 

„Thomas Q. Ellis Jackson 

Oliver L. Luft St. Louis 

E. J. Frost Havre 

_ Edward F. Carter. Lincoln 

_Arthur H. Hesbon.-... Reno 

-Harold 0. Cady -..Concord 

-.Adrian B. Hommell Sussex 

...Arthur C. Culver Albuquerque 

-Joseph H. Reynolds Brooklyn 

.-F. H. Trethewey Charlotte 

-.James C. McCormick. Westhope 

_Geo. H. Hess - Springfield 

„H. A. Butler „ Allen 

... Kenneth M. Robb -Portland 

-A. W. Abramson Warwick 

.-Arden A. Lemon Hamwell 

-Harold L. Tisher Yankton 

-Charles L. Robertson....... Taft 

..-Elmer Renfro Fort Worth 

-A. E. Forbes Ogden 

-W. S. Horn Brandon 

-Archer B. Gay Richmond 

..Ford Q. Ehidge Seattle 

-T. R. Reed. Charleston 

_F. W. Clitheroe ..'vpnosha 



TORONTO, ONTABIO. 1961 



S41 



Other Countries 



Argentina Leonidas Atanasopulos, Buenos Aires 

Bahia (Brazil) 

Chile 

Colombia 

Barranquilla Alex. S. Hamilton Barranquiha 

Colombia Bogota A. Camicelli ~ ~.~ Bogota 

Colombia Cartagena. W. R. Blackmore _ Mexico City 

Costa Rica Miguel Yamuni ^)an Jose 

Cuba L. G. Patten Camaguey 

Denmark. Alfred Nyvang Copenhagerv 

Ecuador Bolivar Plaza N _ Guyaquil 

Finland 

France, Nationale Walter H. Robinson — Paris 

Germany, United 

Grand Lodges Wilhelm Grupe Hanover 

Greece 

Guatemala J. Humberto Ayestas Guatemala 

Sandoval 

Iceland Fomas Tomasson 

Japan...... 

Israel Daniel Horin Tel-Aviv 

Netherlands H. A. K. Buisman Groningen 

Norway A. B. Laurentzon Oslo 

Panama Chas. Qvistgnrd — Colon 

Para (Brazil) Dr. Otto L. Hiltner Belem 

Paraiba (Brazil) Odemar Gomes Nacre... Paraiba 

Peru Manuel ZegarnL Lima 

Philippines '^- C- Del Rosario Manila 

Porto Rico . Isadro Diaz-Lopez. Ponce 

Sweden 0- V. F. Holmgren Stockholm 

.^Switzerland E. Baumgartner geme 

Venezuela Miguel A. Tejeda R — Cararap 

York, Mexico John Jenkin ■ Pachuca 



342 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES OF OTHER 

GRAND LODGES NEAR THE GRAND 

LODGE OF CANADA 

The United Kingdom 

— Hamilton 
—Toronto 



England. „ .T. H. Simpson 

Ireland 

Scotland J. A. Heam...... 



Dominion of Canada 

Alberta. W. K. Bailey 

British Columbia R. W. Treleaven 

Manitoba J. A. Irvine 

New Brunswick W, H. Gibson 

Nova Scotia James Semple „ „ 

Prince Edward Id. _Geo. H. Kyerson 

Quebec John Heisler 

Saskatchewan Richard E. Mills 



Toronto 

— Hamilton 
...London 
,.._Tillsonburg 
....North Bay 
.... Brantf ord 
. . Ottawa 
....Elora 



Other British Countries 



New South Wales.. 

New Zealand 

Queensland ~_— _ 

South Australia 

Tasmania 

Victoria 



-Walter T. Robb Orangeville 

.D. J, Gunn Toronto 

-Charles Fotheringham Tillsonburg 

-R. E. Clemens Hamilton 

-E. W. E. Saunders Toronto 

_M. F. Dvke Elind River 



Western Australia B. C. McClelland Toronto 



United States of America 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado- 
Connecticut- 
Delaware 



Dist. of Columbij 
Floridz 



G. J. McQueen 

0. M. Newton...... 

—E. T. Howe 

— W. L. Wright....-..., 

-H. Minchinton 

_W. F. Reynolds— 

-M. C. Hooper 

-J. R. Rumball™ 
J. R. Simpson „ 



-Hamilton 

-Trenton 

-Windsor 

..Sault Ste. Marie 

-Toronto 

.. Bi'ockville 

..Toronto 

"Toronto 
.Toronto 



TORONTO. ONTARIO. 1961 



Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois- 
Indiana. 
Iowa 



31. C. Cain- 



™.Toronto 



Kansas- 
Kentucky. 
Louisianz 
Maine- 



Marylanc 
Massachusetts- 

Michig-an 

Minnesota 

Mississippi- 
Missouri- 
Montana™ 



-Donald M. Sutherland_Embro 

-A. E. MacGregoT Toronto 

.Alan Broughton Sault Ste. Marie 

-Geo. T. Evans Hamilton 

^Morrison Sellar Owen Sound 

.W. T. Overend Toronto 

.Stilson Swales Watford 

H. L. Martyn Toronto 

_ Harvey Linklater Kincardine 

_W. J. Fuller Mitchell 

.W. H. Kipp London 

-C. E. Hough Toronto 

-D. A, Mclnnis Windsor 

-C. M. Pitts Ottawa 



Nebraska 

Nevada H. B. Coxon 

New Hampshire B. B, Foster 

New Jersey Thos. Montgomery- 



New Mexico- 
New Yorl 
North Carolin£ 
North Dakota. 
Ohio- 
Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina- 
South Dakota- 
Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah- 
Vermont- 
Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia- 
Wisconsin- 



...London 

„Ridgetown 

_Samia 

..-Ottawa 

—London 



X. P. Tilley 

-G. F. Kingsmill 

.A. C. Ashforth Toronto 

-J.J. Talman London 

,G. O. Coales Toronto 

_C. M. Rawson Toronto 

,. F. D. Shannon Barrie 

.Geo. F. Clark Hamilton 

_Ewart G. Dixon Hamilton 

_E. A. Miller London 

.Ed. Balfour Toronto 

.Guelph 

-Toronto 

-Hamilton 



_A. W. Baker- 

.G. W. McRae 

.A. L. Lott 

.Birkett Lishman Ottawa 

,.B. S. Edmondson Oshawa 

.W. D. Connor Hamilton 

-H. S. Johnston Lindsay 



Argentina 

Bahia (Brazil) — 

Chile _ 



Other Countries 

-T. N. Clarke- 
-Wellington Smith— 
.W. E. W. Cressey- 



-Kingston 
.Fort Frances 
.Sudbury 



344 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA ANNUAL COMMUNICATION 



Colombia 

Barranquilla T. H. W. Martin 

Colombia Bogota J. H. Burke 

Colombia Cartagena.A. V, Chapman 

Costa Rica - .....E. N. Gregory 

Cuba 

Denmark W. L. Wright 

Ecuador J. N. Allan 

Finland ....„ 

France, Nationale J. F. Swayze 

Germany, United 

Grand Lodges C. F. Cannon 

Greece — - ....- 

Guatemala Wm. J. Attig 

Iceland. R. L. Dobbin 

Israel D- ^^ Harris 

Japan - 

Netherlands G. E. French 

Norway R. C. Berkinshaw 

Panama G. H. Vogan 

Para (Brazil) — --J\.. D. McRae 

Paraiba (Brazil) Allan C. Mason 

Philippines P. N. Knight 

Puerto Rico Karl B. Conger 

Sweden. C. H. Reeve 

Switzerland W. S. Milmine 

Venezuela. Robt. Strachan. 

York, Mexico W. B. Cannon 



. Toronto 
.Port Str.nley 
.Port Arthur 
..Lindsay 



-Sault Ste. 
J)unnville 



Marie 



— Toronto 



-Toronto 



~Powassan 

-Peterborough 

.Toronto 

..Niagara Falls 
-Toronto 
.St. Thomas 
-Vankleek Hill 
-Acton 

, Grafton 
-Ottawa 

.Orillia 
..Stoney Crp'^' 
-Hamilton 
-Caledon East 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 
ON FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 

To the Most Worshipful, the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M., of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: 

Your Committee on Fraternal Correspondence for the 
Masonic year of 1960-61, composed of M.W. Bro. W. L. Wright, 
R.W. Bro. R. W. Treleaven, R.W. Bro. E. G. Dixon and 
M.W. Bro. H. L. Martyn, Chairman reports as follows: 



FOREWORD 

Few men have contributed to Masonry more than did the 
Past Grand Master who was the Chaii-man of this Committee 
up to the time of his passing a little over five months ago. 
Many of the Reviews were completed before his illness and 
they are recorded in the pages that follow. The Committee 
wish to join the other Committees of Grand Lodge in record- 
ing the deep sense of loss we feel at his passing. This gen- 
eration of Masons can feel proud that they were privileged 
to know and work with a Mason such as the late M.W. Bro. 
William James Dunlop. 

The Committee was able to prevail upon R.W. Bro. J. J. 
Talman, P.G.S.W. of London, Ontario, to write the remainder 
of the reviews. Our sincere thanks and appreciation are ex- 
tended to him for undertaking this task and carrying it 
through to its completion. 

Our Grand Lodge recognizes ninety-four Grand Lodges 
in the various parts of the world. These reviews that are 
presented each year come from the Grand Lodges on this con- 
tinent and some from others in the English speaking world. 
If you read these reviews carefully and thoughtfully, we 
are sure that you will get an appreciation of the workings 
of Masonry in the various parts of our Masonic world. 

The problems that face the different Grand Lodges seem 
to be common rather than isolated. The chief ones appear to 
centre around attendance or the lack of it. Coupled with 
this one comes the decrease in membership. The decrease in 
membership would seem to centre in the main in the Grand 
Lodges in the northeast part of the continent. The larger 
the Grand Lodge the more apparent would seem to be the 
decrease. These trends are important so they should be 
studied. Clcsely allied to this problem is the problem of 
poor lodge attendance. This does not appear to be isolated 
to any particluar area. Interesting comments appear in the 



reviews as to cause and remedy. The 11.30 p.m. leaving 
time that the Grand Master of New South Wales asks for, 

is worthy of note. 

The benevolent work of each Grand Jurisdiction is 
always of interest to the Masonic reader. This topic is 
dealt with in detail by all Grand Lodge Proceedings. In the 
main the Masonic Home is supported in nearly all Grand 
Lodges in the United States. This is so different to our own 
approach that from time to time some of our members desire 
us to change. However, a thorough understanding of our 
system will soon convince the sceptic that our approach 
meets our problem efficiently and effectively. 

It is of interest to note the number of reviews that re- 
cord the fact that the Grand Master laid comer-stones for 
buildings other than Masonic Temples. A few that stand out 
are Delaware, California, Arkansas and Missouri. This is 
of interest to us at the present because of the fact that our 
Grand Master presided at a corner-stone ceremony during 
this last year for a public building It is many years since 
this has happened in our Grand Jurisdiction. 

California records an interesting comment on the de- 
mands that are made on the Grand Master's time. Ari- 
zona reports a scheme of three level control in the adminis- 
trative duties of senior officers of Grand Lodge. These may 
initiate some serious thought in the minds of our readers. 
Do we make too many demands on the time of the Grand 
Master ? 

The Grand Lodges of Australia seem to be concerned 

about the dignity that should prevail at Masonic meetings. 
It is interesting to note the comments on what is appropriate 
dress for members attending lodge. 

In a closing comment, we feel that these reviews show" 
evidence of inspired leadership in the Masonic World. One 
cannot fail to be impressed by the fact that Masonic leaders 
are giving their best to promote the interests of the Craft 
in their respective jurisdictions. 



Respectfully submitted, 



HARRY L. MARTYN, P.G.M., 
Chairman, 



Fraternal Correspondence and Reviews 



ALBERTA— 1960 

55th Annual Communication — June 8-9 

Gand Master, l%9-60— M.W. Bro. David Little 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. W. H. Harper 

Lodges, 169. Membership, 18,931. Gain, 257. 

Unfortunately, the losses totalled 749; 253 demitted; 143 
were suspended; 353 passed on. In spite of this, there was a 
nice increase. (What can be done about suspensions?) 

The Committee on Masonic Education recommended 
greater use of the Grand Lodge Library and of the Bulletin 
and suggested that discussion periods could be built up on 
the material therein available. The Proceedings of the 
Banff Conference were recommended also for study. During 
the year several talks on Masonic Education were given to 
local Lodges. 

Special Communications were held for the purpose of 
constituting and consecrating two new Lodges and dispens- 
ations were issued for the formation of another two Lodges. 
(Good progress, if we may say so.) 

In the course of a most interesting and comprehensive 
Address the Grand Master did not hesitate to reprimand 
where he considered that necessary and desirable. For ex- 
am'ple, though he attended, with the Grand Secretary, all the 
District Meetings, the attendance was not at all satisfactory 
and for this situation he, quite properly, holds the District 
Deputy Grand Masters and the Masters responsible. He 
remarks that the District Deputy Grand Masters have seven 
or eight months to organize their meetings. At each meet- 
ing a degree was conferred; careful attention was given 
to wording; and there was a question and answer period. 
In Alberta there are two Rituals in use, the Canadian and the 
York Rite. The Grand Master did not overlook Yellowknife 
Lodge, No. 162 in the Northwest Territories where a candid- 
ate was raised who had flo\\Ti 200 miles to attend the Meet- 
ing. This Lodge, with 110 members, prospers remarkably. 

Further, he said: "The first and hisrhest allegiance of 
every Mason should be to his Blue Lodge. From her he 
draws his Masonic life. He promised her allegiance before 
he became acquainted with any other organization called 



4 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Masonic." He urged attention to voice and enunciation; 
"Make words live", he said. He had a sharp reprimand for 
those brethren who tell the candidate crazy stories of what 
takes place during a degree and he pleaded for dignity, 
pointing out that in the York Rite there is sometimes un- 
necessary roughness. He condemned the telling of "shady 
stories" at the banquet. All in all, the Address was refresh- 
ing, sensible, and do-w-n to earth. (One of the finest we have 
read.) 

In presenting the Report of the Committee on the Work, 
my friend of many years' standing, M.W. Bro. F. P. Galbraith, 
delivered a pithy and forthright foreword on the necessity 
of impressing on the candidate the lessons we pu<rport to 
teach. 

In 1960-61 twelve bursaries will be available for uni- 
versity students and sixteen in each subsequent year. The 
fund is contributed by the Lodges. 



ARIZONA— 1960 

78th Annual Communication — April 25-26 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. L. D. Wilson 
Gi-and Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. E. A. Spitler 

Lodges, 58. Membership, 12,270. Gain, 404. 

The condition of the Craft is most healthy. Many Lod>ges 
have raised their fees in recognition of the continual climb 
in the cost of living. The Grand Master recommended that 
all Lodges which had not already raised fees consider doing 
so. Masonry is growing in Arizona and the Grand Master 
felt that means should be found of keeping up this growth. 

One important committee appointed was that for in- 
vestigating and finding a suitable location for a permanent 
Grand Lodge building. 

The Grand Master was disturbed to learn that many 
petitions were being signed by members who had known the 
petitioners for only a few months. He recommended the 
adoption of a regulation that a signer must know a petitioner 
at least one year before signing his petition. 

He recommended also that Arizona be divided into three 
districts, with the Deputy Grand Master, the Senior Grand 
Warden, and the Junior Grand Warden each being assigned 
to a district. As an officer moved upward he would be 
assigned to a new district, and in this way, when and if he 
became Grand Master, he would have become familiar with 
the whole jurisdiction. The plan, he felt, would not interfere 
with the office of Grand Master or take away any of his 
prerogatives. But it would relieve him of a host of small 
details. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 5 

ARKANSAS — 1960 

119th Annual Communication — November 15-16 

Grand Master, 1959-60 — M.W. Bro. J. A. Laner 

Grand Master, 1960-61 — M.W. Bro. J. B. Donham 

Lodg-es, 380 Membership, 55,704 Loss, 199 

The year saw several emergent communications for the 
purpose of laying cornerstones. All but one of these were 
for Masonic Temples and Halls. On May 27, however, the 
Grand Lodge met to lay the cornerstone of a new United 
States Post Office and Court House. On this occasion the 
Grand Orator told something of how this particular cere- 
mony has declined. "Cornerstone ceremonies once were big 
events in the lives of communities. A century ago comer- 
stone ceremonies atti'acted thousands of persons from near 
and far whether it was to be held in a large city or in a 
humble community. Religious differences were forgotten in 
great displays of tolerance; and it was significant that the 
ceremony of cornerstone laying for an insane asylum was 
apt to draw almost as many persons as the ceremony of cor- 
nerstone laviSig for a state capitol. As examples, when the 
cornerstone was laid for the Cassville Female Academy in 
Little Cassville, Georgia, on May 10, 1835, 3000 people gath- 
ered from all over the state for the ceremony. And when 
Springfield, Ohio, laid the cornerstone for its city hall on 
June 24, 1849. the crowd was estimated to be from 10.000 to 
15,000 in number. On July 4, 1848, more than 10,000 visitors 
flocked to the cornerstone laying for the Washington Monu- 
ment. And other examples could be given." 

On this occasion 500 attended. 

Disaster struck the Hall of Center Ridge Lodge, No. 475. 
Just a year and a half before the brethren had spent $5,000 
on buying and remodelling their building. This was all lost 
in a tornado. The members raised an additional $2,000 and 
an a.ppeal for eight cents per member in the Grand Juris- 
diction had reached practically the full amount required by 
the time of the meeting of the Grand Lodge. 

Tlie campaign to raise $1.00 per member to assist the 
voung men of the Acacia Fraternity in the erection of a new 
Fraternitv house on the campus of the University of Arkansas 
was the subject of a special appeal by the Grand Master. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA— 1960 

89th Annual Communication — June 23 - 24 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. M. A. R. Howard 

Grand Master, 19G0-61— M.W. Bro. C. G. McMynn 

Lodges, 165. Membership, 26.508. Gain, 352. 

The Grand Master was asked for only one ruling and- 
this was his ansAver; "No Lodge may hold a meeting on a 



6 G'EAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Sunday." He commended the work of the committees on 
Masonic Education in the constituent Lodges and reproved 
members and Lodges for circularizing in order to influence 
the opinion of others in favour of their own pet projects. 
It was his view that it is the prerogative of the Grand 
Master, and of him alone, when Grand Lodge is not in session, 
to determine questions of usage and procedure. He stressed 
the importance of the work of committees of enquiry and 
urged great care in admitting applicants. 

The amount spent on relief during the year was well 
over $15,000 and more than twice that amount remains in 
the fund in addition to the capital sum of $768,010.27. In 
the contingency fund there is $111,509.83 and the general 
fund is in excellent condition. This is really security and 
prosperity! 

There is a "Canadian Working" in use and also an 
"American Working"; the latter is being revised. Some- 
where, sometime, we heard that there are other "Workings" 
under the Grand Lodge. 

To this Reviewer it has 'been a great pleasure to see that 
our powerful and sagacious friend of years ago, M.W. Bro. 
Frank Burd, is still active in Grand Lodge. Through the 
decades he has been a pillar of strength to Freemasonry. 
Long may he flourish! (For us it has been unfortunate that 
last year's Proceedings did not reach us.) We are grateful 
for the fine review given our Grand Lodge. 

The Committee on Masonic Education reported a year of 
continued increase of interest and activity. There are super- 
visors of education in the Lodges and there are Lod'ges of 
Instruction in Vancouver and in Victoria. The "Masonic 
Bulletin" has received full support from the constituent 
Lodges. The appropriation for the Bulletin was increased 
to $2,700. and we wondered how 27,000 copies per month 
could be published so inexpensively but we discovered that 
the Lodges contributed over $5,400, presumably in subscript- 
ions. This seems to be a thoroughly worth while project 
which deserves abundant success. Everywhere Masonic 
Education is receiving attention. 

The special committee appointed to investigate the 
feasability of creating a fund to provide bursaries and 
Scholarships for needy sons and daughters of members re- 
quested more time to study the proposition. (In any Province 
this is a complicated problem.) There were 9 requests to 
initiate petitioners with physical disabilities and only one 
was approved. 

The Grand Lodge of British Columbia is well managed, 
is active and optimistic and is really a credit to Canadian 

Freemasonry. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 7 

CALIFORNIA--1960 

lllth Annuial Communication — September 26-50. 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. J. L. Shell 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. A. F. Breslauer 

Lodges, 696. Membership, 241,819. Gain, 1,691. 

This 'Grand Lodge had a most active year. There were 
twenty-eight Special Communications for the purpose of 
Constitution of five new Lodges, the Dedication of twelve 
new Masonic Temples, the laying of five cornerstones for 
new public school buildings or new civic buildings and for 
one most unusual cornerstone ceremony, that of laying the 
cornerstone for a ne^v Church building. "The latter cere- 
mony," said the Grand Master, "at the request of the author- 
ities of the California Heights Methodist ChurcJi in Long 
Beach, was a most gratifying one by reason of the display 
of cordaal feeling between our brethren and those of the 
Church." 

In addition to these ceremonies six new Lodges were 
instituted. 

.„. "^he Grand Master pointed out the great demands of the 
ottice and the consequent exclusion of some outstanding 
members from it. "The year has been a busy one. I hav« 
no doubt that as time passes by, the number of appearances 
by the Grand Master will necessarily increase, as has been 
true in the past years. 

"In this respect, I humbly express to the Grand Lodge 
the opinion that the affairs of Masonry in this Grand Juris- 
diction have grown in volume and importance to the point 
where we should begin to think of relieving our Grand 
Master of much of the detail attendant upon the office. I 
think I may safely say that the Fraternity has, in recent 
years, been deprived of the sendee of several of our out- 
standing brethren who are very active in their respective 
occupations or professions and so not in a position which 
would permit them to retire therefrom, and who, knowing 
the demands which would be made upon them for their time 
have, upon inquiry, necessarily refused the distinction of 
election to a line office. I do not propose that action be 
taken at this time to afford immediate relief, but I do 
suggest that the appropriate committees of the Grand Lodge, 
particularly the Committees on Policy and General Pui-poses 
and Jurisprudence, give consideration to the problem. 

"My brethren, I do not complain. I have thoroughly 
enjoyed the year. The compensation in satisfaction has been 
imme.isurable, but I honestly extend my sympathy to sue- 



8 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

cessive Grand Masters, knowing that they \\dll be called 
upon to make sacrifices beyond any I have been required 
to make. I am retired from the bench and have had my full 
time to devote to the activities and the voluminous corres- 
pondence, but the full time of other Grand Masters may not 
be available." 

The rulings of the year maintained a high level. One 
group was not permatted to run a lottery. Another ruling 
stated that the manufacture and sale of ash trays bearing 
the square and compass and other masonic emblems was 
contrary to regulations and that even though such merchand- 
ise were given away "it vrould be in the utmost bad taste." 

The non-political character of Freemasonry was re- 
affirmed in an edict ordered to be read at each Stated 
Meeting of each Lodge, including November meetings. 

The Grand Secretary recorded the largest number of 
affiliates of any time during the past forty years. This 
situation may well be due to the excellent work of the 
Sojourners Committee of Grand L-odge which draws in mem- 
bers from other jux-isdictions resident in California. The 
Committee concentrated on encouraging Lodge officers to 
give their attention to sojourners. A great variety of efforts 
were used, including special nights, booklets, and attempts 
to secure names of Masons who move to California from 
other Grand Jurisdictions from the Grand Lodge concerned. 
So far the last method, which one would think might be quite 
finiitful, has not been enthusiastically received by other 
jurisdictions on the grounds that they might lose members 
to California. The Committee, it would seem justifiably, 
remarked: "This is unfortunate because we feel that to do 
himself and the Fraternity any positive good by virtue of his 
Masonic membership the brother should actively associate 
himself with a Lodge in his residence area. Perhaps some 
day we may make progress in this direction." 

The Hawaiian Islands, although now admitted to state- 
hood, form part of the territorial jurisdiction of the Grand 
Lodge of California. The Grand Master recommended to the 
incoming Grand Master that he appoint a special committee 
to study the propriety and feasibility of adding "and Hawaii" 
to the name of the Grand Lodge. 

The Committee on Policy and General Purposes, having 
thoroughly discussed the importance of preserving tlae prec- 
ious and priceless records, artifacts and mementos of early 
California Lodges, strongly recommended that a Special 
Committee be adopted by the Grand Master to study and to 
recommend to Grand Lodge means and procedures by which 
Grand Lodge might aid early California Lodges when aid is 
needed in pT^serving invaluable Masonic possessions for the 
enlightenment of generations to come. The recommendation 
was adopted. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 9 

COLORADO— 1960 

99th Annual Communication — January 26 - 27 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. C. J. Gobble 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. C. M. Ray 

Lodges, 165. Membership, 46,863. Gain, 373. 

The total losses were 1,437, including 894 deaths, 307 
demits, and 232 suspensions. In spite of this, there was a nice 
increase. 

There were 13 Special Communications, chiefly for con- 
stituting Lodges and one for laying the corner-stone of a 
primary school and another for laying the corner-stone of a 
church. 

The Grand Master v.-as impressed with the fact that 
Masonry is progressing with the great influx of population 
into Colorado. He is convinced that Freemasonry is not a 
decadent institution but is a live and vibrant organization. 
He refused a request from a Lodge which proposed to receive 
the petition of a man who was totally blind. 

To requests from a bowling league to be allowed to use 
the word "Masonic" in its name and to a similar request from 
tiie management of a park he sent in each case a refusal as 
he did when another organization, not Masonic but composed 
of Masons, wanted to serve a malt beverage donated as an 
advertisement. Still another outfit of Masons, but not a 
Lodge, wanted a Masonic day at the horse race track and a 
similar organization wanted a list of the members for circular- 
ization. Very properly he refused these as- well. 

A rather influential section of the members of Grand 
Lodge pressed for the establishment of a Masonic Home. 
The Grand Master appointed a committee to study the sug- 
gestion but caution«i the brethren that if a Home were 
decided on, there would be a substantial increase in the per 
capita tax. The committee recommended in favour but the 
report was not adopted for several reasons, among which were 
these; (a) Public and private funds wall provide adequate 
facilities; (b) Numerous other Masonic Homes have been 
abandoned by other Jurisdictions; (c) Many aged and needy 
Masons do not desire and will not accept institutional care. 
All this was in accordance with the Grand Master's opinion. 

However, he proposed the adoption of a system of ap- 
pointed District Deputy Grand Masters and wished to ap- 
point a committee to study the proposal. The Board dis- 
approved without giving reasons. The fee for degrees 
varies from $50 in 22 Lx)dges to $150 in t^^-o Lodges; the 



10 GJIAND LODGE OF CANADA 

annual dues range from $3 to $15. In 17 districts 32 schools 
of instruction were held during the year with a total attend- 
ance of 480. The Committee on Masonic Education reported, 
in part; "Far too many officers in our Lodges seem to think 
that the sole purpose of Masonry is to confer degrees, that 
all Masonry is contained in the ritual work and that there is 
nothing else to learn". Seven service letters were published 
and distributed during the year. Benevolence receives due 
attention and there is an upward trend in fees and dues. 
(A live and growing Grand Lodge.) 



CONNECTICUT— 1960 

172nd Annual Communication — April 6-7 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. G. F. ChriMie 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. R. H. Milnes 

Lodges, 132. Membership, 47,940. Loss, 155. 

The Masonic Home and Hospital has been in operation 
for seventy years. It is now a three-and-a-half million 
dollar installation, pi'oviding comfort to over 300 guests, 
with the most modern hospital conveniences and home facil- 
ities. However, expansion must be planned to accommodate 
the increasing demand. Financing also is beco.ming more 
difficult owing to rising costs. Costs have gone up 150% in 
ten years. Per capita dues pay only 40% of the total. 

A Committee on the Financial Condition of Lodges, 
during 1958 and 1959, studied the finances of all Lodges. 
The Committee concluded that 15% of them were in excellent 
condition, 70% were "skating on thin ice", and the remain- 
ing 15% were in some financial difficulty. A permanent 
committee to review the financial condition of Lodges was 
set up. The Grand Master also suggested that the pos- 
sibility of raising dues or fees be considered. 

One surprising discovery during the year was that the 
original charters of two Lodges could not be found, while 
six others were locked in the private vaults of members and 
so were not available for the members. 

One of the problems encountered in the Grand Jurisdic- 
tion was the exodus of members from cities to suburban 
towns. Lodges nearer their places of residence where there 
were no parking problems benefitted. The merging of some 
Lodges and the extension of concurrent jurisdiction were 
suggested as partial remedies. 

One Lodge sought dispensation to waive a Grand Lodge 
regulation and to permit use of the German language in part 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 11 

of the work. The Grand Master did not feel that the request 
was born of necessity and refused the dispensation. One 
mig-ht wonder how circumstances would arise which would 
justify such a request or how it would be implemented if 
granted. 

The Special Committee on Lodge attendance put for- 
ward several proposals to stimulate interest. Punctuality 
and proficiency were tvro of the remedies proposed, amongst 
many others. 

The long existence of the Grand Lodge was pointed up 
by a resolution to arrange for the setting up of a committee 
to present tentative plans for celebrating the 175th anni- 
versary of the Grand Lodge in 1964 with appropriate cere- 
monies. 

The Appendix presented the seventh installment of a 
history of Freemasonry in Connecticut. The serial history, 
which has been appearing in the Grand Lodge Proceedings 
over several years, brought the account to 1960. 



DELAWARE — 1960 

155th Annual Communication — October 

Grand Master, 1959-60 — M.W. Bro. J. B. Kilvington 
Grand Master, 1960-61 — M.W. Bro. C. E. Daniels 

Lodges, 24 Membership, 8,705 Gain, 152 

Although a small Grand Jurisdiction in comparison with 
many others in America, few show greater activity. No fewer 
than seven Special Communications were held, and as was 
the case in 1959, several were for the purpose of laying cor- 
nerstones of non-Masonic buildings. One was the comer- 
stone of a city hall, a second of a State Board of Health 
building, and a third of a fire hall. 

The percentage increase in membership continue? to de- 
crease but it is the opinion of the Grand Master that World 
War Two and the Korean conflict caused abnormal increases. 

The Masonic Home and system of scholarships continued 
to flourish. 



ENGLAND— 1960 

Quarterly Communication — March 2 

Annual Investiture — April 27 

Quarterlv Communication — June 1 

Notice of Meetings, dated May 21 and August 27 

Grand Master— The Rt. Hon. The Earl of Scarbrough, K.G. 
Grand Secretary — V.W. Bro. James W. Stubbs 



12 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

At the March Communcation reference was made to the 
absence of R.W. Bro. Sir Ernest Cooper who was for many- 
years chairman of the Board of General Purposes. Sir 
Ernest was born in Clinton, Ontario, and graduated from the 
University of Toronto in 1891. Lord Scarbrough was un- 
animously re-elected Grand Master. The dates of the 
Quarterly Communications were changed from the first 
Wednesday to the second Wednesday of March, Jvme, Sept- 
ember and December. Admission to the Annual Investiture 
is by ticket only but "possession of a ticket will not, of itself, 
ensure admission." 

The Grand Lodge of England has not recognized the 
Grand Orient of France since 1878 when that body rejected 
"the existence of God and the immortality of the soul" and 
substituted "absolute liberty of conscience." Nor does 
England recognize the Grand Lodge of France because it 
does not require that the Volume of the Sacred Law be present 
at its meetings; but England does recognize the French 
National Grand Lodge (65, Boulevard Bineau, Neuilly-sur- 
Siene) but not the organization of the same name which 
broke away some time ago and set up headquarters at 5 
Avenue de I'Opera, Paris. A complete statement on all this 
was made and the brethren were warned against visiting in 
lyodges not recognized or receiving in any English Lodge 
visitors from Lodges under any unrecognized Grand Lodge. 
(Canadian Grand Lodges have, in matters of recognition, 
followed England.) 

In presenting the report of the Board of General Pur- 
poses, the President referred to "the zeal and energy" with 
which Sir Ernest Cooper had made new and most satisfactory 
financial arrangements. 

The Grand Masters of England, Ireland, and Scotland met 
three times to discuss the advisability of taking steps to- 
ward? the fonnation of an independent Grand Lodge of India 
and have appointed a committee which has already made 
progress toward the desired end. England has 181 Lodges in 
India. 

The Board of Benevolence reported that, in May, 31 
petitioners were relieved to the extent of about $12,000; in 
June, 61 petitions received over $24,000; and, in July, 44 
received over $15,000, It was recommended that $3,000 be 
granted in 1960 to the Masonic Institutions. 

It is interesting and profitable always to read of the 
doings of the United Grand Lodge of England, "the Mother 
of Us All." Every ceremony is carried out in meticulous old- 
time fashion and the great cause of benevolence is always 
to the fore. England, Ireland, and Scotland are great ex- 
amples for us. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 13 

An indication of progress and development is the list of 
nineteen Lodges warranted since the previous Quarterly 
Communications. These are numbered from 7713 to 7731, 
and include one new Lodge in Bombay, another in Ghana, and 
one in the Transvaal; four are in London and the others in 
various parts of England. 

Quarterly Communication, September 7th and December 7th, 

1960 

The reports of only two of the four Quarterly Communic- 
ations show that no fewer than thirty--six Warrants have 
been granted. The newest Lodge at the end of 1960 was 
No. 7731 Philip Bull, Twickenham, (Middlesex). All but 
five of the new Lodges are in the United Kingdom. Eight 
have London addresses and several others are in that general 
area. The New Lodges outside the United Kingdom are in 
Bombay, India; Johannesburg, South Africa; Salisbury, 
Rhodesia; Port Antonio, Jamaica; and Tema (Accra), Ghana. 
The last reflects the rise of a new city at the new man-made 
harbour at Tema, a few miles from Accra. The United 
'Grand Lodge of England continues to expand. 

One recorded loss closed a chapter in the history of the 
Grand Lodge which had lasted more than a century. The 
Northern Lodge of China, No. 570, Shanghai, ceased to meet 
and its Warrant was returned. The Lodge had been consti- 
tuted in 1849 and was the sole survivor of the District Grand 
Lodge of Northern China "which was formed in 1877 upon 
the division of the District of China into the Districts of 
Northern China and of Hong Kong and South China. The 
District flourished for many years, but after the end of the 
war in 1945 the number of Lodges diminished due to the 
decline of British business interests, and in 1951 the remain- 
ing Lodges in the District were formed into a Group under 
a Grand Inspector. The Northern Lodge of China, Shanghai, 
was the last Lodge of this Group to sur^dve and it had upheld 
the best traditions of English Freemasonry in that part of 
the Far East for a period of more than 100 years. It had 
continued to meet undisturbed by outside pressure but with 
increasing difficulty OAving to shortage of members until 
recent months, Avhen it became clear that it could no longer 
com.mand a quorum: the members have therefore resolved 
to close the Lodge and surrender the Warrant." 

Statistics regarding the United Grand Lodge have not 
been frequentlv published. In the Proceedings of the Grand 
Lodge of South Australia, however, the Grand Secretary, 
R.W. Bro. F. J. Ellen, reviewed the Annual Communication 
held at London, March 2, 1960. He recorded that at that 
time the United Grand Lodge of England had a roll of 6,943 
Lodges, 600,000 members, and a net increse of 59. This is 
a long way round to get the information and we record our 



14 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

thanks to R.W. Bro. Ellen for it. We trust that he will for- 
give our quoting- one further paragraph. 

"The proceedings do not disclose anything of particular 
moment during the year. The Grand Lodge pursues the 
dignified, even tenor of its ways and continues to be the hub 
of the Masonic World. The four great institutions — ^the 
Royal Masonic Institution for girls, the Royal Masonic Insti- 
tution for boys, the Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution 
and the Royal Masonic Hospital are shining examples of 
benevolence maintained almost entirely by voluntary con- 
tributions by the Brethren." 



FLORIDA— 1960 

131st Annual Communication — April 19-21 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. G. R. Porter 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. J. E. Larson 

Lodges, 280. Membership, 67,185. Gain, 1,747. 

The Proceedings bear out the statement of the Grand 
Master, "The Grand Lodge of Florida is growing stronger 
every day. Peace and harmony prevail." Seven charters 
were delivered to new Lodges and dispensation was granted 
for the formation of five Lodges and one was renewed. 
Finances of the Grand Lodge are in excellent shape. 

In 1959 the Grand Lodge created a Budget Commission 
composed of the four elective officers in line. (In Florida 
the Grand Master comes up the line from Junior Grand 
Warden.) The Commission was of inestimable value in hand- 
ling the financial affairs of the Grand Lodge. Some sticklers, 
however, were distuTbed over the arrangement and raised 
the question as to whether the Craft had violated the prerog- 
atives of a Grand Master, gnaranteed him by the Ancient 
Landmarks, by establishing a Budget Commission. The 
Grand Master ruled "No." But in arri\ang at his decision 
he carried back his reasoning a long way. According to 
him the essential characteristic of a Landmark is that it 
must have existed from "time whereof the memory of man 
runneth not to the contrary." He went on: 

"The Old York Constitutions of 926 are the oldest of 
Masonic records, passed down to us, and were in the nature 
of 15 Articles and 15 Points, which were concluded by an 
additional Ordinance which provided that a General Assembly 
should be held every year, and that they (Masons assembled 
in General Assemblies) must renew their obligation to keep 
these Statutes and Constiiutions, v,rhich had been ordained 
by King Athelstan, the appointing Power. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 15 

"It would be impossible for any Landmark to rebate 
the handling- of Grand Lodge Finances because there was no 
provision for a Grand Treasurer, to handle funds, until the 
year 1722. Records indicate there was some semblance of 
Freemasonry under General Assemblies or Grand Lodges 
from 926 to 1722 without the need of a Treasurer. Therefore, 
it seems clear that ordinarily there were no funds to be 
handled. There is no suggestion that financial matters are 
to be controlled under a prerogative of a Grand Master, 
guaranteed by a Landmark, and such rule would fail to meet 
the first requisite for it to be a Landmark." 

A second point made by the Grand Master was that the 
Grand Master is not authorized to make law. He is the 
presiding officer of the 'Grand Lodge. He is subject and 
amenable to the Constitutions and Regulations of the Grand 
Lodge. He has two prerogatives: to preside over Masons in 
meetings and to issue dispensations. And the dispensations 
are regulated by law. Consequently the Grand Lodge was 
within its rights in setting up the Commission. The argument, 
however, occupied almost three full pages. 

The question of members engaged in the selling of 
alcoholic beverages came up several times, and the _ Grand 
Master supported the regulation that no Mason owing al- 
legiance to the Grand Lodge of Florida could engage in the 
sale or manufacture of alcoholic beverages with more than 
3.2 alcoholic content by weight. 

Altogether the Grand Master made more than one 
hundred rulings. Two questions raised brought out facts of 
interest. The first was, "Can a man rejected seven years 
ag-o in a Pennsylvania Lodge be accepted in Florida?" 
The other was, "Can a petition be accepted by a Florida 
Lodg-e from a man rejected in a Lodge in Massachusetts in 
March, 1957?" The answer to the first was "No. The 
'Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania claims and asserts perpetual 
jurisdiction over all rejected material" and to the second was 
"No, the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts claims and asserts 
jurisdiction over rejected material for five years." 

The Grand Master reported on action taken toward the 
building of a new Grand Lodge Temple. A committee was 
appointed to look into the matter. The speaker concluded: 
"It is my conviction that Grand Lodge should have a home 
where no one could tell us to get out. I think we should 
have a Temple standing as a monument to the high ideals 
and philosophies which we teach and which are dear to the 
hearts of every Mason who believes in the freedom of men. 
We \\all decide' this question in a democratic way. The Five 
Year Planning Committee will present a detailed report." 



16 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

GEORGIA — 1960 

174th Annual Communication — October 25-26 

Grand Master, 1959-60 — M.W. Bro. E. A. McWhorter 
Grand Master, 1960-61 — M.W. Bro. J. A. Dunaway 

Lodges, 480 Member^ip, 100,235 Gain, 532 

For the first time in the history of the Grand Lodge a 
member, W. Bro. R. L. Swatts, attained his seventy-fifth an- 
niversary as a Master Mason. The occasion was fittingly 
celebrated. The records of Grand Lodge reveal that for 
thirty-nine years Bro. Swatts had held some office in his 
Lodge. During the year one hundred and seven fifty year 
awards were made. 

Another "first" in the history of the Grand Lodge was the 
rise of total membership above 100,000. 

The Report on the Masonic Home shows that additional 
dormitories have been built for twenty boys and twenty girls. 
The higher education fund has aided nine students in college 
courses. In addition, the report continues "singly and often 
in small groups, destitute children between the ages of five 
and thirteen seek the kindly ministrations of the Home." The 
doors are open to non-iMasonic dependent children. Al- 
together there are ninety-five children in the Home. 

The Educational and Historical Commission reported that 
they had decided on the text of the Roger Lacey Marker and 
had agreed to erect it at Thunderbolt. The text of the marker 
gives a most succinct account of the beginnings of Free- 
masonry in Georgia. 



Roger Hugh Lacey 
First Provincial Grand Master of Georgia 

Roger Hugh Lacey, who arrived in Savannah on Febru- 
ary 1, 1734, came to the Colony of Georgia on his own account 
and not as a charge of the trustees. He had served as one of 
the Stewards of the Grand Lodge of England in 1730. He 
was appointed Provincial Grand Master of Masons in the 
Province of Georgia by the Most Noble and Most V/orshipfuil 
Thomas Thynne, Lord Viscount We\TTiouth, Grand Master of 
the Grand Lodge of England in 1735. the appointment being 
made to Mr. Roger Hugh Lacey, Merchant. During the ad- 
ministration of Provincial Grand Master Lacey, Lodge No. 
139 of English Registry was constituted at Savannah in "ye 
Province of Georgia." 



i 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 17 



Rog-er Hugh Lacey died in Savannah on August 3, 1738, 
and was buried with military honors at Thunderbolt, on the 
land which had been granted him by the Crown. 

May the Masons of Georgia ever hold dear the memory 
of OUR FIRST GRAND MASTER. 

MARKER PLACED BY— 

The Educational and Historical Commission of the Grand 
Lodge of Georgia, F. & A.M. 

In these days, when historic sites are rapidly giving way 
before the development of the continent, one niight be per- 
mitted to wonder if there are some historic sites in other 
Grand Jurisdictions which might be as tastefully and dis- 
creetly marked. 



IDAHO— 1960 

94th Annual Communication — ^September 20-22 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. E. E. Nelson 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. J, C. Hemdon 

Lodges, 84. Membership, 14,894. Gain, 32. 

As usual the Grand Lodge of Idaho enjoyed a successful 
year ^vith few problems. The Grand Master attended an 
International Night when Brethren attended from Canada. 
The Proceedings show that there is much fraternization 
across the international boundary. The Grand Master also 
reported his attendance at a type of meeting not knoA\Ti in 
Ontario. He stated: "Your Grand Master had the privilege 
of v/itnessing the sixteenth annual outdoor meeting on Mt. 
Harrison sponsored by Burley Lodge No. 68. The Third 
Degree of Freemasonry was conferred upon Brother Dennis 
Johnson by the Burley Lodge officers who did an outstand- 
ing job. Brother Sherman J. Bellwood of Rupert Lodge 
delivered a very interesting Masonic talk after which all 
in attendance enjoyed a very fine picnic lunch." 

The list of dispensations granted shows that a second 
Lodge, Hailey No. 16, received permission to hold their 
Annual Communication on the summit of Bald Mountain, 
near Sun Valley. Idaho, for the purpose of exemplifying the 
Master Mason degree. "The usual precautions to be ob- 
served for the preservation of the secrecy of the work." 

Eight Lodges received authority to amend their By-Laws 
to raise annual dues. The new figure in most cases was 
$10.00. 



18 G^AND LODGE OF CANADA 

One ruling it might well have been expected would 
have been made earlier than the 94th year of the history of 
the Grand Lodge stated that it was not necessary to install 
a Treasurer who had been elected to succeed himself in office. 
The "Code and Digest" of Idaho states "officers of a Lodge 
shall hold office until their successors are installed." 

The Grand Master recommended that the incoming 
Grand Master appoint a committee to prepare an appropriate 
ceremony for the observance of the One Hundredth Anni- 
versary of the Grand Lodge of Idaho during the year 1966. 
Wisely, the Grand Master added : "I realize 1966 is six years 
hence, but time passes swiftly and it is not too soon to start 
formulating plans." The forthcoming anniversary shows how 
early Freemasonry moved West. 

The Grand Orator appears to hold a prominent place in 
the Grand Lodge and his oration, on this occasion was given 
to the question "What should a Mason know about Free- 
masonry?" After covering many points which might or 
might not occur to most Masons he presented a most succinct 
history of the Craft: "I firmly believe that every Mason 
should know the essential facts of authentic Masonic history. 
He should realize that modem speculative Freemasonry is a 
direct continuation of the great operative Masonic Guild of 
the Middle Ages, and that some of our existing Scottish 
Lodges have written records reaching back in unbroken 
continuity to the days of the operative Craft. And he should 
certainly understand how, during the transition period of 
the seventeenth century, the operative Craft was gradually 
transformed into the Speculative Society of the present day. 
He should know how the original Grand Lodges of the 
British Isles were formed, the first in London in 1717 and 
the second forty years later, and should realize that these 
original Grand Lodges are the source of all legitimate Free- 
masonry in the world today, and that if he is a member of a 
Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons it descended from the 
first, while if a member of a Lodge of Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons it came from the second. A later union of 
these two Grand Lodges made Masonry one big family." 

The list of elective Grand Lodge Officers shows that the 
Grand Master in 1899, M.W. Bro. J. C. Muerman, was still 
a member of Grand Lodge. 



ILLINOIS— 1960 

121st Annual Meeting — October 7-8 

Grand Master 1959-61— M.W. Bro. P. R. Stephens 

Lodges, 909. Membership, 239,913. Loss, 3,435. 

This volume is without a doubt one of the most attract- 
lively printed Proceedings emanating from any Grand Lodge. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 19 

The type is large and clear and the editor uses different 
sizes of type with good effect. 

The report of the Committee on Masonic Correspondence 
compiled by M.W. Bro. E. L. LawTence, Past Grand Master, 
gives an excellent review of sixty-two Grand Jurisdictions. 
In addition, a topical index is provided to page and line in the 
'P*roceedings. 

Once again there was a severe loss in totals of Lodges 
and members. On this subject the Grand Master remarked: 
"If I were to speak in generalities, I would say that all is 
peace and harmony but in going over the annual reports and 
seeing the activity of a lodge in black and white, changes my 
mind. Activity in Masonry is indeed spotty; a number of 
lodges show an intense effort being made to improve. Several 
apparently are lacking in leadership, a most important asset; 
many lodges have conferred no degrees, some because of the 
location of their temple which is in an undesirable neighbor- 
hood. Many are continuing to make little effort to save 
suspensions. Some have taken too seriously that an appoint- 
ment in line means certain advancement. 

"May I suggest that each Lodge take an inventory of 
its place in Masonry and devote more acti\'ity to filling that 
place with honour and integrity. We are living too much on 
our illustrious past and are not giving enough thought to 
the future we seek." 

The Proceedings give a list of all defunct Lodges which 
once existed in the State. Of the 266 names three were trans- 
ferred to other states. The remainder disappeared or were 
consolidated with other Lodges. The process is by no means 
new and constant shift does suggest a movement of popu- 
lation and possibly the immigration of groups which do not 
apply for membership. Certainly the Grand Lodge rather 
than repining is consolidating on a firmer base than ap- 
parently has been the case heretofore. 



INDIANA— 1960 

143rd Annual Communication — May 17-18 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. J. C. Humphrey 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. J. H. Jefferson 

Lodges, 546. Membership, 185,010. Loss, 107. 

The Grand Master for 1960-61, M.W. Bro. J. H. Jefferson, 
not only bears a name distinguished in Americ-an history but 
oomes from a family with a lengthy Masonic tradition. His 
father was a Mason for sixty-thi'ee years. The Grand Master, 
being a seventh son, has even that fact in his favour. 



20 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

The year was plagxied by repercussions from the troubles 
reported in the Fraternal Reviews, 1960, but the Grand Lodge 
dealt firmly with problems. Though there was a loss in 
total membership it was not large and there was much 
evidence of solid gain. Grand Lodge officers officially re- 
dedicated four of the six Lodges which celebrated their 
centennial years. They also took part in the dedication of 
six new Masonic Temples and laid the cornerstone of another. 

Among the resolutions was one to set up a Sesqui- 
centennial Commission to outline advance plans for the cele- 
bration of the 150th anniversary of the organization of the 
Grand Lodge, in 1968. 

The Report of the Grand Secretary presents Lodge 
statistics in a great variety of ways. By no means the least 
interesting table is the list of the largest Lodges with a 
membership of over 1,500. No fewer than fourteen come 
in this category. One Lodge. Englewood, No. 715, located 
in Indianapolis, has 2,101 members. The Lodge showing the 
greatest net loss (of 69, or almiost two-thirds of the loss of 
the whole Grand Jurisdiction) has a membership of 1,772. 
From this fact it might be argued that in size there is 
weakness. On the other hand the Lodge with the greatest 
net gain, Millersville, No. 126, has a large membership 
too— 1,180, 

Twenty-two Lodges conferred no degrees. Of these 
only one had more than two hundred members (224) and 
seven fewer than one hundred. From these statistics it 
would appear that the optimum number of members lies 
somewhere above two hundred. Actually sixty-nine per cent 
of the Lodges in Indiana have between 100 and 399 members, 
a suggestion of a healthy underlying condition. 



IOWA— 1960 

116th Annual Communication — September 15-16 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. W. W. Bishop 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. E. B. Delzell 

Lodges, 548. Membership, 93,594. Loss, 787. 

When M.W. Bro. W. J. Dufnlop reviewed the Proceedings 
for Iowa for 1959 he remarked that he had long been familiar 
wiith the names of Bro. H. L. Haywood and Bro. E. B. Delzell 
and long ago placed Iowa on a pedestal, especially in Masonic 
Education. Bro. Dunlop must have been pleased with the 
election of Bro. Delzell as Grand Master for 1960-61. Since 
a Grand Secretary does not often become Grand Master, the 
election of Bro. Delzell, Deputy Grand Secretary, 1940-45, 
Grand Secretary, 1945-59, is noteworthy. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 21 

The Grand Master, like his predecessor, was disturbed 
over the decline in total membership. In order that the 
Grand Lodge of Iowa might move forward a special com- 
mittee was set up to assist the Grand Master in the discharge 
of his duties. The new committee, to be known as the Gen- 
eral Purposes Committee, had already begun work and made 
several recommendations regarding the reorganization of com- 
mittees. 

The Grand Secretary is also the Librarian. From the 
Report the purpose of the Library is made abundantly clear. 
"The Grand Lodge Library continues to hold top priority in 
the plan of 'service to the Craft.' There has always been a 
backlog of work needing to be done, and this backlog has 
received major attention the past year. Nearly 600 volumes 
(with many times this number yet to process) have been 
properly catalogued and 3 to 45 reference cards per volume 
placed in the file for ready subject reference." 

In addition to cataloguing 600 voulmes, and evidently in 
a most professional manner, the Library collects and circu- 
lates clipping files. Five hundred clippings were added in 
the year. That these volumes and clippings are used is 
evidenced by the 1,228 volumes and 2,168 clipping files which 
were lent during the same period. Nearly 3,400 persons 
visited the building during the year. 

The longstanding high quality of the Proceedings h^ 
been sustained by the present Grand Secretary, R.W. Bro. 
R. E. Whipple. For example, he has compiled a most com- 
prehensive two-page analvsis of membership statistics for 
the United States and Canada. The totals for 1959-60 which 
could be compiled from the figures given in these reviews 
under each province and state bear repeating here. 

United States: 

Lodges, total 15,797 

Membership, total 4,104,003 

Net gain in year 2,946 

Canada: 

Lodges, total 1,557 

Membership, total 259,197 

Net gain in year 1,591 

From these figures it may be seen that the United 
States with a population approxi matey ten times that of 
Canada has ten times as many Lodges, but just under twenty 
times as many members. The gain, however, of 1,591 com- 
pared with 2,946 appears to be significant. 



22 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

IRELAND — 1960 

Animal Report of the St. John's Day Meeting and the 

Annual Communication of Grand Lodge, 

held in Belfast in October. 

Grand Master — M.W. Bro. Raymond F. Brooke 

The reports to the Grand Lodge had running through 
them the same story of satisfactory progress through the 
year and confidence in the future. Subscriptions to Charities 
showed a marked increase. The Grand Master told of the 
move^ towards constituting a Soverign Grand Lodge of India. 
The idea had received the wholehearted sympathy and sui>- 
port of the three Grand Masters of England, Scotland and 
Ireland. The assumption was that Grand Lodge of India 
would be constituted in 1961. There are fifteen Lodges hold- 
ing warrants from the Grand Lodge of Ireland. The Grand 
Lodge of England has 181 and the Grand Lodge of Scotland 
75. 

The Grand Lodge of Instruction had a good year. The 
demonstrations showed excellent working. The attendance 
was good and the numerous questions showed a real desire 
to adhere strictly to the Irish Ritual. 

The Masonic Benevolent Institutions had a successful 
year. Two of these are the Masonic Girls' School and the 
Masonic Boys' School. There are 93 pupils in the former 
and 108 in the latter school. The Victoria Jubilee Masonic 
Annuity Fund has 330 annuitants on the register. 



ISRAEL — 1960 

Annual Communication — October 25, 1960 

Grand Master — M.W. Bro. Max Seligman 

Lodges, 48. 

This Grand Lodge, established in 1953, now has forty- 
nine Lodges on the roll, adding two during the year. One 
of the most important undertakings to be credited to Grand 
Lodge is the Mutual Insurance Fund, which now numbers 
1,850 members. It is reported that this figure represents 
90 per cent of the Brethren in good standing. Thus there 
must be over 2,000 members of the Craft in Israel. 

Another institution is the Old Aged Home. Here it is 
not possible to provide all the accommodation desired and a 
number of applicants have been turned away. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 23 

The new Masonic year began with the consecration af 
the Temple in Tel-Aviv. The first floor was completed one 
year after the foundation stone was laid, on November 20, 
1958. The Temple, now completed, fills a vital need of the 
Tel -Aviv Lodges. 

The greatest enterprise ahead is the building of a Temple 
of Peace in Jerusalem. There have been some delays in 
advancing this project, but a committee has been set up to 
begin the project in two parts: one a Temple for the use 
of Jerusalem Lodges and the other a universal Temple of 
Peace. 

The Freemason, the organ of the Grand Lodge of Israel, 
reports: 

"For some time a keen desire has been expressed by a 
large number of Bi'ethren residing abroad to become mem- 
bers of a Lodge in Israel in order to be more closely asso- 
ciated -with the Grand Lodge of the State of Israel. 

"In order to meet this desire, Grand Lodge has resolved 
to establish a special Lodge to be called Lodge of the Holy 
Land, No. 50. membership in which will be open to Brethren 
residing abroad, who are in good standing of Lodges belong- 
ing to recognized Constitutions, as well as our own senior 
Orand Lodge Officers. The Lodge of the Holy Land will meet 
from time to time and particularly when groups of Free- 
masons from abroad will be in Israel." 

The first Master of the Lodge will be R.W. Bro. M. 
Silverstone, Deputy Grand Mas-ter. 

The April issue of "The Freemason", printed half in 
English and half in Hebrew by the Grand Lodge of the State 
of Israel of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons. 

After reporting that the Grand Master and the Deputy 
had gone on a mission to North America, the editor went on 
to say; "There are three main objectives behind the journey 
of the Grand Master. The first, and most important, is to 
represent our 'Grand Lodge at the Grand Master.^' Confer- 
ence in Washington and convev the message of Israel Free- 
masoni-y to them. The second is to strengthen the ties of 
brotherhood and friendship between our Grand Lodge and 
Grand Lodges elsewhere. And, finally, to continue all those 
important Masonic acti\'ities which had been commenced by 
earlier Grand Masters." 

In February one hundred and thirteen brethren and 
their wives arrived from England and spent fourteen days 
in Israel. The Mayor of Jerusalem, who is not a Mason, 
said, in part; "I know that Jerusalem is the cradle of the 



24 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Freemasons and that the man chosen to be your president 
sits on the throne of King Solomon." Further, he said; 
"I regret that I cannot invite you to visit the eastern part 
of our city which is divided into two parts. Let us hope that 
the city will not always be divided between two peoples, 
between two countries and that we shall live to see the ful- 
filment of the prophecy of End of Days as foretold by our 
rig-hteous prophets." . . . "Not so long ago I had the honour 
to receive a group of pilgrims, a group of Freemasons from 
the UjS.A." During their stay the English brethren attended 
lodge meetings in Jerusalem, Haifa, and Tel-Aviv. They 
were pleased, they said, with the high standard of the work 
they saw. 

Some time earlier, the Earl of Eglinton and Winton, 
Grand Master Mason of Scotland, speaking on the subject 
of "Tolerance" said inter alia; "I can give you no better 
example than that of the Grand Lodge of Israel, which was 
founded only a few years ago, where despite what appears 
to mark hatred between Jews and the Arabs, our brethren 
of both races still live and labour Masonically in complete 
peace and harmony and this is only due to what Tolerance 
can produce if the urge is there". 

The 49th Lodge is shortly to be installed. The magazine 
carries a good picture of Sir Walter Scott who, says the 
writer of the sketch, "was the first English author who 
acted as a protagonist of the Jews, particularly in his novel, 
"Ivanhoe". 

It will be interesting to observe the growth and the 
progress of this active Grand Lodge. 



KANSAS— 1960 

104th Annual Communication — March 9-10 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. A. C. Irby 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. R. W. Kinzie 

Lodges, 440. Membersihip, 100,042. Loss, 817. 

The industrious Fraternal Correspondent, M.W. Bro, F. 
S. Ecord, has gleaned some interesting facts from his 
perusal of the various Proceedings. He found that, of the 
38 United States Jurisdictions that he reviewed, 26 operate 
Masonic Homes, 12 do not. two are studying the proposal 
and one has rejected the idea. "The problem everywhere," 
he reported, "seems to be lodge attendance and lodge repre- 
sentation at Grand Lodge Communications. Many Jurisdic- 
tions are increasing the tempo of the Masonic Education 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 25 

activities and report that this is helping to build lodge at- 
tendance." "The District of Columbia has a custom which 
requires its Grand Master to teach the Sunday School lesson 
on tAvo different occasions in two different diurches." 
"South Carolina has a Committee on Education which is 
investigating the possibility of purchasing and operating a 
college." He has three pages of such facts. 

At the Annual Communication 288 Lodges were repre- 
sented and 152 were not represented. (Apathy has made 
inroads?) 

Forty-Seven dispensations were issued permitting short- 
ening of the time between degrees but some Lodges shortened 
the time \\athout waiting for a dispensation and were quite 
properly reprimanded. 

It is a pleasure to read of Special Communications for 
such purposes as laying the foundation stone of a Court 
House; placing the comer-stone of a Federal building; dedi- 
cating two new Post Office buildings and placing a memorial 
plaque therein. Such public appearances enhance the prestige 
of Freemasonry. 

Not by any means all of the Grand Master's recommend- 
ations were approved and adopted by Grand Lodge but two 
interesting proposals were made law. First, a member of a 
Lodge in Kansas may join another Lodge outside the State 
though dual membership is prohibited in Kansas. This was 
intended largely for the benefit of members of the Armed 
Forces. Another was that any constituent Lodge that has 
not been officially represented at the Annual Communication 
of Grand Lodge for three consecutive years may be cited to 
show just cause why disciplinary action should not be in- 
voked. (This seemed a most necessary change.) 

Attendance at the Schools of Instruction was not what 
it should be, the Committee reported, and went on, "We 
regret to report that we still have a few Lodges whose 
officers take their work very lightly and make no effort to 
attend the district meetings." 

Throughout the Proceedings there is no hesitation in 
stating facts but there is optimism and confidence in every 
report. 

LOUISIANA — 1961 

150th Annual Communication — Febniary 6-7 

Grand Master, 1960-61 — M.W. Bro. Frank Brown 
Grand Master, 1961-62 — M.W. Bro. Morris Shapiro 

Lodges, 276 Membership, 51,203 Gain, 221 

The Grand Master reported that the overall picture of 
Freemasonn,' in Louisiana is encouraging and on a definite 



26 GJIAND LODGE OF CANADA 

uptrend. In his opinion attendance is a little better but not 
up to par. 

The programme of Masonic Education is making great 
progress. A Southeastern Masonic Conference, comprising 
eight Southeastern states has been organized. This Con- 
ference will take up all Masonic problems common to all 
jurisdictions, es)pecially Masonic Education. 

The Masonic Home for children in Alexandria is iji good 
condition. The Foundation is now producing sufficient rev- 
enue from, investments to educate several older children 
who can qualify for college. 

The Sesquicentennial Committee reported on the pro- 
gramme planned to commemorate the 150th anniversary of 
the organization of the Grand Lodge of Louisiana. Extensive 
plans were laid to take the historical observance to several 
sections of the State 



MAINE— 1960 

141st Annual Communication — May 3-4-5 

Grand Master, l©58-60— M.W. Bro. J. M. Littlefield 
'Grand Master,1960-62— M.W. Bro. L. M. Sanborn 

Lodges, 208. Membership, 47,805. Loss, 159. 

This Grand Lodge, like many others but not all, in- 
cludes its Eeviews in its Proceedings and the Reviews are 
written by a veteran, Ralph J. Pollard, P.G.M. who has 
had fifteen years' experience in this service and who is a 
master hand. Writing of our Grand Lodge's Annual Com- 
munication he quotes extensively from the report presented 
by our late M.W. Bro. Copus wiho he says, expressed his own 
views exactly. He quotes also from our Grand Master's 
Address. This versatile brother is also Chairman of Masonic 
Education and is well known as a Masonic scholar and a 
writer of renown on Masonic topics. "Lodges using the 
educational program in its entirety are much pleased with 
the results which needs the full co-operation of every Master 
to make it effective." 

For the first time since 1942 Maine shows a loss in 
membership of 159. During the year 116 fewer candidates 
were raised than in the previous year and there were 54 more 
deatihiS'. The membership is 10.5 per cent of the male popula- 
tion of the State. 

Three District Deputy Grand Masters received a gentle 
reprimand for failing to comply \\ath instructions to arrange 
district meetings. (How far can apathy go?) 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 27 



Every year some Lodg-es ask for a dispensiation to hold 
the Annual Meeting though the officers expect that there 
•wiU not be a quoru'm present and every such request is 
refused. 

The Constitution of the Grand Lodge of Maine opens with. 
this statement; "Freemasonry is a charitable, benevolent, ed- 
ucational and religious secret society, adhering to its own 
peculiar, ancient Landmarks. Its methods of recog^tion and 
of symibolic instruction are secret and thereby a test of 
membership is provided, though a brotiier be travelling in 
foreigTi countries and among those who would otherwise be 
strangers." 

"The Grand Master called upon M.W. Bro. Clarence M. 
Pitts to respond for the distinguished guests at the complet- 
ion of which he presented him with a Josiah Hayden Drum- 
mond Distinguished Service Medal." (Maine is one of the 
finest — careful, conservative, dignified.) 

"The Trustees of the Grand Lodge Charity Fund ap- 
proved 69 applications for assistance from 55 Lodges during 
the year ending March 31st, 1960. The total amount of as- 
sistance granted was $22,3i95. It was with real satisfaction 
that funds were made available in response to every ap- 
plication." The grants ranged from $1()0 to $1,000. 46 of 
the 69 recipients were over seventy years of age and 38 were 
members of the Fraternity. The Lodges paid from their own 
funds $20,127 for chaiity as compared with $16,674 reported 
last year. 

The Grand Lecturer deplored the prevalent tendency to 
horse-play and pleaded for dignity and decorum though 
some exuberant spirits criticized him from time to time and 
said he had "gone soft." 



MANITOBA— 1960 

85th Annual Communication — June 1-2 

Grand Master, 1959-60 — M.W. Bro. W. D. G. Bunions 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. A. J. Sawatzky 

Lodges, 120. Membership, 16,358. Gain, 12. 

The Grand Secretary suggested that concentrated effort 
might reduce the number of suspensions. He viewed uith 
alaiTn the number, 1,801, of members in arrears and pointed 
out that the smaller Lodges were, on the whole, doing better 
than the larger ones except that one Lodge with a member- 



28 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

ship of 276 had only two members in arrears for $16.00 and 
had only one suspension in 6 years. 

Reciprocal legislation was suggested by which a member 
who had for example, taken his demit from a Lodge under a 
recognized Grand Lodge in another Province, could receive 
recognition for his total membership, perhaps 10 years in 
one Province and 40 years in another Province. (Of course, 
why not? Let's be logical and be kind as well. The fifty- 
year medal is highly prized. Let it continue to be so.) 

Manitoba is a carefully managed, expertly managed, 
Grand Lodge. Besides the General Fund, there is a Benev- 
olent Endowment Fund (§350,000); a Beneficiary Fund 
($69,000); a Masonic Disaster Relief Fund ($28,000); and a 
Masonic Brotherhood Disaster Fund ($18,000). This Grand 
Lod'ge is ready for any kind of Masonic weather! 

A Past Master, who is now secretary of his Lodge and 
has guided it over most difficult times, was awarded the 
rank of Honorary Past District Deputy Grand Master in 
recognition of his unusually valuable services and was pre- 
sented Math the appropriate regalia. His Lodge is situated 
in the far North. 

Reviews are published of the Proceedings of 32 Grand 
Lodges, ours among them. The Reviewer commends the 
action of our Grand Lodge in having an advisory committee 
on lodge buildings and on stressing Masonic Education. He 
describes our Grand Master as "an inspiring, energetic, able, 
and far-seeing leader of men who is known throughout 
Canada and far beyond." 

This Reviewer v/as greatly grieved to read of the passing 
of his old friend, M.W. Bro. Wm. D. LaMTence, who was Grand 
Master in 1939. In a comprehensive and inspiring Address, 
Grand Master Runions expressed his pleasure over the in- 
creasing attendance at Masonic Church Services. He mention- 
ed the fact that, in the Province's hinterland, there are five 
Lodges under the personal supemnsion of the Grand Master; 
he visited them all and found Masonic virility, warmth of 
fellowship, and realistic optimism. The Masons in those 
isolated communities are open-handed, open-hearted, and 
respond generously to the claims of benevolence. 

The District Meetings in the rural Districts drew larger 
attendances than did the city meetings, though half the total 
membership is in Greater Winnipeg. To me, one of the 
supreme highlights of the Proceedings is as always the 
History by M.W. Bro. Wm. Douglas. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 29 

MASSACHUSETTS— 1959 

4 Quarterly Communications, 21 Special Communications, 
and Stated Communications. 

Grand Master, 1959 — M.W. Bro. Andrew G. Jenkins 

Grand Master, 1960 — M.W. Bro. Laurence E. Eaton 

The Grand Master's term is three years. 

Lodges, 343. Membership, 134,937. Gain, 737. 

Really inspiring it is to read of the many varied activities 
of this front-rank Grand Lodge, generally conceded to be the 
oldest in North America and certainly one of the most pro- 
gressive, always adhering strictly to Masonic tradition and 
procedure. Our Grand Master attended; received the Henry 
Price Medal; and delivered an eloquent address. Our relat- 
ions with this Grand Lodge have always been of the closest; 
it was our model for the introduction of Masonic Education 
in 1931. 

The Grand Master indulged in no over-statement but 
simply stated a fact when he said, in thanking the brethren 
for their co-operation in obser\'ing the 225th anniversary in 
1958, that they had "contributed in great measure to the 
high regard in" which the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts is 
universally held." 

The twenty-two Special Communications were held for 
several purposes such as burning mortgages on Temples, con- 
stituting Lodges, celebrating fiftieth and one hundred an- 
niversaries and laying corner-stones. These occasions were 
highlights in the experience of each of the Lodges concerned. 

At the Quarterly Communication in March, one member 
was expelled; a complaint against another was dismissed; 
and four brethren were re-instated. At the Quarterly Com- 
muncation in June, recognition was granted to the United 
Grand Lodges of Germany "in substitution for the recognition 
previously granted to the United Grand Lodge of Germany." 

At the same Communication, the Committee on Charters 
and ]By-laws recommended that Henry Price Lodge be permit- 
ted to reduce its initiation fee from $200 to $150 but that 
permis.=;ion be not granted to pro\-ide that the son of a mem- 
ber of the Lodge be required to pay a fee of only $100. 
Such a practice would be termed "discrimination" and could 
not be approved. Six brethren were re-instated at this 
Communication and in September four others were similarly 
dealt with. In October, with elaborate and appropriate cere- 
mony at a Special Communication, my good friend, M.W. Bro. 
Roger Keith was presented with his Veteran's Medal. It may 
not be generally knoA\Ti that, like the Grand Lodges of the 



36 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

British Isles, Massachusetts has constituent Lodges abroad — 
7 in the Canal Zone, 3 in Chile, and one in Japan. 

Comment on the Proceedings of Massachusetts would be 
far from adequate without mention of Education, Service, 
Relief, Library and the Museum. T^e attendance at Lodges 
of Instruction was good, 33,020. Though candidates' attend- 
ance showed a decrease, officers' attendance was higher 
than in the previous year. The scope of Masonic Service 
has- been broadened to include sick and hospitalization, car 
pools, telephone contact, Masonic reading and many others 
lis'ted^ in the Masonic Service Manual. The Blood Program 
continues to increase. Though finding employment is believed 
to be the duty of the local Lodges, some positions* were found 
by the Service Director. The Chairman reported, "We feel 
that in our Grand Jurisdiction Masonic Service has risen to 
greater heights than ever before. This progress will con- 
tinue just so long as every Mason feels that he is a vital 
part of a great on-going and out-reaching pragram." 

In the Masonic Home there were 21 guests at 90 years 
of age or over; 68 between 80 and 89; 27 between 70 and 79; 
and 3 under 70, the total number of guests being 57 men 
and 62 women while in Juniper Hall there were 12 men and 
14 women. The Library and the Museum are among the 
very best on the Continent. 

One can only repeat that it is most inspiring to read of 
the admirable achievements of the Grand Lodge of Mas- 
sachusetts. 



MEXICO (YORK) — 1960 

95th Annual Communication — March 19 
(Numbering changed since last year) 

Grand Master — M.W. Bro. M. M. Covo. 

Lodges, 10. Membership, 618. Loss, 28. 

The Grand Master assumed the chair for the second 
time, his previous incumbency being 1955-56. He found that 
some "interim" or special Communications had, in past years, 
been counted as Annual Communications and so he re- 
commended that the next one, in 1961, be known as the 96th 
in order that the One Hundredth would be held in 1965 on 
the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Grand Lodge. 
One new Lodge was instituted during the year. 

"In 1911, in order to protect the constituent Lodges as 
well as the interests of foreign Jurisdictions, the regular 
Grand Lodge adopted the name 'York Grand Lodge of Mexico, 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 31 

F. and A.M.' with English as the official language and with 
jurisdiction limited to members of its constituent Lodges. 
Since that time this Grand Lodge has been working harm- 
oniously under Masonic Laws similar to those that prevail 
in the Grand JuTisdictions of the U.S.A. and following the 
same Ancient Landmarks that have governed the Craft from 
time immemorial." It is interesting to note that, though 
English is the official language, the Grand Master was bom 
in Italy of old Spanish lineage on his father's side and his 
mother is Italian. (We congratulate him.) 

On the Grand Master's recommendation, recognition was 
granted to the Grand Lodge of Finland. The Grand Secretary 
moved that Mackey's definition of a member be adopted 
and only those who had received the third degree be consider- 
ed members of the Lodges. This motion was seconded 
but, after discussion, was lost. The Grand Secretary also 
suggested that the term of office for Grand Lodge officers 
be two years. This was carried. The Committee on Lodges 
was unanimously against the institution of a new Lodge to 
work in the Spanish language. 

The objective of the Committee on Masonic Education 
is "to bring up wholeheartedly dedicated and well-instructed 
Freemasons." The Committee found that long-winded dis- 
cussions defeat their own purpose. It also found that "the 
younger Mason is insufficiently infoiTned on the structure 
of Freemasonry as a universal fraternity and also even on 
the organization of his own Grand Lodge". The Committee 
on Work and Ritual expressed the opinion that there is 
authority to "pei-mit the formation of Lodges to work in any 
language, although the official language is English". After 
lengthy discussion it wa? decided that 750 copies of the 
Ritual .should be printed at an estimated cost of $1.56 each. 
The proposed re-printing of the Constitution was postponed, 
pending reports. 

It is most interesting to read of the progress and the 
problems of this Grand Lodge which carries the banner of 
Freemasonry under difficulties unknown in most parts of 
the world. 



MICHIGAN— 1960 

134th Annual Communication — May 24-25 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. R. P. Sackett 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. W. W. Kent 

Lodges, 537. Memberrship, 175,546. Loss, 89(5. 

This report shows a high purpose in the Grand Lodge 
of Michigan, from the Grand Master down. The Grand 



32 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Master, M.W. Bro. R. P. Sackett, in addressing Grand Lodge 
stated that in twelve months he had travelled in excess of 
fifty thousand miles throughout the Grand Jurisdiction. To 
reach this total he had to travel just over 137 miles every 
day, a figure which reveals the extent of his efforts while 
in office. The Grand Master holds office for only one year. 

As in the previous year the question of lotteries arose 
once more and again the Grand Master declared that the law 
and_ decisions of earlier Grand Masters were clear. No lodge 
or its officers should consider this type of activity. One 
interesting ruling was that "The ballot shall be cast only in 
a Lodge open on the Master Mason Degree." One would 
think that such an important ruling would have been made 
by a Grand Master earlier than the 109th. 

Lodges of Instruction evidently play a significant role in 
Michigan. The Worshipful Master of one Lodge and the 
Worshipful Master and two Wardens of another were ordered 
to appear before the Grand Master to show cause why they 
should not be disciplined for their failure to attend such 
Lodges of Instruction. The Grand Lectiirer reported that 
he had ^^sited every District in the State and in many cases 
held more than one District Lodge of Instruction in order to 
reduce travelling by Lodge officers. No fewer than 452 
Masters attended such Lodges. 

The determination to maintain the high quality of Free- 
masonry in Michigan is shown in an amendment, proposed 
to clarify the language and intent of existing regulations: 
"A Lodge shall advance a candidate only after an examin- 
ation in open Lodge as to his proficiency in the preceding 
degree and a unanimous ballot cast in favor of his proficiency 
and continued worthiness." 

The Report of the Committee on Fraternal Relations 
described activity in South Africa, interesting not only to 
Michigan but also to Canadian Masons: "Michigan is prob- 
ably aware that the Union of South Africa does not possess 
an independent Grand Lodge nor has there, until recently, 
been any real desire on the part of South African Masons to 
establish their own Grand Lodge. 

"In recent months, however, the Masonic press, of this 
part of the world, has been filled wath the pros and cons 
relative to the formulation of a Grand Lodge for the Union 
of South Africa. 

"At this point it is interesting to observe that the 
Masonic field in the Union is occupied by the Grand Lodges 
of England, Ireland, Scotland, and the Netherlands and it is 
possible to visit Lodges under any and all of these Jurisdic- 
tions, in almost any part of the country. 

"... Should a consolidation come, it would probably 
be done wiith the blessing of the parent Grand Lodges." 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 33 

MINNESOTA— 1960 

107th Annual Communication — March 23, 24. 

Grand Mastsr, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. C. E. Herman 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. M. H. Voss 

Lodges, 293. Membership, 69,866. Gain, 302. 

Presiding over the Annual Communication under review 
was a really dynamic Grand Master, physically and mentally 
alert, productive of ideas and capable of putting ideas into 
action. He undertook to "pep" up his Lodges with compe- 
titions; he advocated "father and son" nights, past Masters' 
nights. sociiaJ fuctions for ladies and friends, birthday 
celebrations of all kinds, inter-Lodge visitation, new Masons' 
nights. Masonic veterans' nights, educational nights. Awards 
were presented to the two Lodges in each District who did 
the best work in arranging "fellowship acti\aties" of this kind. 

This Grand Master was also a most terrific visitor and 
he did not overlook our country; he visited our Annual 
Communication, also Manitoba and Alberta. Seven visitors 
from Manitoba returned his courtesy by attending the An- 
nual Communication as did two from Alberta and two irom 
our Grand Lodge. In his plan? for his ov.n Lodges he met 
with tremendous success; he must have been a full-time 
Grand Master. 

A few quotations are significant. "It is my con.-idered 
opinion that most lodge problems can be solved by careful 
selection and development of lodge leaders." "In some urban 
areas, Lodges are so large they are almost asleep in their 
obesity." "Our visitation work in the hospitals at Rochester, 
which has been carried on for 39 years, is a privilege given 
to you and me as Minnesota Masons. This is an opportunity, 
such as is found nowhere else in these United States, to put 
Masonry in action." "Minnesota Masonry's voluntary 
campaign for gifts made possible the building of Masonic 
Memorial Hospital at the University of Minnesota. This 
million-dollar hospital with 80 beds is a haven of hope to 
those who are being cared for and treated there". 

The Grand Master stressed the importance of and the 
necessity for the best degree work possible and urged that 
every officer crusade for impressive ritualistic rendition. 
He recommended a year before and put into action a com- 
mittee on publicity which rendered excellent sendee. It was 
recommended that Lodges adopt the "counsellor" or "mentor" 
plan. 

The per capita tax was raised to $3.00 effective 1962. 
There is an excessive amount of unpaid lodge dues but this 
Avill soon be corrected. The Grand Lodge of Minnesota has 
entered on a new era. 



34 GRANiD LODGE OF CANADA 

MISSISSIPPI— 1960 

142nd Annual Communication — February 9-10 

Grand Master, 1959— M.W. Bro. G. H. Anderson 
Grand Master, 1960— M.W. Bro. E. J. Smith 

Lodges, 313. Membership, 50,762. Gain, 318. 

With the sentiments expressed in the Grand Master's 
Address we would all agree, when he said, "In the years 
behind we have had a noi-mal healthy growth. I never would 
ask for more numbers and at the same time sacrifice one 
landmark or one ideal of our great institution". 

The Fraternal CoiTespondent had noted that 19 Grand 
Lodges showed losses last year and that the next gain of the 
49 Grand Lodges was only 14,015, as compared with a gain 
of 82,527 in 1954. The same official was appalled to find 
in some areas in the U.S. a growing friction between Masonry 
and the Church. (We have not heard of this in Canada.) He 
said, "This matter was openly discussed in several Grand 
Lodges and seems to cause great concern and rightly so for 
there must be no conflict here. We are all taught that 
Masonry is a philosophy of life — not a religion". 

Approval was given by the Finance Committee and 
by Grand Lodge to the Grand Master's recommendation that 
the total personal expenses to evei*y Annual Communication 
be paid for every wearer of a 50-year button but the Finance 
Committee would not extend this concession to all brethren 
over 65 years of age as had been suggested. 

Ihe incoming Grand Master was instructed to appoint 
a committee to investigate the possibility of giving scholar- 
ships to sons or daughters of Master Masons. These scholar- 
ships, if approved, are to be held in Junior Colleges for two 
years and the cost is not to exceed $300 per annum. Two 
years ago a new policy was adopted and the former two 
Homes were combined into one. The regulations pro^dde that 
no children be admitted to the Home except those with 
Masonic connections. The relief program for aged and dis- 
abled brethren was liberalized and the part of the per capita 
tax formerly assigned to the Home is now given to the 
Relief Fund. There are 49 children in the Home and the 
relief granted to aged and infirm brethren has grown to 
$33,000 for one year. All this indicates that benevolence is a 
primary concern of the Grand Lodge of Mississippi. In many 
other ways, great work is being done. 

The ever-recurring and all pervasive anxiety regarding 
lack of applicants and meagre attendance is commented on 
in several places in the Proceedings of this Grand Lodge as 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 35 

of many others, The Grand Master Avondered whether "the 
leaders of sister jurisdictions are cognizant of the status 
of this Nation should^ Freemasonry disappear." Another 
official said, "Apathy is the great problem which faces us 
as a people who enjoy Freemasonry because we enjoy freedom. 
Masonry seems to be losing ground." 

But there is actually no pessimism; rather there is con- 
fidence that brighter days are ahead. 



MISSOURI — 1960 

139th Annual Communication — September 27-28 

Grand Master, 1959-60 — M.W. Bro. H. 0. Grauel 
Grand Master, 1960-61 — M.W. Bro. B. H. Hunt 

Lodges, 594 Membership, 123,357 Loss, 759 

As in previous years, the Grand Master laid many cor- 
nerstones. Indeed, on one afternoon he laid four for new 
buildings on the Southeast Missouri State College campus. 
It might be added that M.W. Bro. Grauel is head of the 
Division of English Speech and Modern Languages at the 
College. He has been on the staff for thirty-two years. 

In lighter vein, the Grand Master repoi-ted on some of 
the unusual occurrences he had encountered. 

"At 4.10 on December 12, 1959, I paid an official visit to 
the Brethren of Perseverance Lodge No. 92 at Louisiana, 
Missouri; and found one hundred and four wide-awake Master 
Masons to receive me. Breakfast was scheduled for 5.30 
a.m. The Brethi"en informed me that it was customary to 
call a 4 a.m. meeting once a year, confer a third degree and 
enjoy breakfast together. This year, the Worshipful Master 
explained that instead of a third degi-ee, he wanted me to 
talk until the breakfast bell rang. I did and the speech lasted 
one hour and twelve minutes." 

. . . "In the lodge halls, I found the unusual: the old- 
fashioned telephone directly behind the Secretary's desk, 
Cunningham Lodge, No. 525 at Sumner; at Mack.'; Creek, 
Lodge No. 433, a spring of clear, cool water in the base- 
ment; a huge, unusual, glazed spittoon beside the Master's 
pedestal, St. Francois Lodge, No. 234 at Libertyville ..." 

During the year the Grand Master made some interesting 
decisions, all revealing strict interpretation of the regula- 
tions of the Grand Lodge. 

University Lodge, No. 649 raised its dues to $17.00 per 
annum together with a resolution making all fifty-year mem- 



36 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

bers life members. The amendment was ruled out of order 
as the Lodge was chartered only in 1920 and thus no member 
would be eligible for life membership before 1970. 

On another occasion the Grand Master ruled that a card 
party for which tickets are sold and table prizes awarded 
is not permissible in the dining hall of a Masonic Temple. 

A letter to the Grand Master enquired if the Grand 
Lodge could and would issue a charter to a Spanish speak- 
ing Lodge if it were possible to organize one. The decision 
was negative, as it has been the policy of this Grand Lodge 
to have all the work of the ritual delivered in English since 
1918. One of the problems which would arise would be the 
impossibility of securing a Grand Lecturer conversant with 
the language. 

The Grand Master, in what must have been one of the 
finest Grand Master's addresses given in the year under re- 
view, reminisced on his early years on a farm in Ohio. 
He likened his search for evidence that one can hear the 
com grov/ after a summer rain to what he was searching 
for in Freemasonry. In each case he was successful. He 
concluded, "If we listen intently, with all our being, we can 
hear Freemasonry, in its calm and quiet way, express its 
tremendous power of love without great tumult or sound of 
trumpets." 

M.W. Bro. Grauel must have made a real contribution to 
Freemasonry in Missouri, in spite of his final disclaimer: 
"In conclusion, may I say that only a Past Grand Master 
has sound understanding of what it means to act as a 
Grand Master. To serve well in this official position of the 
Fraternity is an art — an art so great and so difficult to 
master than one can spend a full twelve months at it without 
realizing much more than his limitations and mistakes and his 
distance from the ideal." 



MONTANA— 1960 

96th Annual Communication — ^June 27-28 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. F. E. VanDemark 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. J. R. Hopper 

Lodges, 139. Membership, 26,056. Loss, 191. 

Close ties between the Grand Lodge of Montana and the 
Grand Lodges in Western Canada are revealed in several 
places in this Report. A dispensation was issued to Living- 
ston Lodge, No. 32 to hold a lodge meeting in the Civic 
Centre in Livingston for the purpose of having the North 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 37 

West Mounted Police Lodge, No. 11, of Regina, exemplify the 
second degree. The request was granted as the lodge room 
could not accommodate the expected crowd. 

Another dispensation was issued to permit a Lodge to 
hold an outdoor meeting in the valley of the Missouri, with 
all due caution exercised. 

Sometimes meetings are carried out under difficulties. 
The Grand Master's diary, under the date November 12, 1959, 
records: "Official visit at Dillon Lodge, No. 16, it being 
their Seventy-fifth Anniversary. This \'isit v.-ill long be 
remembered. We all wore our overcoats during the entire 
evening — the furnace did not Avork and there was a bad 
storm outside. Your Grand Master got the thermometer to 
rise by holding it in his hand. Their Secretary, Fielding 
Graves, made a wonderful report on the early history of 
this Lodge (should be published)." 

At the same meeting it was reported that one of the 
early Masonic Temples, still standing on the property of the 
State Historical Society, was in bad repair. The Grand 
Master appealed for action to repair it and it is safe to 
as.=ume that something will be done if other actiAnties des- 
cribed in the Report may be taken as a criterion. 

The happiest note of the year grew out of a disaster. 
The Masonic Temple at Virginia City, the birth place of the 
Grand Lodge in 1866, was badly damaged by an earthquake 
and rendered unsafe. The Virginia City Temple Association 
applied for aid or a loan from Grand Lodge, for which there 
was no provision. Shortly afterward the Grand Master was 
at a Masonic Conference in Banff where he was assured 
that the Grand Lodges of Manitoba and Minnesota would 
assist. But he felt that Montana could raise the funds. A 
campaign produced not only the $7,000 which the repairs cost, 
but a surplus of over S4,0b0 which Grand Lodge is going to 
double to Pet up a peiTnanent disaster fund. The Grand 
Lodge of Manitoba sent a cheque for $400, and many 
Canadian names appear in the list of donors. 

The Virginia City Temple was fully repaired, newly 
painted inside, and ended up in better shape than it was before 
the earthquake. 

The Report of the Committee on Masonic Education and 
Research reported a full year of activity. One of the principal 
features of the Montana plan is the preparation and distribu- 
tion of short papers to the Lodges in order that there aa-III be 
one available for reading and discussion at every meeting. 
Twenty papers were supplied to the Lodges during the year, 
of which fifteen were written for the committee and five 
obtained from other sources. By action of the Grand Lodge 



38 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

in 1959 it is mandatory that the essentials of the annual pro- 
ceedings be read in lodg-e, but use of material provided by this 
committee is entirely optional. 

Altogether the Grand Jurisdiction of Montana appears to 
be in a flourishing condition. 



NEBRASKA— 1960 

103rd Annual Communication — June 7-8 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. J. C. Tye 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. J. F. Futcher 

Lodges, 275. Membership, 46,095. Loss, 46. 

The Grand Master reported that Masonry in Nebraska 
is healthy, saying in part: "We have more certified men 
and more certified Lodges than we have had for many years. 
Our area meetings were well attended and were most en- 
thusiastically received by those in attendance. Many of the 
Lodges are attracting attention because of the young men 
who are participating in all of the activities." 

Few Grand Lodges can have equalled the number of 
cornerstones laid for non-Masonic buildings. In addition to 
those of two Masonic Temples, the cornerstones were laid for 
a high school and buildings on three "N.S.T.C." (presumably 
Nebraska State Teachers' College) campuses. 

There seems to be some evidence of a shift in the at- 
titude to publicity in Masonic matters. The following para- 
graph is given in its entirety ^vithout comment. 

"It is hoped that you noticed numerous newspaper items 
with reference to the activities of your Grand Lodge, the 
subordinate lodges, and Masons, during the year. There 
has been some doubt in the minds of some concerning^ pub- 
licity or public relations, and very frequently Masonic ac- 
tivities and the activities of individual Masons have not been 
called to the attention of the public generally. It seems that 
good acts and deeds should be given proper notice. A Public 
Relations Committee was appointed this year and all com- 
ments have been gratifying." 

The question of the eligibility of members associated with 
the sale of liquor came up again in a special form. A mem- 
ber of a Lodge was a steward in a club where liquor was 
not sold but members could bring and store their own bottles. 
Could the member remain as ^ member of the Craft? The 
ruling was "Yes". Selling seems to be the significant factor 
in the rule. 



FRATEiRNAL CORRESPONDENCE 39 

Another decision, and a sound one, arose from the fact 
that members who were candidates for public office were 
listing- their Masonic membership on political cards and in 
political advertisements. The decision was that the use of 
Masonic membership in connection with any political ad- 
vertising is in violation of Masonic law. 

The greatest problem in the Grand Lodge of Nebraska 
is financial. The per capita tax is $3.00, of which $2.00 is 
earmarked for the Nebraska Masonic Home and .20c for the 
relief and care of orphans. Thus, the Grand Lodge is left 
with .80c per capita. This sum has proved totally inadequate 
and the Grand Lodge has been running in arrears for five 
yeai's. The Grand Master began by proposing the elijnin- 
ation of his address from the printed proceedings as an 
economy measure, but was informed this was not permissi- 
ble. He al?o recommended that the per capita tax be in- 
creased by $1.00 and that each initiate be required to pay 
$10.00 for the benefit of the Home. The drastic remedies 
proposed and the necessity for them make clear the cost 
of operation of Masonic Homes. 

The Grand Secretary reported that he was continuing 
to microfilm the card files and returns to Grand Lodge as 
time permitted. Thus modern techniques of record preserv- 
ation and storage are invading an old organization which has 
suffered many times in the past from loss and damage of 
irreplaceable records. 



NEVADA— 1960 

96th Annual Communication — June 9-10 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. R. D. Crowell 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. S. D. Sundeen 

Lodges, 29. Membership, 5,900. Gain, 113. 

Although a relatively small Grand Jurisdiction, Nevada, 
now approaching its centennial, is extremely active. In 
speaking on the State of the Craft the Grand Master said: 
"Masonrj' in Nevada is generally good. The ritualistic work 
is improving, is more uniform and many of the Lodges 
exhibit work that shows considerable practice and effort 
towards perfection. In most areas membership is increasing, 
although not in proportion to our expanding population. I 
believe our membership will accelerate in the next few years. 
Interest is healthy, many Lodge officers are young men, 
active and interested .... 

"Two new Lodges ai'e under dispensation, one in Reno, 
one in Las Vegas. The enthusiasm of these Brethren m 
forming a new Lodge is contagious and will further boost 



40 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Masonic interest. The fact these Brethren are almost entirely 
sojourners from other Jurisdictions means simply that now 
we have that many more interested active Masons in Nevada." 
The Grand Master continued, "... I would rather see five 
smaller lodges of 200 to 300 members than one large lodge 
of 1,000 members. Fior the reason that five lodges and 
five sets of officers will be more active than one lodge and 
one set of officers. National attendance records will prove 
there will be three to four times as many attending the five 
small lodges as attending the one large lodge." 

Tlie Grand Lodge must be well and favourably known in 
the State as no fewer than six cornerstones were laid. Only 
one was for a new Masonic Temple. The others were for a 
new building of the Nevada Industrial Commission, a new 
public school, a new high school, a fine arts building at 
the University of Nevada, and a National Guard Armory. 
The orations given on these occasions are printed in full. 

At the same time the Grand Lodge did not court unwant- 
ed publicity. The Grand Master reported: "In answer to 
an oral request for information as to the legality and pro- 
priety of submitting an article on the history and information 
concerning one of the Constituent Lodges in a local news- 
paper running a series of articles on various organizations, 
I said I believed this should not be done. The matter is a 
delicate one, and unless very, very carefully edited could 
bounce back to our discredit." This would seem to be a 
safe and sound position. 

By-Laws approved produced something new. Amity 
Lodge, No. 4, in Silver City, chartered in 1864, was author- 
ized to change dues to one dollar per month, following a 
unanimous vote of the membership. The collection of dues 
might well become a major task for the secretary, except 
for the fact that there are only 56 members in the Lodge. 
Another Lodge, Mt. Moriah, No. 39, was authorized to change 
dues to $18 per year. 

Grand Lodge approved the raising of the per capita tax 
to $2^50 to take care of the increasing costs of operating 
the Grand Lodge. One of the costs is the payment of $10 
per diem to Masters and Wardens of the Constituent Lodges 
attending Grand Lodge. 

Many Grand Jurisdictions in the United States take a 
leading part in promoting public school development. The 
Grand Master, in this Grand Jurisdiction however, recom- 
mended that the 'Tublic Schools Week program" be abolished 
as unworkable. 

The Grand Lodge approved a stiff recommendation con- 
cerning the knowledge of the Code (our Constitution) pos- 
sessed by Masters of Lodges. "I recommend each newly 



FRATEiEINAL CORRESPONDENCE 41 

installed Worshipful Master of the Constituent Lodges of 
the State of Nevada must within 60 days following his instal- 
lation read and study the entire Masonic Code of the State 
of Nevada and so certify to the Grand Master in writing; or 
lacking suitable cause, be removed from office." 

Another ruling was that although there was nothing in 
the Code to the contrary, only tradition, no member of any 
Lodge may hold more than one office in the same Lodge at 
one and the same time, except a Trustee. 

A Committee on Centennial Celebration is at work and 
already has done research on the organization meeting, 
January 16, 1865, when the Grand Lodge was set up. 

Altogether, the Grand Lodge of Nevada appears to be 
strong and active and building on firm foundations. 



NEW BRUNSWICK— 1960 

93rd Annual Communication — May 26 

Grand Master— M.W. Bm. F. C. Thomas 

Lodges, 48. Membership, 8,961. Gain, 9 

Freemasonry in New Brunswick is in good condition. 
The Degree work is being well done. This is due, the Grand 
Master believes, not only to the untiring efforts of the Ritual 
Committees and the District Deputies but also to the interest 
of the Officers. Not only do they know the ritual well but 
are asking to know more about Masonry. To satisfy this 
interest the Grand Master has enlarged the conunittee on 
Masonic Education. 

The Grand Historian, R.W. Bro. A. S. Robinson, present- 
ed a full report and drew attention to showcases of valuable 
and interesting items, pertaining to the history of the Order 
in New Brunswick, in the anteroom of the Masonic Temple 
in Saint John. With feeling he added, "the slack hand of 
indifference has allowed the loss of many priceless thmgs 
that could have told us of our past as nothing else could 
have done." 

The Grand Jurisdiction is divided into seven districts. 
The District Deputies, who are appointed, may be continued 
in office for more than one year. Their reports reveal 
much activity on their own part. One reading the Pro- 
ceedings is left with the impression that there is much solid 
activity in New BrunsAvick. 



42 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

NEWFOUNDLAND— 1960 

District Grand Lodge of the United Grand Lodge of England 

Semi-Annual Communication, November 18 and 
89th Annual Communication, April 27 

District Grand Master— R.W. Bro. G. R. Williams 

Lodges, 18. Membership, 2,359. Gain, 28. 

The District Grand Master's report, in the form of a 
diary, shows that few days go by without some Masonic 
activity. On May 2 he met with Brethren from Argentina 
who discussed the possibility of securing a charter. They 
had already secured the title deed to some land. 

On May 25, the Grand Master laid the cornerstone of 
Gander Masonic Hall. He also conducted the annual instal- 
lation. On June 30 he laid the cornerstone of Burin Masonic 
Hall. 

The fraternal relationship between the District Grand 
Lodges of England and Scotland is shown by the entry: 
"August 25. Understand a delegation of high-ranking Grand 
Lodge officers are due here 1st week October to install R.W. 
Bro. Louis John Harnum, D.G.M. of D.G. Lodge of Scotland 
in Newfoundland. In view of this I asked the chaiiinan of 
our 4th Biennial Conference to consider giving up his book- 
ing for the conference and hold it later to accommodate our 
Scottish Lodge brethren which was kindly acceded to." 

Twillingate Lodge celebrated its seventieth anniversary 
on September 29. The District Grand Master recorded: 

"Twillinsrate has records of men from Britain settling 
.there in 1700 and following years, when St. John's, Bay Bulls, 
pia'-pntip anH Carbonear T=:iand were attacked by the French. 
In 1739 T-willingate had 386 persons li\ang there. John Slade 
,of Poole. Devon. England, carried on a large business there 
,in the 18th century; he died in 1792. 

"The Lodge at Twillingate can be proud of its founders. 
Thev take courage from nast record? of the men in Masonry 
who have inspired their labour. Let us hope the Lodge ^vill 
form a committee and record Twillingate's history of Masonry 
and men for coming generations." 

Another contact between the two District Grand Lodges 
of Newfgundland is recorded on October 6: 

"M.W. Lord Elgin and Kincardine, P.G.M.M. of Grand 
Lodge of Scotland and G.S.W. of the United Grand Lodge of 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 43 

England, accompanied by Major Moncrieff, D. of C, and V. 
Wor. Bro. Alex F, Buchan, M.B.E., Grand Secretary, arrived 
about 2.30 today. Wor. Bro. Edgar P. Newman, P.M., Secre- 
tary for Botwood Lodge, met them at Gander and arrived by 
the same plane. Met Wor. Bro. Howard Patten, P.M. of 
Grand Bank, and invited him to join the D.G. Lodge delegates 
attending the installation of Wor. Bro. Louis John Hamum, 
D.G.M. of D.G. Lodge of Scotland for Newfoundland. 

"October 7. With the D.G. Secretary, Wor. Bro. Miles, 
I had invitation to attend a luncheon today at Government 
House given in honour of the visiting Grand Lodge of 
Scotland delegation. I was seated next to Lord Elgin which 
gave me an opportunity to chat with him. In the evening 
I attended the installation of Wor. Bro. Harnum, D.G.M. , by 
the Scottish Lodge delgation held in St. Michael's School 
Building, LeMarchant Road." 

The entries for October 8 and March 3 tell a great story 
of Masonic zeal and enthusiasm over many years: "Owing 
to being on the toast list of the dinner in honour of the 
Scottish Grand Lodge delegation in Nev\rfoundland Hotel 
and installation of R.W. Bro. L. J. Harnum, I missed attend- 
ing annual meeting of Avalon Lodge this evening of which I 
am sixty-two years a member." 

"March 3. My 83rd birthday. With a thankful heart I 
was able to be at the office as usual. Received a telephone 
call from my home in afternoon to return. Delegations from 
St. John's, Avalon, Whiteway and St. George's Lodges had 
called to offer birthday gifts and personal greetings as a 
surprise. Their good wishes were extended and tokens pre- 
sented with true Masonic ceremonial. The gifts consisted 
of gold cuff links, desk clock and pen, slippers and silk scarf. 
A social hour resulted and delegation retired. Needless to 
say, Mrs. Williams and I were very pleased to see them and 
receive their good wishes." 

The District Grand Lodge of Newfoundland is well 
ser\'ed by R.W. Bro. G. R. Williams. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— 1960 

101st Semi-Annual Communication — November 17, 1959 

and 

171st Annual Communication, May 18, 19, 1960 

Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. P. H. Bennett 

Lodges, 81. Membership, 17,169. Loss, 4. 

In his Foreword for Fraternal Correspondence our friend, 
M.W. Bro. Harold 0. Cady, P.G.M., asfcs a question which 



44 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

has always puzzled this Reviewer. "Why do these many 
other organizations find it necessary to predicate their mem- 
bership on membership in a Masonic Lodge?" (Why, may we 
ask, must so many fine organizations, well-meaning, philan- 
thropic, insist on calling themselves "Masonic"?) He asks 
for some plan, as many others ask, by which so many sus- 
pensions and demits may be avoided. 

Operation of the Masonic Home costs under $95,000 and 
there were 19 men and 21 women living there, the average 
age of these 40 members being 80.8 years. Outside the Home 
were 3 men and 2 women whose average age was 85 years; 
these were under the care of Grand Lodge. Benevolence re- 
ceives due attention. 

Lodges of Instruction were held during the autumn and 
early winter in the eight Masonic Districts but the attend- 
ance of Wardens was not as large as expected. However, the 
attendance of Masters and of newly-made Master Masons 
was most encouraging. On each occasion the Grand Master 
greeted the newly raised Master Masons personally. 

During the month of January six Lodges requested per- 
mission to increase the annual dues. (Almost everywhere 
the trend is upward for dues and fees.) In the previous 
month ten Lodges made the same request. The Grand 
Master urged that every Lodge have some funds set aside 
for relief which he regards as "the most fundamental obli- 
gation which each of us has voluntarily assumed at the altar." 
The Grand Wardens have charge of the periodic publication 
of a bulletin with which secretaries are asked to co-operate 
by sending in announcements and other items. The Grand 
Master expects "that increased fraternal visitation will be 
encouraged by such publicity." 

The Masonic Education Committee, headed by the Senior 
Grand Warden, "has in the short space of several years 
achieved very impressive results and has advanced the extent 
of Masonic enlightenment immeasurably among the members." 

Apparently, the per capita tax is $2.00 per member; in 
addition it was regiilarly resolved and approved that 50 cents 
per annum be levied on all members except those in the 
Armed Forces, wearers of 50-year medals and those whose 
dues were remitted, and that ten cents be appropriated for 
the use of the Committee on Masonic Education and thirty- 
five cents be remitted to the Masonic Service Association for 
its hospitalization program. 

It is a pleasure to read the Reviews and we gladly extend 
our thanks for a comprehensive outline of the Proceedings of 
our Grand Lodge. A perusal of the Proceedings of New 
Hampshire gives one the definite impression that this old, 
yet young, Grand Lodge is making a determined and an 
intelligent effort to overcome the apathy so noticeable almost 
everywhere in the Masonic World. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 45 

NEW JERSEY— 1960 

173rd Annual Communication — April 20-21 

Grand Master, 1959-60 — M.W. Bro. W. Davies 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. S. B. Brosius 

Lodges, 289. Membership, 107,321. Loss, 149. 

At the previous Annual Communication, Grand Lodge had 
authorized the setting aside of $5,000 for use in celebrating 
the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth Anniversary. The Com- 
mittee set up came to the conclusion that a successful 
celebration would cost $15,000. Their recommendation for 
the appropriation of additional funds was adopted. 

For the first time in the history of the Grand Lodge 
two members of Constituent Lodges were entitled to receive 
a seventy-five year diamond token. The Grand Master made 
both presentations. 

Although the use of costumes in conferring degrees was 
banned many years ago the Grand Master had received many 
requests for permission to do so. The Grand Master there- 
fore recommended: "The conferring of any of the three 
symbolic degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry by brethren 
wearing other than business suits, tuxedo, or conventional 
full dress is prohibited, but this prohibition shall not apply 
to brethi'en who are actually in military service or who are 
wearing a uniform which because of their daily vocation is 
required to be worn at that particular time." The recom- 
mendation was not adopted. 

The Constitution and Code of this Grand J.urisdiction 
•pecif ies : "Lodges under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge 
are expressly forbidden to introduce within their lodges any 
spirituous liquor, wine or beer." This legislation has been 
on the books since 1843. In most cases the rule is taken for 
granted. For many years, however, club licenses have existed, 
legally issued by the proper State and municipal authorities, 
in a number of Masonic Temples. These in no way disturbed 
"the peace and tranquility" of any person. Unfortunately, 
aa the Grand Master says: "We began to serve beer with 
refreshments in Masonic Temples after our lodge meetings, 
cocktails before dinner preceding our communications. In an 
anteroom we offered toasts to our Worshipful Master-elect, 
using liquor immediately after or before the qualification 
ceremony ..." Other, and indeed more flagrant, incidents 
were cited. As a consequence the Grand Master decreed that 
no spirituous liquor should be sold, served, or consumed, in 
«ny Masonic Temple, except where there were club licenses. 
In these cases he set up a timetable to extinguish such 
licenses by 1964. His recommendations were adopted by 
Grand Lodge. 



46 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

All the regular reports show that, except for a very" 
small decline in total membership, the Grand Lodge is in a 
flourishing condition. 



NEW MEXICO— 1960 

83rd Annual Communication — March 21-22 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. S. W. Dennis 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. W. L. Ranville 

Lodges, 63, Membership, 15,001. Gain, 312. 

The Grand Master reported a most active and successful 
year. Five special communications were called, one for the 
constituting, dedicating and consecrating a new Lodge, two 
for dedicating two new Lodge Halls, one for laying the corner- 
stone of the First Baptist Church in Artesia, and one for 
conducting the Masonic Funeral services of a Past Grand 
Master, M.W. Bro. A. W. Pollard. The cornerstone laying 
suggests that Freemasoni'y has a public acceptance in New 
Mexico. 

In the course of his year the Grand Master visited every 
Lodge in his jurisdiction at least once, travelling 28,000 miles 
in the process. 

No fewer than twenty-five Lodges received approval of 
By-Laws to raise fees. 

The Grand Lodges of Arizona, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas 
and New Mexico unite in a Southwest Conference. At the 
meeting held in Little Rock, Ark., problems common to the 
five grand juHsdictions were discussed. Unsatisflactory 
Lodge attendance seemed to be general. 



NEW SOUTH WALES— 1960 

72nd Annual Report of two Special and four Quarterly- 
Communications — 1959 and 1960 

Grand Master, 1959— M.W. Bro. H. R. Maas 

Lodges, 887. Membership, 133,051. Loss, 2,075. 

This tightly packed Report gives a clear picture of the 
Craft in New South Wales. The first Special Communication 
of the year was held on July 29. 1959 for the Installation 
of the Grand Master Elect. R.W. Bro. Harry Rickards Maas. 
He replaced M.W. Bro. T. L. Warren, who had held the office 
for four years. During his two years as Deputy Grand 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 47 

Master, two years as pro Grand Master, and four years as 
Grand Master, he had seen over seventy new Lodges war- 
ranted. 

At his first address the new Grand Master remarked that 
it had been brought to his attention that some Lodges meet- 
ing in suburban areas were allowing members to remain in 
the Temple buildings until well after midnight. He request- 
ed Worshipful Masters to ensure that Brethren leave their 
buildings at 11.30. 

The Grand Inspector of Workings gives a full report 
at each quarterly communication. On September 9, 1959, he 
had much of interest to say. 

"In many reports it is stated that the standard of work 
is of a high quality performed with dignity and exactness 
by enthusiastic brethren who have really tried to interpret 
the Ritual in a becoming manner which is inspiring to all 
members of the Craft. In a few Lodges unfortunately, report 
has been made that the standard of work is not up to the 
general standard. The D.G.I.W. should at all times endeavour 
to encourage the W.M. to increase their ritual efficiency not 
only by mere repetition but by an intelligent interpretation. 

"One of the features of the D.G.I.W. reports is that 
attendances at Lodges appear to be slightly increasing. In 
most cases this appears to be due to the untiring efforts of 
W.M. and the raising of the standard of the Lodge work. 
In every case it has been found that where an excellent 
ceremony of installation and degree work and/or the present- 
ation of properly prepared lectures have had a direct effect 
for the year on the attendances of brethren at the general 
Lodge meetings. 

"One of the pleasing features of the reports is the 
number of brethren that the Lodge are receiving as Candi- 
dates who were not born in Australia. The absorption of such 
men is a gratifying feature of our Craft and conversely it 
must be of great pleasure to these new members. 

"During the period under ^e^^ew most Lodges appear to 
have held many social functions and D.G.I.W.s report that 
they have attended in all cases and the standard of confluct 
had been exceedingly high. 

"In addition the Masonic Choir has continued to give 
unselfishlv of its services particularly in many Lodges and 
District Church Services. Their presence has on all occasions 
left a very favourable impression. 

"The services of Brother Fred Cox of the Lodge of 
Australia No. 3 deserves a special mention. He celebrated 



48 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

his 85th birthday during the quarter. He has been a Mason 
for 60 years and is still a very regular attender at all Lodge 
meetings particularly he has been a support to the W.M. on 
fraternal visits. He is an inspiration to the younger 
brethren of the Craft." 

Unfortunately dumg the year the Grand Inspector of 
Workings, V.W. Bro. H, C. Cameron, died. His successor, 
V.W. Bro. W. Bailey, continued the high level of reporting 
set by his predecessor. On March 9, 1960 the report spoke of 
the high standard of work except for a few cases on Past 
Masters' Nights when it would appear that the Worshipful 
Brethren had not bothered to hold a rehearsal. The same 
report added: "It has been reported that in some Lodges 
members are still not conforming to the requirements regard- 
ing dress. Candidates for Freemasonry should give an under- 
taking that if they are not already in possession of dress 
clothes they will obtain them," 

Freemasonry in Australia is evidently more formal than 
is generally the case in America. The importance of opening 
Lodge on time was stressed in a subsequent report. All 
over the Masonic world the same rules for success hold. 



On March 9, 1960 the Grand Master referred to the good 
work being done by the N.S.W. Masonic Jubilee Choir at 
many church services held by Private Lodges throughout 
Sydney and metropolitan areas. He made a personal appeal 
for young members to replenish the ranks of the organiz- 
ation set up in 1938 to mark the Jubilee of the Grand Lodge. 

In his next address, (during the year the Grand Master 
makes four) he commented on a growing tendency "at In- 
stallation Ceremonies for Brethren who are members of other 
organizations outside Freemasonry to wish to make a present- 
ation of a gavel or some other token to the newly Installed 
Worshipful Master who is also a member of that particular 
organization. Whilst this is a very nice gesture on their part 
I feel that such a presentation does not form part of the 
ceremonial and that it would be more fitting for it to be 
made at the Festive Board either during or after the propos- 
ition of the Toast to the Worshipful Master and his Officers 
when there is more opportunity for the Brethren concerned 
to express themselves and for the Worshipful Master to 
acknowledge such presentation apart from giving all the 
Brethren present the opportunity to participate and show 
their feelings by acclamation." 

These remarks might have a wider application than only 
in New South Wales. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 49 

NEW YORK— 1960 

179th Annual Communication — May 3-5 

-Grand Master, 1959-60 — M.W. Bro. H. L. Jones 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. C. W. Peterson 

Lodges, 1,064. Membership, 302,S72. Loss, 2,832. 

The Grand Master presented a comprehensive and well- 
reasoned address which might well be read with profit in all 
jurisdictions. In spite of a drastic reduction of member- 
ship, verging on one per cent, which is recorded, the report 
leaves a reader with the impression that Freemasonry is a 
strong force in New York State. 

From the address we learn that New Yorkers move from 
the State in great numbers. No fewer than 45,000 of the 
total membership, or fifteen per cent, live outside New York. 
Of these 8,000 live in Florida and 5,000 in California. These 
Masons undoubtedly make their influence felt in the states 
where they are sojourning. The reports of California and 
Florida where increases of membership are recorded, bear 
out the conclusions of the Grand Master. But non-resident 
members cannot make a contribution in their mother Lodges 
and their own Grand Jurisdiction. The implication is that 
these members have retired and have moved to warmer 
climates. But the Grand Master added that many young 
men who otherwise would be attracted to the Fraternity at 
an early age are taking advantage of the opportunities of- 
fered by the professions and industry which require residence 
in other parts of the country and even abroad. Compulsory 
military training is another factor which accounts for yoxing 
men deferring their applications for membership, since fol- 
lowing completion of their service they are concerned prim- 
arily with getting established in civilian life. 

The Grand Master concluded from these facts that no up- 
turn in numbers could be expected during the next few years. 
In the meantime a trend toward a higher average age for new 
members will continue. At the same time, he said, the fact 
should not be ignored that there are many misconceptions 
held by our non-Masonic friends which shouid be cleared up. 

"For example, the so-called secrecy of Freemasonry. 
True, there are certain private and confidential activities that 
go on in the Lodge room, just like any private organization; 
and there are certain Masonic Rites and ceremonies which 
are known only to the initiated. But there all secrecy ceases, 
because the real work of Masonry goes on outsiue 11;? Lodge 
room. 



50 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

"In some non-Masonic quarters, the Fraternity is re- 
garded as a secret Order, which definitely it is not. There is 
no secret as to its membership, which is a matter of public 
record; meetings are held in public places and there is no 
secret as to the teachings and idealistic aims of Masonry, 
which can be found in public print. 

"Another misconception which is general among the un- 
initiated is that Freemasonry is a religion, which again, it 
definitely is not, although it is religious in character .... 

"What is unique about our Fraternity, which sometimes 
puzzles our non-Masonic friends, is the fact that there is a 
strict prohibition against the solicitation for membership, 
and that those seeking admission to the Fraternity must do 
so of their own volition. 

"Membership in the Fraternity requires a belief in the 
higher purposes of life and a willingness to render service to 
mankind, not only through charity and benevolence, but by 
helping to promote the spirit of Brotherhood and Human 
Kindness throughout the world, as this is the great mission 
of Freemasonry. Masonry strives to be an effective force 
for good in the world and it offers no inducements to pro- 
spective candidates other than the opportunity to render 
service to others, in keeping with the idealistic concept of 
Brotherhood." 

Lodge attendance is not what it might be, but is not so 
disturbing when the number of members living outside 
New York is taken into account. The Grand Master made 
a most reasonable appraisal of the facts which is so funda- 
mental that it may well be rendered here. 

"Now, we must be realistic and recognize that under the 
changed conditions which affect our way of living today, 
there are many new interests that are competing for our 
attention and support, and these counter-attractions are not 
all pleasurable pursuits. We have come a long way from the 
time when the church and the Lodge room were the centres of 
cultural, social and community life. In earlier years, Lodge 
meetings were held weekly, but in time it was found ex- 
pedient to change to twice a month, and this is the general 
practice today. 

"During the last four decades, various patriotic organ- 
izations have come into being, vrhile the parents of young 
children are taking a greater interest in education through 
membership in Parent-Teacher Associations. Again, church 
and svnagogue activities have been greatlv expanded. As to 
the Fraternity, innumberable Masonic Clubs and Square 
Clubs have come into being, while many of the Brethren 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 51 

find special interest in the work of the Concordant Bodies 
and the Shrine. 

"Tlie fact that Blue Lodge attendance based on two 
nights a month is on the low side, is not a true indication of 
the interest taken in Masonry_ by the Brethren generally. 
This I know from my own experience, that when some special 
event is being celebrated by a Lodge, or some District affair 
is being held, the Brethren with divided Masonic interests 
always rally round; furthermore, I have found that those 
who are particularly active in the other Bodies, also have 
the welfare of their respective Blue Lodges very much at 
heart." 

The Grand Lodge of New York, in keeping with its pur- 
pose, has built a new Medical Research Laboratory on the 
Home Grounds, Utica, at a cost of nearly $1,000,000. The 
annual cost of operation ^^nll run about $250,000. At this 
Laboratory the Director and staff are conducting research in 
the field of Gerontology, "which has to do wath the study 
of the chronic diseases which beset the elderly, and with the 
ageing process itself." 

The Grand Master called attention to the limitations of 
the 23rd Street Masonic Temple and recommended the ap- 
pointment :of a special committee to survey the advantages 
of a new Temple. 



NORTH CAROLINA— 1960 

173rd Annual Communication — April 19 - 20. 

Grand Master— 1959-60— M.W. Bro. W. E. Hand 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. H. W. Smith 

Lodges, 857. Membership, 62,122. Gain, 758. 

To read the Grand Master's Annual Address gives one 
an insight into the sterling character of a fine Freemason 
whose clear, concise, yet comprehensive and do^\■n-to-earth 
exhortations must have greatly benefitted his brethren. _He 
began by stressing the necessity for Masonic _ Education; 
went on to urge definite compliance with Masonic Law; and 
then stressed the duty of every Freemason to give strict 
obedience to the Moral Law. He said that "the present 
moral situation throughout the world leaves much to be 
desired. It has reached such a point that one wonders 
whether indi^^duals and nations have not lost their will to 
distinguish between right and wrong. In these chaotic times 
we need men who can be relied upon; men whose word is their 
bond." 



52 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Eighty-one "opinions" were given. (Some Grand Lodges 
would call these "rulings.") They were chiefly answers to 
questions sent in by Lo'dges and, in every case, the answer 
was given in clear, unmistakable language. Two requests 
for dispensations to waive physical disability were granted 
and two were refused. 

During the year the Oxford Orphanage was filled to 
capacity with an enrolment of 312 children of whom 19 were 
"children of Masonic heritage." The appropriation for the 
year was $50,000. 

Two Lodges were given permission to erect one-storey 
lodge buildings. Eleven Lodges were not represented at the 
Annual Communication that year or the year before and 
they were called upon to show cause why their charters 
should not be arrested. The Grand Master dealt wisely 
and quite emphatically with a problem that crops up every- 
where. A brother who had been non-affiliated (we would 
say "under suspension") for twenty-four years asked for his 
50-year medal and another who had been "out" for two 
years wanted his 25-year emblem! As he said, "to furtiier 
devalue these awards would make therr meaningless." Of 
course, it is always necessary that the records be complete 
and that they prove the non-affiliation without question. 

The Fraternal Correspondent commented as follows; 
"Almost all Grand Masters complain about poor attendance 
at Lodge meetings. Here it is noted that the percentage 
of attendance is much better in small Lodges than in large 
ones." He remarks on the formation of new Lodges and the 
erection of new buildings and aptly explains the "answer 
to the contradiction lies in the quality of leadership in the 
Lodges." 



NORTH DAKOTA— 1960 

71st Annual Communication — June 20-22 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. B. G. Gustafson 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. G. L. Paxman 

Lodges, 120. Membership, 13,935. Loss, 174. 

The programme for the year in North Dakota placed 
emiphasis on lodge activity, on education and on individual 
and group initiative and responsibility. Although the roll 
Bhowed a net loss on the year, for the first time in a number 
of years raisings exceeded deaths. There was a strong pre- 
dominance of young Masons among the new members and 
among the Officers of the Constituent Lodges which boded 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 53 

well for the future. The Grand Master stressed the need 
for quality and leadership in candidates. Membership, he 
declared, was a critical matter. 

The Grand Master put forward a recommendation which 
brought out several timely historic facts of interest to both 
American and Canadian Masons. "It is further recommended 
that the Grand Lodge of North Dakota collaborate with the 
Grand Lodges of Manitoba, Montana and Minnesota in the 
observance of 1964 as a Masonic Memorial Year. It will be 
the 75th Anniversary of the Grand Lodge of North Dakota, 
the 100th Anniversary of the Grand Lodge of Montana, the 
100th Anniversary of the first Masonic Meeting in Manitoba, 
and the 100th Anniversary of the first organized Masonic 
Lodge in what is now the State of North Dakota, the North- 
em Light Military Lodge (U.D.) under the Grand Lodge of 
Minnesota." 



The entire Proceedings shows an awareness of the need 
for "International Masonic Relations." Starting with the 
presentation of the flags of the United States, Canada, 
Mexico and the State of North Dakota at the opening of the 
Grand Lodge. M.W. Bro. L. H. Bergstrom, Grand Master 
of Saskatchewan, in his brief remarks, also referred to the 
many visits which occurred between Lodges back and forth 
across the border. 

Although the Grand Master, the Gi-and Secretary, and 
the Chairman of the Library Committee, regretted that more 
could not be done for the Grand Lodge Library the report 
was impressive. Receipts totalled more than $14,000.00 and 
over 2,000 books, pamphlets, periodicals, etc., were circulated 
to 85 communities, several outside the State. 

The Committee on the Condition of Freemasonry, estab- 
lished in 1946 had not reported to Grand Lodge since 1949. 
This year the Committee endeavoured to begin the practice 
enew but did encounter some difficulty in securing reports 
from constituent Lodges since only 77 reported. One recom- 
mendation surprising to Masons in a jurisdiction where 
District Deputies are required to visit every Lodge in their 
districts was the statement: "We encourage at least one 
visitation to each lodge in the district by the District Deputy 
Grand Lecturer and the District Deputy Grand Master each 
year." The implication is that such visits are not compul- 
Bory. With twenty-three District Deputies available the task 
would not seem to be onerous. 



54 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

NOVA SCOTIA— 1960 

95th Annual Communication — June 13 - 14 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. C. H. Colwell 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. W. E. Moseley 

Lodges, 144. Membership. 14,794. Loss, 67. 

Thoug-h our sturdy neighbour down by the sea is not 
yet quite one hundred years old, Freemasonry was planted, 
took root, and slowly grew in that Province just about 222 
years ago. All this story of the day of small things M.W. 
Bro. Harris will tell us in the history of Freemasonry in the 
four Atlantic Provinces which is ready for printing. 

Just a little indication of how important politics can be 
in the Provinces "down by the sea," the Annual Communic- 
ation was to have been held on June 5th to 7th but a prov- 
incial election was called for June 7th and Grand Lodge 
postponed its meeting to June 12th. (No doubt, most others 
would do the same.) 

The Grand Master did a good deal of visiting and to 
three Grand Lodges presented a six foot silk flag of New 
Scotland. 

A 61-page booklet containing 256 questions and answers! 
has been distributed to each Lodge as has a new booklet on 
the Masonic funeral service. By the way. modifications of 
the funeral service have been made recently by many Grand 
Lodges and in some cases there has been the suggestion that 
this service should be abandoned. (Most of us would agree.) 

Among several suggestions made by the Grand Master 
were: punctual openings, early closings, personal contact 
with delinquent brethren before suspension, thorough ventil- 
ation in lo-dge rooms. (He might have added "shorter 
speeches".) 

EA'^eryone will agree with one of his closing paragraphs: 
"I hsive learned that of the many essentials for success 
three are vital — ^hard work, absolute integrity, and courage. 
I have also learned that he vrho reaches the top will often 
be misunderstood and be the target for criticism. The only 
policy in high office is an intense devotion to duty and a 
capacity to rally all Masons to a common pur-pose of brother- 
ly love." 

The Grand Lodge of Mississippi which broke off relations 
with Nova Scotia some time ago has not replied to or ack- 
nowledged the Grand Secretary's statement. The Prince 
Hall Grand Lodge has failed to implement the reasonable 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 55 

agreement, made with Nova Scotia some years ago. to with- 
draw the warrant of one of its Lodges. The edict of 1948, 
forbidding any inter-visitation, still stands and Equity Lodge 
coontinues to prosper. 

The Board of Education recommended that each Lodge 
have an education committee and that two talks, at least, 
per year be arranged on symbolism, history, etc.; also that 
a "newsy" summons be issued. 

The authorized ritual has been revised with changes in 
rubrics and floorwork and the obligations have been added to 
in order to bring them into line with obligations used in other 
Canadian and British jurisdictions. (What Nova Scotia does 
it does well.) 



OHIO — 1960 

151st Annual Communication — October 14-15 

Grand Master, 1959-60 — M.W. Bro. C. K. Cunningham 
Grand Master, 1960-61 — M.W. Bro. C. H. Strayer 

Lodges, 671 Membership, 282,397 Loss, 396 

This Grand Lodge has a Grand Historian. The present 
holder of the office is W. Bro. James J. Tyler, who has 
completed twenty-five years in this post. Annually he has 
contributed an essay on the early years of Freemasonry in 
Ohio. This year is no exception. His contributions to the 
Proceedings provide a priceless treasure of Masonic history. 

M.W. Bro. Carl W. Ellenwood, Grand Master of Ohio in 
1935, was appointed to the office of Fraternal Correspondent 
in 1947. His reviews are full and comprehensive and this 
year totalled seventy. It Avnuld have been a pleasure to see 
his report on the Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of 
Ontario. But this was not included. 

The Grand Master received several requests to hold out- 
door meetings for the purpose of conferring degree work. 
He stated: "While there is some doubt in my mind as to 
the value of su^ch meetings, nevertheless, no Dispensations 
were refused." Tn each instance the D.D.G.M. having iuris- 
diction was required to visit the site and thoroujrhly satisfy 
himself as to the suitabilitv and security. Dispensations 
were granted upon the condition that the District Deputy 
be present and assume full responsibility for the proper con- 
duct and security of the meeting. Each year is bringinsr an 
increase in the requests for outdoor meetings and the Grand 
Master suggested the desirability of reviewing the matter. 



56 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Several years ago the Grand Lodge permitted the public 
installation of the officers of subordinate Lodges. Circum- 
stances made it desirable to forbid such meetings. However, 
the suggestion has been put forward that public ii^tallations 
might again be desirable. A committee has been appointed 
to look into the matter. 

Another committee has been appointed to study a "con- 
troversial subject". There are many Brethren in Ohio who 
firmly believe that a much stronger Fraternity would result 
if Lodges were limited to a small or moderate-sized member- 
ship. The Deputy Grand Master is chairman of the com- 
mittee to make a preliminary investigation. A hasty glance 
over the Lodge statistics shows that almost fifty have more 
than 1,00'0 members. Five have over 2,000 members. 

For the first time in twenty-one years there was a de- 
cline in total membership. The Grand Master remarked that 
many factors, sociological, economic, and otherwise are conr 
vincingly offered as reasons for the downward trend in can- 
didates which has continued since 1946. He then asked the 
question: "Do we have any real cause for apprehension?" He 
went on to show that in 1890 the Masonic membership in 
Ohio was 0.9 per cent of the total population of the State, 
whereas in 1960 it was approximately 3.2 per cent of the 
total population. While the population of the State was 
increasing threefold. Masonry was increasing its membership 
ninefold. 

He concluded: 'If the size of membership is the principal 
criterion for appraising the Fraternity, then the solution 
is simple. We have but to discard the unanimity of the ballot 
box, relax the investigating committee, and start a whole- 
sale solicitation. All these would soon multiply our numbers 
appreciably, biit at the same time we would be losing those 
principles which have identified our Order for centuries. 

"Quality accompanied with quantity is a rarity in nature 
and, likewise, a rarity in human organizations. 

"Masonry occupies the unique position of being the 
largest Fraternity in the world and at the same time it en- 
joys an unexcelled reputation for the honesty, integrity, moral 
and spiritual quality of its members." 

OKLAHOMA— 1960 

52nd Annual Communication — February 9-10-11 

Grand Master, 1959— M.W. Bro. R. K. Babb. 
Grand Master, 1960— M.W. Bro. E. C. Morris 

Lodges, 383. Membership, 86,883. Loss, 358, 

The Grand Secretary reported that 1,075 members were 
unable to p^ay their dues and that the charter of one Lodge 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 57 

had been arrested and was being held in abeyance. During 
the year there had been three "consolidations" of Lodges. 
The Home for Aged and the Children's Home carried on their 
good work even beyond "the call of duty." The Committee 
on Masonic Education was increased from three members to 
five and was charged vrith. the responsibility of developing 
programs designed to bring needed information to the mem- 
bers of the Lodges. Area Institutes were operated for the 
instruction of officers and progress was made toward the 
compilation and publication of the History of Oklahoma 
Masonry. Good use was made of the Grand Lodge Library 
and Museum. 

The Oklahoma Mason, the official publication of Grand 
Lodge, has a relatively small subscription list and a special 
committee was appointed to study the possibility of sending 
this publication free to every member of every Lodge. This 
committee reported that 8 pages of advertising be added 
and that 50 cents be added to the per capita tax. Besides, 
it would be necessary to spend $50,000 on the purchase of 
new equipment for printing 90,000 copies of each issue. 
These recommendations of the committee were adopted. The 
cost of issuing 90,000 copies a month at 70 cents per year 
would total approximately $63,000. (We shall be interested 
to hear how this venture succeeds.) 

The Grand Master visited the Juvenile Institute in 
Pittsburgh and concluded, from his observations, that the 
Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania is rendering an excellent 
service to the juveniles of that area. ("We wash that Grand 
Lodge every success in this most important work.) 

During the year some interesting interpretations were 
given by the Grand Master, all dealing with cases connected 
closely or remotely with what they call "the liquor business". 
One of rather special interest was "that a brother whose 
wife goes into the liquor business is definitely connected 
with it" and would be required to withdraw from Masonry. 
All who did not comply during the year ^^'ithdrew except 
one who was expelled. (Isn't it strange that we never hear 
of this sort of thing outside the United States and not always 
there?) One Lodge sent in a resolution to the effect that 
"the sale of intoxicating liquors is now just as legal as any 
other business in Oklahoma", and that "Masonry has no 
right to tell a member that he cannot enter into a legal 
and legitimate business". This resolution was rejected! 

OREGON— 1960 

llOth Annual Communication — June 15-17 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. D. W. Pearson 

Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. J. M. Swanson 

Lodges, 192. Membership, 44,370. Loss, 176. 

Since 1916 the Annual Communication had been held in 

Portland. But follo\ving an invitation from Eugene it was 



58 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

held there. Any strangeness felt by the members was, as the 
iGrand Master pointea out, more than outweighed by the 
benefits. He said: "I have long believed that it would 
be of real value to Freemasonry in the Grand Juridiction of 
Oregon to hold our Annual Communication in various sections 
of the state. It gives the Brethren in various areas, who 
might never have the opportunity of attending Grand Lodge, 
a chance to benefit by personal observation; it puts more 
Masons to work, and it tends to relieve the feeling, however 
unfounded, that Lodges from a particular section where 
Grand Lodge is held year after year are in the driver's seat." 
A tremendous amount of work was involved, however. 

In the list of dispensations no fewer than four were to 
permit outdoor meetings, all for the purpose of conferring 
the Master Mason degree. One was "the 21st Annual 
Malheur Cave meeting"; another was "an outdoor meeting 
on the crown of Roman Nose Mountain near Mapleton"; the 
third was "in Crater Lake National Park"; while the fourth 
was "at Alpine Meadows on the slopes of Mt. Hood." 

The all inclusive character of Freemasonry was revealed 
in another dispensation which permitted Harmony Lodge, 
No. 12, to advance their regular meeting a week "so as not 
to conflict with the Jewish Passover." 

In Oregon, District Deputies are appointed and may 
remain in office for more than one year. The Grand Master 
had some comments to make on the practice: "There has, 
unfortunately, sprung up some thinking in certain areas that 
appointment of a Brother as a District Deputy confers an 
honor on the Lodge of which he is a member; that the max- 
imum term a Deputy should serve is 3 years and that then 
the position should be given to a Brother of another Lodge 
in the district. Nothing could be further from practical 
facts. The Deputy is appointed for his abilities and devotion 
to Masonry, not to honor a Lodge which is fortunate to have 
him as a member .... While each Grand Master has free- 
dom of choice, it has been the feeling of those immediately 
preceding me and of this Grand "Master that as long as the 
best interests of Masonry are served, a good and effective 
District Deputy should be continued in office regardless of 
the number of years he may have held the position." 

Annually, the elective Grand Lodge officers and im- 
mediate past Grand Masters of the Grand Jurisdictions of 
Washington, Idaho, and Oregon, hold a tri-state conference 
in one of the states. This year the meeting was held in 
Seattle. Each Grand Lodge officer of each Grand Jurisdic- 
tion presents a subject, which is later discussed by those 
present. 

Although a long way from Europe, the Grand Lodge 
of Oregon has one Lodge, Oregon Military Lodge, U.D. at 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 59 

Frankfurt, Germany. The Grand Master was convinced that 
the Lodge "is performing a tremendous Masonic work for 
American nationals in Germany." 

The financial position of the Grand Lodge is exception- 
ally strong. The Endo^^^nent Committee considered ways 
and means to increase the endowment to meet the needs of 
maintenance of the Home, and thereby relieve the member- 
ship of the per capita levy of $2.50. 

Ways and means were discussed of publishing the 
history of the first fifty years of the Grand Lodge. It was 
decided to print five hundred copies to be sold at cost. The 
Grand Historian, W. Bro. John Wilkinson, was encouraged to 
go on with the writing of the history of the second fifty 
years. 



PHILIPPINES — 1960 

44th Annual Communication — April 26-28 

Grand Master, 1959-60 — M.W. Bro. M. M. Ofilada 
Grand Master, 1960-61 — M.W. Bro. L. B. Bewley 

Lodges, 113 Membership, 10,732 Gain, 269 

The Grand Master, according to his o^\^l words, did not 
offer a literary gem as his report but plunged into the 
middle of things immediately. His report could be simple 
and direct as hip record spoke for itself. After a loss last 
year the Grand Jurisdiction showed a gain of 269. Visits to 
Lodges showed that the condition of Freemasonry was satis- 
factory. Attendance in many Lodges had improved, which 
indicates that the members realize what Freemasonry can 
mean to them. He did point out, however, that while gains 
were gratifying, Freemasonry in the Philippines as every- 
where else is not dependent on a big membership merely. 
"We are concerned with qualitative quantity only." 

"One salient fact," remarked the Grand Master, "that 
the eye can hardly miss in lodge visitation is the predomi- 
nance of silver heads among the coal, if the parody may be 
permitted." This situation was evidence that there are too 
many old men and too few young men in the membership. 

The Grand Jurisdiction took a step fonvard in standard- 
izing the ritual in Filipino. The Grand Master explained: 

"Heretofore, in the exemplification of degree work in 
the vernacular, our lodges have been using different ver- 
sions. None has to this day been recognized as official trans- 
lation of our ritual. 



60 ORAND LODGE OF CANADA 

"Responding to the clamor of many Lodges to be pro- 
vided with an official version in Filipino, I constitute a 
committee of vernacular writers, known and recognized for 
their knowledge of Tagalog, to revise all existing copies of 
the Tagalog version of the first, second and third degree 
rituals as well as of the installation and funeral ceremonies, 
and prepare a set for the use of our lodges preferring to ex- 
emplify work in the Filipino language. The Committee has 
been busy on the job and its work is almost finished." 

The Grand Lodge maintains a Masonic Hospital for 
Crippled Children. The Hospital is supported by a per capita 
assessment of 3.00 pesos per year, support by those who take 
out a membership, life or otherwise, in the Hospital, and by 
donations "from big-hearted Masons and non-Masons who 
realize the essentially humanitarian nature of the work of 
the Hospital." 

The Chairman of the Committee on Temples outlined a 
proposal to erect, co-operatively, a twelve storey building. 
The concept of a co-operative building is novel in the Philip- 
pines but quite feasible. According to plans the building 
should be the largest, in terms of floor space, in the city of 
Manila. It is intended also to make it "the most beautiful' 
in the Far East." The Grand Lodge would retain owner- 
ship, for Lodge purposes, of the top four floors. The pro- 
posal is most ambitious. An important factor is that th« 
Grand Lodge owns a most desirable site for the building. 



QUEBEC— 1960 

90th Annual Communication — June 2. 

Grand Master— M.W. Bro. L. J. Robb 

Lodges, 107. Membership, 17,988. Loss, 51. 

In his Address the Grand Master said. "This year, for 
the first time in several, our membership shows a small net 
loss. No undue concern, however, need be felt at this circum- 
stance. Membership, for the sake of membership, should 
never be an objective in this Order. Actually, the small net 
loss reflects rather the desire of some Lodges to set their 
house in order." He commended the news letters issued by 
eome Lodges and the Masonic Bulletin which gives pertinent 
facts about the Craft and the Grand Jurisdiction in particular. 
He had heard a good deal of discussion regarding the desir- 
ability of having a Home for senior Masonic brethren and 
their dependents and recommended the appointment of a com- 
mittee to study this question again. An interesting report 
was that the Story of Masonry in Quebec had been written 
and would soon be published. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 61 

The Grand Secretary was appointed Custodian of the 
Work with the suggestion that standardization and uniformity 
in the ritualistic work of the Lodges was desirable. The 
brethren were asked by the Grand Master to give support to 
the Masonic Blood Bank to the best of their ability. 

From the Report of a Committee the following extract 
is taken. "A more disturbing feature arises from the reports 
that attendance at lodge meetings is not what it ought to 
be, a problem almost every Lodge must deal with. Changing 
social conditions have undoubtedly contributed largely to this 
situation, radio and television perhaps being primarily 
responsible. On the other hand, capable and enthusiastic 
leadership in each Lodge can find ways and means of off- 
setting this claim on the time and interest of lodge 
members." 



QUEENSLAND — 1960 

One Special and Four Quarterly Communications 

Grand Master, 19bv, .. — M.W. Bro. H. B. Milliner 

Lodges, 454 Membership, 36,921 Gain, 286 

This was the Centenary year of Masonry in Queensland. 
On July 15 the Grand Lodge journeyed to Warwick to visit 
the grave of Wor. Bro. James Watkin Jackson, who was the 
first Worshipful 'Master of North Australian Lodge, No. 1. 
A centennial dinner was held on the same night. A centen- 
nial history has been prepared for publication. 

It was reported that the Grand Master of the United 
Grand Lodge of England had dissolved the District Grand 
Lodge of England in Queensland. The District Grand Master 
R.W. Bro. E. Aldous had relinquished his office which he 
had held since 1937. He was in his 91st year. Nothing was 
said regarding the disposition of the Lodges in the District 
Grand Lodge. 

A discussion of the danger inherent in Freemasons' using 
their membership and rank in Masonry to attain public 
positions drew forth a strong statement by R.W. Bro. T. 
Strachan, President, Board of Ceneral Purposes: "In my 30 
odd years of association with the Craft, I can conscientiously 
say that I know of no instance where a Brother endeavoured 
to ingratiate himself in the eyes of the public during a politi- 
cal campaign. We all know that if a Brother attempts to do 
that, he brings upon himself the contempt of his Brethren. 
TTiat is his punishment. After all, what is the basic principle 
of Freemasonry ? When we join a Lodg^ we protest our lack 



62 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

of mercenai-y objectives. Every time vre go into a Lodge we 
are taught that basic principle, which is the essence of our 
ritual." 

The Grand Master, Grand Secretary, and President of tiie 
Board of General Purposes made a most interesting tour of 
New Guinea, part of the Grand Jurisdiction. They found all 
Temples they visited a credit to Freemasonry, Two of them 
"earn quite respectable incomes through the letting of the 
festive halls as Court Houses." 

The President of the Board of General purposes gave a 
good dsscription of the appearance of a Lodge at work and 
also told something of the difficulties regarding dress in 
tropical regions. "Another matter to which I should particu- 
larly like to refer is the formal dress adopted by all Lodges. 
This consists of the white mess jacket, white soft shirt, black 
bow tie, black trousers with cummerbund, black shoes and 
socks. To enter a Lodge, filled to capacity, and be greeted 
with the sight of all present so immaculately clad, toned here 
and there with the light blue regalia, is an experience to be 
remembered and one that cannot fail to create a feeling of 
pride. 

"To be in keeping, our official party had similar jackets 
made here of white synthetic material lined with a non- 
absorbent cloth, the idea being that they could be washed 
after each function and would not require starching or iron- 
ing. To our surprise we were spared the necessity of wash- 
ing, as they did not absorb moisture as is the case with con- 
ventional cloths and did not show creases to the same extent. 
The problem of white apparel has always been the matter of 
laundering, but in view of the fact that these coats were 
subjected to equatorial conditions and stood up to the test, 
the time may not be far distant when similar formal dress 
becomes the rule rather than the exception for this Grand 
Lodge for the hot and humid summer months." 



RHODE ISLAND— 1960 

Semi-annual Communication — November 16, 1959 

169th Annual Communication — May 16, 1960 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. H. L. Palmer 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. I. L. Tucker 

Lodges, 44. Membership, 19,000. Loss, 171. 

Although the total number of Lodges is not large, and 
conflicts over date for Masonic events cannot be as numerous 
in Rhode Island as they are in larger Grand Jurisdictions, 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 63 

the Grand Master made a most practical suggestion. In 
order to prevent the conflict wherein two lodges in the same 
district have an event on the same evening, the District 
Deputy Grand Masters have been directed to keep a calendar 
of the events in their respective districts and state-wide 
functions. The Masters are directed to check with the 
iDistrict Deputy Grand Master on events scheduled and give 
dates of any of their events to the District Deputy Grand 
Master._ This will assist in preventing two lodges in a district 
scheduling events on the same evening. 

A calendar of state-wide functions has been established in 
the Grand Secretary's office. All Masonic bodies having a 
function of state-wide importance are urged to check with 
the Grand Secretary's office before deciding upon a date, 
and when the date has been decided upon, to inform the 
Grand Secretary. 

During the year some Lodges asked for permission to 
amend by-laws to permit an increase in dues. This the Grand 
Master believed was a step in the right direction. Along 
this line the Grand Master recommended that Lodges which 
have shown a net operating loss for a three year period be 
required to increase their dues, or, as an alternative, "a mini- 
mum dues" be adopted for all Lodges. 

The per capita assessment is $1.25. The feeling of the 
Secretaries was that the assessment should be raised to $2.00 
to avoid another inci'ease per capita for some time. However, 
the Finance Committee recommended an increase to $1.50. 



SCOTLAND— 1960-61 

M.W. Grand Master Mason — The Right Honorable The Earl 
of Eglinton and Winton 

R.W. Grand Secretary — Dr. Alexander Buchan 

Lodges, within Scotland, 624. Overseas, 395, 

Although an old Grand Lodge, the Grand Lodge of 
Scotland has some new ideas. At the Quarterly Communi- 
cation, February 4, 1960, the Grand Master Mason explained 
the extra lighting in the Lodge Room. "The_ Halls Committee 
for some time have had under consideration the necessity 
for more accommodation at our Grand Lodge meetings, and 
it has been suggested that Closed Circuit Television into the 
hall downstairs might solve the problem. Some weeks ago 
this was tried out and Grand Committee saw it in action, 
and to-day we have it on at the moment for the benefit of 
the Halls Committee to watch this meeting to see if it is 
going to be a success. I want to make it quite clear to Grand 



64 GEAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Lodge that it is a closed circuit and that the Lower Hall 
is properly tyled." 

New Lodges proposed, among others, show the broad 
influence of the Grand Lodge. They were at Dunkwa-on- 
Offin, Ghana; at Mina-al-Ahmadi, Kuwait; and at Mzuzu, 
Nyassaland. The initiation fees for the new Lodges were £50, 
£25 and £21 respectively. An interesting provision added 
was specification for the Colour of Lodge Clothing. Mid- 
blue and Gold; Royal Blue and White, edged with Caledonia 
Tartan; and Hunting McMillan Tartan. Altogether eleven 
new Lodges were chartered, only two in Scotland, the other 
nine overseas. 



At the Quarterly Communication on May 5, 1960, the 
Grand Master Mason reported on a visit, with the Grand 
Secretary, to Uganda, Kenya, Tanganyika, Nyassaland, 
Rhodesia and the Union of South Africa. At Mombasa the 
Temple is air-conditioned, thus making attendance at Lodge 
in the tropics a delight. In Johannesburg he attended a 
meeting and dinner with between 1,200 and 2,000 in attend- 
ance. 



The Grand Master Mason concluded: "The most out- 
standing feature of Freemasonry in East, Central and South 
Africa is the quite wonderful harmony which exists between 
the Brethren of the four Constitutions represented there, and 
in a number of Districts, the brethren of these Constitutions 
have a joint Benevolent Fund. We were greatly impressed 
with the high standard of work, and the dignified manner 
in which all the ritual work was performed .... Our lodges 
overseas do not have unduly large memberships. When the 
membership exceeds one hundred, many of our Brethren ask 
if it is not time to petition for a new Lodge. In this way, 
more Brethren have an opportunity of taking part in the 
work of the Degrees, and generally sharing in the affairs 
of the Lodge." 

"I think we all know, Brethren, that at the moment 
South Africa is a very unhappy country. Grand Secretary 
and I, unfortunately, saw quite a lot of the trouble out there. 
We, as Freemasons, do not, within our Lodges discuss poli- 
tics, but I am convinced that Freemasonry can do a great 
deal to help to settle the difficulties in South Africa by 
creating a spirit of goodwill, of tolerance, of friendliness 
and brotherhood. As I mentioned earlier it was simply 
wonderful to see the Brethren of the four Constitutions 
working in such perfect harmony, and I am sure that this 
atmosphere of goodwill and true Masonic spirit will spread 
out with these Lodges, and so help to bring that unhappy 
and lovely land back on an even keel." 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 65 

Once again the Proceedings show the great work being 
done by the Grand Lodge with Masonic Homes and Ben- 
evolence. 



Year Book, 1960 



What a treasure-house of priceless information and in- 
spiration is the Year Book of the Grand Lodge of Antient 
Free and Accepted Masons of Scotland! 



First to take the reader's attention is the frontispiece, an 
excellent picture showing the Grand Master Mason flanked 
by the District Grand Master of the Far East and the District 
Grand Master of the Middle East. In the second row, stand- 
ing, are: Dr. A. F. Buchan, Grand Secretary; a Past Master 
from Johannesburg; a brother from Iran and a Past District 
Superintendent from Egypt; a District Grand Secretary from 
New Zealand South and a Senior District Grand Warden, a 
negro, from Sierra Leone; brethren, most of them officers, 
from Pakistan, Natal, Nyassaland. Turkey, and Peru. (Seeing 
our brother from Sierra Leone in this cosmopolitan group 
makes one wonder whether Mississippi and Oklahoma are 
considering breaking off relations with Scotland, as one did 
and the other proposed to do with Nova Scotia!) In the list 
of Office-Bearers there is a brief biography of the Grand 
Piper. (That is an office we have not yet created although 
we have several brethren, any one of whom might be recog- 
nized.) 

There is a list of "Some Notable Masonic Dates" oc- 
cupying a whole page. Among these are 1376 (earliest known 
use of the word "Freemason"); 1717 (England); 1725(Ire- 
land); 1736 (Scotland); 1781 (initiation of Robert Bums); 
1860 (The Mark Degree restored to the Scottish Working). 
In the Grand Lodge Library there are 18 books on Robert 
Bums and one of them, entitled, "What Robert Burns owed 
to Freemasonry" is a little book which, it is said, "should be 
read by every Freemason". For the convenience of brethren 
pursuing special studies an interchange of books has been 
arranged among the Grand Lodge Libraries of England, 
Ireland, and Scotland. 

In the story of Lord Elgin's \'isit to Canada last year, 
mention is made of what he called "an interesting feature" 
in the working of a degree. (We have all noticed occasionally 
some of our brethren from the United States giving a 
preliminary sign which they called, when asked, the "dew 
guard" or "due guard" (I never knew which nor took the 
trouble to find out.) Lord Elgin spells it "Dieu Guarde" 
which, perhaps, may be freely translated, "The Lord protect 
me." (We're always learning!) 



66 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Many interesting articles fill a large part of the book. 
These are; "An Overseas Letter from the District Grand 
Lodge of the Far East"; "A Visit to Bahrain, Pakistan, India, 
Burma, Thailand and Ceylon" by Lord Macdonald and Dr. 
Buchan; "Lodge Otago Kilwinning, No. 417"; "Out Rjtual"; 
"Saint Andrew Lodge No. 418"; "Glasgow Kihvinning Lodge 
No, 4". The last number in the list of Lodges is 1,568. 



SOUTH AUSTRALIA — 1960 

Half-yearly Communication, October, 1959 and Annual 
Communication, April 20, 1961. 

Grand Master, 1960-61 — M.W. Bro. D. B. Ross 

Lodges, 204 Membership, 27,330 Gain, 425 

The Grand Jurisdiction had a successful year. Initiations, 
totalling 1,066, remained at a level consistent with the last 
two years, 1,063 and 1,066. Six new Lodges received warrants. 
One meeting not generally held in many jurisdictions was a 
Conference of Secretaries for the purpose of providing an 
opportunity for Lodge Secretaries to meet and discuss with 
the Grand Secretary problems of mutual interest and points 
of procedure. 

During the period under review four Masonic Temples 
were dedicated and several others were under construction. 
The Grand Master commented: "In these days of high build- 
ing costs, the building of a temple is a major financial pro- 
ject, and the building activities which have been carried on 
by so many Lodges seem to me to afford a good index of the 
healthy progress of the Craft and the zeal and the enthusiasm 
of the brethren of the Lodges concerned. Each of the new 
temple.^ to which I have referred is commodious, well con- 
stiTicted and dignified in appearance, and much of the furni- 
ture and equipment has been generously donated by brethren 
of the respective Lodges. We pray that each one of these 
fine buildings may continue a lasting monument to the taste, 
spirit and liberality of its founders." 

The question of dress at meetings again arose although 
the regulations had been laid down in 1951. The Grand 
Master once more directed: "... it shall be the rule that 
except in exceptional circumstances the dress to be worn 
at Lodge meetings shall consist of either full evening dress 
or dinner suit or under the special conditions previously laid 
down a white mess jacket with black trousers, socks and 
shoes and a white shirt and collar with a black bow tie. 
Deterrmination of what are 'exceptional circumstances' for 
the purpose of this ruling can be safely left to the discretion 
of the Masters of the various Lodges. There may well be in 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 67 

every Lodge elderly brethren or brethren in ill-health or poor 
circumstances who coulld not reasonably be expected to pro- 
cure evening dress, and every effort should be made to avoid 
embarrassment to brethren who fall within these special 
classes. However, the vast majojrity of Lodge members 
should be able to comply with the above ruling, and it should 
be the responsibility of the proposer and seconder of each 
future candidate to clearly inform such candidate that he 
must equip himself with formal dress for Lodge functions." 

The Grand Master appealed particularly for support of 
the Masonic Homes for the aged as a Masonic charity. Two 
pairs of homes were erected in 1929, two pairs in 1934, and 
two pairs in 1939, tv\-elve in all. The cottages have three or 
four rooms. During the year under review an additional 
twelve "flatlets" were completed. 



SOUTH CAROLINA— 1960 

223rd Annual Communication — April 28 - 29. 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. T. H. Pope 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. H. N. Layne 

Lodges, 301. Membership, 57,323. Gain, 810. 

For many years close relationships have existed between 
this outstanding, old Grand Lodge and ours and it is a 
pleasure to see in the Proceedings the names of several of 
our friends of earlier years who are still active in the councils 
of the Craft. Inter-visitation is constant and regular. Our 
•Grand Master attended this Annual Communication and his 
remarks were "appropriate, interesting, and enthusiastically 
received by the brethren." Our Grand Secretary was there, 
too, and, as always, was among friends who received hijn 
and entertained him with the greatest cordiality; he and 
M.W. Bro. Henry Collins have been colleagues for years. 
It is pleasing to read that South Carolina's Grand Secretary 
is to be presented with an oil portrait of himself. 

The Grand Master exhorted his brethren to avoid person- 
alities in discussion of Masonic problems and he reported that 
finances were in excellent condition. Six constituent Lodges 
completed a century of ser\-ice during 1959. No dispens- 
ations were granted for confirming degrees on more than 
five candidates at one meeting. 

The proposal to establish a Masonic University was 
(fortunately, as we think) at least shelved for a time, per- 
haps forever. The Grand Master recommended that a trust 
fund be established to provide the complete four year (only 
four?) medical education of a deserving student who would 



68 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

agree that, on completion of his internship and residence 
requirements, he would practise for five years in a rural 
community which lacks medical facilities. (This seems to be 
a grand idea.) 

"Relief in the amount of $62.746. .50 was paid to 95 Master 
Masons and 183 widows of Master Masons. Each appeal for 
aid has been carefully investigated and every effort has 
been made to give help where needed and to cut it off when 
a need has been met." 

There were six Special Communications held for the 
dedicating of new Masonic Temples. 

The Committee on Masonic Education decided that to 
accomplish the desired results the instructional meetings 
should be held in the districts so that all could participate 
in a review and its presentation of Masonic law, custom, 
and procedure. The official bulletin edited by the Grand 
Secretary, showed a pleasing increase in annual and life 
subscriptions. 

To read the Proceedings of this expertly managed Grand 
Lodg'e provides interest, inspiration, and real profit. 



SOUTH DAKOTA— 1960 

8Gth Annual Communication — June 14 - 15 

Grand Master, l^Q-BO— M.W. Bro. N. J. Doolittle 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. J. S. Rowe 

Lodges, 168. Membership, 20,317. Loss, 98. 

At the beginning of his year the Grand Master intro- 
duced a program which was a departure from the general 
programs which had been followed for many years. He 
wished to get back to "basic Masonry" and directed that 
emphasi? should be placed on the first degree along' with 
the .selection and education of candidates. The officers of 
Grand Lodge co-operated and it was found that the program 
had merit and that it accomplished a part at least of what the 
Grand Master had hoped for. Then there was a series of 
"fellowship breakfasts" on Sunday mornings after which 
all those present attended church. Though all District 
Masters were asked to arrange these, some, strange to say, 
did not comply with the Grand Master's request. 

Among eleven recommendations made by the Grand 
Master were; (a) that a suitable appropriation be set up to 
provide for proper distribution of the official publication of 
Grand Lodge, the Masonic Messenger; (b) that the Board 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 69 

of Custodians be authorized to pick up and destroy any 

illegitimate "keys"; (c) that the Special Committee on the 
Grand Lodge Libi*ary building be continued in office. 

The Grand Secretary reported, with regret, that in each 
of the last three year's there had been a loss in membership 
though in the previous sixteen years there had always been 
a gain. The per capita levy was raised to $2.00 of which 25 
cents was to be paid to the Temporary Grand Qiarity Fund. 
This was an increase of 50 cents. 

During the second year of publication four issues of the 
Masonic Messenger were printed and copies were mailed to 
Masters, Senior Wardens and Secretaries. The hope was 
expressed that this publication may be continued and im- 
proved. A Senior Warden's Manual has been produced. The 
Board asked for an appropriation of $1,200 for the promotion 
of Masonic Education. 

Twenty-three of the twenty-eight District Masters at- 
tended the Annual Communication and were thanked by the 
Chairman of the Board of Custodians "for their co-operation, 
such as it was." They were also thanked for their efforts 
in securing better representation of Lodges at the Annual 
Communication. Constituent Lodges to the number of 114 
were represented at Grand Lodge. 

The Masonic Veterans' Association, which any Master 
Mason over 21 years of age may join, held its 59th Annual 
Session. Henceforth "a fine of $1.00 is to be charged each 
member who does not bring and wear his Veteran's badgei 
during the sessions of Grand Lodge." 



TASMANIA — 1960 

Half-yearly Communication — August 27 

Grand Master — M.W. Bro. H. V. Jones 

Lodges, 69. Membership, 8,777 Gain, 32 

Although comprising only twenty-three pages these Pro- 
ceedings are full of sound opinion, reflecting the thoughtful- 
ness of the Grand Master. He "found the heart of Free- 
masonry beating strongly wherever he had been." 

The Grand Jurisdiction maintains two groups of homes, 
concerning which the Grand Master reported; 

"The two chief Masonic Balls of the State, at Hobart 
and Launceston, were again highly successful, and our Homes 



70 GEANiD LODGE OF CANADA 

for the Aged at Lindisfame and Peace Haven will benefit 
greatly from the funds raised . . . 

"I had the honour of opening officially another set of 
cottages at Peace Haven. 

"Every time I visit our Homes at Lindisfame or Peace 
Haven I am led to a deeper appreciation of the wonderful 
work that is being done by the host of Freemasons' con- 
nected with the raising of funds for, or with the running 
of _ these institutions. I thank them for this and I commend 
this work to every Freemason in Tasmania." 

Several new Temples are being constructed and during 
recent years several others have been built. Much of the 
work in many instances is being done by the Brethren them- 
selves. 

The Grand Master stressed the importance of church- 
going, raised a question as to the sums being expended on 
refreshments, and reaffirmed his interest in Ma-sonic Edu- 
cation, all in well-considered and well-chosen language. 

The Grand Master also spoke at the Centenary of 
Pacific Lodge, No. 5. His address, printed in full, was most 
appropriate. A few brief excerpts must suffice here: 

"Longevity of a Lodge is not unlike long life in an indi- 
vidual: it really means little if some worthy service has not 
been rendered throughout the years. To be 'Masonic' a Lodge 
must practice Masonry in all its fullness, not just confer 
degrees and conduct routine business. The excelllent sketch 
of the story of the Ledge, compiled and read by Wor. Bro. 
Em McLagan, leaves us in no doubt as to the worthy service 
that has been performed by the Br. of Pacific Lodg«. Natur- 
ally, the only names mentioned in that story are of those 
who rose to leadership or performed some outstanding service, 
but every true Freemason gives of his best to his Lodge, and 
tonight we are honouring the full membership of 100 years, 
for they have all made a contribution to the century old 
foundation on which Pacific Lodge stands today. Many of 
the names concerned are known only to the few who occa- 
sionally scan the musty membership rolls of long ago, but 
tonight, as well as praising famous men, we think also of 
the Pacific Brethren. 

Of little showing: 
For their work continueth 
Broad and deep continueth, 
Greater than their knowing. 

What changes in Tasmania, and, indeed, in the whole of the 
world, this Lodge has seen! 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 71 



"... While witnessing these epoch-making changes, 
Pacific Lodge passed through many vicissitudes of fortune. 
Like the mosaic pavement, its story has its dark as well as 
its light patches. Through all its vicissitudes, amongst its 
Brethren two lights have shone strongly, the lights of Faith 
and Hope, and thus the dark days were passed through quite 
safely. A Lodge is the better for having had to pass through 
difficult times. "A smooth sea can never make a skilful 
mariner. Neither do uninterrupted prosperity and success 
qualify man for usefulness and happiness. The storms of 
adversity, like the storms of the ocean, rouse the faculties, 
and excite invention, prudence, skill, and fortitude in the 
voyages." 

"So much for the spell of the historic past. One could 
play for a long time on the magic strings of history, but we 
must concern ourselves now with the present and future. We 
must not indulge any nostalgia for the past: it is a poor 
compliment to our fathers to camp where they fell ..." 



69th Annual Communication — February 27 

Ten brethren were "excluded" by their respective Lodges; 
otherwise the half-yearly gain of 19 might have been higher. 

The President of the Board of General Purposes found 
that applications for assistance came occasionally from 
brethren who had only recently joined the Craft and he 
suggested that greater consideration should be given to 
prospective candidates to make sure that their financial 
position is such that they can afford Masonrj' — "which after 
all can only be regarded a? a luxury". They should be told 
that they are not "joining a benefit society". In reply to 
several "approaches for guidance in allotting the work," the 
same official replied that Grand Lodge "prefers" that the 
W.M. or a P.M. do the O.B. and the secrets. 

A Grand Inspector of Lodges recommended that "prospec- 
tive candidates should be advised that it \vill be necessary 
for each to have a dinner suit" — to avoid embarrassment 
later. He admonished some directors because "visitors are 
frequently left to find their own way to a seat". 

Another G.I.L. reported that "many Lodges are giving: 
short lectures during the retirement of candidates and these 
are well received by the brethren". 

In his half-yearly address, six months before, the Grand 
Master had "stressed the importance of every brother's beings 
actively associated with his church" and he had noticed an 
encouraging response. 



72 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

In an eloquent and inspiring address the Grand Master 
stated thai tlie great objective is "the strengthening of the 
quality of Freemasonry in Tasmania". Further, he said, 
"The chief work of a Grand Master, as I see it, is not con- 
nected with routine and administration. The Board of Gen- 
eral Purposes will always take care of these matters, leaving 
the Grand Master free to encourage and inspire his brethren 
to higher standards of life rather than higher standards of 
living — ^to exemplify the Masonic virtues". No wonder he 
is referred to frequently as "the most popular Grand Master". 

Excellent service is rendered by those interested in the 
Masonic Homes at Lindisfarne which is well managed. 

Here is an interesting excerpt from the address delivered 
at the consecration of a new Lodge. "The purpose of this 
ceremony is to consecrate the members of the Lodge to the 
piirpose of speculative Masonry. The members of this Lodge 
will regard' this temple as Holy Ground. They will always 
remove their hats before entering. They will not do or say 
anything profane in it. They will not smoke in it. They 
will not allow any intemperance or excess to bring discredit 
to the Craft". 



TENNESSEE--1961 

147th Annual Communication — ^March 22-23 

Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. W. 0. May 
Grand Master, 1961-62— M.V>^. Bro. L. A. Hagan 

Lodges, 388. Membership, 89,951. Gain, 948. 

The Report of the Grand Secretary shows that there 
has been a consistent fonvard movement in this Grand 
Jurisdiction since 1940. The gain this year is larger than 
that two years ago. 

The kind of trouble that can si;rike a Lodge was revealed 
in a report on Bigby-\dlle Lodge No. 167. A severe windstorm 
completely demolished the Lodge Hall in May, 1960. This 
Lodge was chartered in 1849 and its membership totals 29 
members. The abstract of returns shows, however, that 
during the year they initiated three candidates in the emer- 
gency quarters in a school house. The Grand Lodge, naturally, 
made a generous grant for the purpose of restoring the 
building. Although no statistics of Lodge attendance are 
available, one can hazard a guess that the attendance and 
enthusiasm in Bigbyville Lodge must be extremely high. 

The Proceedings list the names of veteran Secretaries. 
Nineteen have held office for at least twenty-five years. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 73 

One was elected in 1920. One wonders how the constituent 
Lodges in any Grand Jurisdiction could work as they do 
without the devoted labours of the Secretaries. 

The Report of the Committee on Fraternal Correspond- 
ence, by M.W. Bro. Phelan Douglas, contains two significant 
paragraphs: the first is most appropriate for quotation in 
any body of Fi-aternal Reviews, the second says something 
that should be said. The heading is "Is the tide turaing?" 

"Nothing in life is static! Evei-ything progresses or retro- 
gresses. One of the primary functions of the Correspondence 
Report or Fraternal Review is to reflect the overall picture 
of the condition of the Fraternity. The answer is not found 
entirely in statistical tables, nor is the story told fully in 
the amount and character of publicity given to our 
activities. Many writers are disturbed because attendance 
at Lodge meetings is not what it used to be. While this is 
discouraging, it does not mean that Masonry is dying. The 
whole situation must be considered in the light of changing 
times and with a finger on the pulse of the individual Mason. 

"A perusal of the reviews in the succeeding pages, if read 
with understanding and without undue pessimism, will leave 
one with the feeling that the tide is turning, ever so slowly, 
back toward Freemasoniy. Where is there another institu- 
tion, even those di^^nely in?pired. that has been able to meet 
successfully in the evening — night after night, month after 
month, in winter and in summer — in the face of so much 
competition from outside interests ? Where else can man 
find fraternal fellowship free from the usual restraints of 
the commercial and political world ? The tide of diminish- 
ing increases has been stemmed and net gains are on the 
rolls in some sections. With the stress of modem times, 
men are seeking for the quiet, peacefulness of their Lodges 
once again, and those who do not attend Lodge often are 
manifesting their intere<^t and love for the Fraternity in 
various and numerous Avays. This is the true test of the 
worth of our Order. As long as good men are proud to bear 
the name of 'Freemason' we have little to fear. Yes, the 
tide is turning our waj'^!" 

UTAH— 1960 

88th Annual Communication — January 25 

Grand Master, 1959— M.W. Bro. C. L. Prisk 
Grand Master, 1960— M.W. Bro. J. P. Coombs 

Lodges, 30. Membership. 6,832. Loss, 7. 

The Grand Secretary states: "The figure 7 looms up as 
a loss becauf^e several dual members in Utah dropped their 



74 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

dual membership and are now counted once instead of twice. 
There were 193 Master Masons raised during the year, a 
gain of 16 over last year". 

"I am more con\-inced than ever", said the Grand Master, 
"that to overcome the attendance and interest problem and be 
competitive with those forces — be what they may — competing 
for the time and attention of our members, Masonry must 
have an objective". (The problem he mentions is in evidence 
almost everywhere.) 

"We are again failing", he went on, unless we find ways 
and means of identifying, contacting, and interesting sojourn- 
ing Masons and their families. The Church should be the 
first place these strangers contact, but we should be a close 
and finn second". 



Another \\x)rthwhile remark was: "We should have an 
educational program and Masters and Wardens must take an 
active part. We have been trying to do this by means of 
bulletins but that is not enough". 

Expressing concern regarding investigation committees 
which, he considered, were being appointed in a casual sort 
of way, the Grand Master commented, "If we only realize 
that a courteous, dignified, proper investigation would not 
only prevent concern and embarrassment, but would even 
create desire, enthusiasm, and interest in the mind of the 
person we are investigating, we would be better off". 

The Masonic Foundation of Utah made substantial con- 
tributions to the Shriners' Hospital, to the York Rite Educ- 
ational Fund, to Lodges for new Temples, and to various 
other charitable organizations. 

The Grand Lecturer had his difficulties. He reported, 
"This year I was dismayed to discover that several of the 
Lodges were permitting undue roughness and comedy to 
creep into the second section of the Master Mason degree". 
He fou'nd that this is not peculiar to Utah and he pointed out 
that "levity, jesting, and roughness" are entirely out of place 
in this work and "that proper decorum is essential in a 
Masonic Lodge at all times". (This is, fortunately for us, no 
problem in Canada and never can be under our system.) 

There is a most interesting history of early days in 
Camp Floyd where the first Lodge was established in 1859, 
and there is a fine report of the Committee on Masonic 
Education. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 76 

VERMONT — 1960 

167th Annual Convention — June 15-16 

Grand Master, 1958-60 — M.W. Bro. F. M. Brownell 
Grand Master, 1960 — M.W. Bro. N. D, Rowe 

Lodges, 103 Membership, 18,145 Loss, 158 

"Following- a custom established in 1931," the Proceed- 
ings state, "our Grand Master assembled his entire official 
family. Grand Lodge Committeemen, and our distinguished 
visitors all with their ladies, together with such other mem- 
bers of the Grand Lodge as had made it their way to be in 
Burlington the evening prior to the opening of our Annual 
Communication, on the 'Roof of the Hotel Vermont at 6.30 
Tuesday evening, the 14th, for an excellent dinner and the 
opportunity for fellowship and getting acquainted." 

Masons of this Grand Jurisdiction will take pride from 
the concluding paragraph: "More than one hundred were 
present and were inspired, strengthened, and instructed by 
the address of guest speaker, Bro. Clarence M. Pitts, Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of 
Ontario. The speaker's inspired words and charming per- 
sonality left with all his hearers a most favorable impression 
— one never to be forgotten." 

The Grand Master in commenting on some of the ques- 
tions raised at the Grand Masters Conference, held in Wash- 
ington, dealt with the question: "Should larger lodges with 
good talent assist the small lodges with Degree work?" His 
opinion would seem to be most reasonable: "There are cer- 
tainly two good sides to this question. In the affirmative, 
■perhaps better work would be presented for the benefit of the 
candidates. However, smaller lodges might lean too heavily 
upon the other, with a possible resultant of the ultimate dis- 
integration of the smaller lodges. It has been my experience 
and belief that talent can be found and developed in every 
lodge. I do not go along with brothers in our own State who 
tell me they cannot get officers to fill the chairs.' 

The Proceedings of the various Grand Lodges show that 
many of the problems arising in the jurisdictions are much 
alike. However, Vermont produced a new and difficult prob- 
lem. The question was whether it would be permissible to 
use a photostat of the Charter in a Lodge Room to save wear 
and tear of a badly deteriorated original. Surprisingly, it 
would seem, the Grand Master ruled that a photostatic copy, 
in lieu of the original, would fully satisfy any re«[uirement 
for the actual presence of a Charter in a Lodge Room during 
work. 



76 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Some early pages of the Proceedings are devoted to the 
Address given at the Dedication of a ne^- Masonic Temple in 
West Rutland. The new Lodge Room in a converted church 
was admirably suited for its purpose. Sevei'al more pages 
are given to a most interesting history of George Washing- 
ton Lodge, No. 51, presented on the hundredth Anniversary 
of the Lodge. Three other Lodges also celebrated hundredth 
anniversaries. 

The Grand Secretary' paid tribute to the often overlooked 
contribution of Lodge Secretaries. In Vermont, with 103 
Lodges, no fewer than thirty-eight have served ten years or 
more. Six of these have served thirty years or more, one 
thirtv-five vears. 



VICTORIA (AUSTRALIA)— 1959 

Quarterly Communications, March, June, September, December 

Grand Master — His Excellency General Sir Dallas Brooks 
Grand Secretary— R.W. Bro. C. W. Da\is 

Lodges, 795. Membership, 110,956. Gain, 1,444. 

Having completed nine consecutive years in his high 
office the Grand Master was re-elected for the tenth time. 
There was a wann discussion over a motion to prohibit any 
Lodge from initiating more than eight candidates in one 
year because this has been a requirement imposed on all new 
Lodges. The idea was to prevent mass-production of Masons 
but the motion was lost chiefly when it was pointed out that 
attendance at meetings is decreasing and that the annual 
gain in m.embership had been; in 1953, 4,140; in 1954, 3,302; 
in 1955, 3,280; in 1956, 2,433; in 1957, 1,810; and in 1958, 
1,444. This rather alarming situation was, in part, produced 
by "exclusions" (we sav "suspensions") for non-payment of 
dues; there are pages of lists of names of members who were 
excluded and only short lists of "exclusions removed". It's 
the same story as elsev.-here, the story of the many who lose 
interest and "drop out." (What are we going to do about it?) 
Not only was the motion lost but the Board of General 
Purposes was asked to remove the eight-per-year require- 
ment on nev>' Lodges. 

The chief concern of this fine Grand Lodge is, as one 
might expect, the care of Masonic widows, orphans and 
dependents. At each Quarterly Communication grants were 
approved, in large numbers, for the "maintenance and educ- 
ation" of sons and daughters not only of deceased brethren 
but of some others whose financial circumstances were sudh 
that they were unable to provide advanced education for 
their own children. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 77 

During the year, 1958, the number of patients treated 
in the Freemasons' Hospital was 2,610 of whom 1,793 were 
Masons or relaitives of Masons. 

There are Reviews of twenty Grand Lodges, including 
Alberta, New Brunswick, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. 
Ontario is not included. The Grand Secretary introduces the 
Fraternal Correspondence with this statement: "Reports of 
various Grand Lodges in fraternal recognition with the United 
Grand Lodge of A.F. & A. Masons of Victoria have beer- 
reviewed by the individual representatives and are published 
herewith. The Annual Reports of several Sister Grand 
Lodges have been reviewed. Our Grand Representative is 
R.W. Bro. W. H. Tucker of Melbourne." 



VIRGINIA— 1960 

142nd Annual Communication — February 9-10-11 

Grand Master, 1959-60— M.W. Bro. S. D. Forbes 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. C. M. Flintoff 

Lodges, 338. Membership, 69,115. Gain, 482. 

The Grand Secretary, M.W. Bro. Archer B. Gay, has 
written a very fine Review of the Proceedings of our Grand 
Lodge, not missing any important feature: and his final 
comment is: "The Fraternal Reviews are well done and we 
are grateful for the fine treatment accorded Virginia". (The 
Reviews to which he refers were written by the late M.W. 
Bro. N. C. Hart.) In his Report he has some shrewd com- 
ments on present conditions, noting that fewer young men 
are coming into the Craft and, naturally, the death toll 
among the older brethren is high and is increasing every 
year; he suggests that many members are allowing them- 
selves to be suspended because they have not been given 
any work to do. The problem of lack of attendance is "a 
pix)b]em of major magnitude in every Virginia Lodge." Every 
member of a Lodge could be a member of some committee, he 
says and goes on: "Masonic education and indoctrination of 
our younger brethren must also go hand-in-hand with our 
■program of activation and re-activation." 

With the assistance provided by Grand Lodge through 
the Committee on Higher Education, one young woman 
graduated a? a nurse and four others were ready to proceed 
further. The Committee on Masonic Charity disbursed nearly 
$6,000 to the Lodges during the year. 

An Officers' Manual has been published and has proved 
to be useful but there is difficulty in getting the brethren 



78 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

interested in The Masonic Herald; many do not take the 
magazine from the post office. (It's a bad time for Masonic 
publications!) There is a fine library and there is also an 
excellent Museum and the Masonic Home is rendering most 
useful service. 

Our Grand Master responded on behalf of the distin^ish- 
ed guests and, of course, performed that pleasant task 
admirably. Virginia's Grand Master reported a most 
astonishing disaster. The Secretary-Treasurer of two funds 
used for a Masonic Home in a sister Grand JuTisdiction 
embezzled $360,000 — and he was a Past Grand Master. 
(Fortunately, this is an isolated catastrophe.) 

One Lodge asked for a ruling on this matter. A man 
has been given his first two degrees but, when he presented 
himself for his third degree, he was refused on moral 
fitness grounds. Can he sit in lodge in the first and second 
degrees? The answer w^as, quite properly, "No". The Grand 
Master ruled that a man who has lost the little finger of his 
right hand (or never had it) is not eligible to petition for 
admission. 

Being the first Mason from the 33rd Masonic District 
to attain the office, the Grand Master was presented, by the 
Masons of that District, with a beautiful automobile. 

To judge by the Proceedings (and what better yardstick 
could be used?) the Grand Lodge of Virginia is one of the 
outstanding Grand Lodges of North America. It is a great 
pleasure to read of its welfare and its progress. Long may 
it flourish! 



WASHINGTON— 1960 

103rd Annual Commumication — June 21 - 22. 

'Grand Master. 1959-60— M.W. Bro. R. J. Guthrie 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. A. J. Ring. 

Lodges, 285. Membership, 68,992. Loss, 203. 

The Grand Master visited all but one of the fifteen 
Lodges in Alaska and was forced to misis that one on account 
of weather conditions. He left for home "with the feeling 
that Masonry in Alaska is safe in the hands of dedicated 
Masons who are carrying out the design of our institution." 

Commenting on general conditions, the Grand Master 
said "Masonry throughout our Grand Jurisdiction seems to 
be in a very healthy condition. Most Lodges are active with 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 79 

degree work and their financial condition is excellent. It is 
my observation that the Lodges are endeavouring to bring 
to their initiates the true meaning of Masonry and not just 
a repetition of words. By so doing they are fulfilling the 
true purposes of our Craft." 

Some of the study groups in constituent Lodges are 
making good use of the Grand Lodge Library. (The study 
group is, manv have found, the best medium for Masonic 
Education.) The Grand Lecturer had a most successful year, 
stressing the standard "Work" in the twenty-five Districts. 

A supplement to Washington Masonic Code (1930) 
occuipies thirty-four pages of the Proceedings and records 
all changes made since 1953. Among these is a section which 
decrees that no Lodge shall confer the degrees for a sum 
less than $50 and, when the petitioner has been elected for 
admission, an additional fee of $20. is required as a contri- 
bution to the Masonic Home Fund. Another additional fee 
of $1.00 is required as a contribution to the endowTnent fund 
of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Associ- 
ation. The number initiated in 1959 was 1,761 which 
brought a considerable contribution. (By the way, glancing 
casually over the names of Lodges one is pleased and 
interested to note York Lodge No. 234, Queen Anne Lodge 
No. 242. and Robert Bums Lodge No. 243.) 

The Fraternal Correspondent, M.W. Bro. Fred Winkels, 
P.G.M., writes forcefully as follows: "The doctrine of Uni- 
versal MaJionry may at ?ome time become a reality; however, 
we cannot accept this doctrine if such acceptance means the 
recognition of all and/or any group, or groups, who may 
call or label themselves as Masonic. We have a time-tested 
and eminently satisfactory basis for recognition. All that 
glitters is not gold, neither is all that claims to be Masonic 
truly so." (A comer-stone of the Craft well and truly laid!) 



WESTERN AUSTRALIA — 1960 

Quarterly Communications — August, November, 1958, 
February, May, 1%0 

Grand Master — M. W. Bro. J. L. Rossiter 

Lodges, 314 Membership, 22,587 Gain, 18 

The Grand Lodge meets in four Quarterly Communica- 
tions, The May Communication however, draws the largest 
attendance, from about 400 to about 650. After meeting in 
country centres for some year? the Grand Master thought 
it wise to hold these four in Perth, where the largest and 
most representative attendance was practicable. 



80 GfRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Two dipensations, of forty, may bear noting. One was 
to initiate a candidate on the night of election. The other 
was to receive the nomination of a candidate under the age of 
21 years. During the year the Grand Master found it neces- 
sary to exercise a power he pK)&sesses to prohibit the initiation 
of a candidate who had been elected. All facts of the can- 
didate's past were not known to the Lodge. Hence the Grand 
Master deemed it advisable in the best interests of the Craft 
to preclude from membership one whose past history rendered 
it improbable that he could be worthy of the Institution. The 
Grand Master concluded: "It is opportune for me to observe 
that the Craft should always receive the benefit of any doubt 
about a candidate." 

Western Australia is the only State in Australia without 
a Masonic Benevolent Institution. Over the years magnificent 
work has been done by the West Australian Widows, Orphans 
and Aged Freemasons' Fund (called in the Proceedings the 
W.A.W.O. & A.F. Fund) in granting annuities. The Grand 
Master felt that the time had come to do something further. 

The Grand Master asked the Board of General Purposes 
to set up an Education Committee to which three matters 
were referred: 

(a) The preparation of short information pamphlets on 
such subjects as "What we may safely tell one who 
approaches us abou-t Freemasonry," and "Three 
Pamphlets amplifying and explaining the ceremonial 
of the three degrees." 

(b) A report on the Library and on the establishment of 
a museum. 

(c) Music, and in the first instance the possible forma- 
tion of a Masonic Choir. A beginning had already 

been made with this. 

Of the 314 Lodges in the Grand Jurisdiction, there are 38 
with a membership of 100 or over. The Lodge with the high- 
eat membership is the Wellington Lodge, No. 4, with 159 
members. 



WEST VIRGINIA — 1960 

96th Annual Communication — October 12-13 

Grand Master, 1959-60 — M.W. Bro. C. E. Berg 
Grand Master, 1960-61— M.W. Bro. D. E. Williams 

Lodges. 164 Membership, 48,529 Gain, 275 

This volume of Proceedings is another excellently turned 
out piece of printing. The total work runs to 640 pages. 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE 81 

Much of the size is explained by the fact that in the Grand 
Lodge of West Virginia it is customary to print a complete 
alphabetical list of all members of all Lodges. Thus, for 
example, Ohio Lodge, No. 1, Wheeling, Ohio County, occupies 
over four pages in the report. Such a service by the Grand 
Lodge must be helpful to members of Lodges to find the 
names of some of the brethren whom they do not see in Lodge 
and possibly do not know as members. 

Although the American press intimates that many parts 
of West Virginia are severely depressed there is no depres- 
sion in Freemasonry in the State. 

In 1965 the Grand Lodge will be 100 years old and the 
Grand Master recommended that a committee be appointed 
to begin making plans for the centenary celebration. In 1946 
a committee appointed to look into the matter recommended 
the building of a permanent headquarters for housing the 
offices of Grand Lodge, Museum and Library. The Grand 
Master put forv\'ard the idea that the building might 
be built to celebrate the anniversai-y. 

The Grand Lecturer reported that a large majority of 
the Lodges in all parts of the State were highly skilled and 
readily responded to instruction. 

WISCONSIN — 1960 

116th Annual Communication — June 14-15 

Grand Master, 1959-60 — M.W. Bro. 0. H. Larrabee 
Grand Master, 1960-61 — M.W. Bro. E. W. Stegner 

Lodges, 305 Membership, 33,691 Loss, 565 

The year saw much physical change and expansion. Three 
cornerstones were laid and six Masonic Temples were dedi- 
cated by the Grand Master. Much of the activity resulted 
from the construction of a new superhighway which caused 
some properties to be sold. But in addition to this forced 
liquidation and consequent search for new Masonic homes 
there was a genuine movement to acquire or build new 
temples or remodel older ones which have many years of life 
remaining. 

A proposal, revolutionary in Wisconsin, but of more 
than one hundred years' standing in the Grand Lodge _ of 
Canada in the Province of Ontario, came with the resolution 
of a committee appointed in 1959 "to study the plan of having 
a Board of General Purposes and/or a District Deputy Sys- 
tem." The arguments presented by the Grand Master which 
resulted in the withdrawal of the recommendation are in- 
teresting. 



82 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

"The change in methods of operation of the Grand 
Lodge proposed in this study is nothing shoii; of revolution- 
ary in Wisconsin, although one or both of these systems are 
in use in quite a number of the Grand Jurisdictions of the 
United States. Presently, whatever policies are attempted to 
be established in Wisconsin have been the work of the Grand 
Master with the advice of his line officers and with the fur- 
ther aid of committees whose members are specially selected 
because of fitness and knowledge of the subject under con- 
sideration. This method of presenting the subject matter has 
proved efficient in the past and it has the advantage of elimi- 
nating all cut and di-ied proposals which are almost certain 
to pass against the unorganized opposition of those members 
who do not approve the proposition. It is the usual, and not 
the extraordinary procedure in Wisconsin to submit issues 
which may be controversial to the decision of the members of 
the Grand Lodge with the utmost sincere desire for full and 
complete understanding and decision by the representatives 
of the lodges. Experience demonstrates, and I have seen it 
happen when visiting other Grand Lodges operating under 
the Board of General Purposes System, that a Board of 
General Purposes in the absence of Grand Lodge and just 
before the annual communication, actually decides the im- 
portant issues beyond much hope of change at the Grand 
Lodge meeting. So true is this conclusion that I have seen 
many members of other Grand Lodges leave the meeting 
because of the recognition of the futility of attempting to 
oppose the 'steam roller'. In my opinion and other officers 
join me in so believing, it is but a refined resumption of the 
'Amen' corner which was discarded in Wisconsin in the early 
twenties. With it in operation there would be but little hope 
of getting a full discussion on the merits by the representa- 
tives of the lodges. 

"The District Deputy System works well in many of the 
larger jurisdictions with a large number of lodges, for there 
it is necessary- to maintain a contact between the Grand 
Lodge and the constituent lodges. In those jurisdictions the 
task of visiting all or most of the lodges is too great for the 
physical capacity of the Grand Lodge Officers to accomplish. 
In Wisconsin every lodge is now \'isited by the Grand Lec- 
turer, while the Grand Master customarily visits every Lodge 
to which he is invited and, if unable to come at the time 
requested, either arranges for a later visit or sends another 
officer as his special representative to make the visitation. 
The success of our present custom for \nsitation should make 
us hesitate to interpose a real buffer between the lodges and 
the Grand Lodge Officers for this, in my opinion, is just what 
the District Deputy System would do. Local men duly ap- 
pointed District Deputies would make the visits to lodges 
rather than Grand Lodge Officers." 

The Grand Lodge officers clearly must have a very full 
year in office. Nor do their responsibilities end with the 



FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE «3 

usual duties of the Grand Lodge. In addition, the "Grand 
Lodge Officers are all required to attend and assist" at the 
centennial celebrations of all Lodges "unless a real valid 
excuse is presented and accepted." Since the Grand Lodge, 
one hundred years ago, granted more charters for the forma- 
tion of constituent Lodges than it does now, each year finds 
a number of Lodges which attain the distinction of being one 
hundred years old. In the year covered here nine Lodges 
reached this figure. The list of active Lodges shows that this 
year will see seven more. 

The Committee on Resolutions turned in a lengthy re- 
port. One recommendation which reveals some original 
thought was that all constituent Lodges in the Grand Lodge 
,of Wisconsin should have concurrent territorial jurisdiction 
thoughout the State of Wisconsin to receive petitions for 
degrees. The Grand Lodge was not ready for such a pro- 
posal, however, and it was not adopted. 

Another resolution, "The terms of Masonic officers shall 
expire with the installation of their successors. An officer 
of a lodge cannot resign his office" was adopted. 



WYOMING — 1960 

86th Annual Communication — August 22-23 

Grand Master, 1959-60 — M.W. Bro. W. F. Smith 
■Grand Master, 1960-61 — M.W. Bro. R. C. Witherspoon 

Lodges, 54 Membership, 12,982 Gain, 66 

The Grand Master reported that the Grand Jurisdiction 
was in a healthy condition. Membership, while not increasing 
substantially, did not show a loss as some other Grand Juris- 
dictions did. The Lodges, too, were in good financial condi- 
tion. During his year in office the Grand Master was able 
to visit every Lodge in Wyoming. All but three of these 
visitations were made singly. The year was harmonious. 
No major and few minor decisions were necessary. 

The Wyoming Masonic Home Fund Foundation is being 
well taken care of by interest and bequests. 

One need is for first mortgage loans for the erection of 
Masonic Temples and other allied Masonic group buildings, 
such as a fraternity house for Acacia Fraternity at Wyoming 
University. The Grand Master proposed that the C-ode (i.e 
Constitution) be amended to allow the Wyoming Masonic 
Home Fund Foundation to invest in first mortgages to be 
used for such buildings. The matter was left for further 
study. 



84 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA 

Bro. Irving E. Clark, the Grand Secretary, who had held 
office for nineteen years, was forced to resign on account of 
ill health. Brother Marcus R. Nichols was elected in his 
place. 

Although not yet a hundred years old the Grand Lodge 
brought out the second volume of the history of Masonry in 
Wyoming, written by Bro. W, C. Reusser. The new volume 
covers the story from 1925 to 1956. 

Altogether the Proceedings bear out the optimistic state- 
ments of the Grand Master. 



APPENDIX "B" 

Address delivered by R.W. Bro, Dr. C Ritchie 
Bell, B.A., B.D., at the Grand Master's Banquet held 
in thie Royal York Hotel, Toronto, on Wednesday 
evening July 19, 1961. 

M. WO(R. BRO. HARRY L. MARTYN: 

M. Wor. Grand Master, Distinguished Guests and Brethren 
of our Grand Lodge: I hasten to rise and acknowledge the 
magnificent concession that the Grand Master has made in 
allowing me to introduce our guest speaker to-night. M. 
Wor. Grand Master, I certainly thank you because this is a 
delightful honour to have the privilege of presenting such, 
an outstanding speaker as the Grand Master has brought to 
us to-night, to deliver this inspirational message to our 
guests and to the Masons of our Grand Lodge. 

There is one thing nice about all the speakers we have 
had at our Grand Masters' Banquets and at Grand Lodge 
sessions because all through the years that follow we look 
upon them as wonderful Masonic friends. Now our guest 
speaker to-night talks about the wonderful concession that 
he has made. I want to draw to your attention the great 
disappointment I had in that I didn't get this guest speaker 
to be sitting here where he is now four years ago to-night. 
But we were just too late; I think we were about a year 
too late in booking him up at that time. It is a great de- 
light to us, the Masons of the Grand Lodge of Canada in the 
Province of Ontario, to have Dr. Bell from our sister Pro- 
vince of Quebec as our speaker to-night. 

Brethren, at a time like this I am sure that there are 
certain things about our speaker that our brethren would 
be interested in knowing in connection ^\^th his outstanding 
life in his chosen profession, his outstanding contribution in 
the Masonic World with our sister Grand Lodge and to 
everything that he has had the privilege of being associated 
with. 

I told you that he was a native son of the Province of 
Quebec and he had trained for his life work at his home in 
Sherbrooke originally, then at Bishop's University at Lennox, 
University of New Brunswick, holding degrees from both. 
The Presbyterian College of Montreal that conferred on him 
the Bachelor of Divinity Degree in 1936, and the Degree of 
Doctor of Divinity in 1949. 

Our guest has held the highest offices, pastoral charges 
in the Church and in the administrative offices in the wider 
sphere in the work of the Church. In the year 1948 he was 



2 APPENDIX "B" 

the youngest clergyman that ever was elected as Moderator 
of The Presbyterian Church in Canada — our Church, Grand 
Master. 

At the present time Dr. Bell is a Professor of Pastoral 
Theology and Homiletics in The Presbyterian College in 
Montreal, and he has held this position, brethren, since 1950. 
A man so outstanding is bound to find himself in unusual 
situations that come to him as something that he merits 
from the contributions he has made. 

In the year 1954 when the Governor-General, The Rt. 
Hon. Vincent Massey, gave a State Dinner to Her Majesty, 
Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother, at Rideau Hall in 
Quebec, Rt. Rev. Dr. Ritchie Bell represented the Presbyterian 
Church in Canada at that State Dinner. Later in the same 
year, in the summer of that year while serving a term as 
Chaplain on one of the ships of the Royal Canadian Navy, 
it was his privilege at that time to accompany Sir Henry 
Outerbridge, The Lieut. Governor of the Province of 
Newfoundland, on an official visit to Labrador. 

Brethren, our guest to-night can be heard every Sunday 
in religious programmes broadcasting under the title "Life 
is Worth Living" over one of the radio stations in the 
Province of Quebec, CKL from Verdun. 

Our speaker is a Past Master of Royal Arthur Lodge, 
No. 86, under the Grand Register of Quebec, meeting in the 
City of Montreal. For seven different years he has served 
as The District Grand Chaplain for the Province of Quebec. 
seven years in affice in the Grand Lodge Office, and it is my 
great privilege to-night, brethren, to introduce and present 
to this wonderful congregation, the Rt. Rev. and Rt. Wor. 
Bro. C. Ritchie Bell, our speaker. (Applause). 

DR. 0. RITCHIE BELL: 

M. Wor. Sirs, Distinguished Guests, and Brethren all: 
First of all I want to thank my very kind friend, M.W. Bro, 
H. L. Martyn, for his very wonderful and kind and gracious 
and extravagant introduction. I only hope that I can in 
some small way measure up to all that he has said to you and 
that you will not feel that the best part of this speech was 
the speech that he made prior to my own. (Laughter), I 
only wish that I could take him with me that I might get 
somewhere in this world. (Laughter). If I had as good a 
press agent, and build up in this way, it's a wonderful thing 
what Masonic charity will do for a fellow, (laughter) and I 
feel that Masonic friendship and charity have been thrown 
over my emaciated form. 

I want to, ait the outset, thank the M.W. Grand Master 
for his Idndness, his faith and confidence, in inviting me to 



APPENDIX "B" 3 

give this address to-night. He was down in The Presbyterian 
College on business for our Church some months ago, and, 
after addressing the students, he came in and sat and talked 
with me for a little while and spoke to me about this 
banquet to-night and asked me if I would come and do this. 
I felt a debt of gratitude to him for his great gift to The 
Presbyterian Church in Canada, and if in any small measure 
I could say to him in a tangible way that we are appreciative 
of all that he has done, then I wanted to accept this invitation, 
and I did accept it, I am sorry I wasn't here two years 
ago, and yet I am so happy that I have this privilege and 
honour to-night. 

You have paid tribute during the day to the M.W. the 
Grand Master as a group of Masons. To-night I would like 
to add my o\\ti humble words of appreciation to a great 
Canadian, a very loyal and devoted and inspiring churchman 
and a tremendous and distinguished brother Mason. I feel 
that all of us are always so much better for rubbing shoulders 
with Clarie Pitts, and if in this way to-night my being here 
can say to him, "we in our Church are very grateful to